University of California, Berkeley - 2012

Institution Information

Contact Information

Institution's Mailing Address

Institution Name: University of California, Berkeley
Mailing Address: University of California, Berkeley
Department/Office Name
City: Berkeley
State: CA
Postal Code: 94720
Country: United States
Phone 510-642-6000
Fax:
Website: http://www.berkeley.edu

Head of Institution

Robert Birgeneau
Chancellor
Office of the Chancellor
University of California, Berkeley
200 California Hall # 1500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1500
Phone: 510-642-7464
Fax: 510-643-5499
chancellor@berkeley.edu

Engineering College Inquiries

Fiona Doyle
Executive Associate Dean
College of Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
320 McLaughlin Hall # 1700
Berkeley, CA 94720-1700
Phone: 510-642-5771
Fax: 510-642-9178
fmdoyle@berkeley.edu

Undergraduate Admission Inquiries

Fiona Doyle
Executive Associate Dean
College of Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
320 McLaughlin Hall # 1700
Berkeley, CA 94720-1700
Phone: 510-642-5771
Fax: 510-642-9178
fmdoyle@berkeley.edu

Graduate Admission Inquiries

Samer Madanat
Chair
Civil and Environmental Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
760 Davis Hall # 1710
Berkeley, CA 94720-1710
Phone: 510-642-3261
Fax: 510-643-5264
madanat@ce.berkeley.edu

David Dornfeld
Chair
Mechanical Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
6141 Etcheverry Hall # 1740
Berkeley, CA 94720-1740
Phone: 510-642-1338
Fax: 510-642-6163
dornfeld@berkeley.edu

Mark Asta
Chair
Materials Science and Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
210 Hearst Memorial Mining Bldg # 1760
Berkeley, CA 94720-1760
Phone: 510-642-3801
Fax: 510-643-5792
mdasta@berkeley.edu

Douglas Clark
Chair
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
201 GilmanHall #1462
Berkeley, CA 94720-1462
Phone: 510-642-2291
Fax: 510-642-4778
cbechair@berkeley.edu

Karl van Bibber
Chair
Nuclear Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
4155 Etcheverry Hall # 1730
Berkeley, CA 94720-1730
Phone: 510-642-4077
Fax: 510-643-9685
karl.van.bibber@nuc.berkeley.edu

David Culler
Chair
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
University of California, Berkeley
253 Cory Hall #1770
Berkeley, CA 94720-1770
Phone: 510-642-3214
Fax: 510-642-7846
culler@eecs.berkeley.edu

Phil Kaminsky
Chair
Industrial Engineering & Operations Research
University of California, Berkeley
4141 Etcheverry Hall # 1777
Berkeley, CA 94720-1777
Phone: 510-642-5484
Fax: 510-642-1403
kaminsky@ieor.berkeley.edu

Kevin Healy
Chair
Bioengineering
University of California, Berkeley
306 Stanley Hall, MC1762
Berkeley, CA 94720-1762
Phone: 510-642-5833
Fax: 510-642-5835
kehealy@berkeley.edu

Institution Information

General Information


Type of institution: PUBLIC
Academic Year: SEMESTERS
Setting of Main Engineering Campus URBAN

Main Campus Information

Is the main campus located in a city with a population greater than 100,000?: Yes
Name of this city, or if no, the name of the nearest city of any size?: Berkeley
This city's population (approx.): 112,580
Distance from Main Campus: 0

Total Enrollment

Total Undergraduate enrollment: 25,774
Total Graduate enrollment: 6,948
Total Professional and other enrollment: 3,177

Non-Engineering Degree Granting Colleges

Business, Education, Law, Chemistry, Environmental Design, Information Management & Systems, Journalism, Letters and Science (including fine arts programs), Natural Resources, Optometry, Public Health, Public Policy, Social Welfare

Institution Information

General Admissions

Entrance Requirements and Recommendations

Requirements

:::::::::::: MINIMUM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:
All freshman applicants must complete a minimum of 15 college preparatory courses in the University of California's a-g subject pattern and present scores from the SAT Reasoning Test or ACT Assessment Plus Writing.

:::::::::::: REQUIRED SUBJECTS:
a) History/Social Science 2 years required;
b) English 4 years required;
c) Mathematics 3 years required, 4 recommended;
d) Laboratory Science 2 years required, 3 recommended;
e) Language Other than English 2 years required, 3 recommended;
f) Visual and Performing Arts one year;
g) College Preparatory Electives one year.

:::::::::::: REQUIRED TESTS:
The SAT Reasoning Test or ACT Assessment Plus Writing. While SAT Subject Tests are no longer required, the presence of SAT Subject Tests - particularly in a science or Math Level 2 - will be considered value added. Engineering applicants are strongly encouraged to take the SAT Subject Test in Math Level 2. It is crucial that you complete all tests no later than the December examination dates of the year in which you file your application.

If you are a California resident with a GPA of 3.0 or above in the required courses, you must achieve the test score total indicated in the University's Freshman Eligibility Index. You may also be eligible through Eligibility in the Local Context, or by examination alone.

Nonresidents must attain a minimum 3.4 GPA in the a-g courses and the test score total indicated in the Eligibility Index under "Nonresidents", or be eligible by examination alone.

Recommendations

:::::::::::: All engineering applicants are encouraged to include a year of high school pre-calculus and AP courses, especially in math, physics and chemistry.

:::::::::::: NOTE: Admission to Berkeley is highly selective. Meeting minimum UC requirements does not guarantee admission.

Engineering Information

Head of Engineering

Head of Engineering

S. Shankar Sastry
Dean
College of Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
320 McLaughlin Hall # 1700
University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720-1700
Phone: 510-642-5771
Fax: 510-642-9178
sastry@coe.berkeley.edu

Engineering Information

Engineering Degrees Offered

Types of Engineering Degrees

Bachelor's:B.A, B.S.
Master's:M.S. with thesis, M.S. without thesis, but with project or report, M.Eng.
Doctoral:Ph.D., D.Eng.

Computer Science Degrees Awarded Outside the College/School of Engineering

Bachelor's

Engineering Information

Engineering Departments

Engineering Department(s) Degree Granting Level Department Chair Discipline
Bioengineering Both Kevin Healy Biomedical Engineering
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Both Douglas Clark Chemical Engineering
Civil and Environmental Engineering Both Samer Madanat Civil Engineering
Dual Major Undergraduate Other Engineering Disciplines
Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences Both David Culler Computer Science (inside engineering)
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Both David Culler Electrical/Computer Engineering
Engineering Science Both Rob Harley Other Engineering Disciplines
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Both Phil Kaminsky Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Joint Major Undergraduate Other Engineering Disciplines
Letters & Science Computer Science1 Undergraduate David Culler Computer Science (outside engineering)
Letters & Science Operations Research and Management Science Undergraduate Phil Kaminsky Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Materials Science & Engineering Both Mark Asta Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Both David Dornfeld Mechanical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering Both Karl van Bibber Nuclear Engineering

1The department is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.

Engineering Information

Research Centers

  • INCOLL - Research center WITHIN the college of engineering
  • INDEPT - Research center WITHIN an engineering department
  • INUNIV - Research center WITHIN university system
  • OUTUNIV - Research center OUTSIDE the university
Center/Lab Discipline Research Class Head Chair
Berkeley Center for New Media Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV David Bates
Berkeley Initiative in Soft Computing Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL Lotfi Zadeh
Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute (BNNI) Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Ramamoorthy Ramesh
Berkeley Nuclear Research Center Nuclear Engineering INCOLL David McCallen
Berkeley Quantum Information & Computation Center Computer Science (inside engineering) INCOLL Umesh Vazirani
Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center (BSAC) Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL John Huggins
Berkeley Stem Cell Center Chemical Engineering INUNIV David SCHAFFER
Berkeley Water Center Civil/Environmental Engineering INCOLL David Sedlak
Berkeley Wireless Research Center (BWRC) Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL Gary Kelson
BID: Berkeley Institute of Design Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Paul Wright
Blum Center for Developing Economies Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV S. Shankar Sastry
California Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Research (QB3) Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Susan Marqusee
Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science (E3S) Electrical/Computer Engineering INUNIV Eli Yablonovitch
Center for Entrepreneurship & Technology (CET) Engineering Management INUNIV Ikhlaq Sidhu
Center for Environmental Design Research Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Ed Arens
Center for Hybrid and Embedded Software Systems (CHESS) Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL Christopher Brooks
Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS) Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Paul Wright
Center for Intellient Systems (CIS) Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL Jitendra Malik
COINS: Center of Integrated Nanomechanical Systems Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Alex Zettl
Coleman Fung Institute for Engineering Leadership Engineering Management INCOLL Lee Fleming
Consortium on Green Design and Manufacturing Other Engineering Disciplines INCOLL Arpad Horvath
Energy Biosciences Institute Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Chris Somerville
Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology Laboratory Civil/Environmental Engineering INCOLL Jim Hunt
Ergonomics Program/UC Center for Occupational and Environmental Health Biomedical Engineering INUNIV David Rempel
Fung Institute for Engineering Leadership Other Engineering Disciplines INCOLL Lee Fleming
GLOBE: Center for Global Learning and Outreach from Berkeley Engineering Other Engineering Disciplines INCOLL Anthony St. George
Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV John Ngai
Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS) Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Joan Walker
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV A. Paul Alivisatos
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Other Engineering Disciplines OUTUNIV Penrose Albright
Marvell Nanofabrication Laboratory Other Engineering Disciplines INCOLL Ming Wu
Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) Civil Engineering INUNIV Stephen Mahin
Par Lab: Parallel Computing Laboratory Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL David Patterson
PATH: Partners for Advanced Transit & Highways Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Roberto Horowitz
Simons Institute Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL Richard Karp
Synthetic Biology Institute Biomedical Engineering INCOLL Adam Arkin
Team for Research in Ubiquitous Secure Technology (TRUST) Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL S. Shankar Sastry

Engineering Information

Degree Programs

Bachelor's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Bioengineering Bioengineering (B.S.) Biomedical Engineering
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Chemical Engineering (B.S.) Chemical Engineering
Civil and Environmental Engineering Civil & Environmental Engineering (B.S.) Civil Engineering
Dual Major Bioengineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Dual Major Electrical & Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Computer Science & Engineering (B.S.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Engineering Science Engineering Physics (B.S.) Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Engineering Science Engineering Undeclared Other Engineering Disciplines
Engineering Science Environmental Engineering Science (B.S.) Environmental Engineering
Engineering Science Energy Engineering (B.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Engineering Science Engineering Mathematics and Statistics (B.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Industrial Engineering & Operations Research (B.S.) Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Joint Major Bioengineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Joint Major Chemical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Joint Major Chemical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Joint Major Nuclear Engineering & Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Joint Major Electrical & Computer Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Joint Major Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Joint Major Materials Science & Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Joint Major Materials Science & Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Letters & Science Computer Science Computer Science (B.A.)1 Computer Science (outside engineering)
Note: This discipline is housed outside the college of engineering. This information will not be added to the engineering total
Letters & Science Operations Research and Management Science Operations Research & Management Science (B.A.) Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Note: This discipline is housed outside the college of engineering. This information will not be added to the engineering total
Materials Science & Engineering Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) Mechanical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) Nuclear Engineering

Master's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Master's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Bioengineering Bioenginering (M.S.) Biomedical Engineering
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Chemical Engineering (M.S.) Chemical Engineering
Civil and Environmental Engineering Civil & Environmental Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) Civil Engineering
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Electrical & Computer Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Computer Science & Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Engineering Science Applied Science and Technology (M.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Engineering Science Engineering Undeclared Other Engineering Disciplines
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Industrial Engineering and Operations Research (M.S, M.Eng.) Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Materials Science & Engineering Materials Science & Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) Mechanical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) Nuclear Engineering

Doctoral Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Doctoral Degree Program(s) Discipline
Bioengineering Bioengineering (Ph.D.) Biomedical Engineering
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) Chemical Engineering
Civil and Environmental Engineering Civil and Environmental Engineering (Ph.D.) Civil Engineering
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Electrical & Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Computer Science & Engineering (Ph.D.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Engineering Science Applied Science and Technology (Ph.D.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Engineering Science Engineering Undeclared Other Engineering Disciplines
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Industrial Engineering and Operations Research (Ph.D.) Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Materials Science & Engineering Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D., D.Eng.) Mechanical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Engineering (Ph.D.) Nuclear Engineering

1The degree program is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.

Engineering Information

Areas of Expertise

Engineering Departments Areas of Expertise
Bioengineering
  1. Systems and Synthetic Biology
  2. Bioinstrumentation
  3. Computational Biology
  4. Biomaterials and Nanotechnology
  5. Cell & Tissue Engineering
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering
  1. Biochemical Engineering; Biomedical Engineering
  2. Heterogeneous Catalysis and Reaction Engineering
  3. Polymers and Soft Materials
  4. Electrochemical and Environmental Engineering5. Theory, Multiscale Modelingand Computer Simulation
  5. Microelectronics Processing and MEMS
Civil and Environmental Engineering
  1. GeoEngineering
  2. Civil Systems
  3. Structural Engineering, Mechanics & Materials
  4. Transportation Engineering
  5. Engineering and Project Management
  6. Environmental Engineering
  7. Energy, Civil Infrastructure and Climate
Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences
  1. Graphics; Human-Computer Interaction
  2. Operating Systs; Networking; Database Mgmt Systs
  3. Artificial Intelligence
  4. Programming Systems; Scientific Computing
  5. Computer Architecture & Engineering
  6. Theory; Computational Biology
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
  1. Integrated Circuits
  2. Physical Electronics
  3. Communications Networking, & Signal Processing
  4. Computer Architecture & Engineering
  5. Control, Intelligent Systems, & Robotics
  6. Design of Electronic Systems
Engineering Science
  1. Energy Engineering
  2. Engineering Mathematics and Statistics
  3. Engineering Physics
  4. Environmental Engineering Science
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research
  1. Automation and Robotics
  2. Market and Financial Engineering
  3. Optimization
  4. Stochastic Modeling, Control and Simulation
  5. Production, Service, Supply Chain Systems
  6. Energy Systems and Markets
Materials Science & Engineering
  1. Nanomaterials
  2. Structural Materials
  3. Biomaterials
  4. Chemical & Electrochemical Materials Science & Enginering
  5. Computational Materials Science and Enginering
  6. Electronic, Magnetic and Optical Materials
Mechanical Engineering
  1. Biomaterials & Biomedical Devices
  2. MEMS, Microsystems & Nanosystems
  3. Controls, Dynamics & Mechatronics
  4. Combustion, Energy & Environment, & Thermal Sciences
  5. Design & Manufacturing
  6. Fluids, Solids, Materials, Computation, & Ocean
Nuclear Engineering
  1. Applied Nuclear Physics; Bionuclear and Radiological Physics
  2. Risk, Safety and Systems Analysis; Fuel Cycles and Radioactive Waste
  3. Fission Reactor Analysis and Engineering; Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics
  4. Laser, Particle Beam, and Plasma Technologies
  5. Chemistry and Materials in Nuclear Technology
  6. Fusion System Analysis and Engineering

Engineering Information

Societies

Honor Societies

National Groups

  • Alpha Pi Mu
  • Chi Epsilon
  • Eta Kappa Nu
  • Pi Tau Sigma
  • Tau Beta Pi

Local Groups

  • Alpha Nu Sigma, Nuclear Engineering Honor Society
  • Epsilon Pi (EP), Engineering Physics Honor Society

Student Organizations

National Groups

  • Am. Nuclear Society
  • Am. Soc. of Mechanical Engineers
  • American Institute of Chemical Engineers
  • American Society of Civil Engineers
  • Biomedical Engineering Society
  • Eng. Medicine and Biology Soc.
  • Engineers Council
  • Inst. of Industrial Engineers
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
  • Soc. of Eng. Science
  • Soc. of Naval Architects and Marine Eng.
  • Soc. of Women Engineers
  • Women in Science and Engineering

Local Groups

  • American Society of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Student Chapter
  • Arab American Association of Engineers and Architects (AAAEA)
  • Berkeley Engineers and Mentors (BEAM)
  • Berkeley Innovation
  • Berkeley Nanotechnology Club
  • Bioengineering Society (Beast)
  • Black Engineering & Science Students Association
  • Black Graduate Engineering & Science Students
  • Cal Construction
  • Cal Environmental Team
  • Cal Human Powered Vehicle
  • Cal Solar Vehicle Project (CalSol)
  • Cal Steel Bridge Competition Team
  • ChemE Car Team
  • Computer Science Undergraduate Association
  • Concrete Canoe
  • Electrical Engineering Graduate Student Association (EEGSA)
  • Engineering World Health
  • Engineers Without Borders
  • Formula SAE
  • Graduate Women of Engineering (GWE)
  • Hispanic Engineers & Scientists
  • Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE)
  • International Association for the Exchange of Students for Technical Expertise
  • International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering
  • Jews in Engineering (JEWSE)
  • Korean-American Scientists and Engineers Association (KSEA)
  • Latino/a Association for Graduate Students in Engineering and Sciences (LAGSES
  • Materials Science and Engineering Association
  • Mechanical Engineering Graduate Student Council (MEGSCo)
  • Nuclear Engineering Graduate Student Association (NEGSA)
  • Out in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (oSTEM)
  • Pilipino Association of Scientists, Architects & Engineers
  • SACNAS at Berkeley (SACNAS)
  • Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS)
  • Society of Asian Scientists and Engineers (SASE)
  • Supermileage Vehicle Team
  • Women in Computer Sci & Engineering
  • Young Chinese Institute of Engineers (YOUNG CIE)

Engineering Information

Support Programs

College's Under-Represented Student Groups

National Groups

  • National Society of Black Engineers
  • Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Society of Women Engineers

Local Groups

  • Arab American Association of Engineers and Architects
  • Black Engineering and Science Students Association (BESSA)
  • Black Graduate Engineering and Science Students (BGESS)
  • Graduate Women of Engineering (GWE)
  • Hispanic Engineers and Scientists (HES)
  • Jews in Engineering
  • Latino/Latina Assoc. of Graduate Science and Engineering Students (LAGSES)
  • Out in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (oSTEM)
  • Pilipino Assoc of Scientists, Architects & Eng. (PASAE)
  • Society for the Advancement of Chicanos & Native Americans in Science (SACNAS)
  • Women in Computer Science & Eng (WICSE)
  • Women in Science and Engineering (WISE)

Other Student Support Programs

The College of Engineering provides support services and programs for students historically underrepresented in the field of engineering. The Pre-Engineering Program (PREP) is a ten-day intensive program prior to the start of the academic year for new first year students who are underrepresented, first generation, and from low income backgrounds. PREP is designed to give students the preparation they need in math, physics, and chemistry to be successful in engineering. It also provides information about studying skills, time management, and university and college resources and helps them connect with student mentors, staff and faculty. The Multicultural Engineering Program's Academic Learning Center provides free tutoring to undergraduate students in both lower division gateway and upper division engineering courses. The staff of Engineering Student Services also provides support and advising for the college's underrepresented engineering student organizations and coordinates educational workshops and networking ssessions for underrepresented students.

