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University of California, Berkeley - 2012

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Engineering Information

Student Projects

Student Design Projects Description

::::::::::::BIOENGINEERING (BIOE) Design is an important component of our undergraduate and graduate training programs. Undergraduates must satisfy a design requirement by taking one of three defined upper division design courses or through faculty-directed individual research. The Bioengineering capstone design course satisfies this requirement through team projects on real-world bioengineering problems in partnership with clinical and academic researchers at UCSF and Berkeley. A large percentage of our undergraduate students participate in independent laboratory research and design, through organized either of two major undergraduate research programs or as volunteers.
Some recent student projects: :::: Improved Embryo Delivery Device for Greater In Vitro Fertilization Success :::: Devices for Portable Assessment of Hemoglobin Levels in Resource Poor Settings :::: At-Home Monitoring: Early Detection of Asthma Flares :::: The Branched Thoracic Catheter; Efficient Hemothorax Drainage Through Localization Targeting


:::: Synthesis of hard tissue composites using hydroxyapatite binding elastin-like polypeptides, faculty advisor: Prof. Seung-wuk Lee.

:::: Measuring the contractile force of single platelets at the surface of a fibrin gel, faculty advisor: Prof. Dan Fletcher.

:::: Super paramagnetic iron oxide particle characterization for magnetic particle imaging, faculty advisor: Prof. Steve Conolly.

:::: In vivo gene construction: Developing E. coli strains that can assemble DNA sequences, faculty advisor: Prof. Christopher Anderson.

:::: Experimental and computational investigation of aggregation in non-disease proteins, faculty advisor: Prof. Teresa Head-Gordon.


::::::::::::CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING (CEE) -- All students participate in at least one of the following capstone design courses in their senior year: CE 105, Applied Environmental Fluid Mechanics; CE 112, Environmental Engineering Design; CE 122, Design of Steel Structures; CE 123, Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures; CE 153, Transportation Facility Design; CE 177, Foundation Engineering Design; CE 180, Construction, Maintenance, and Design of Engineered Systems.

:::::: For example, one design course breaks into teams to address design, construction and maintenance of contemporary civil and environmental engineered systems. Teams identify engineering problems aided by experienced engineers and consultants. They construct a physical model of a system or a critical part of the system, and produce a formal report on their project. At end of the semester, the student teams present project results to a panel of judges.

:::::: In addition to the design classes, students are involved in extramural competitions such as the concrete canoe, steel bridge, environmental team, the AGC (American General Contractor) team and the Seismic Design team.

:::: Concrete Canoe: Undergraduate students apply engineering principles to design, analyze, construct and race a concrete canoe. Students enter the regional canoe competition and winners go to a national competition, sponsored by ASCE and Master Builders, Inc. The competition is judged on the engineering design and construction principles used, a technical paper, an oral presentation and a display as well as the performance of the canoe and paddlers in five different race events.

:::: Steel Bridge Design and Construction: Undergraduate students design, analyze and construct a short span bridge, all in steel. Students enter their design in the regional competition where the bridge is loaded to failure and maximum capacity/weight is measured. The activity is organized by the Student Chapter of ASCE and was supported by the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC).

:::: The Environmental Team: The competition team is tasked with applying solutions to real world environmental problems such as water filtration in disaster situations using only the resources available at hand. In a state-wide contest, students compete against other university teams.

:::::: The American General Contractor's Team is a construction management competition team. Students are called upon to work in a professional atmosphere and develop solutions to a real-life Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building project.

::::::All the competition teams are now offered as student led DeCal classes and students enrolled in these activities receive course credit for their participation.

:::::: Berkeley Engineering students are also able to join Engineers for a Sustainable World, an organization that is interested in engineering issues surrounding appropriate developing technologies.

:::::: The Seismic Design Team educates students on earthquake resistant design of high rise buildings. Students construct a 5' model building made of balsa wood which is tested on a shake table that replicates historic earthquakes.


::::::::::::ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE ENGINEERING (EECS)

EE 192 (Mechatronics Design Lab)

Prerequisites: CS 150, EECS 120 or equivalent, C Programming experience.

The Mechatronics Design Lab is a design project course focusing on application of theoretical principles in electrical engineering and computer science to control of mechatronic systems incorporating sensors, actuators and intelligence. This course gives students a chance to use their knowledge of (or learn about) power electronics, filtering and signal processing, control, electromechanics, microcontrollers, and real-time embedded software in designing a racing robot.