:::::::::::: American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE)
Purpose: Chemical Engineering organization to assist chemical engineers in their professional/personal endevours.

Association for Muslim Professional Development (AMPD) (AMPD)
Purpose: The Association for Muslim Professional Development of UC-Berkeley is a student organization dedicated to preparing Muslim students for careers in industry; through networking, information workshops, and personalized coaching; attempting to facilitate awareness and access to professional internships and vocations. These include, but are not limited to the professional arenas of finance, medicine, engineering, consulting, sales and marketing, research, law and academics. We are open to ALL majors looking to prepare themselves for the job market. AMPD was previously known as MBSA, the Muslim Business Students' Association. (est. 2005)

Berkeley Nanotechnology Club (BNC)
Purpose: The Berkeley Nanotechnology Club fosters and promotes information exchange and entrepreneurship opportunities for Berkeley students and alumni in the San Francisco Bay Area. The Berkeley Nanotechnology Club is a nonprofit association.

Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES)
Purpose: To provide valuable information too all those interested in Biotech

Black Engineering and Science Students Association (BESSA)
Purpose: The mission of this student chapter of the professional organization is to increase the number of culturally responsible black engineers who excel academically, suceed professionally and positively impact the community.

Chemical Engineering Graduate Student Advisory Committee (ChemE GSAC) (GSAC)
Purpose: The objective of this Committee shall be to recognize and promote professional service in Chemical Engineering.

Electrical Engineering Graduate Student Association (EEGSA)
Purpose: The purpose of the Electrical Engineering Graduate Student Association (EEGSA) is as follows: 1. Provide a forum to discuss concerns and issues concerning the graduate students influenced by the Electrical Engineering Department, including limited service as a liaison if an issue between the Department and the Student arises. 2. To improve the general well-being of Electrical Engineering graduate students, staff, faculty and graduate students being advised or co-advised by an Electrical Engineering faculty.

Berkeley Engineers and Mentors (BEAM)
Purpose: Berkeley Engineers and Mentors is a new collaborative organization created to provide students at low-income background and afterschool programs with engaging engineering activities that stimulate their interest in pursuing careers in math, science and engineering. UC Berkeley students volunteer their time mentoring younger students, learning about science education, and building relationships with their mentees.

Engineers For A Sustainable World -Berkeley (ESW-B )
Purpose: Provide a forum for students, faculty, professionals and community members both here and internationally to learn about and critically evaluate sustainable and appropriate engineering solutions; Coordinate collaborations between volunteers from all disciplines and underserved communities to address technical problems....; Promote awareness of worldwide development issues in the UCB campus community and facilitate research on issues relevant to the engineering needs of underserved populations.

Engineering Student Joint Council (ESC)
Purpose: To increase participation of engineers in engineering society as well as foster a sense of camaraderie between engineering students

Engineers Without Borders at Berkeley (EWB)
Purpose: The UC Berkeley Chapter of Engineers Without Borders partners with developing communities to improve their quality of life through the implementation of environmentally sustainable, equitable, and economical engineering projects while developing socially and environmentally conscious engineering students. Our chapter offers the opportunity to enhance many attributes critical to successful engineering practice, including team work, problem solving, and creativity. Furthermore, EWB at Berkeley allows Cal engineers to utilize and expand their engineering skills for a meaningful, moral purpose.

Graduate Women of Engineering (GWE)
Purpose: Support women pursuing their Graduate studies in Mechanical, Nuclear, Industrial and Bioengineering

Material Science and Engineering Association (MSEA)
Purpose: To foster an atmosphere of friendship and intellectual exchange in the materials science and engineering community.

Mechanical Engineering Graduate Student Council (MEGSCo)
Purpose: To promote community among all graduate students in the dept. of Mechanical Engineering; We serve to address specific problems and concerns regarding academic, policy and research related requirements and practices, building facilities and equipment, and overall quality of life issues; and then make appropriate recommendations for change and improvement to the faculty and administrators.

Society of Engineering Sciences (SES)
Purpose: Our organization seeks to encourage a sense of community among students in the Engineering Science discipline, to advise and provide academic support to those students in Engineering without a declared major, and to stand a representative of Engineering Science to the University of California - Berkeley, the local community, and the world at large.

Engineering Information

Student Projects

Student Design Projects Description

::::::::::::BIOENGINEERING (BIOE) Design is an important component of our undergraduate and graduate training programs. Undergraduates must satisfy a design requirement by taking one of three defined upper division design courses or through faculty-directed individual research. The Bioengineering capstone design course satisfies this requirement through team projects on real-world bioengineering problems in partnership with clinical and academic researchers at UCSF and Berkeley. A large percentage of our undergraduate students participate in independent laboratory research and design, through organized either of two major undergraduate research programs or as volunteers.
Some recent student projects: :::: Improved Embryo Delivery Device for Greater In Vitro Fertilization Success :::: Devices for Portable Assessment of Hemoglobin Levels in Resource Poor Settings :::: At-Home Monitoring: Early Detection of Asthma Flares :::: The Branched Thoracic Catheter; Efficient Hemothorax Drainage Through Localization Targeting


:::: Synthesis of hard tissue composites using hydroxyapatite binding elastin-like polypeptides, faculty advisor: Prof. Seung-wuk Lee.

:::: Measuring the contractile force of single platelets at the surface of a fibrin gel, faculty advisor: Prof. Dan Fletcher.

:::: Super paramagnetic iron oxide particle characterization for magnetic particle imaging, faculty advisor: Prof. Steve Conolly.

:::: In vivo gene construction: Developing E. coli strains that can assemble DNA sequences, faculty advisor: Prof. Christopher Anderson.

:::: Experimental and computational investigation of aggregation in non-disease proteins, faculty advisor: Prof. Teresa Head-Gordon.


::::::::::::CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING (CEE) -- All students participate in at least one of the following capstone design courses in their senior year: CE 105, Applied Environmental Fluid Mechanics; CE 112, Environmental Engineering Design; CE 122, Design of Steel Structures; CE 123, Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures; CE 153, Transportation Facility Design; CE 177, Foundation Engineering Design; CE 180, Construction, Maintenance, and Design of Engineered Systems.

:::::: For example, one design course breaks into teams to address design, construction and maintenance of contemporary civil and environmental engineered systems. Teams identify engineering problems aided by experienced engineers and consultants. They construct a physical model of a system or a critical part of the system, and produce a formal report on their project. At end of the semester, the student teams present project results to a panel of judges.

:::::: In addition to the design classes, students are involved in extramural competitions such as the concrete canoe, steel bridge, environmental team, the AGC (American General Contractor) team and the Seismic Design team.

:::: Concrete Canoe: Undergraduate students apply engineering principles to design, analyze, construct and race a concrete canoe. Students enter the regional canoe competition and winners go to a national competition, sponsored by ASCE and Master Builders, Inc. The competition is judged on the engineering design and construction principles used, a technical paper, an oral presentation and a display as well as the performance of the canoe and paddlers in five different race events.

:::: Steel Bridge Design and Construction: Undergraduate students design, analyze and construct a short span bridge, all in steel. Students enter their design in the regional competition where the bridge is loaded to failure and maximum capacity/weight is measured. The activity is organized by the Student Chapter of ASCE and was supported by the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC).

:::: The Environmental Team: The competition team is tasked with applying solutions to real world environmental problems such as water filtration in disaster situations using only the resources available at hand. In a state-wide contest, students compete against other university teams.

:::::: The American General Contractor's Team is a construction management competition team. Students are called upon to work in a professional atmosphere and develop solutions to a real-life Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building project.

::::::All the competition teams are now offered as student led DeCal classes and students enrolled in these activities receive course credit for their participation.

:::::: Berkeley Engineering students are also able to join Engineers for a Sustainable World, an organization that is interested in engineering issues surrounding appropriate developing technologies.

:::::: The Seismic Design Team educates students on earthquake resistant design of high rise buildings. Students construct a 5' model building made of balsa wood which is tested on a shake table that replicates historic earthquakes.


::::::::::::ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE ENGINEERING (EECS)

EE 192 (Mechatronics Design Lab)

Prerequisites: CS 150, EECS 120 or equivalent, C Programming experience.

The Mechatronics Design Lab is a design project course focusing on application of theoretical principles in electrical engineering and computer science to control of mechatronic systems incorporating sensors, actuators and intelligence. This course gives students a chance to use their knowledge of (or learn about) power electronics, filtering and signal processing, control, electromechanics, microcontrollers, and real-time embedded software in designing a racing robot.

The course project requires students to consider real-world constraints such as limited volume, payload, electrical power, processing power and time. Oral and written reports will be required justifying design choices. Grading will be based upon design checkpoints, the reports and a final exam. A portion of the grade will be determined by vehicle performance and robustness.


::::::::::::INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING AND OPERATIONS RESEARCH (IEOR) Students
work with nearby companies and Organizations on their Senior Projects, in
teams of 3 to 5 students. Recent projects include:

United Airlines Staff Planning and Scheduling: Development of optimization-based methods (including software) to provide decision-support in scheduling airport customer service personnel with multiple skill sets (including languages) at an international airport terminal.

Lonely Planet Warehouse Redesign: Development of a new warehouse layout and improved material handling and packaging methods to increase the warehouse throughput rate and improve response times.

Restoration Hardware Inventory Management: Development of improved inventory target levels for slow-moving items using historical demand data coupled with advanced inventory control methodologies.

Kaiser Permanente (HMO) Patient Scheduling: Analysis of current throughput of patients undergoing gastroenterology screening and development of new patient schedules and medical staff resource plans to increase throughput.

::::::::::::MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING (MSE)
:::::: Formula SAE® is a student design competition organized by SAE International (formerly the Society of Automotive Engineers), dating from 1979. Each student team designs, builds and tests a prototype Formula-style race car based on a series of rules. Design components include materials selection, processing, joining (welding), and finishing, and one of the three faculty sponsors at Berkeley is from MSE (Professor Gronsky). The competition includes a number of spin off events, and in the United States there are two locations: California and Michigan. Berkeley’s team information can be found at http://fsae.berkeley.edu and the national website is located at http://students.sae.org/competitions/formulaseries/about.htm .

:::::: Super Mileage Vehicle: This is another design project associated with the national Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), with the self-evident goal of high gasoline mileage. Materials selection and design are also critical in this effort, and MSE majors frequently participate in the team. The URL describing Berkeley's effort is http://smv.berkeley.edu/. For more information about the national program, visit http://www.sae.org/students/supermw.htm;

:::::: Human Powered Vehicle: In this project, a bicycle with a lightweight aerodynamic shroud is the vehicle on which design and execution is focused, although it involves quite a bit of athletic prowess, too. The URL describing Berkeley's program is http://calhpv.berkeley.edu/;

:::::: Solar Powered Car (CalSol): Originating at Berkeley in 1990, this project was initially led by an MSE student with interest in photovoltaics. It has since grown to involve many students from all disciplines in the college. The URL describing Berkeley's project is http://www.me.berkeley.edu/calsol/.

::::::::::::MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (ME)
::::: ME - Formula SAE at Berkeley: The Formula SAE Series competitions challenge teams of university undergraduate and graduate students to conceive, design, fabricate and compete with small, formula style, autocross racing cars. To give teams the maximum design flexibility and the freedom to express their creativity and imaginations there are very few restrictions on the overall vehicle design. Teams typically spend eight to twelve months designing, building, testing and preparing their vehicles before a competition. The competitions themselves give teams the chance to demonstrate and prove both their creation and their engineering skills in comparison to teams from other universities around the world. The team has been working hard on the design of the car. The biggest change for this upcoming year is that they will be moving to a carbon-fiber monocoque for the front half of the car, while keeping a steel tube frame for the rear half. The Team is continuing with their single-cylinder, 450cc engine (Honda CRF450x) from last year, but they are also doing far more testing and analysis on the associated engine systems in order to maximize our horsepower. General goals for this year include further reducing overall weight, gaining power, improving ergonomics, and increasing the breadth and depth of analysis in the design phases. The team has already begun construction on the rear subframe, as well as several of the suspension components. The engine is on schedule to go on the dyno within the next few weeks, with several test mufflers ready to go and test intakes being finalized.
The team is open to Cal students of any year and any major.
List of sponsors: KLA Tencor, Infineon Raceway, USF Surface Prepartion, Hexcel, SolidWorks, Supra Alloys Inc., Microsemi, Jenvey, William C. Mitchell Software, Airtech, Vic Hubbard Speed and Machine, Space Systems/Loral, Active Performance Cooling, Brembo, SPAL, Performance Friction Brakes, YKs Unlimted, terminal Supply, Centerline Precision, TAP Plastics, T&N Enterprises, , UCB AAVP, UCB ASUC, UCB College of Engineering, UCB Materials Science, UCB Mechanical Engineering, UCB Student Machine Shop, SAE NorCal section,. More information is available on the Formula SAE web site http://fsae.berkeley.edu/about.html.

::::: ME - Supermileage Vehicle Project: The Supermileage Competition provides students with a challenging design project that involves the development and construction of a single-person, fuel-efficient vehicle. Vehicles are powered by a small four-cycle engine. Students have the opportunity to set a world fuel economy record and increase public awareness of fuel economy. The design consists of five major parts: the chassis, power train, controls, fairing, and electrical systems. The functionality and integration of each of these parts is essential in the production of a competitive vehicle. List of sponsors: AG Right Enterprises, Airtech, The Associated Students of the University of California, Berkeley, Bearing Works, Briggs & Stratton, Chevron, Berkeley Engineering, Digalog, Ford, Hexcel, Industrial Tube & Steel Corporation, Lockheed Martin, Loctite, Department of Mechanical Engineering of the University of California, Berkeley, Millennium Technologies, Phil Wood & Co., SAE International, TAP, and VILNOVUS. More information is available on the SMV web site: http://smv.berkeley.edu/.

::::: ME - Cal Sol: CalSol is a recognized competition vehicle team representing UC Berkeley. Completely student-led and open to all Cal students, CalSol designs and builds one-seater solar vehicles for solar competitions.

Students involved in CalSol learn many important skills not taught in the classroom. Instead of merely cranking out problem sets, students get the chance to apply scientific and engineering theories to real world situations and are given the freedom to think up creative solutions and ideas of their own. The team project atmosphere also encourages good teamwork and communication between team members, all vital skills to help prepare Cal students for their future in industry, academia, business, etc.
CalSol also works to expose the public to the possibilities of alternative energy and inspire the younger generation to become interested in science. CalSol showcases its cars at various events and expos, where CalSol team members answers questions and interacts with the public.
List of sponsors: Advanced Circuits, AIRTECH, Berkeley Engineering, CITRIS, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (UCB), Department of Mechanical Engineering (UCB), DOW, Engineers Joint Council of Berkeley, CA, Google, and the Green Mountain Engineering and the Training-Classes.com.

More information is available on the CalSol web site: http://www.me.berkeley.edu/calsol/about.ph

::::: E10-Engineering Design and Analysis, is an introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines through a variety of modular design and analysis projects. Hands-on creativity, teamwork, and effective communication are emphasized. Common lecture sessions address the essence of engineering design, the practice of engineering analysis, the societal context for engineering projects and the ethics of the engineering profession. Students develop design and analysis skills, and practice applying these skills to illustrative problems drawn from various engineering majors. This course provides first year students a broad introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines, through a variety of small group design and analysis projects. At the core of the course are projects and case studies, through which the main concepts of the course are developed. The objectives or the course are to:
• enhance critical thinking and design skills;
• introduce students to a broad view of engineering analysis and design;
• reinforce the importance of mathematics and science in engineering design and analysis;
• emphasize communication skills, both written and oral;
• develop teamwork skills;
• offer experience in hands-on, creative engineering projects;
• provide an introduction to different fields of engineering; and
• introduce students to professional ethics and the societal context of engineering practice.

::::: E 28, Basic Engineering Design Graphics: Introduction to the engineering design process and graphical communications tools used by engineers. Students learn graphical analysis and design techniques using the hardware and software tools used by engineers in the field. Economic, manufacturing, and fabrication issues are considered throughout the course as they apply to the topics addressed. Students are introduced to the concept of working in a group through the semester-long design project. As part of this project, students are required to communicate orally and graphically, and make presentations to the class and instructors.

::::: E 128, Advanced Engineering Design Graphics: Advanced, 3-dimensional graphics tools for engineering design. Wire frame, surface and solids modeling: boundary representation, constructive solids, sweeping, rotation, Boolean operations. Computer rendering, viewing, and presentation of solids. Presentation using computer animation and multimedia techniques. Design using parametric CAD.

::::: ME 101, High Mix/Low Volume Manufacturing: This course is to enable students analyze manufacturing line in order to understand production process and improve production efficiency covering complete manufacturing process from production planning to quality control. This course will provide practical knowledge and skills which can be used in real manufacturing industry. Students are given a chance to practice and implement what they learn during lectures by conducting projects with manufacturing companies nearby.

::::: ME 102B, Mechatronics Design: This course exposes students to key design elements of the profession through a series of laboratory assignments, and a substantial term project. This course introduces the students to design and design techniques of mechatronics systems; provide guidelines to and experience with design of variety of sensors and actuators; design experience in programming microcomputers and various IO devices; exposure to and design experience in synthesis of mechanical power transfer components; understanding the role of dynamics and kinematics of robotic devices in design of mechatronics systems; exposure to and design experience in synthesis of feedback systems; provide experience in working in a team to design a prototype mechatronics device.
::::: ME 110, New Product Development: ME 110 aims to develop the interdisciplinary skills required for successful product development in today's competitive marketplace. Students form small product development teams and step through the new product development process in detail, learning about the available tools and techniques to execute each process step along the way. Each student brings his or her own skills to the team effort, and must learn to synthesize that perspective with those of the other students in the group to develop a sound, marketable product. Students can expect to depart the semester understanding new product development processes as well as obtaining useful tools, techniques and organizational structures that support new product development practice.

::::: ME C117, Structural Aspects of Biomaterials: This course covers the mechanical and structural aspects of biological tissues and their replacements. Tissue structure and mechanical function are addressed. Natural and synthetic load-bearing biomaterials for clinical and medical applications are reviewed. Biocompatibility of biomaterials and host response to structural implants are examined. Quantitative treatment of biomechanical issues and constitutive relationships of tissues and biomaterials are covered. Material selection for load-bearing applications including reconstructive surgery, orthopedics, dentistry, and cardiology. Mechanical design for longevity including topics of fatigue, wear, and fracture. Use of bioresorbable implants and hybrid materials. Directions in tissue engineering. Students work in teams on a semester long design project. Students are required to complete a technical write-up and give a presentation at the end of the semester.

::::: ME 119, Introduction to MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems): This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of microelectromechanical systems including design, fabrication of microstructures; surface-micromachining, bulk-micromachining, LIGA, and other micro machining processes; fabrication principles of integrated circuit device and their applications for making MEMS devices; high-aspect-ratio microstructures; scaling issues in the micro scale (heat transfer, fluid mechanics and solid mechanics); device design, analysis, and mask layout. Midway through the semester the student submits an individual project proposal and at the end of the semester they will give an oral project presentation.

::::: ME 128, Computer-Aided Mechanical Design: The course aims to provide students with computer aided design skills including using computer graphics to design structures, converting analytical models with computational analyses and using computational tools to predict structural outputs in terms of material, mechanics, heat and other physical variables. Students will understand and appreciate how such optimization tools can be used to simplify the analysis, and enhance the performance, of a design. A final project that allows students to demonstrate their expertise with the design and analysis tools presented by designing/solving a practical project either suggested by the instructor or provided by student but with approval of the instructor.

::::: ME 130, Design of Planar Machinery: As an introduction course to mechanisms design and analysis, the students learn to take the projects from the drawing board to a working model. The students complete a team term project which involves the design, fabrication and prototype demonstration of a mechanical device.

::::: ME 135, Design of Microprocessor-Based Mechanical Systems: This course covers software design and implementation methodologies suited to the control of complex mechanical systems. The design methodology allows for the operational description of mechanical systems in a way that can be presented to semi-technical personnel as well as serve as a basis for software development. Implementation is based on the object-oriented computing language Java. Implementation methodology is presented with software portability a primary emphasis. Students work in teams to design and implement solutions to problems of increasing complexity using prototype lab equipment, including a design project for which they must formulate objectives.

::::: ME 146, Conversion Principles: This course covers the fundamental principles of energy conservation processes, followed by development of theoretical and computational tools that can be used to analyze energy conversion processes. The course also introduces the use of modern computational methods to model energy conversion performance characteristics of devices and systems. Performance features, sources of inefficiencies, and optimal design strategies are explored for a variety of applications, which may include conventional combustion based and Rankine power systems, energy systems for space applications, solar, wind, wave, thermoelectric, and geothermal energy systems.

::::: ME 165, Ocean-Environment Mechanics: The student learns physical properties and characteristics of the oceans, global conservation laws, surface-waves generation, gravity-wave mechanics, kinematics, and dynamics, design consideration of ocean vehicles and systems, model-testing techniques, prediction of resistance and response in waves--physical modeling and computer models.

::::: ME C218, Introduction to MEMS Design: The student learns to rigorously formulate MEMS design problems analytically and then determine the correct dimensions of MEMS structures so that the specified function is achieved. The formulation allows the student to trade off various performance requirements and thereby develops a rational design compromise solution when including flexure systems, accelerometers and rate sensors. A variety of design and optimization methods are used to numerically and analytically determine the design. The students are required to prepare 5 projects; Parametric Design of MEMS Flexures for X- and Y-Stiffness, Parametric Design of MEMS Accelerometer, Optimal Design of MEMS Angular Accelerometer via Monotonicity Analysis and Grid Study, Optimal Design of Linear MEMS Suspension visa Penalty Function Method, Parametric Design of MEMS TBA.

::::: ME C219, Parametric and Optimal Design of Microelectromechanical Systems: The student will learn to rigorously formulate MEMS design problems analytically and then determine the correct dimensions of MEMS structures so that the specified function is achieved. The formulation will allow the student to trade off various performance requirements and thereby develop a rational design compromise solution when faced with conflicting design requirements. A variety of MEMS structures will be treated in this class, including flexure systems, accelerometers and rate sensors. A variety of design and optimization methods will be used to numerically and analytically determine the design. This course presumes the student is already familiar with a variety of basic MEMS fabrication processes. Parametric design and optimal design will be applied to MEMS, with an emphasis on design and not on fabrication. The format of the course is oriented toward design projects.

::::: ME 221, High-Tech Product Design and Rapid Manufacturing: Students learn about the creative design of new consumer products and the prototyping of such products in our new Ford Design Studio Economic and social drivers, organizational structure, product life-cycle and future trends, CAD/CAM, rapid-prototyping, metal-products, semiconductors, electronic packaging, biotechnology, and robotics technologies are all addressed in this course and laboratory. This studio and course also delivers a "hands-on" laboratory using CAD and manufacturing techniques.

::::: ME 222, Advanced Manufacturing Processes: This course presents an overview of the theory of manufacturing processes, machine tool design, and process issues in quality, production rate, and flexibility of manufacturing. Nontraditional manufacturing processes will be introduced. Topics covered include overview of models of conventional manufacturing (material removal, joining, forming, and deforming), elements of machine tool error and machine tool component design, nontraditional manufacturing processes (laser, water jet, electrical discharge machining, electro-chemical machining), rapid prototyping, and process selection, optimization, and planning issues. This course incorporates a laboratory term project in the application of nontraditional manufacturing processes.

:::: ME 229, Design of Basic Electro-Mechanical Devices: Fundamental principles of magnetics, electro-magnetics, and magnetic materials as applied to design and operation of electro-mechanical devices. Type of device to be used in a particular application and dimensions of parts for the overall design will be discussed. Typical applications covered will be linear and rotary actuators, stepper motors, AC motors, and DC brush and brushless motors.

::::: ME 230, Engineering Application of Mini and Micro Computers: The course covers software design and implementation methodologies suited to the control of complex mechanical systems. The design methodology allows for the operational description of mechanical systems in a way that can be presented to semi-technical personnel as well as serve as a basis for software development. Implementation is based on object-oriented computing languages such as C++ and Java. Implementation methodology is presented with software portability a primary emphasis. Students work in teams to design and implement solutions to problems of increasing complexity using prototype lab equipment, including a design project for which they must formulate objectives.

::::: ME 235, Switching Control and Computer Interfacing: Students design and analyze the control systems utilizing switching elements. The focus is on using CAD tools, less on hand-solving logic minimization problems. The lab introduces building simple circuits and the use of laboratory equipment. Students build a closed loop position control system where they handle encoder monitoring, PWM generation, bus interface, and real time software.

::::: ME 290H, Green Product Development: Design for Sustainability. The focus of the course is management of innovation processes for sustainable products, from product definition to sustainable manufacturing and financial models. Using a project in which students will be asked to design and develop a product or service focused on sustainability, we will teach processes for collecting customer and user needs data, prioritizing that data, developing a product specification, sketching and building product prototypes, and interacting with the customer/community during product development. The course is intended as a very hands-on experience in the "green" product development process. The course will be a Management of Technology course offered jointly by the College of Engineering and the Haas School of Business. In addition, it will also receive credit towards the new Engineering and Business Sustainability Certificate (currently under review by the Academic Senate). We aim to have half MBA students and half Engineering students (with a few other students, such as from the I-School) in the class. The instructors will facilitate students to form mixed disciplinary teams for the development of their "green" products. Students from the California College of the Arts (CCA) will also participate on the teams through a course taught separately at CCA. Students can expect to depart the semester understanding "green" product development processes as well as useful tools, techniques and organizational structures that support sustainable design and environmental management practice.

::::: ME 290P, New Product Development: Design Theory and Methods. This course is one of five core courses of the Management of Technology program at the University of California, Berkeley. It is considered an operationally focused course, as it aims to develop the interdisciplinary skills required for successful product development in today's competitive marketplace. Engineering and Business students join forces on small product development teams to step through the new product development process in detail, learning about the available tools and techniques to execute each process step along the way. Each student brings his or her own disciplinary perspective to the team effort, and must learn to synthesize that perspective with those of the other students in the group to develop a sound, marketable product. Students can expect to depart the semester understanding new product development processes as well as useful tools, techniques and organizational structures that support new product development practice. Students form teams of MBA students, engineering or iSchool students and industrial design students. Each team is provided a "coach" from industry to advise them on the new product development process.

::::::::::::NUCLEAR ENGINEERING (NE)
::::: In the undergraduate senior design project for NE 170, a study was conducted to explore and determine stable and economically viable domestic sources of Li-7 in response to the United States’ dire demand. Two alternative methods to mercury-based separation were investigated: crown-ether enrichment and atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS). An economic analysis of the mixer-settler system indicated that crown ethers may be an economically competitive option if used for large-scale production. AVLIS analysis indicated that high quality product may be obtainable in relatively few stages. AVLIS appeared quite affordable but may be difficult to produce on a larger scale. Comparing the two options, AVLIS appeared to be the better choice for meeting current U.S. pressurized water reactor (PWR) demands, while a mixer-settler crown ether system seemed more viable if a fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) market emerges. Given the strategic importance of continued and reliable operation of U.S. PWRs, the design team recommended that the American utility industry encourage the development of a domestic supply of enriched Li-7 by offering to enter into long-term procurement contracts with a U.S.-based supplier and to encourage development of one or both of the enrichment methods described here. Further experimentation was recommended to determine optimal parameters for a scaled-up mixer-settler system using crown ethers as reagents.

The NE-265 graduate design course in the Fall of 2011 was devoted to the design of a couple of Generation-IV type novel reactor concepts; both of the “Breed-and-Burn” (B&B) reactor type. Whereas conventional reactors need either continuous supply of enriched fuel or fuel reprocessing in order to be able to generate nuclear power, B&B reactors are fed with natural or even depleted uranium (presently a waste of the enrichment plants) and are capable of converting into useful energy (heat and electricity) a significant fraction of this feed fuel without requiring to enrichment and reprocessing.
One of the B&B reactor concepts designed is of a pebble-bed type. Whereas in the classical pebble-bed reactors the pebbles are made of graphite in which thousands of sub-millimeter size coated fuel particles are embedded and the coolant is helium, in the NE-265 project the pebbles were made of metallic fuel that is enclosed within a spherical shell made of steel, while the coolant is sodium. This novel concept offers a better neutron economy than a B&B core design that uses conventional cylindrical fuel rods and fuel assemblies.
The second B&B reactor concept designed is of the seed-and-blanket type. The seed has the function of, and is designed similarly to the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) " a major candidate in the US for the transmutation of the trans-uranium (TRU) waste generated in Light Water Reactors (LWR). However, instead of designing the ABR core to be of a pancake shape with nearly 20% of the fission-born neutrons leaking in the axial direction and wasted, the seed is designed to be of a cigar shape with the majority of the neutron leakage in the radial direction and to make constructive use of the leaking neutrons to “drive” a B&B thorium blanket that radially surrounds the core. The project objective is to design a TRU fuelled seed and a thorium fuelled blanket that will maximize the fraction of core power generated by the thorium blanket subjected to neutronics, thermal-hydraulic and material-related constraints.
There were 2 design teams, one of 4 and the other of 5 students. Each student was responsible for one of the following disciplines: neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, fuel performance, material compatibility and system integration.

Engineering Information

College Description

Engineering College Description and Special Characteristics

:::::::::::: BIOENGINEERING -- The Department of Bioengineering’s (BIOE) undergraduate program is a multidisciplinary undergraduate major, intended for academically strong students who excel in the physical sciences, mathematics and biology. The curriculum provides a strong foundation in the fundamentals of engineering, as well as in integrative and molecular biology. Students can build upon this foundation by later specializing in advanced areas of both engineering and biology, including laboratory and clinical work. The Bioengineering major offers six well-defined concentrations: Biomaterials, Biomechanics, and Cell & Tissue Engineering; Biomedical Devices; Biomedical Imaging; Computational Bioengineering; Premed; and Synthetic Biology. Bioengineering students are encouraged to gain hands-on research experience through internships in faculty or industry laboratories. The Department offers a minor open to any Berkeley undergraduate with the proper preparation. The Ph.D. degree in Bioengineering is jointly offered by UC Berkeley and UC San Francisco (http://bioegrad.berkeley.edu) as an interdisciplinary effort that combines the resources in biomedical sciences at UCSF with the excellence in engineering, physical, and life sciences at UC Berkeley. With access to faculty with diverse specialties and facilities on both campuses, our program offers unmatched graduate training opportunities in bioengineering. The department also offers a unique one-year Master in Translational Medicine program, designed to train students in applying translational research and engineering approaches to solve fundamental problems in healthcare delivery, also jointly operated with clinical faculty at UCSF. A new one-year professional master's degree at Berkeley Engineering, the Master of Engineering, is being launched in 2013.

:::::::::::: CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING -- The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers a minor in structural engineering, designed particularly for students in the Department of Architecture, but also available to any student who has met the prerequisites and is enrolled in a non-civil engineering program. The Department also offers a minor in environmental engineering and a minor in geoengineering. These minors are available to any student who has met the prerequisites, has a 3.0, and is enrolled in a non-civil engineering program. Additionally, the College offers students the opportunity to participate in the Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology (CET), which is designed to foster high-tech venture creation and to expand entrepreneurial education.


Concurrent graduate degree programs are offered between Civil and Environmental Engineering and City and Regional Planning (M.S./M.C.P.), Civil Engineering and Architecture (M.S./M.Arch.), and Civil Engineering and Public Policy (M.S./M.P.P.).