The course project requires students to consider real-world constraints such as limited volume, payload, electrical power, processing power and time. Oral and written reports will be required justifying design choices. Grading will be based upon design checkpoints, the reports and a final exam. A portion of the grade will be determined by vehicle performance and robustness.


::::::::::::INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING AND OPERATIONS RESEARCH (IEOR) Students
work with nearby companies and Organizations on their Senior Projects, in
teams of 3 to 5 students. Recent projects include:

United Airlines Staff Planning and Scheduling: Development of optimization-based methods (including software) to provide decision-support in scheduling airport customer service personnel with multiple skill sets (including languages) at an international airport terminal.

Lonely Planet Warehouse Redesign: Development of a new warehouse layout and improved material handling and packaging methods to increase the warehouse throughput rate and improve response times.

Restoration Hardware Inventory Management: Development of improved inventory target levels for slow-moving items using historical demand data coupled with advanced inventory control methodologies.

Kaiser Permanente (HMO) Patient Scheduling: Analysis of current throughput of patients undergoing gastroenterology screening and development of new patient schedules and medical staff resource plans to increase throughput.

::::::::::::MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING (MSE)
:::::: Formula SAE® is a student design competition organized by SAE International (formerly the Society of Automotive Engineers), dating from 1979. Each student team designs, builds and tests a prototype Formula-style race car based on a series of rules. Design components include materials selection, processing, joining (welding), and finishing, and one of the three faculty sponsors at Berkeley is from MSE (Professor Gronsky). The competition includes a number of spin off events, and in the United States there are two locations: California and Michigan. Berkeley’s team information can be found at http://fsae.berkeley.edu and the national website is located at http://students.sae.org/competitions/formulaseries/about.htm .

:::::: Super Mileage Vehicle: This is another design project associated with the national Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), with the self-evident goal of high gasoline mileage. Materials selection and design are also critical in this effort, and MSE majors frequently participate in the team. The URL describing Berkeley's effort is http://smv.berkeley.edu/. For more information about the national program, visit http://www.sae.org/students/supermw.htm;

:::::: Human Powered Vehicle: In this project, a bicycle with a lightweight aerodynamic shroud is the vehicle on which design and execution is focused, although it involves quite a bit of athletic prowess, too. The URL describing Berkeley's program is http://calhpv.berkeley.edu/;

:::::: Solar Powered Car (CalSol): Originating at Berkeley in 1990, this project was initially led by an MSE student with interest in photovoltaics. It has since grown to involve many students from all disciplines in the college. The URL describing Berkeley's project is http://www.me.berkeley.edu/calsol/.

::::::::::::MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (ME)
::::: ME - Formula SAE at Berkeley: The Formula SAE Series competitions challenge teams of university undergraduate and graduate students to conceive, design, fabricate and compete with small, formula style, autocross racing cars. To give teams the maximum design flexibility and the freedom to express their creativity and imaginations there are very few restrictions on the overall vehicle design. Teams typically spend eight to twelve months designing, building, testing and preparing their vehicles before a competition. The competitions themselves give teams the chance to demonstrate and prove both their creation and their engineering skills in comparison to teams from other universities around the world. The team has been working hard on the design of the car. The biggest change for this upcoming year is that they will be moving to a carbon-fiber monocoque for the front half of the car, while keeping a steel tube frame for the rear half. The Team is continuing with their single-cylinder, 450cc engine (Honda CRF450x) from last year, but they are also doing far more testing and analysis on the associated engine systems in order to maximize our horsepower. General goals for this year include further reducing overall weight, gaining power, improving ergonomics, and increasing the breadth and depth of analysis in the design phases. The team has already begun construction on the rear subframe, as well as several of the suspension components. The engine is on schedule to go on the dyno within the next few weeks, with several test mufflers ready to go and test intakes being finalized.
The team is open to Cal students of any year and any major.
List of sponsors: KLA Tencor, Infineon Raceway, USF Surface Prepartion, Hexcel, SolidWorks, Supra Alloys Inc., Microsemi, Jenvey, William C. Mitchell Software, Airtech, Vic Hubbard Speed and Machine, Space Systems/Loral, Active Performance Cooling, Brembo, SPAL, Performance Friction Brakes, YKs Unlimted, terminal Supply, Centerline Precision, TAP Plastics, T&N Enterprises, , UCB AAVP, UCB ASUC, UCB College of Engineering, UCB Materials Science, UCB Mechanical Engineering, UCB Student Machine Shop, SAE NorCal section,. More information is available on the Formula SAE web site http://fsae.berkeley.edu/about.html.