:::::::::::: CHEMICAL ENGINEERING -- The Department of Chemical Engineering is administered by the College of Chemistry.
The College research facilities consist of:
• The X-Ray Facility (http://xray.cchem.berkeley.edu/index.html)
• The Graphics Facility (http://glab.cchem.berkeley.edu/)
• QB3/Mass Spectrometry Facility (http://www.qb3.org/msf/msf.htm)
• The Microanalytical Facility (http://chemistry.berkeley.edu/research_facilities/research_microlab.html)
• The NMR Facility (http://chemistry.berkeley.edu/research_facilities/research_nmr.html)
• Shops (http://chemistry.berkeley.edu/research_facilities/shops/index.html)
• Chemistry Library (http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/CHEM/)

:::::::::::: ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING & COMPUTER SCIENCES -- In addition to undergraduate and graduate engineering degrees offered through the department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, the College of Letters and Science offers an undergraduate degree (BA) in Computer Science.

The Five-Year Bachelor’s Master’s Program in EECS (B.A./M.S or B.S./MS).
The combined Bachelor’s/Master’s program is designed to take outstanding EECS and CS (L&S) undergraduates immediately into an intensive two-semester program conferring the Master of Science degree. This combines program promotes interdisciplinary focus and is best suited to those who are more “professionally oriented” as opposed to those wishing to pursue a more traditional research-based and discipline-specialized advanced course of study.

Beginning in Fall 2006, the EECS Department implemented a five year combined Bachelors/Masters program. This program is geared towards students who are attracted to a more 'professionally-oriented' program than the traditionally research-based and discipline-specialized M.S. and Ph.D. courses of study. This program is only available to Berkeley EECS and CS L&S Undergraduates.

Joint Major Programs

The department offers two joint majors with the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Nuclear Engineering.

• EECS/Materials Science and Engineering
For students interested in materials and devices, a double major in EECS/MSE can be valuable. The program combines the study of materials from a broad perspective, as taught in MSE, with the study of their applications in electronic devices and circuits, as taught in EECS.
• EECS/Nuclear Engineering
The EECS/NE double major combines the traditional EE program with one in the nuclear sciences. Nuclear Engineering shares with EE a concern for electrical power generation, automatic control, computer sciences and plasmas.

There are three types of M.S. degrees EECS students can be awarded. Each requires either a thesis (Plan I) or a report on a project (Plan II). The M.S. and Ph.D. are academic degrees with an emphasis on research. It is possible to complete the M.S. degree in a single academic year, but most students take three to four semesters. The following degrees are offered:
• M.S. in Engineering
For EE students with a B.S. degree in one of the accredited engineering curricula or who have satisfied the equivalent of a B.S. degree as determined by the department.
• M.S. in Engineering Science
For EE students with a bachelor's degree in a non-engineering field (i.e. chemistry, physics, math, geology or the life sciences).
• M.S. in Computer Science
For CS students with a B.S. in computer science or as determined by the department.
The CS "M.S. Only" Program
The Computer Science Division's "M.S. Only" program is designed for students who intend to enter industry with an M.S. rather than stay for a Ph.D. Applicants to the M.S. Only program are considered separately from those applying for a Ph.D and students in this program are not guaranteed admission for the Ph.D. Those who would like to continue for a Ph.D. must petition the admissions committee.

Master of Engineering Program

The Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) program was implemented in the 2011-12 academic year. M.Eng. is a professional masters with a larger tuition, and is designed for students who plan to join the engineering profession immediately following graduation. The accelerated program is designed to develop professional engineering leaders of the future who understand the technical, economic, and social issues of technology. This one-academic year interdisciplinary experience includes three major components: an area of technical concentration, courses in leadership skills, and a rigorous capstone project experience.

Undergraduate Minors
• The EECS Minor
The EECS minor, offered through the College of Engineering (COE), is an optional program for students interested in coherent EECS study outside of their major. It is open to any undergraduate who has declared a major other than EECS on the UC Berkeley campus, completed two of the four lower division course requirements, and has a GPA (in required lower division courses) no less than 0.2 points below the Letters & Science Computer Science Major "cutoff" GPA for the semester in which they are applying.

• The CS Minor
The minor program is offered through the College of Engineering (COE) and is open to all upper division Berkeley undergraduates with a declared major other than EECS. To be admitted to the CS minor, you must have a declared major in some field and have acquired a grade point average for required technical electives .2 below the cut-off GPA for admission to the major, which differs every semester.

:::::::::::: INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING AND OPERATIONS RESEARCH -- The Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research minor program is offered through the College of Engineering (COE) and is open to all upper division Berkeley undergraduates with a declared major other than IEOR.

The ORMS program has four possible concentrations: decision making in economic systems, decision making in industrial and service systems, decision making in societal systems, and algorithmic decision making. BA students will develop scientific and quantitative, model building, and problem solving skills through core courses in mathematics, statistics, operations research, and management sciences. They will also learn to apply these skills and tools effectively for operational, tactical, and strategic decisions in scientific solving problems in an area of their choice. Graduate students will emphasize on applied courses, preparing them for professional practice or may follow a more theoretical program for those intending to pursue doctoral studies. In the doctoral program, students investigate additional major topics in depth, as well as study two minor fields.

Also, Industrial Engineering and Operation Research teams up with Civil and Environmental Engineering to jointly offer an interdisciplinary program for graduate students, the Logistics Certificate Program. The program is intended for students interested in logistics design.

The five year program is designed for a small number of students with
outstanding performance to allow the students to obtain both degrees in five years. Each student must complete three courses within their area of concentration, as well as complete an individual or small group project as well part of the program via at least 2 units of either Master's
level-independent study units or a Master's level project based course to gain experience in applying IEOR methodology to real-world problems.

::::::::::::MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
Materials Science and Engineering encompasses all natural and man-made materials " their extraction, synthesis, processing, properties, characterization, and development for technological applications. Advanced engineering activities that depend upon optimized
materials include the medical device and healthcare industries, the energy industries, electronics and photonics, transportation, advanced batteries and fuel cells, and nanotechnology. Students in materials science and engineering develop a fundamental understanding of materials at the nano, micro and macro scales, leading to specialization
in such topics as: biomaterials; chemical and electrochemical materials science and engineering; computational materials science and engineering; electronic, magnetic and optical materials; and structural materials. As in the past, today’s materials advancements enables new technological breakthroughs across all engineering disciplines.

:::::::::::: MECHANICAL ENGINEERING -- The undergraduate degree in Manufacturing Engineering is jointly offered by the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research. Joint undergraduate major programs are available with either the Department of Materials Science and Engineering or the Department of Nuclear Engineering.

Graduate doctoral degree program jointly offered by the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Department of Public Policy.

:::::::::::: NUCLEAR ENGINEERING
The Department of Nuclear Engineering offers joint programs with Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering, Chemical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering.


:::::::::::: Engineering, Other - The Committee on Engineering Science administers the Engineering Science undergraduate degree programs (Energy Engineering, Engineering Math and Statistics, Environmental Engineering Science, and Engineering Physics).
The Coleman Fung Institute for Engineering Leadership serves engineers and scientists seeking professional or executive careers, with an emphasis on industry applications for emerging technologies. Eligible individuals may choose among a range of undergraduate, graduate and executive programs that combine leadership coursework with intensive study in an engineering specialization:

The Fung Institute’s Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology (CET) offers undergraduate courses in entrepreneurship as well as professional networks and research marked by strong industry participation. The Fung Institute also administers the College of Engineering’s Master of Engineering degree program, which combines technical depth in a chosen engineering concentration with leadership education and an industry-oriented capstone project. The Engineering Leadership Program for Professionals (ELPP) offers a certificate program for working engineers seeking to develop professional and leadership skills to contribute to their companies at a higher level.

:::::::::::: JOINT, CONCURRENT AND DOUBLE MAJOR PROGRAMS
Bioengineering - Materials Science and Engineering;
Chemical Engineering - Materials Science and Engineering;
Chemical Engineering - Nuclear Engineering;
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences - Materials Science and Engineering;
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences - Nuclear Engineering;
Materials Science and Engineering - Mechanical Engineering;
Materials Science and Engineering - Nuclear Engineering;
Mechanical Engineering - Nuclear Engineering

Engineering Information

Engineering Faculty & Research

Teaching, Tenure-Track View Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Full Professors Assoc. Professors Assistant Professors Program Total
Bioengineering 11 5 3 19
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering 0 0 0 0
Civil and Environmental Engineering 34 5 3 42
Dual Major 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences 61 17 8 86
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science 0 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research 12 2 1 15
Joint Major 0 0 0 0
Letters & Science Computer Science1 0 0 0 0
Letters & Science Operations Research and Management Science 0 0 0 0
Materials Science & Engineering 10 3 0 13
Mechanical Engineering 37 5 1 43
Nuclear Engineering 6 0 1 7
Totals: 171 37 17 225

1The department is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.

Teaching, Non-Tenure-Track

Engineering Department(s) FT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel PT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Teach. Personnel
Bioengineering 0 0 0 0.00
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Civil and Environmental Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Dual Major 0 0 0 0.00
Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences 4 0 4 0.00
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences 0 0 0 0.00
Engineering Science 0 0 0 0.00
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research 0 0 0 0.00
Joint Major 0 0 0 0.00
Letters & Science Computer Science1 0 0 0 0.00
Letters & Science Operations Research and Management Science 0 0 0 0.00
Materials Science & Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Nuclear Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Totals: 4 0 4 0.00

1The department is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.

Non-Teaching, Research

Engineering Department(s) Non-Teach. FT Research Personnel Non-Teach. PT Research Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Non-Teach. Research Personnel
Bioengineering 0 0 0 0.00
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Civil and Environmental Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Dual Major 0 0 0 0.00
Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences 0 0 0 0.00
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences 0 0 0 0.00
Engineering Science 0 0 0 0.00
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research 0 0 0 0.00
Joint Major 0 0 0 0.00
Letters & Science Computer Science1 0 0 0 0.00
Letters & Science Operations Research and Management Science 0 0 0 0.00
Materials Science & Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Nuclear Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Totals: 0 0 0 0.00

1The department is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

  • American Indian or Alaska Native (Am Ind): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.
  • Asian: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
  • Black or African American (B/AfrA): A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as "Haitian" or "Negro" can be used in addition to "Black or African American."
  • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (Haw): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
  • Hispanic or Latino (Hisp): A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. The term, "Spanish origin," can be used in addition to "Hispanic or Latino."
  • White: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Full Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Bioengineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 7 2 0 0 9 2
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Civil and Environmental Engineering 0 0 3 1 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 24 2 0 0 31 3
Dual Major 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences 0 0 1 0 0 0 11 2 0 0 0 0 43 4 0 0 55 6
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 2 0 0 9 3
Joint Major 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Letters & Science Computer Science1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Letters & Science Operations Research and Management Science 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Materials Science & Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 1 0 0 9 1
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 26 2 0 0 35 2
Nuclear Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 5 1
Totals: 0 0 6 1 0 0 28 3 0 0 0 0 119 14 0 0 153 18

1The department is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Associate Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Bioengineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 4 1
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Civil and Environmental Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 2 3
Dual Major 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences 0 0 2 0 0 0 6 2 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 15 2
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
Joint Major 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Letters & Science Computer Science1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Letters & Science Operations Research and Management Science 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Materials Science & Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 1
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 3 2
Nuclear Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 0 0 2 0 0 0 10 5 1 0 0 0 14 5 0 0 27 10

1The department is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Assistant Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Bioengineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 1
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Civil and Environmental Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 1
Dual Major 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 6 2
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Joint Major 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Letters & Science Computer Science1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Letters & Science Operations Research and Management Science 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Materials Science & Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Nuclear Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Totals: 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 10 3 0 0 13 4

1The department is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.

Undergraduate

Admissions/Transfers

Undergraduate Admission to the College of Engineering

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING:
All students must satisfy the general requirements for admission to the University. Admission to the joint major programs is at the junior level only. Continuing students may petition for change to a joint major in the final semester of their sophomore year. Transfer students interested in the joint major with chemical engineering must apply to the College of Chemistry.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING:
Complete information on undergraduate admissions is available at http://chemistry.berkeley.edu/student_info/undergrad_info/index.html.

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

Proficiency in English is critical to success at UC Berkeley. One of the following exams is required of all international applicants from non-English speaking countries:
• International English Language Testing System (IELTS) - a score of 7 or higher on the academic module or
• Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) - a score of 80 or higher on the TOEFL iBT or 550 or higher on the paper-based exam
Language exam results must be received in the Office of Undergraduate Admissions no later than January prior to the fall semester in which the student wishes to enroll. More information for international applicants is available at: http://admissions.berkeley.edu/internationalrequirements

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

No additional requirements. Information for non-resident freshman applicants is available at: http://www.berkeley.edu/catalog/undergrad/admission.html.

Residency Requirements

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING:
UC Berkeley is one of the premier universities in the nation, attracting students from many different states and countries. It is also a state-supported institution and, therefore, must charge all nonresident students an additional Nonresident Supplemental Tuition fee. Because of the financial independence requirement, the process of obtaining California residency for tuition purposes is extremely difficult for undergraduate students with nonresident parents. Virtually all nonresident undergraduates with nonresident parents remain nonresidents for the duration of their undergraduate career at the University. Many graduate students, however, are able to establish residency the year after their arrival. Detailed information regarding establishing residency for tuition purposes can be found at http://registrar.berkeley.edu/Registrar/about_residency.html

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING:
For tuition purposes, U.S. citizens or permanent residents who are not residents of California may be able to establish California residency by fulfilling the physical presence, intent AND financial independence requirements. Because of the financial independence requirement, the process of obtaining California residency for tuition purposes is extremely difficult for undergraduate students with nonresident parents. Virtually all nonresident undergraduates with nonresident parents remain nonresidents for the duration of their undergraduate career at the University. Many graduate students, however, are able to establish residency the year after their arrival. Detailed information regarding establishing residency for tuition purposes can be found at http://registrar.berkeley.edu/residency.html.

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING:
Applicants are selected primarily for strength of over-all grade point average, grades in specific courses for intended major, completion of lower division requirements and personal statement.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING:
Information on admission as a transfer student is available at
http://chemistry.berkeley.edu/student_info/undergrad_info/prospective_undergrad/admission/transfer_students.html

Number of Transfer Students from:

A two-year community junior college where they were full-time students: 247
A four-year college or university where they were full-time students: 6

Undergraduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): In-State / Out-of-State

Undergraduate Group 1 Undergraduate Group 2
Tuition & Fees: $14,986 $37,864
Room & Board: $15,000 $15,000
Books & Supplies: $1,214 $1,214
Other Expenses: $1,414 $1,414
Estimated avg. course load per term: 15 15
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Special Programs or Fee Structures

Students in a number of professional degree programs will pay additional tuition and fees based on their school or department, or degree program. Check with the school or department for more information about their Professional Degree Supplemental Tuition policy.

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

Undergraduate

New Applicants

New Undergraduate Applicants

A. Number of undergraduate applicants to the engineering college: 14,110
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 2,027
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 815
Percentage of entering students (excluding transfer students) ranked in the top quarter (25%) of their high schools: 100%

Newly Enrolled Test Scores

Scores Reflect 75th to 25th percentile

SAT 75th 25th
Math Range:
Reading Range:
Writing Range:
Combined Range:
ACT 75th 25th
Math Range:
Composite Range:

Undergraduate

Enrollments by Class

Undergraduate Engr. Programs Fresh
1st Year
Soph
2nd Year
Junior
3rd Year
Senior
4th/5th Year
Full Time Total Part Time Total
Bioengineering (B.S.) 92 95 77 122 386 3
Bioengineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0
Bioengineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) 1 0 6 9 16 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 76 84 123 103 386 10
Chemical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) 0 1 10 12 23 1
Chemical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 2 1 3 1
Civil & Environmental Engineering (B.S.) 73 42 60 129 304 13
Computer Science & Engineering (B.S.) 4 47 39 56 146 9
Computer Science (B.A.)1 1 12 73 145 231 15
Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.) 271 203 291 238 1003 27
Electrical & Computer Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) 2 2 9 0 13 0
Electrical & Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 8 8 0
Energy Engineering (B.S.) 0 2 0 1 3 0
Engineering Mathematics and Statistics (B.S.) 5 3 4 6 18 0
Engineering Physics (B.S.) 28 13 20 24 85 1
Engineering Undeclared 76 52 2 0 130 1
Environmental Engineering Science (B.S.) 12 14 5 5 36 0
Industrial Engineering & Operations Research (B.S.) 28 16 31 43 118 3
Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) 28 17 14 18 77 4
Materials Science & Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 1 3 8 17 29 0
Materials Science & Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 3 1 4 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 157 122 143 167 589 10
Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) 4 0 4 3 11 0
Nuclear Engineering & Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.) 1 0 3 3 7 0
Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) 19 11 9 13 52 1
Operations Research & Management Science (B.A.) 0 1 11 10 22 2
Totals: 878 728 874 989 3469 86

1The program is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.

Freshmen

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Bioengineering (B.S.)
Men 5 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 42 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 61 0
Women 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 20 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 31 0
Bioengineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Bioengineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 9 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 32 0 0 0 1 0 14 0 0 0 58 0
Women 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 18 1
Chemical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chemical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Civil & Environmental Engineering (B.S.)
Men 11 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 15 1 1 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 45 1
Women 5 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 16 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 28 0
Computer Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 4 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Science (B.A.)1
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 24 8 4 0 0 0 0 0 166 1 2 0 0 0 44 0 0 0 240 9
Women 8 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 14 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 31 0
Electrical & Computer Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Electrical & Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Energy Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Mathematics and Statistics (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Physics (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 0 0 13 0 0 0 23 0
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0
Engineering Undeclared
Men 4 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 32 0 0 0 0 0 26 0 0 0 66 0
Women 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 10 1
Environmental Engineering Science (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 10 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Industrial Engineering & Operations Research (B.S.)
Men 9 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 18 1
Women 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 10 0
Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 17 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 11 0
Materials Science & Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Materials Science & Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 16 0 2 0 16 0 0 0 56 0 1 0 0 0 42 0 0 0 133 0
Women 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 12 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 24 0
Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Nuclear Engineering & Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 17 0
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Operations Research & Management Science (B.A.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 116 10 14 0 40 0 2 0 475 3 6 0 1 0 224 1 0 0 878 14

1The program is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.

Sophomores

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Bioengineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 43 0 0 0 0 0 9 1 0 0 60 1
Women 2 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 24 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 35 0
Bioengineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Bioengineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 13 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 34 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 61 0
Women 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 23 0
Chemical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chemical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Civil & Environmental Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 15 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 31 0
Women 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 11 0
Computer Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 5 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 32 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 44 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 1
Computer Science (B.A.)1
Men 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7 0
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 24 0 8 0 2 0 0 0 116 1 1 0 0 0 30 0 0 0 181 1
Women 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 22 1
Electrical & Computer Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Electrical & Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Energy Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Mathematics and Statistics (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Engineering Physics (B.S.)
Men 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 9 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0
Engineering Undeclared
Men 5 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 21 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 41 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 11 0
Environmental Engineering Science (B.S.)
Men 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 8 0
Women 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0
Industrial Engineering & Operations Research (B.S.)
Men 4 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 11 0
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 12 2
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0
Materials Science & Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Materials Science & Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 14 0 1 0 8 0 0 0 50 0 0 0 0 0 40 0 0 0 113 0
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 9 0
Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nuclear Engineering & Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 9 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Operations Research & Management Science (B.A.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 97 1 23 1 27 0 1 0 411 2 1 0 0 0 168 3 0 1 728 8

1The program is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.

Juniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Bioengineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 32 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 44 0
Women 3 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 17 1 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 33 1
Bioengineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Bioengineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 20 0 2 0 4 0 0 0 39 0 0 0 0 0 24 0 0 0 89 0
Women 9 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 17 1 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 34 1
Chemical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 8 0
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Chemical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Civil & Environmental Engineering (B.S.)
Men 7 0 3 0 4 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 1 0 12 0 0 0 39 0
Women 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 1 0 6 0 0 0 21 0
Computer Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 21 4 1 0 0 0 7 1 0 0 35 5
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0
Computer Science (B.A.)1
Men 6 0 6 0 1 0 0 0 32 1 1 0 0 0 12 1 0 0 58 2
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 15 0
Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 30 0 15 0 8 0 0 0 137 1 0 0 0 0 61 0 0 0 251 1
Women 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 32 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 40 0
Electrical & Computer Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 9 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical & Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Energy Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Mathematics and Statistics (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Physics (B.S.)
Men 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Women 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 18 0
Engineering Undeclared
Men 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Environmental Engineering Science (B.S.)
Men 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0
Industrial Engineering & Operations Research (B.S.)
Men 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 19 1
Women 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 12 0
Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 7 0
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 7 0
Materials Science & Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Materials Science & Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 6 0 5 0 8 0 3 0 48 0 1 0 1 0 49 0 0 0 121 0
Women 3 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 22 0
Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nuclear Engineering & Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Women 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 7 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Operations Research & Management Science (B.A.)
Men 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0
Totals: 114 0 51 0 38 0 4 0 429 7 3 0 4 0 231 2 0 0 874 9

1The program is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.

Seniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Bioengineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 4 0 4 0 0 0 53 1 2 0 1 0 10 0 0 0 75 1
Women 4 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 33 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 47 0
Bioengineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Bioengineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 8 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 11 1 3 0 2 0 1 0 36 3 1 0 0 0 15 2 0 0 69 6
Women 6 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 18 2 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 34 2
Chemical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 1
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Chemical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Civil & Environmental Engineering (B.S.)
Men 10 0 4 1 6 1 0 0 44 2 1 0 0 0 21 2 0 0 86 6
Women 3 0 4 1 4 3 1 0 15 1 1 0 0 0 15 1 0 0 43 6
Computer Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 5 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 22 0 0 0 0 0 16 0 2 0 49 0
Women 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 7 1
Computer Science (B.A.)1
Men 17 1 6 0 4 2 0 0 56 3 1 0 0 0 31 4 0 0 115 10
Women 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 21 2 0 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 30 3
Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 28 1 10 2 9 2 1 0 117 7 2 0 0 0 40 2 0 0 207 14
Women 5 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 17 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 31 1
Electrical & Computer Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical & Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Energy Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Mathematics and Statistics (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Engineering Physics (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 10 1 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 21 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Engineering Undeclared
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Environmental Engineering Science (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Industrial Engineering & Operations Research (B.S.)
Men 4 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 16 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 27 1
Women 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 16 0
Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 12 1
Women 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 1
Materials Science & Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 13 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0
Materials Science & Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 18 0 7 2 15 0 1 0 68 4 1 0 0 0 36 2 0 0 146 8
Women 2 0 2 0 5 0 0 0 10 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 21 2
Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Nuclear Engineering & Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 12 0
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Operations Research & Management Science (B.A.)
Men 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 2
Women 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0
Totals: 118 5 48 7 62 7 4 0 523 24 12 0 1 0 219 12 2 0 989 55

1The program is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.

Undergraduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Bioengineering (B.S.) 5 8 0 0 72 0 0 23 0 108 66 42
Bioengineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Bioengineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 1
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 16 3 2 1 53 1 0 0 11 87 59 28
Chemical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 2 0 8 5 3
Chemical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 4 4 0
Civil & Environmental Engineering (B.S.) 4 8 10 0 46 1 0 41 0 110 72 38
Computer Science & Engineering (B.S.) 9 4 0 0 44 0 0 22 0 79 72 7
Computer Science (B.A.)1 4 6 6 0 53 0 0 28 0 97 77 20
Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.) 30 15 3 0 136 1 0 41 0 226 198 28
Electrical & Computer Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 3 3 0
Electrical & Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Energy Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 4 4 0
Engineering Mathematics and Statistics (B.S.) 1 0 2 0 4 0 0 1 0 8 7 1
Engineering Physics (B.S.) 2 0 0 0 6 0 0 6 0 14 14 0
Engineering Undeclared 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Environmental Engineering Science (B.S.) 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 4 1 3
Industrial Engineering & Operations Research (B.S.) 10 5 2 0 29 0 1 4 0 51 33 18
Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) 1 2 0 0 12 0 0 6 0 21 14 7
Materials Science & Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 7 6 1
Materials Science & Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 16 19 12 0 76 0 0 59 0 182 144 38
Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 0
Nuclear Engineering & Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 3 3 0
Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) 0 1 2 0 4 1 0 1 0 9 8 1
Operations Research & Management Science (B.A.) 4 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 7 4 3
Totals: 100 70 37 2 501 4 1 215 11 941 722 219

1The program is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Bioengineering (B.S.) 3 2 6 2 0 0 0 0 39 33 0 0 0 0 18 5 0 0 108
Bioengineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Bioengineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 7 9 3 0 2 0 1 0 38 15 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 4 87
Chemical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 8
Chemical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4
Civil & Environmental Engineering (B.S.) 2 2 5 3 7 3 0 0 32 14 1 0 0 0 25 16 0 0 110
Computer Science & Engineering (B.S.) 7 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 40 4 0 0 0 0 21 1 0 0 79
Computer Science (B.A.)1 3 1 5 1 5 1 0 0 41 12 0 0 0 0 23 5 0 0 97
Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.) 28 2 11 4 3 0 0 0 121 15 1 0 0 0 34 7 0 0 226
Electrical & Computer Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Electrical & Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Energy Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4
Engineering Mathematics and Statistics (B.S.) 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 8
Engineering Physics (B.S.) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 14
Engineering Undeclared 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Environmental Engineering Science (B.S.) 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
Industrial Engineering & Operations Research (B.S.) 9 1 2 3 0 2 0 0 19 10 0 0 0 1 3 1 0 0 51
Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 3 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 21
Materials Science & Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 7
Materials Science & Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 14 2 13 6 12 0 0 0 57 19 0 0 0 0 48 11 0 0 182
Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Nuclear Engineering & Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3
Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 9
Operations Research & Management Science (B.A.) 3 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7
Totals: 79 21 50 20 30 7 2 0 379 122 4 0 0 1 171 44 7 4 941

1The program is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.

Undergraduate

Dual Degrees

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

The College of Engineering offers dual majors in which a student may complete two degree programs one within College of Engineering and another one with a different college.

The College of Engineering also offers a simultaneous degree program with all the other UC Berkeley Colleges. A student must complete the necessary requirements for both Colleges and both majors. Only two upper division courses are permitted to overlap. Students must apply at the end of the sophomore year.

A minor in Chemical Engineering will be awarded to students who complete five upper division courses, at least three of which must be taken at Berkeley. Grading restrictions apply. More information is available at: http://chemistry.berkeley.edu/student_info/undergrad_info/index.html

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degrees Awarded

40

Undergraduate

Program Comparisons

  • ABET - Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
  • CEAB - Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board
Degree Program ABET/CEAB Accred. Nominal Program Length
(yrs.)
Average Program Length
(yrs.)
Time: Day/Even./
Both
Co-op: None/Opt./
Required
Grads in Co-op Progs.
Bioengineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Bioengineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.) no 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Bioengineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Chemical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Chemical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Civil & Environmental Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Computer Science & Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Computer Science (B.A.)1 yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Electrical & Computer Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Electrical & Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) no 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Energy Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Engineering Mathematics and Statistics (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Engineering Physics (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Engineering Undeclared no Both None
Environmental Engineering Science (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Industrial Engineering & Operations Research (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Materials Science & Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Materials Science & Engineering and Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Materials Science & Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Nuclear Engineering & Electrical & Computer Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Operations Research & Management Science (B.A.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional

1The degree program is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.

Graduate

Admissions Information

Graduate Admission to the College of Engineering

:::::::::::: COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING - Students admitted by the Graduate Division of the University to graduate study in engineering, including those interested in multidisciplinary programs, must be accepted by one of the engineering departments. Students must state on the admission application form the department and the program of study they desire. All international applicants from countries in which the official language is not English are required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Additional admission information for graduate study in engineering is available at http://www.coe.berkeley.edu/students/prospective-students/admissions.

:::::::::::: CHEMICAL ENGINEERING - Admission is granted by the University's Graduate Division on the recommendation of the department. Foreign students whose native language is not English must take an English proficiency exam (TOEFL). Additional information can be found at http://cheme.berkeley.edu/grad_info/prospective_grad_admission.html

Graduate Admission to an Engineering Department

:::::::::::: Direct COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING admission inquiries to the department of interest. Engineering department information can be found at http://www.coe.berkeley.edu/students/prospective-students/admissions.

:::::::::::: The DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING is part of the College of Chemistry. Address admission inquiries to: Graduate Office, Department of Chemical Engineering, 201 Gilman Hall # 1462, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1462 or visit:
http://cheme.berkeley.edu/grad_info/prospective_grad_admission.html

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

:::::::::::: COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING: All international applicants from countries in which the official language is not English (or who have not completed at least one year of full-time academic course work with grades of B or better at a U.S. university) are required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Additional information can be found at http://www.coe.berkeley.edu/students/prospective-students/admissions.

:::::::::::: CHEMICAL ENGINEERING: Foreign students whose native language is not English must take an English proficiency exam (TOEFL). Additional information can be found at http://cheme.berkeley.edu/grad_info/prospective_grad_admission.html.

Residency Requirements

There are no residency requirements unique to transfer students.

For residency requirements for all students with respect to ATTENDANCE, see
http://www.coe.berkeley.edu/students/prospective-students/admissions and http://grad.berkeley.edu/policies/guide.shtml.

For residency requirements for all students with respect to TUITION, see
http://www.grad.berkeley.edu/admissions/cost_fees.shtml.

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

There are no admission requirements unique to transfer students.

For admission information for all students, see http://www.grad.berkeley.edu/admissions/admis_require.shtml,
http://www.coe.berkeley.edu/students/prospective-students/admissions, and http://cheme.berkeley.edu/grad_info/prospective_grad_admission.html.

Graduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): In-State / Out-of-State

Graduate Group 1 Graduate Group 2
Tuition & Fees: $15,340 $30,442
Room & Board: $16,602 $16,602
Books & Supplies: $702 $702
Other Expenses: $1,456 $1,456
Estimated avg. course load per term: 12 12
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Special Programs or Fee Structures

Students in a number of professional degree programs will pay additional tuition and fees based on their school or department, or degree program. Check with the school or department for more information about their Professional Degree Supplemental Tuition policy.

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

Additional Financial Aid Information

Graduate students may apply for need-based loans and work-study through the Financial Aid Office (FAO). Questions about financial aid programs should be directed to the FAO, Graduate Unit, 211 Sproul # 1960, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1960, (510) 642-6442.

:::::::::::: COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING: There are multiple filing dates for submitting completed applications for admission and fellowship consideration, the earliest being December 1.

Additional information can be found at http://www.coe.berkeley.edu/students/prospective-students/admissions and http://www.grad.berkeley.edu/financial/index.shtml.

:::::::::::: CHEMICAL ENGINEERING: All students admitted to the graduate program receive a stipend for the duration of study in the form of research assistantships. Additional information can be found at http://cheme.berkeley.edu/grad_info/prospective_grad_aid.html.

Graduate

New Applicants

New Graduate Applicants

A. Number of graduate applicants to the engineering college: 9,230
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 1,142
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 580

Graduate

Enrollments by Class

Master's

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Applied Science and Technology (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Bioenginering (M.S.)
Men 2 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 11 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 5 0
Chemical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 8 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Civil & Environmental Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.)
Men 30 0 10 0 6 0 0 0 20 1 1 0 0 0 21 0 0 0 88 1
Women 13 0 9 0 0 0 0 0 13 0 0 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 49 0
Computer Science & Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.)
Men 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 13 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Electrical & Computer Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.)
Men 9 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 16 0
Women 7 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 9 0
Engineering Undeclared
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research (M.S, M.Eng.)
Men 21 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 26 0
Women 14 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 0
Materials Science & Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.)
Men 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Mechanical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.)
Men 22 0 7 0 2 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 55 0
Women 4 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 18 0
Nuclear Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.)
Men 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 6 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Totals: 134 0 40 0 12 0 1 0 75 1 2 0 0 0 66 0 0 0 330 1

Doctoral

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Applied Science and Technology (Ph.D.)
Men 12 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 24 0
Women 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 9 0
Bioengineering (Ph.D.)
Men 17 3 14 2 5 1 0 1 17 5 3 1 0 0 31 9 0 0 87 22
Women 10 0 6 2 2 1 0 0 17 3 2 1 1 0 13 5 0 0 51 12
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 6 0 6 0 5 0 0 0 18 0 1 0 0 0 41 1 0 0 77 1
Women 7 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 7 0 2 0 0 0 23 0 0 0 43 0
Civil and Environmental Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 51 1 11 0 5 0 0 0 14 0 3 0 0 0 50 0 0 0 134 1
Women 20 0 6 0 4 0 0 0 6 0 3 0 0 0 26 0 0 0 65 0
Computer Science & Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 82 0 26 0 8 0 0 0 13 0 1 0 0 0 56 2 0 0 186 2
Women 11 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 34 0
Electrical & Computer Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 117 1 14 0 5 0 2 0 41 0 6 0 1 0 58 0 0 0 244 1
Women 20 0 5 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 16 0 0 0 48 0
Engineering Undeclared
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research (Ph.D.)
Men 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 37 0
Women 11 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 15 0
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D)
Men 21 0 5 0 6 0 8 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 19 0 0 0 63 0
Women 5 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 5 0 2 0 0 0 13 0 0 0 28 0
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D., D.Eng.)
Men 101 0 19 0 10 0 0 0 21 0 1 0 1 0 53 0 0 0 206 0
Women 22 0 3 0 6 0 1 0 10 0 1 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 57 0
Nuclear Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 13 0 6 0 2 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 20 0 0 0 45 0
Women 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 13 0
Totals: 561 5 131 4 66 2 12 1 195 8 26 2 3 0 472 17 0 0 1466 39

Graduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Applied Science and Technology (M.S.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 2 0
Bioenginering (M.S.) 1 3 0 0 5 0 0 6 0 15 10 5
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 10 0 1 0 6 1 0 3 0 21 12 9
Civil & Environmental Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 37 17 11 2 43 4 0 72 0 186 128 58
Computer Science & Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 5 3 1 0 6 0 0 5 0 20 15 5
Electrical & Computer Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 31 4 1 1 10 1 0 8 0 56 46 10
Engineering Undeclared 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research (M.S, M.Eng.) 42 2 0 0 12 1 0 1 0 58 39 19
Materials Science & Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 7 5 1 0 5 0 0 10 0 28 18 10
Mechanical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 26 3 4 0 12 0 0 32 0 77 63 14
Nuclear Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 8 5 3
Totals: 163 37 21 3 99 7 0 141 0 471 338 133