::::: ME - Supermileage Vehicle Project: The Supermileage Competition provides students with a challenging design project that involves the development and construction of a single-person, fuel-efficient vehicle. Vehicles are powered by a small four-cycle engine. Students have the opportunity to set a world fuel economy record and increase public awareness of fuel economy. The design consists of five major parts: the chassis, power train, controls, fairing, and electrical systems. The functionality and integration of each of these parts is essential in the production of a competitive vehicle. List of sponsors: AG Right Enterprises, Airtech, The Associated Students of the University of California, Berkeley, Bearing Works, Briggs & Stratton, Chevron, Berkeley Engineering, Digalog, Ford, Hexcel, Industrial Tube & Steel Corporation, Lockheed Martin, Loctite, Department of Mechanical Engineering of the University of California, Berkeley, Millennium Technologies, Phil Wood & Co., SAE International, TAP, and VILNOVUS. More information is available on the SMV web site: http://smv.berkeley.edu/.

::::: ME - Cal Sol: CalSol is a recognized competition vehicle team representing UC Berkeley. Completely student-led and open to all Cal students, CalSol designs and builds one-seater solar vehicles for solar competitions.

Students involved in CalSol learn many important skills not taught in the classroom. Instead of merely cranking out problem sets, students get the chance to apply scientific and engineering theories to real world situations and are given the freedom to think up creative solutions and ideas of their own. The team project atmosphere also encourages good teamwork and communication between team members, all vital skills to help prepare Cal students for their future in industry, academia, business, etc.
CalSol also works to expose the public to the possibilities of alternative energy and inspire the younger generation to become interested in science. CalSol showcases its cars at various events and expos, where CalSol team members answers questions and interacts with the public.
List of sponsors: Advanced Circuits, AIRTECH, Berkeley Engineering, CITRIS, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (UCB), Department of Mechanical Engineering (UCB), DOW, Engineers Joint Council of Berkeley, CA, Google, and the Green Mountain Engineering and the Training-Classes.com.

More information is available on the CalSol web site: http://www.me.berkeley.edu/calsol/about.ph

::::: E10-Engineering Design and Analysis, is an introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines through a variety of modular design and analysis projects. Hands-on creativity, teamwork, and effective communication are emphasized. Common lecture sessions address the essence of engineering design, the practice of engineering analysis, the societal context for engineering projects and the ethics of the engineering profession. Students develop design and analysis skills, and practice applying these skills to illustrative problems drawn from various engineering majors. This course provides first year students a broad introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines, through a variety of small group design and analysis projects. At the core of the course are projects and case studies, through which the main concepts of the course are developed. The objectives or the course are to:
• enhance critical thinking and design skills;
• introduce students to a broad view of engineering analysis and design;
• reinforce the importance of mathematics and science in engineering design and analysis;
• emphasize communication skills, both written and oral;
• develop teamwork skills;
• offer experience in hands-on, creative engineering projects;
• provide an introduction to different fields of engineering; and
• introduce students to professional ethics and the societal context of engineering practice.

::::: E 28, Basic Engineering Design Graphics: Introduction to the engineering design process and graphical communications tools used by engineers. Students learn graphical analysis and design techniques using the hardware and software tools used by engineers in the field. Economic, manufacturing, and fabrication issues are considered throughout the course as they apply to the topics addressed. Students are introduced to the concept of working in a group through the semester-long design project. As part of this project, students are required to communicate orally and graphically, and make presentations to the class and instructors.

::::: E 128, Advanced Engineering Design Graphics: Advanced, 3-dimensional graphics tools for engineering design. Wire frame, surface and solids modeling: boundary representation, constructive solids, sweeping, rotation, Boolean operations. Computer rendering, viewing, and presentation of solids. Presentation using computer animation and multimedia techniques. Design using parametric CAD.

::::: ME 101, High Mix/Low Volume Manufacturing: This course is to enable students analyze manufacturing line in order to understand production process and improve production efficiency covering complete manufacturing process from production planning to quality control. This course will provide practical knowledge and skills which can be used in real manufacturing industry. Students are given a chance to practice and implement what they learn during lectures by conducting projects with manufacturing companies nearby.