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Applied Science and Technology (M.S.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2
Bioenginering (M.S.) 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 15
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 6 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 3 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 21
Civil & Environmental Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 24 13 14 3 4 7 1 1 32 11 2 2 0 0 51 21 0 0 186
Computer Science & Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 5 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 4 2 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 20
Electrical & Computer Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 26 5 2 2 1 0 1 0 9 1 1 0 0 0 6 2 0 0 56
Engineering Undeclared 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research (M.S, M.Eng.) 28 14 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 3 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 58
Materials Science & Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 7 0 2 3 0 1 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 6 4 0 0 28
Mechanical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 20 6 3 0 3 1 0 0 10 2 0 0 0 0 27 5 0 0 77
Nuclear Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 3 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 8
Totals: 121 42 27 10 9 12 2 1 73 26 4 3 0 0 102 39 0 0 471

Master's Degree Programs

Master's Degree Program Degree Type
Master's w/ Thesis Master's w/o Thesis or with Proj./Report Program Totals
Applied Science and Technology (M.S.) 0 2 2
Bioenginering (M.S.) 0 0 0
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 3 18 21
Civil & Environmental Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 2 191 193
Computer Science & Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 1 19 20
Electrical & Computer Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 2 56 58
Engineering Undeclared 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research (M.S, M.Eng.) 0 60 60
Materials Science & Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 1 27 28
Mechanical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 2 74 76
Nuclear Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 2 6 8
Totals: 13 453 466

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Applied Science and Technology (Ph.D.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 3 0
Bioengineering (Ph.D.) 2 3 2 0 11 2 0 10 0 30 18 12
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 8 0 14 8 6
Civil and Environmental Engineering (Ph.D.) 15 3 1 4 0 0 0 9 0 32 20 12
Computer Science & Engineering (Ph.D.) 13 2 0 0 4 1 0 5 0 25 23 2
Electrical & Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) 22 10 0 0 11 0 0 8 0 51 44 7
Engineering Undeclared 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research (Ph.D.) 7 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 10 6 4
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D) 2 1 1 0 2 0 0 9 0 15 10 5
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D., D.Eng.) 19 3 3 0 4 2 1 24 0 56 44 12
Nuclear Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 4 0 7 6 1
Totals: 83 24 7 4 38 6 1 80 0 243 182 61

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Applied Science and Technology (Ph.D.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3
Bioengineering (Ph.D.) 2 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 6 5 1 1 0 0 6 4 0 0 30
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 0 5 3 0 0 14
Civil and Environmental Engineering (Ph.D.) 10 5 2 1 1 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 3 0 0 32
Computer Science & Engineering (Ph.D.) 11 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 25
Electrical & Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) 20 2 8 2 0 0 0 0 10 1 0 0 0 0 6 2 0 0 51
Engineering Undeclared 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research (Ph.D.) 4 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 10
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D) 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 5 4 0 0 15
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D., D.Eng.) 15 4 2 1 3 0 0 0 3 1 2 0 0 1 19 5 0 0 56
Nuclear Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 0 0 0 7
Totals: 67 16 18 6 6 1 1 3 27 11 4 2 0 1 59 21 0 0 243

Graduate

Research Expenditures

Expenditures by Research Department

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Engineering Department External Funding Source
Bioengineering
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $151,000
Fed/Nat: $15,476,000 Industry: $1,240,000 Priv/Non: $2,282,000
State: $1,466,000 Local: $354,000 Total Expn.: $20,969,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $283,000
Fed/Nat: $33,215,000 Industry: $4,286,000 Priv/Non: $950,000
State: $769,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $39,503,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv: $57,000
Fed/Nat: $5,814,000 Industry: $3,492,000 Priv/Non: $3,833,000
State: $11,016,000 Local: $459,000 Total Expn.: $24,671,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv: $509,000
Fed/Nat: $33,670,000 Industry: $22,140,000 Priv/Non: $6,249,000
State: $2,396,000 Local: $712,000 Total Expn.: $65,676,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Engineering Science
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv: $3,000
Fed/Nat: $948,000 Industry: $279,000 Priv/Non: $322,000
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $1,552,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Materials Science & Engineering
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv: $12,000
Fed/Nat: $6,550,000 Industry: $1,274,000 Priv/Non: $854,000
State: $140,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $8,830,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Mechanical Engineering
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $41,000
Fed/Nat: $11,493,000 Industry: $6,948,000 Priv/Non: $1,954,000
State: $1,734,000 Local: $111,000 Total Expn.: $22,281,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Nuclear Engineering
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv: $2,000
Fed/Nat: $7,098,000 Industry: $622,000 Priv/Non: $813,000
State: $0 Local: $478,000 Total Expn.: $9,013,000
Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $1,058,000
Fed/Nat: $114,264,000 Industry: $40,281,000 Priv/Non: $17,257,000
State: $17,521,000 Local: $2,114,000 Total Expn.: $192,495,000

Expenditures by Research Center

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Center/Lab External Funding Source
Berkeley Center for New Media
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Berkeley Initiative in Soft Computing
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute (BNNI)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Berkeley Nuclear Research Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Berkeley Quantum Information & Computation Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center (BSAC)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Berkeley Stem Cell Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Berkeley Water Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Berkeley Wireless Research Center (BWRC)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
BID: Berkeley Institute of Design
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Blum Center for Developing Economies
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
California Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Research (QB3)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science (E3S)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Entrepreneurship & Technology (CET)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Environmental Design Research
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Hybrid and Embedded Software Systems (CHESS)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Intellient Systems (CIS)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
COINS: Center of Integrated Nanomechanical Systems
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Coleman Fung Institute for Engineering Leadership
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Consortium on Green Design and Manufacturing
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Energy Biosciences Institute
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Ergonomics Program/UC Center for Occupational and Environmental Health
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Fung Institute for Engineering Leadership
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
GLOBE: Center for Global Learning and Outreach from Berkeley Engineering
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Marvell Nanofabrication Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Par Lab: Parallel Computing Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
PATH: Partners for Advanced Transit & Highways
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Simons Institute
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Synthetic Biology Institute
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Team for Research in Ubiquitous Secure Technology (TRUST)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0


Grand Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $1,058,000
Fed/Nat: $114,264,000 Industry: $40,281,000 Priv/Non: $17,257,000
State: $17,521,000 Local: $2,114,000 Total Expn.: $192,495,000

The following text was offered to each school as a guideline for the calculation of externally-funded research expenditures:

Include all expenditures associated with grants and contracts specifically budgeted for externally sponsored research and associated programs and expenditures associated with all gifts auditably used for research. Include expended funds provided by the following external sources:

  1. Federal Government
  2. State Government
  3. Foreign Governments
  4. Industry
  5. Non-Profit Organizations (e.g. foundations)
  6. Individuals
  7. Local Government

The expenditures reported should be only those funds provided by organizations, agencies, and individuals external to the institution. Cost sharing/matching funds should be included only if provided from sources external to the institution.

Only State government funds that were obtained competitively or as matching funds associated with other externally funded programs should be included. State funds that are part of the normal operating budget should not be included regardless of purpose.

For all joint or contracted projects or sub-projects, only the portion of the center research performed by faculty, staff, and students of the affiliated engineering school should be credited to that school. Expenditures for capital costs of research laboratory building construction should not be included.

Expenditures for research laboratory renovations should not be included unless the renovation funds expended came from grants and contracts expressly intended for the direct support of engineering research.

Any portion of academic year and/or summer salary for any researcher that is not derived from external research grants or contracts should not be counted.

Total #: Report total number of individual grants, not the total dollar amount of the expenditures.

Expenditures: Report actual expenditures (as opposed to authorization amounts) in U.S. dollars.

Time frame for expenditures: Report expenditures for your current fiscal year.

Research centers listed as "WITHIN an engineering department" on the Research Centers page (screen 7) of the College of Engineering Profile, will not have their expenditures added to the school's total research expenditures. Such expenditures can be included in the department total, while still being listed for the appropriate center. This allows users to list the expenditures in two areas without double-counting.

Graduate

Research Description

Research Description By Graduate Engineering Department

Bioengineering

The research of the faculty members of the UC Berkeley - UC San Francisco Graduate Group in Bioengineering falls into ten main areas of focus: Biomaterials; Biomechanics; Biomedical Imaging and Instrumentation; BioMEMS & Nanotech; Computational Biology, Bioinformatics and Genomics; Drug Delivery Systems & Pharmacogenomics; Neural Systems Engineering & Vision Science; Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine; Systems & Synthetic Biology.

The Graduate Program utilizes Berkeley’s strengths in engineering and UCSF’s history of excellence in biomedical science to embrace a diversity of research topics. Research opportunities for our graduate students exist at the intersection of many disciplines including computational biology, cellular and molecular biomechanics, biomedical imaging, BioMEMS/nanotechnology, tissue engineering, stem cell engineering, synthetic and systems biology. Specific recent projects of note include the discover of the role of stem cells in atherosclerosis in Professor Song Li’s laboratory; new techniques to generate electricity from viruses in Professor Seung-wuk Lee’s group; explanation of the conditions leading to fast tumor cell migration from Professor Sanjay Kumar; and progress on an implantable artificial kidney led by Professor Shuvo Roy.

Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

The Department of Chemical Engineering has programs of graduate teaching and research in the following areas: biochemical engineering; metabolic engineering; separations; catalysis and reaction engineering; electrochemical engineering; electronic materials; molecular theory and simulation, complex fluids, including polymers and colloids; biomedical engineering; microelectronics processing and Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). Individual faculty research programs can be found by following the links at http://cheme.berkeley.edu/faculty/faculty.html

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Civil and Environmental Engineering
The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) at UC Berkeley is a worldwide leader in developing engineering solutions to societal-scale challenges. The Department conducts cutting-edge research, in evolving and vital areas that address societal needs for well-designed and well-operated buildings, energy, transportation, and water systems. These critical systems must be reliable and resilient in the face of hazards such as earthquakes and flooding. Extensive efforts will be needed to adapt civil infrastructure to withstand adverse changes in weather and climate. Our research and teaching serve the needs of a growing and increasingly urban world population that requires sustainable improvements in standards of living.

CEE research establishes and advances the intellectual foundations of new fields of study. We develop theory and improve understanding, and provide tools and techniques for solving important new problems. Educational activities of the Department focus on developing future leaders in the engineering profession, in academia, and in the broader societal context. Through individual and collective efforts, the Department serves the needs of our College and University, and provides technical expertise and service to other public, private, and professional entities.

The Department is a place of intellectual vitality and diversity in which all students, faculty, and staff have the opportunity and the impetus to achieve their highest potential. Signs of this vitality and diversity are seen in innovative research conducted by students and faculty; creative, flexible, adaptable, and forward-looking curricula; outstanding classroom teaching; attentive academic mentoring; and a shared sense of a community that is inclusive and respectful of all members. We are proud of our contributions to the public mission of the University of California, as demonstrated for example by our role in providing access to higher education for students from low and middle-income families.

Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences

Computer Science research areas include: artificial intelligence; computer architecture and engineering; database management systems; graphics; operating systems; programming languages and environments; scientific software and numerical methods; theory; human-computer interaction; and computational biology; networking; security.

Engineering Science

The Engineering Science Program is multi-departmental and interdisciplinary. This undergraduate program encompasses a variety of closely related areas of the physical and biological sciences, mathematics, and engineering. It is intended to provide a means whereby students, while acquiring knowledge of engineering methods, can pursue their interests in areas of natural science. The options offered within the curriculum prepare students for advanced study in engineering, science, bioengineering, or medicine.


There are four fully structured majors in the curriculum:

Energy Engineering
Engineering Mathematics and Statistics
Engineering Physics
Environmental Engineering Science

Industrial Engineering and Operations Research

Research is conducted on mathematical optimization (including linear and non-linear programming, integer programming and combinatorial optimization), stochastic processes, queuing models, quality control, simulation modeling, risk analysis, production planning and scheduling, distribution and transportation planning, supply chain management, electric utility planning, energy systems, healthcare systems, robotics, stochastic control and financial engineering.

Materials Science & Engineering

Materials Science and Engineering is a discipline that encompasses all natural and synthetic materials -- their extraction, production, processing, properties, characterization, and development for technological applications. Advanced engineering activities that depend upon optimized materials include the medical device and healthcare industries, the energy technologies (harvesting, conversion, storage, and transmission), electronics, photonics, transportation, communication, and sports and recreation. Students in materials science and engineering augment their foundation in mathematics, chemistry, physics, and engineering with sophistication in the synthesis, processing, properties, and performance of materials, employing computational and experimental methods for design and analysis. Their fields of expertise include a growing population of novel materials for biological, electronic, magnetic, optical, and structural applications

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineers serve society by solving problems in transportation, energy, the environment, and human health. The activity of mechanical engineers extend from investigation of physical phenomena governing the behavior of our surroundings to the manufacture and evaluation of products. The technical domain of the mechanical engineering profession encompasses topic areas, including acoustics, automatic control, bioengineering (biomechanical and biomolecular), control theory, combustion, cryogenics, design, dynamics, energy conversion, engines, environment, heat transfer, lubrication, mass transfer, manufacturing, materials processing, mechanics of solids and fluids, mechanism, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), nanoscale engineering, ocean engineering, petroleum, plasma dynamics, propulsion, thermodynamics, vibration, and wave propagation.

Nuclear Engineering

The Department of Nuclear Engineering was established in 1958. There are currently about 70 graduate students in the Department. Graduates find opportunities for employment and professional careers in the United States and abroad. Recent graduates are employed in academia, industry, national laboratories, and state and federal agencies.

The Department has strong relations with the nearby Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. A number of faculty and students collaborate with researchers in these laboratories, and use the facilities of these laboratories in their research projects.

Research Description By Engineering Research Center

Berkeley Center for New Media

The Berkeley Center for New Media (BCNM) is a focal point for research and teaching about new media, led by a highly trans-disciplinary community of 120 affiliated faculty, advisors, and scholars, from 35 UC Berkeley departments,
BCNM catalyzes research, educates future leaders, and facilitates public discourse through courses, lectures, symposia, and special events. BCNM has established cross-disciplinary faculty positions and a special program for masters’ and Ph.D. students. The BCNM supports academic modes of scholarship while encouraging unorthodox artworks, designs, and experiments. By reaching out to students, researchers, industry figures, and the broader public, BCNM stimulates new perspectives on contemporary new media.

Berkeley Initiative in Soft Computing

BISC Program is the world-leading center for basic and applied research in soft computing. The principal constituents of soft computing (SC) are fuzzy logic (FL), neural network theory (NN) and probabilistic reasoning (PR), with the latter subsuming belief networks, evolutionary computing including DNA computing, chaos theory and parts of learning theory. Some of the most striking achievements of BISC Program are: fuzzy reasoning (set and logic), new soft computing algorithms making intelligent, semi-unsupervised use of large quantities of complex data, uncertainty analysis, perception-based decision analysis and decision support systems for risk analysis and management, computing with words, computational theory of perception (CTP), and precisiated natural language (PNL).

Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute (BNNI)

The UC Berkeley/Stanford/CalTech/UC Merced NSF-NSEC Center of Integrated Nanomechanical Systems (COINS), operating under the umbrella of the Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute, has made significant progress in advancing its technology, science, outreach, and education missions. The Center has achieved important results in the interdisciplinary research projects at the heart of its vision; for example, in the understanding and application of nanotube resonators, thermal transport and dissipation, controlled synthesis, mobility, and device integration. The Center has leveraged the rich nanosciences, nanoengineering, societal, and educational environments at the participating institutions to achieve these advancements.

The mission of the Center is to inspire and realize applications involving molecular transport, replication, and energy conversion using nano-mechanical technology, integrated with suitable societal implications studies and educational, outreach, and knowledge transfer programs. Specifically, the technical focus of COINS is to develop the means for realizing its two major technology applications - personal and community-based environmental monitoring (PACMON) and tagging tracking and locating (TTL). A key to our success in achieving these application visions lies in the unique COINS nanoscience environment (embedded in the larger California �nano-ecosystem�), which brings together highly interdisciplinary teams to solve problems and bridge technology gaps in new ways.