::::: ME 102B, Mechatronics Design: This course exposes students to key design elements of the profession through a series of laboratory assignments, and a substantial term project. This course introduces the students to design and design techniques of mechatronics systems; provide guidelines to and experience with design of variety of sensors and actuators; design experience in programming microcomputers and various IO devices; exposure to and design experience in synthesis of mechanical power transfer components; understanding the role of dynamics and kinematics of robotic devices in design of mechatronics systems; exposure to and design experience in synthesis of feedback systems; provide experience in working in a team to design a prototype mechatronics device.
::::: ME 110, New Product Development: ME 110 aims to develop the interdisciplinary skills required for successful product development in today's competitive marketplace. Students form small product development teams and step through the new product development process in detail, learning about the available tools and techniques to execute each process step along the way. Each student brings his or her own skills to the team effort, and must learn to synthesize that perspective with those of the other students in the group to develop a sound, marketable product. Students can expect to depart the semester understanding new product development processes as well as obtaining useful tools, techniques and organizational structures that support new product development practice.

::::: ME C117, Structural Aspects of Biomaterials: This course covers the mechanical and structural aspects of biological tissues and their replacements. Tissue structure and mechanical function are addressed. Natural and synthetic load-bearing biomaterials for clinical and medical applications are reviewed. Biocompatibility of biomaterials and host response to structural implants are examined. Quantitative treatment of biomechanical issues and constitutive relationships of tissues and biomaterials are covered. Material selection for load-bearing applications including reconstructive surgery, orthopedics, dentistry, and cardiology. Mechanical design for longevity including topics of fatigue, wear, and fracture. Use of bioresorbable implants and hybrid materials. Directions in tissue engineering. Students work in teams on a semester long design project. Students are required to complete a technical write-up and give a presentation at the end of the semester.

::::: ME 119, Introduction to MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems): This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of microelectromechanical systems including design, fabrication of microstructures; surface-micromachining, bulk-micromachining, LIGA, and other micro machining processes; fabrication principles of integrated circuit device and their applications for making MEMS devices; high-aspect-ratio microstructures; scaling issues in the micro scale (heat transfer, fluid mechanics and solid mechanics); device design, analysis, and mask layout. Midway through the semester the student submits an individual project proposal and at the end of the semester they will give an oral project presentation.

::::: ME 128, Computer-Aided Mechanical Design: The course aims to provide students with computer aided design skills including using computer graphics to design structures, converting analytical models with computational analyses and using computational tools to predict structural outputs in terms of material, mechanics, heat and other physical variables. Students will understand and appreciate how such optimization tools can be used to simplify the analysis, and enhance the performance, of a design. A final project that allows students to demonstrate their expertise with the design and analysis tools presented by designing/solving a practical project either suggested by the instructor or provided by student but with approval of the instructor.

::::: ME 130, Design of Planar Machinery: As an introduction course to mechanisms design and analysis, the students learn to take the projects from the drawing board to a working model. The students complete a team term project which involves the design, fabrication and prototype demonstration of a mechanical device.

::::: ME 135, Design of Microprocessor-Based Mechanical Systems: This course covers software design and implementation methodologies suited to the control of complex mechanical systems. The design methodology allows for the operational description of mechanical systems in a way that can be presented to semi-technical personnel as well as serve as a basis for software development. Implementation is based on the object-oriented computing language Java. Implementation methodology is presented with software portability a primary emphasis. Students work in teams to design and implement solutions to problems of increasing complexity using prototype lab equipment, including a design project for which they must formulate objectives.

::::: ME 146, Conversion Principles: This course covers the fundamental principles of energy conservation processes, followed by development of theoretical and computational tools that can be used to analyze energy conversion processes. The course also introduces the use of modern computational methods to model energy conversion performance characteristics of devices and systems. Performance features, sources of inefficiencies, and optimal design strategies are explored for a variety of applications, which may include conventional combustion based and Rankine power systems, energy systems for space applications, solar, wind, wave, thermoelectric, and geothermal energy systems.

::::: ME 165, Ocean-Environment Mechanics: The student learns physical properties and characteristics of the oceans, global conservation laws, surface-waves generation, gravity-wave mechanics, kinematics, and dynamics, design consideration of ocean vehicles and systems, model-testing techniques, prediction of resistance and response in waves--physical modeling and computer models.