To realize efficiently the goals of COINS, the research is divided into six distinct thrusts, each with numerous overlaps with the others. These enabling thrusts are Society, Systems, Instrumentation, Characterization, Simulation, and Synthesis. Important technical achievements during the past year include the ability to tune the thermal conductance of nanotubes, the development of nanofluidic circuits and field effect transistors, the development of energy storage for nanoscale mechanical mobility, a new detection system based on dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, deep insight into diamondoids � a new form of carbon, the ability to control nanotube and nanowire alignment for assembly and integration, the ability to tune resonant frequencies in nanotubes up to GHz, new insights into our understanding of nanomechanical energy transfer, and the synthesis and integration of silicon nanowires for photovoltaic applications. In addition, a host of other technical advances have been achieved along all six thrust lines, from design and implementation of piezoresistive force sensors to the demonstration of high-accuracy �pick-and-place� assembly for nano/micro integration. Working within the COINS framework of the programs of societal implications, education and human resources, and outreach and knowledge, a number of exciting developments have been accomplished, from new nanoscience courses to new partnerships to new web-based nanoscience learning programs for children.

Berkeley Nuclear Research Center

The University of California Berkeley Nuclear Research Center (BNRC) was formed in January 2009 with financial support through the UC Office of the President. The principal focus of the center is to address critical sustainability issues for the nuclear fuel cycle

Berkeley Quantum Information & Computation Center

Quantum information processing investigates fascinating issues at the foundations of computer science and quantum mechanics. Revolutionary research at the intersection of computer science and quantum physics has led to a realization that computers operating according to quantum mechanics can be exponentially faster than classical computers. In particular, quantum computers provide exponential speedups for computational tasks such as integer factorization and properties of quantum bits can be used to achieve secure communication. These advances have also changed our understanding of the relation between information and quantum physics, with significant implications for a broad range of subjects including quantum phases, metrology, quantum nanosystems and measurement and control of quantum systems. The Berkeley Center for Quantum Information and Computation brings together researchers from the colleges of Chemistry, Engineering and Physical Sciences to work on fundamental issues in quantum algorithms, quantum cryptography, quantum information theory, quantum control and the experimental realization of quantum computers and quantum devices.

Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center (BSAC)

This center conducts industry-relevant, interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research on micro- and nano-scale sensors, moving mechanical elements, microfluidics, materials, and processes that take advantage of progress made in integrated-circuit, bio, and polymer technologies: MEMS/NEMS (Micro/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems), BioMEMS, RF MEMS, MicroPhotonics/Adaptive Optics, Micropackaging, and related areas. BSAC is the largest of nearly 50 National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Centers and the only one focused on Microsensors and Microactuators. BSAC has brings together in one center 23 primary and affiliate faculty from across the UC Berkeley and UC Davis campuses with affiliates from UC San Francisco, and 120 researchers, primarily from Electrical, Mechanical, Bio, and Chemical Engineering. BSAC is supported by 47 major industrial organizations.

Berkeley Stem Cell Center

Basic and translational research emphases of the Berkeley Stem Cell Center include molecular mechanisms of pluripotency; hematopoietic stem cell development and differentiation; neural differentiation and neurodegenerative disease; cardiovascular and skeletal muscle differentiation; cancer and cancer stem cells; tissue engineering for stem cell culture and transplantation; and design and fabrication of instruments for stem cell isolation, biochemical analysis and imaging. Clinical research is focused on the use of cord blood stem cells in treatment of inherited and malignant blood disorders.

Berkeley Water Center

The Berkeley Water Center takes a comprehensive approach to water resources research and management that reflects the conditions of the 21st Century: variable and uncertain supply, increasing demand and inadequate structural and institutional infrastructure. We seek to develop and demonstrate the application of new concepts, information and engineering technology and computational tools that serve diverse water interests.

Berkeley Wireless Research Center (BWRC)

Berkeley Wireless Research Center (BWRC) provides an environment for research into the design issues necessary to support next generation wireless communication systems and expand the graduate research program in the wireless segment. The research focus is on highly-integrated CMOS implementations with the lowest possible energy consumption and advanced communication algorithms. Components are fabricated using state-of-the-art processes and evaluated in a realistic test environment.
BWRC is supported by 22 of the world's leading electronics companies and Federal and State research agencies. The Center's research team consists of 12 faculty and over 60 graduate students.

BID: Berkeley Institute of Design

The Berkeley Institute of Design (BiD) is a proposed research/teaching unit that fosters a new and deeply interdisciplinary approach to design for the 21st century: The design and realization of rich, interactive environments which are shaped by the human activities they support.
Objectives of BiD
Educate students on the breadth of topics that are important for 21st century design
Develop students' skills in team-work, communication, and creativity
Promote excellence in the practice of design within and across professions
Expose students to real-world design problems and bringing concepts to reality
Cultivate students' ability to express, evoke and shape experience through design
Foster critical reflection on technology and the contexts that shape its use
Create a generation of designers who lead product development in large companies

Blum Center for Developing Economies

The Blum Center for Developing Economies was established in March 2006 to improve the well-being of the three billion people in the world who live on less than two dollars a day. Spanning UC Berkeley, UC Davis, UC San Francisco, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, its mission is to improve the well-being of poor people in developing countries by designing, adapting and disseminating scalable and sustainable technologies and systems and by educating and inspiring a new generation of global citizens. The Blum Center addresses the needs of the poor in developing countries by leveraging UC and LBNL expertise and preparing students with the theoretical understanding, applied skills and experiential learning that enable them to become agents of change in the struggle against global poverty.

The Center uses a rigorous, multi-disciplinary approach that corresponds to the complex nature and the intricate web of factors that cause poverty. It integrates innovation and social entrepreneurship to develop appropriate, sustainable solutions to the toughest poverty challenges. The Blum Center brings real-world issues faced by the poor to classroom, the lab and into the field. With its combination of unrivaled disciplinary depth and breadth, cutting-edge thinking and the University of California's unique culture of global engagement, research and reflection are translated back into real-world applications that solve real problems.

The Center’s focus on partnership, capacity building of local partners and on factors affecting decision-making and behavioral change improves outcomes, increases efficiency and enhances the chance of long-term sustainability. Rigorous monitoring and evaluation methodologies promote responsive implementation and maximize both short-term results and long-term impacts.

California Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Research (QB3)

QB3 Mission - During the last half-century, molecular genetics revolutionized biomedical research and gave rise to the biotechnology industry. During the next half-century, the application of the quantitative sciences - mathematics, physics, chemistry and engineering - to biomedical research brings about a second revolution that promises to improve human health and create dynamic new technologies.

To catalyze these changes, the California Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Research (QB3), a cooperative effort among three campuses of the University of California and private industry, harnesses the quantitative sciences to integrate our understanding of biological systems at all levels of complexity - from atoms and protein molecules to cells, tissues, organs and the entire organism. This long-sought integration allows scientists to attack problems that have been simply unapproachable before, setting the stage for fundamental new discoveries, new products and new technologies for the benefit of human health.

The Institute builds on strengths in the engineering and physical sciences at UC Berkeley, engineering and mathematical sciences at UC Santa Cruz, and the medical sciences at UC San Francisco, as well as strong biology programs at the three campuses.

In addition to the creation of fundamental new knowledge and potent new technologies, a major goal of the Institute is to train a new generation of students able to fully integrate the quantitative sciences with biomedical research.

The Institute involves more than 100 scientists to be housed in a new building at Mission Bay in San Francisco, the new UCSF campus that will be part of a public/private biomedical research park, in a new building at UC Berkeley and in two new facilities at UC Santa Cruz.

QB3 Initiatives

Synthetic Biology Initiative: Synthetic biology involves the design and creation of new biological entities such as enzymes, genetic circuits, and cells. This emerging field has extraordinary potential to improve health care, boost energy production, and protect the environment. The University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory recently established the Berkeley Center for Synthetic Biology (BCSB), the first center of its kind, to foster development of the field of synthetic biology and to make Berkeley a leader in the field.

The Center is working with Michael Nacht, Dean of Public Policy to develop an education and outreach program on Bioethics and Biothreats. We are working with UCB's Development Office to develop program components to submit for funding to several foundations.
Computational Biology Initiative � Center for Computational Biology is undergoing a profound transformation enabled by simultaneous revolutions in experimentation and computation. Joining these twin revolutions together has resulted in an explosion of advances in biotechnology, agriculture, environmental quality, and medical practice. It is becoming possible to characterize biological systems with heretofore unimaginable detail and scope. Most remarkably, the sequences of complete genomes including our own have placed voluminous data on the desktop of every biological researcher. At the same time, increasing computer speeds are enabling more sophisticated quantitative modeling and computational methods. These computational approaches will define the biological sciences for the decades to come.

There is intense national and international competition to establish institutional prominence in this field. This initiative aims to assemble key faculty and resources in the focus area of genomic analysis and associated areas of mathematics, statistics and systems modeling. This is a direction within biology that presents exceptional opportunities for major advances in the immediate future. Our recruitment will be oriented toward this area, but will be adaptable to the new discoveries and opportunities that will surely come along in the next five years.


Computer Algorithm for T Cell Signaling (CATS) Consortium
Arup Chakraborty, a chemical engineer at UCB, created a consortium to develop computational models that can simulate T cell recognition of antigen and subsequent receptor signaling. This will combine in silico, in vivo, and in vitro studies. Consortium members include scientists from UCB, Stanford Med, NYU Med, Wash U Med and UCSF. QB3-Berkeley has provided a postdoctoral fellow to work on this program.

Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science (E3S)

The Center for E3S is a Science and Technology Center (STC) funded by the National Science Foundation’s Integrative Partnerships Program, and is a consortium of world class academic institutions. We are working in a collaborative and innovative environment to make fundamental and conceptual breakthroughs in the underlying physics, chemistry, and materials science of electronic systems, breakthroughs needed to reduce these systems’ energy consumption by orders of magnitude.

Center for Entrepreneurship & Technology (CET)

The CET graduate program provides students with an opportunity to work on real-world problems within emerging industry. The graduate curriculum is comprised of the CET Venture Lab, focused on students' individual ventures, and the CET Industry Lab, which allows students to focus on larger-scale problems. Both labs provide students with real-world environments in which to practice innovation, leadership, entrepreneurship, and technology management.

Center for Environmental Design Research

Center for Environmental Design Research (CEDR)'s mission is to foster research in environmental planning and design. Such research is aimed at increasing the factual content of planning and design decisions and at promoting systematic approaches to design decision making.

The scope of environmental planning and design is broad, ranging from the local environments of people within buildings to region-wide ecosystems, from small details of building construction to large-scale urban planning, from the history of the built environment to the design process itself.


Center for Hybrid and Embedded Software Systems (CHESS)

A cyber-physical system (CPS) integrates computing and communication capabilities with monitoring and / or control of entities in the physical world dependably, safely, securely, efficiently and in real-time. The mission of the Center for Hybrid and Embedded Software Systems (CHESS) is to provide an environment for graduate research in cyber-physical systems by developing model-based and tool-supported design methodologies for real-time, fault tolerant software on heterogeneous distributed platforms that interact with the physical world. CHESS provides industry with innovative software methods, design methodology and tools while helping industry solve real-world problems. CHESS is defining new areas of curricula in engineering and computer science which will result in solving societal issues surrounding aerospace, automotive, consumer electronics and medical devices. The CHESS research team includes 23 faculty and about 50 graduate students at 4 institutions.

Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS)

The Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS) is a joint venture of four University of California campuses: (Berkeley, Davis, Merced and Santa Cruz), as well as partners in industry and government. CITRIS is one of four California Institutes of Science and Innovation established by Governor Gray Davis to combine the strengths of the University of California and leading-edge businesses in piloting the next generation of technology and educating new generations of technological leaders. The CITRIS partnership is the first to create and harness information technology to tackle some of society's most critical needs. More than 300 faculty members in engineering, science, social science, law, information management, health care, and other disciplines at four UC campuses are collaborating with researchers at more than 60 supporting companies on CITRIS research. CITRIS incubates research on problems that have a major impact on the economy, quality of life, and future success of California, the Nation, and beyond: creating and conserving energy; dramatically improving education at all levels; saving lives, property, and productivity in the wake of disasters; boosting transportation efficiency; advancing diagnosis and treatment of disease; protecting information through more robust tools for cyber-security; and expanding business growth through much richer personalized information services. Solutions to many of these problems have a common IT feature: at their core they depend on highly-distributed, reliable, and secure information systems that can evolve and adapt to radical changes in their environment, delivering information services that adapt to the people and organizations that need them. It is this feature that is at the heart of the research agenda for CITRIS.

Center for Intellient Systems (CIS)

The aim of the Center for Intelligent Systems (CIS) is to relaunch the field as an integrated scientific discipline with solid foundations and ambitious, interdisciplinary applications. The Center will bring together researchers from artificial intelligence, computer vision, speech recognition, robotics, control theory, operations research, neuroscience, adaptive systems, information retrieval, data mining, computational statistics, and game theory. The Center will focus on developing a unified theoretical foundation for intelligent systems, building on the tremendous advances made in various individual disciplines in the last decade. New computational tools will be built and disseminated, and a new generation of researchers will be trained to solve large-scale problems -- problems whose solution will benefit the economy and society.

COINS: Center of Integrated Nanomechanical Systems

The goal of COINS is to develop and integrate cutting-edge nanotechnologies into a versatile platform with various ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective, self-powering, mobile, wirelessly communicating detection applications. The success of this mission requires new advances in nanodevices, from fundamental building blocks to enabling technologies to full device integration. Since 2004, we have set our Center on a path towards achieving this goal by developing four major research thrusts, in the areas of Energy, Sensing, Mobility, and Electronics/Wireless. Each of these programs encompasses research projects spanning the full spectrum of basic through to the applied level, and each program has a set of criteria that has been established for use as a means of determining which projects to support, in order to assure optimal project alignment. In addition to engaging in research within each of the enabling thrusts, we are also integrating the component technologies from each of the thrusts to realize into functioning detection systems.

Coleman Fung Institute for Engineering Leadership

The Coleman Fung Institute for Engineering Leadership, launched in January 2010, prepares engineers and scientists " from students to seasoned professionals " with the multidisciplinary skills to lead enterprises of all scales in industry, government and the nonprofit sector.

Consortium on Green Design and Manufacturing

The Consortium on Green Design and Manufacturing (CGDM) was formed in 1993 to encourage multi- disciplinary research and education on environmental management, design for environment and pollution prevention issues in critical industries.
Together with industry and governmental organizations, we strive to meet the following objectives:

Form multidisciplinary research agendas among engineering, management, public health and policy faculty members to address the inherently cross-disciplinary issues of environmental design, management and pollution prevention.
Integrate green design and manufacturing issues into the curriculum so that students in engineering, business, and sciences are exposed to and learn approaches for solving problems in these areas.
Establish collaborative research with industry partners.
Establish channels of support and information exchange with governmental agencies at the city, regional, state and federal levels.
Serve as a facilitator for dissemination of information on green design and manufacturing for businesses, government, management, and the non-profit sector.

Energy Biosciences Institute

The Energy Biosciences Institute was formed, following an international competition invited by the global energy company BP, in late 2007 and was funded for 10 years and $500 million ($350 million for the public institutions). The quest so far involves two primary areas of bioenergy development " cellulosic fuels (derived from non-food plants) and fossil fuel microbiology. Other applications of biological knowledge to energy solutions, such as biolubricants and biosequestration, may follow. The challenges are huge, but the resources to meet them are vast " expertise and the finest research facilities at three of the world’s most distinguished centers of learning and knowledge, plus the corporate know-how of an experienced international energy company.

Ergonomics Program/UC Center for Occupational and Environmental Health

The Ergonomics Program conducts research to measure risk factors for chronic musculoskeletal disorders of the upper extremities and to evaluate hand tools and other engineering solutions designed to prevent these disorders. A principal focus of research is on understanding hand and arm biomechanics during computer use.

GLOBE: Center for Global Learning and Outreach from Berkeley Engineering

GLOBE creates on- and off-campus customized corporate education programs for business and government leaders in technology-based topics such as entrepreneurship, innovation, product and project management, and industry-specific disruptive technologies.

Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute

The Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute at UC Berkeley is an active, collaborative research community that investigates fundamental questions about how the brain functions. Using approaches from many disciplines (including biophysics, chemistry, cognitive science, computer science, genetics, mathematics, molecular and cell biology, physics, and physiology), we seek to understand how the brain generates behavior and cognition, and how to better understand, diagnose and treat neurological disorders.

Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS)

The Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS), one of the oldest and largest transportation research institutes in the country, offers students a chance to participate in a wide range of high-level transportation research projects.

On average, its programs receive $20 million in research funds each year, one of the largest award totals for an organized research unit or academic department on the Berkeley campus. Almost 100 faculty members and staff researchers, plus more than 100 graduate students, participate in ITS research, which crosses a variety of disciplines. Areas of research include aviation planning and operations, intelligent transportation systems, transit planning and operations, traffic safety, transportation economics, infrastructure design and management, traffic theory and operations, transportation policy, logistics, transportation and land use planning, and environmental assessment. .