::::: ME C218, Introduction to MEMS Design: The student learns to rigorously formulate MEMS design problems analytically and then determine the correct dimensions of MEMS structures so that the specified function is achieved. The formulation allows the student to trade off various performance requirements and thereby develops a rational design compromise solution when including flexure systems, accelerometers and rate sensors. A variety of design and optimization methods are used to numerically and analytically determine the design. The students are required to prepare 5 projects; Parametric Design of MEMS Flexures for X- and Y-Stiffness, Parametric Design of MEMS Accelerometer, Optimal Design of MEMS Angular Accelerometer via Monotonicity Analysis and Grid Study, Optimal Design of Linear MEMS Suspension visa Penalty Function Method, Parametric Design of MEMS TBA.

::::: ME C219, Parametric and Optimal Design of Microelectromechanical Systems: The student will learn to rigorously formulate MEMS design problems analytically and then determine the correct dimensions of MEMS structures so that the specified function is achieved. The formulation will allow the student to trade off various performance requirements and thereby develop a rational design compromise solution when faced with conflicting design requirements. A variety of MEMS structures will be treated in this class, including flexure systems, accelerometers and rate sensors. A variety of design and optimization methods will be used to numerically and analytically determine the design. This course presumes the student is already familiar with a variety of basic MEMS fabrication processes. Parametric design and optimal design will be applied to MEMS, with an emphasis on design and not on fabrication. The format of the course is oriented toward design projects.

::::: ME 221, High-Tech Product Design and Rapid Manufacturing: Students learn about the creative design of new consumer products and the prototyping of such products in our new Ford Design Studio Economic and social drivers, organizational structure, product life-cycle and future trends, CAD/CAM, rapid-prototyping, metal-products, semiconductors, electronic packaging, biotechnology, and robotics technologies are all addressed in this course and laboratory. This studio and course also delivers a "hands-on" laboratory using CAD and manufacturing techniques.

::::: ME 222, Advanced Manufacturing Processes: This course presents an overview of the theory of manufacturing processes, machine tool design, and process issues in quality, production rate, and flexibility of manufacturing. Nontraditional manufacturing processes will be introduced. Topics covered include overview of models of conventional manufacturing (material removal, joining, forming, and deforming), elements of machine tool error and machine tool component design, nontraditional manufacturing processes (laser, water jet, electrical discharge machining, electro-chemical machining), rapid prototyping, and process selection, optimization, and planning issues. This course incorporates a laboratory term project in the application of nontraditional manufacturing processes.

:::: ME 229, Design of Basic Electro-Mechanical Devices: Fundamental principles of magnetics, electro-magnetics, and magnetic materials as applied to design and operation of electro-mechanical devices. Type of device to be used in a particular application and dimensions of parts for the overall design will be discussed. Typical applications covered will be linear and rotary actuators, stepper motors, AC motors, and DC brush and brushless motors.

::::: ME 230, Engineering Application of Mini and Micro Computers: The course covers software design and implementation methodologies suited to the control of complex mechanical systems. The design methodology allows for the operational description of mechanical systems in a way that can be presented to semi-technical personnel as well as serve as a basis for software development. Implementation is based on object-oriented computing languages such as C++ and Java. Implementation methodology is presented with software portability a primary emphasis. Students work in teams to design and implement solutions to problems of increasing complexity using prototype lab equipment, including a design project for which they must formulate objectives.

::::: ME 235, Switching Control and Computer Interfacing: Students design and analyze the control systems utilizing switching elements. The focus is on using CAD tools, less on hand-solving logic minimization problems. The lab introduces building simple circuits and the use of laboratory equipment. Students build a closed loop position control system where they handle encoder monitoring, PWM generation, bus interface, and real time software.