The Institute currently hosts seven affiliated centers that specialize in different areas of transportation research: PATH (Partners for Advanced Transit and Highways), the nation’s largest program of intelligent transportation systems research which conducts research on traffic operations, transit operations and active traffic safety; CCIT (the California Center for Innovative Transportation), which conducts “last mile” research to facilitate the deployment of new transportation technologies; NEXTOR (the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research), a Federal Aviation Administration-funded program that examines advanced air traffic management systems, security, air traffic safety, and the performance and productivity of the nation’s aviation system; PRC (the Pavement Research Center), an international authority on pavement design, construction, maintenance and rehabilitation; the UC Berkeley Center for Future Urban Transport, a Volvo Foundations Center of Excellence focused on the mutual interdependence of urban transportation policy and technology and sustainable transportation strategies for the world's cities; TSC (the Traffic Safety Center), a joint venture of the Institute and the School of Public Health that carries out traffic safety research, and the Transportation Sustainability Research Center (TSRC), whose mission is at the intersection of sustainability and transportation.

In addition, ITS is home to the Harmer E. Davis Transportation Library, among the world’s leading transportation libraries.

ITS faculty and students regularly appear in the top ranks of the transportation engineering and planning professions. Institute graduates are leaders in the public and private sectors of transportation. A recent alumni outreach project identified more than 90 graduates who hold academic posts at universities in the U.S. and abroad.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

Laboratory Mission - Berkeley Lab is a multiprogram national scientific facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE�s National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab conducts key elements of DOE�s security missions in science, energy, and the environment. In support of these missions, Berkeley Lab:

Performs leading multidisciplinary research in the computer sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and environmental protection.

Develops and operates unique national experiment facilities for qualified investigators.

Educates and trains future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals

Transfers knowledge and technological innovations, and fosters productive relationships among Berkeley Lab�s research programs, universities, and industry.

Scientific Role - Berkeley Lab is unique among the multiprogram laboratories, with its proximity to major research universities, the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) and the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF).

Accelerator and Fusion Research: Fundamental accelerator physics research; accelerator design and operation; advanced accelerator technology development for high-energy and nuclear physics; accelerator and beam physics research for heavy-ion fusion; beam and plasma tools for materials sciences, semiconductor fabrication, and engineering and biomedical applications, and for other advanced detection applications.

CHEMICAL SCIENCES: Chemical physics and the dynamics of chemical reactions; structure and reactivity of transient species; synthetic chemistry; homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis; chemistry of the actinide elements; molecular and environmental chemistry; atomic physics.

MATERIAL SCIENCES: Advances ceramic, metallic, polymeric, magnetic, biological, and semi-and superconducting materials for catalytic, electronic, optical, magnetic, structural, and specialty application; studies of nanoscience, nanodevices, and nanotechnology; development and use of instrumentation, including spectroscopies, electron microscopy, x-ray optics, nuclear magnetic resonance, and analytical tools for ultrafast processes and surface analysis.

PHYSICAL BIOSCIENCES: Integrates the techniques and concepts of the physical and engineering sciences into the investigator of biological challenges requiring large-scale team research in concert with individual exploration. Emphases include macromolecular structure, function and dynamics; rapid automated methods for gene expression optimizations, biochemical reaction networks, cellular machinery engineering; high-throughput determination of protein structure and function; sensory and signaling systems; nanoscale manipulation of molecular architecture; genetics and mechanisms of photosynthesis; operation and development of the Berkeley Center for Structural Biology at the Advance Light Source and the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center.

EARTH SCIENCES: Structure, composition, and dynamics of earth�s subsurface, geophysical imaging methods; chemical and physical transport in geologic systems, including carbon sequestration, isotope geochemistry; physiochemical process investigations; environmental biotechnology; climate modeling; and carbon cycle science.

ENVIRONMENTAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES: Energy-Efficient building technologies; indoor air quality; batteries and fuel cells for electric vehicles; combustion, emissions, and air quality; industrial transportation, and electricity reliability and energy use; national and international energy policy studies; aspects of global climate change related to energy.

COMPUTER RESEARCH DIVISION: Applied research and development of computer science, computational science, and applied mathematics, including system architectures, software implementation, mathematical modeling, and algorithmic design, software components that allow scientists to address complex and large-scale computing and data analysis problems in a distributed environment such as the DOE Science Grid; direct collaboration with scientists gain new physical insights and made data more comprehensible.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a premier research and development institution for science and technology applied to national security. We are responsible for ensuring that the nation�s nuclear weapons remain safe, secure and reliable. LLNL also applies its expertise to prevent the spread and use of weapons of mass destruction and strengthen homeland security.

Our national security mission requires special multidisciplinary capabilities that are also used to pursue programs in advanced defense technologies, energy, environment, biosciences and basic science to meet important national needs. These activities enhance the competencies needed for our defining national security mission.

The Laboratory serves as a resource to the U.S. government and is a partner with industry and academia. Safe, secure and efficient operations and scientific and technical excellence in our programs are necessary to sustain public trust in the Laboratory.

Nuclear Weapons Stockpile Stewardship -- Livermore plays a prominent role in NNSA�s Stockpile Stewardship Program. Laboratory scientists and engineers must assure the safety and reliability of the nation�s nuclear weapons and certify weapon performance in the absence of nuclear testing.

Nonproliferation and Homeland Security -- Nuclear weapons expertise and extensive capabilities in physical and life sciences are applied to meet the challenge of weapons-of-mass-destruction (WMD) proliferation and terrorism. For example, the Laboratory develops advanced technologies such as real-time, portable detectors of nuclear materials and biological agents.

Advanced Defense Capabilities -- Livermore provides the Department of Defense, the intelligence community, and other agencies with analytical support and advanced technologies to meet current and emerging national security needs.

Enduring National Needs -- The Laboratory pursues research and development in areas of enduring importance to the nation. In support of DOE mission priorities in energy and environment, bioscience, and fundamental science and applied technology, Livermore seeks challenges that reinforce its national security mission and have the potential for high-payoff results.

Energy and Environment -- Long-term research is needed to provide the nation with abundant, reliable energy and a clean environment. Livermore�s programs contribute to the scientific and technological basis for secure, sustainable and clean energy resources for the U.S. and to reducing environmental risks.

Bioscience and Biotechnology -- Bioscience research at Livermore is directed at understanding the causes and mechanisms of ill health, developing biodefense capabilities, improving disease prevention and lowering health-care costs. Projects leverage the Laboratory�s extensive physical science, computing, and engineering capabilities.

Fundamental Science and Applied Technology -- Scientists and engineers pursue projects in fundamental science and applied technology that build on the Laboratory�s core strengths and take advantage of the unique research capabilities and facilities at Livermore. Many projects entail collaborations with universities, industry and/or other laboratories.

Marvell Nanofabrication Laboratory

The Marvell NanoLab is a shared research center providing more than 100 Principal Investigators and over 500 academic and industrial researchers a complete set of micro- and nano-fabrication tools.

Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER)

The PEER Center is a National Science Foundation (NSF) earthquake engineering research center located at the University of California, Berkeley campus, Richmond Field Station. The PEER Center is a part of NSF's program to reduce losses due to earthquakes through the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP). Investigators from over twenty universities and several consulting companies conduct research in earthquake-related geohazard assessment, engineering seismology, risk management, public policy, geotechnical and structural engineering. PEER organizes its research around the concept of performance-based earthquake engineering, in which owners and other decision makers define performance targets in terms of safety, cost and functionality needs. This approach translates these performance targets into engineering criteria that aim to produce facilities that perform to expectations. In addition to conducting research to develop performance-based earthquake engineering technology, the PEER Center's mission is to disseminate its findings to earthquake professionals who ensure the results are useful, useable and used.

PATH: Partners for Advanced Transit & Highways

The California Center for Innovative Transportation (CCIT) merged with the California Partners for Advanced Transit and Highways (PATH) in January 2011 to form California Partners for Advanced Transportation Technology (PATH), reflecting a mission that is foremost concerned with innovation through technology, rather than with any specific mode of transportation. The group is administered by the Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS) at the University of California, Berkeley, in collaboration with Caltrans, the U.S DOT, other transportation agencies and the private sector.

Simons Institute

The Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing is an exciting new venue for collaborative research in theoretical computer science. Established on July 1, 2012 with a grant of $60 million from the Simons Foundation, the Institute will be housed in Calvin Hall, a dedicated building on the UC Berkeley campus. Its goal is to bring together the world's leading researchers in theoretical computer science and related fields, as well as the next generation of outstanding young scholars, to explore deep unsolved problems about the nature and limits of computation.

Synthetic Biology Institute

The Synthetic Biology Institute at UC Berkeley (SBI) was established in 2010 to clear a path to the widespread production of new biological systems to benefit society. Through the combined effort of its researchers, partners and Industry Members, SBI is developing the standards and technologies needed to create transformative applications in energy, materials, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, food products, security, and other industries that affect our daily liv

Team for Research in Ubiquitous Secure Technology (TRUST)

The Team for Research in Ubiquitous Secure Technology (TRUST) is a National Science Foundation sponsored Science & Technology Center focused on the development of cybersecurity technology that will radically transform the ability of organizations to design, build, and operate trustworthy information systems. TRUST is one of 17 active STCs and is the only center focused on IT security, privacy, and infrastructure protection. TRUST activities (1) advance a leading-edge research agenda to improve the state-of-the art in cybersecurity and critical infrastructure protection; (2) develop a robust education plan to teach the next generation of computer scientists, engineers, and social scientists; and (3) pursue knowledge transfer opportunities to transition TRUST results to end users within industry and the government. Through partnerships with commercial companies, government organizations and laboratories, and research institutes, TRUST results are being transitioned to leading information technology companies, software vendors, system operators, and other commercial companies as well as federal, state, and local agencies.

TRUST is a multi-disciplinary, multi-university partnership led by the University of California, Berkeley with support from Carnegie Mellon University, Cornell University, Mills College, San Jose State University, Smith College, Stanford University, and Vanderbilt University. Affiliated with TRUST are over 150 faculty, students, post doctoral scholars, research scientists, and staff from computer engineering, computer science, economics, electrical engineering, law, public policy, and social sciences. More information is available at www.truststc.org

Graduate

Subject Areas of Research

Subject Areas

  • 11-3023: Self-Sustaining Thorium Boling Water Reactors
  • Berkeley Robust Aerobot Information Network
  • CDI Type I: Freeway Corridor Operations Design and Implementation
  • CPS: Medium: High Confidence Active Safety Control in Automotive Cyber-Physical Systems
  • CPS: Medium: Learning for Control of Synthetic and Cyborg Insects in Uncertain Dynamic Environments
  • CPS: Medium: LoCal-A Network Architecture for Localized Electrical Energy Reduction, Generation and Sharing
  • CPS: Medium: Making Cloud Computing Sense, Act, and Move (SAM)
  • Catalytic Chemistry for the Utilization of Synthesis Gas
  • Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science (Center for E3S)
  • Center on Interfacial Engineering for Microelectromechanical Systems (CIEMS)
  • Cloud Physics: Understanding the Conditions for Cloud Formation and Phase Change
  • Collaborative Research: Cyberinfrastructure and Research Facilities: Process Informatics for Chemical Reaction Systems
  • Combined Computational and Experimental Search for Isostructural Multicomponent Alloys - A Replacemnt Strategy for Refractory Materials
  • Coordinating Multiple Decision Makers in a Service Environment
  • Demonstration of On-Chip Inductor Using Self-Assembled Nano Magnets
  • Deterministic Doping of Silicon Through Molecular Design
  • EFRI-M3C: A Hybrid Control Systems Approach to Brain-Machine Interfaces for Exoskeleton Control
  • Electromagnetically-Enhanced Combustion: Electric Flames
  • Evaluation of Mobile Source Emissions and Trends
  • Fundamental Investigations of Impurity Effects in a-Titanium
  • Fundamental Physical and Chemical Processes in Ultrafast Laser Materials Interactions
  • Global Ground Motion Prediction Equations
  • Hardware, Languages, and Architectures for Defense Against Hostile Operating Systems
  • Hierarchically-Based Adaptive and Flexible Electronics and Energy Harvesting Membranes for Large Surface Area Deployment
  • High Z Materials for Nuclear Detection: Synergy of Growth, Characterization and Defect Physics of Room Temperature Devices
  • High-Strength, Ductile, Corrosion-Resistant Molybdenum-Alloy/Zirconium Composite Tubing for Fuel Cladding of Light Water Reactors
  • High-Temperature Salt-Cooled Reactor for Power and Process Heat
  • I/UCRC for Excellence in Logistic and Distribution (CELDi): Berkeley Research Site Focusing on Biopharmaceutical Operations
  • IDR: Nucleic Acid-Lipid Films-Programmable Structural Transitions for Drug Delivery and Regulating Gene Expression
  • Implantable Micro Device for Drug Delivery System
  • Implementation of Intermediate-Band Solar Cells Using Multi-band Semiconductors
  • Improved Near-Source Ground Motion Characterization (NGA-West 2)
  • Infiltration of Botnet Command-Control and Support Ecosystems
  • Integrated Molecular Diagnostic Systems (iMDs)
  • Investigation of Growth and Dopant Incorporation in Silicon Carbide Nanowires
  • MEMS Electronic-Photonic Heterogeneous Integrated (MEPHI) FMCW LADAR
  • MEMS SWEEPER with High Contrast Grating Mirrors
  • Making Sense at Scale with Algorithms, Machines and People
  • Maximum Fuel Utilization in Fast Reactors without Chemical Reprocessing-Work Scope IIR-1
  • Molecular Sensors for Feedback Controlled Greenhouses to Optimize Crop Yield
  • Multi-Scale Systems Center
  • NEES Operations: FY2010 - FY2014
  • NEESR-GC:Mitigation of Collapse Risk in Vulnerable Concrete Buildings
  • NEESR: Seismic Performance of Conventional and Innovative Special Structural Walls
  • Nano-Electro-Mechanical Technologies and Circuits (NEMTaC) for Ultra-Low-Energy Electronics
  • Networked Control of Greenhouses
  • Next Generation Attenuation Models for Central and Eastern US (NGA-East)
  • Next Generation Attenuation Relationships for the Eastern United States (NGA-East)
  • Nuclear Engineering Faculty Development Project
  • Nuclear Science and Security Consortium
  • Objective Operational Learning and Applications
  • Off-Equilibrium Doping of Semiconductor Nanowires
  • Office of Energy, Policy and Innovation Wholesale Market Software Design Study
  • PEER-Lifelines Partnerships
  • Partnered Pavement Research Center
  • RI-Medium: Robust Intelligent Manipulation and Apprenticeship Learning for Robotic Surgical Assistants
  • Rare Earth Alternative Processing (REAP) Phase 2
  • Real-Time Frequency Gating Mechanical Spectrum Analyzer
  • Recognizing Activities with Probabilistically Grounded Visual Intelligence Models
  • Recovery Act: Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building Management System
  • SHF: Large: Phase-based Logic Realized Using Oscillatory Nanosystems (PHLOGON)
  • SINTEF-UC Berkeley Collaboration Research: Characterization of Lean Hydrogen Turbulent Premixed Flames on Perforated Plate at Elevated Pressures
  • Seismic Levee Performance and Repair
  • SiC TAPS (Temp, Accel, Press, and Strain) Sensors for Extreme Harsh Environments
  • Study of Slope Stability in Relation to Roots and Seepage and Levee Failure Forensic Study
  • Sustainability in Development Solutions (SDS)
  • Synthesis and Structural and Functional Assessment of Metal and Oxide Clusters Encapsulated with Small-Pore Zeolites
  • TAS::89 0227::TAS Recovery Act - Accelerating Science Driven System Design with RAMP
  • Team for Research in Ubiquitous Secure Technology (TRUST): An NSF Science and Technology Center
  • The Dynamics of a Novel Wave Energy Converter
  • Tools for the Analysis and Design of Complex Multi-Scale Networks
  • UCB Department of Nuclear Engineering Faculty Development Program
  • Universal Parallel Computing Research Center
  • University Parallel Computing Research Center

Graduate

Dual Degrees

Graduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

The College of Engineering offers concurrent degree programs with other UC Berkeley schools and colleges. A student must complete the necessary requirements for both colleges and both majors. Direct inquiries to the departments or schools involved.

Graduate

Student Appointments

Appointments by Department

Appointments - Number of Appointments
Stipend - Average Monthly Stipend

Department Fellowships TA RA Other Total Appts.
Bioengineering
Appointments: 66 22 53 2 143
Stipends: $0 $0 $0 $0
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering
Appointments: 75 40 56 1 172
Stipends: $0 $0 $0 $0
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Appointments: 141 68 122 26 357
Stipends: $0 $0 $0 $0
Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences
Appointments: 101 50 210 2 363
Stipends: $0 $0 $0 $0
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
Appointments: 0 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0 $0
Engineering Science
Appointments: 119 44 146 0 309
Stipends: $0 $0 $0 $0
Industrial Engineering and Operations Research
Appointments: 31 30 15 5 81
Stipends: $0 $0 $0 $0
Materials Science & Engineering
Appointments: 36 16 59 5 116
Stipends: $0 $0 $0 $0
Mechanical Engineering
Appointments: 100 71 169 28 368
Stipends: $0 $0 $0 $0
Nuclear Engineering
Appointments: 31 4 29 2 66
Stipends: $0 $0 $0 $0
All Total Appointments 700 345 859 71 1975