::::: ME 290H, Green Product Development: Design for Sustainability. The focus of the course is management of innovation processes for sustainable products, from product definition to sustainable manufacturing and financial models. Using a project in which students will be asked to design and develop a product or service focused on sustainability, we will teach processes for collecting customer and user needs data, prioritizing that data, developing a product specification, sketching and building product prototypes, and interacting with the customer/community during product development. The course is intended as a very hands-on experience in the "green" product development process. The course will be a Management of Technology course offered jointly by the College of Engineering and the Haas School of Business. In addition, it will also receive credit towards the new Engineering and Business Sustainability Certificate (currently under review by the Academic Senate). We aim to have half MBA students and half Engineering students (with a few other students, such as from the I-School) in the class. The instructors will facilitate students to form mixed disciplinary teams for the development of their "green" products. Students from the California College of the Arts (CCA) will also participate on the teams through a course taught separately at CCA. Students can expect to depart the semester understanding "green" product development processes as well as useful tools, techniques and organizational structures that support sustainable design and environmental management practice.

::::: ME 290P, New Product Development: Design Theory and Methods. This course is one of five core courses of the Management of Technology program at the University of California, Berkeley. It is considered an operationally focused course, as it aims to develop the interdisciplinary skills required for successful product development in today's competitive marketplace. Engineering and Business students join forces on small product development teams to step through the new product development process in detail, learning about the available tools and techniques to execute each process step along the way. Each student brings his or her own disciplinary perspective to the team effort, and must learn to synthesize that perspective with those of the other students in the group to develop a sound, marketable product. Students can expect to depart the semester understanding new product development processes as well as useful tools, techniques and organizational structures that support new product development practice. Students form teams of MBA students, engineering or iSchool students and industrial design students. Each team is provided a "coach" from industry to advise them on the new product development process.

::::::::::::NUCLEAR ENGINEERING (NE)
::::: In the undergraduate senior design project for NE 170, a study was conducted to explore and determine stable and economically viable domestic sources of Li-7 in response to the United States’ dire demand. Two alternative methods to mercury-based separation were investigated: crown-ether enrichment and atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS). An economic analysis of the mixer-settler system indicated that crown ethers may be an economically competitive option if used for large-scale production. AVLIS analysis indicated that high quality product may be obtainable in relatively few stages. AVLIS appeared quite affordable but may be difficult to produce on a larger scale. Comparing the two options, AVLIS appeared to be the better choice for meeting current U.S. pressurized water reactor (PWR) demands, while a mixer-settler crown ether system seemed more viable if a fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) market emerges. Given the strategic importance of continued and reliable operation of U.S. PWRs, the design team recommended that the American utility industry encourage the development of a domestic supply of enriched Li-7 by offering to enter into long-term procurement contracts with a U.S.-based supplier and to encourage development of one or both of the enrichment methods described here. Further experimentation was recommended to determine optimal parameters for a scaled-up mixer-settler system using crown ethers as reagents.

The NE-265 graduate design course in the Fall of 2011 was devoted to the design of a couple of Generation-IV type novel reactor concepts; both of the “Breed-and-Burn” (B&B) reactor type. Whereas conventional reactors need either continuous supply of enriched fuel or fuel reprocessing in order to be able to generate nuclear power, B&B reactors are fed with natural or even depleted uranium (presently a waste of the enrichment plants) and are capable of converting into useful energy (heat and electricity) a significant fraction of this feed fuel without requiring to enrichment and reprocessing.
One of the B&B reactor concepts designed is of a pebble-bed type. Whereas in the classical pebble-bed reactors the pebbles are made of graphite in which thousands of sub-millimeter size coated fuel particles are embedded and the coolant is helium, in the NE-265 project the pebbles were made of metallic fuel that is enclosed within a spherical shell made of steel, while the coolant is sodium. This novel concept offers a better neutron economy than a B&B core design that uses conventional cylindrical fuel rods and fuel assemblies.
The second B&B reactor concept designed is of the seed-and-blanket type. The seed has the function of, and is designed similarly to the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) " a major candidate in the US for the transmutation of the trans-uranium (TRU) waste generated in Light Water Reactors (LWR). However, instead of designing the ABR core to be of a pancake shape with nearly 20% of the fission-born neutrons leaking in the axial direction and wasted, the seed is designed to be of a cigar shape with the majority of the neutron leakage in the radial direction and to make constructive use of the leaking neutrons to “drive” a B&B thorium blanket that radially surrounds the core. The project objective is to design a TRU fuelled seed and a thorium fuelled blanket that will maximize the fraction of core power generated by the thorium blanket subjected to neutronics, thermal-hydraulic and material-related constraints.
There were 2 design teams, one of 4 and the other of 5 students. Each student was responsible for one of the following disciplines: neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, fuel performance, material compatibility and system integration.