University of Utah - 2016

Institution Information

Contact Information

Institution's Mailing Address

Institution Name: University of Utah
Mailing Address: University of Utah
72 S. Central Campus Drive Rm 1650
City: Salt Lake City
State: UT
Postal Code: 84112
Country: United States
Phone 801-581-6911
Fax: 801-581-8692
Website: http://www.utah.edu

Institution Information

General Information


Type of institution: PUBLIC
Academic Year: SEMESTERS
Setting of Main Engineering Campus URBAN

Main Campus Information

Is the main campus located in a city with a population greater than 100,000?: Yes
Name of this city, or if no, the name of the nearest city of any size?: Salt Lake City
This city's population (approx.): 1,029,655
Distance from Main Campus: 0

Total Enrollment

Total Undergraduate enrollment: 23,789
Total Graduate enrollment: 7,739
Total Professional and other enrollment: 332

Non-Engineering Degree Granting Colleges

Business, Communications, Dentistry, Education, Fine arts, Law, Liberal arts, Medicine, Natural sciences, Nursing, Pharmacy, Architecture, Social & Behavioral Science, Health, Humanities

Institution Information

General Admissions

Entrance Requirements and Recommendations

Requirements

Applicants for freshman admission are evaluated using a holistic review process. This review includes consideration of the following:
Excellence in Academic Achievement, Intellectual Pursuits, and Creative Endeavors; GPA/Rigor of High School Curriculum; Standardized Test Scores (ACT/SAT); Academic Distinctions; Significant Commitment to Citizenship through Public Service, School Activities, Community Engagement, Leadership, or Familial Responsibilities; Satisfactory completion of all high school core course requirements: 4 yrs. English; Math, 2 years beyond elementary algebra; 3 years Biological/Physical Science; 1 yr. American Government/History; First and second year (level) of the same foreign language taken during grades 7-12; Students are also evaluated on their Personal Achievements and Characteristics: Personal Qualities, Integrity, Maturity, Motivation and Resilience; Significant Commitment to Citizenship through Public Service, School Activities, Community Engagement, Leadership or Familial Responsibilities; Demonstrated Understanding of and Respect for Historically Underrepresented Populations; Ability to Contribute to and Benefit from a Culturally and Intellectually Diverse Learning Community. For additional requirements see http://admissions.utah.edu/undergraduate
Students who have completed at least 30 semester credits from a regionally accredited college or university after high school should apply as Transfer Students. Test credits (AP, IB, CLEP, Language, etc.) do not apply toward the 30 semester credit requirement. Concurrent enrollment will not be included in the 30 semester credit requirement unless the student has attended another college or university for at least one semester after high school graduation. The 30 required hours need to be completed at the time of application.
If you have earned fewer than 30 semester credits after high school, you will also need to submit materials required by Freshman applicants, including high school transcripts and ACT or SAT test scores.
• Freshman Applicants will be notified of their admission status on specific dates depending on when their application is complete. Applications completed by:
◦ Dec 1 will be notified Jan 15
◦ Feb 1 will be notified March 1
◦ March 15 will be notified on a rolling basis
• Transfer, Returning Students, Second Bachelor’s, Non-traditional, and Early Admission will be notified on a rolling admission system. Admissions decisions will be mailed to students soon after they have been processed.

Recommendations

Exceptions: Students who have completed all of the listed requirements, except for the high school core course requirements, may be admitted "conditionally" depending on their placement on the Admission Profile. Students admitted "conditionally" will need to complete the high school course deficiencies prior to earning 30 semester hours at the University of Utah.
Students not meeting the admission criteria may be considered for admission on an exception basis if their special talents or diversity enhances the institution's life and character.

Engineering Information

Head of Engineering

Head of Engineering

Richard Brown
College of Engineering Dean
College of Engineering
University of Utah
University of Utah
72 Central Campus Dr.1650 WEB
Salt Lake City, UT 84112
Phone: 801-581-6912
Fax: 801-581-8692
brown@utah.edu

Darryl Butt
College of Mines & Earth Sciences Dean
College of Mines & Earth Sciences
University of Utah
University of Utah
115 S. 1460 E. Rm. 205
Salt Lake City, UT 84112
Phone: 801-581-8767
Fax: 801-581-6636
darryl.butt@utah.edu

Engineering Information

Engineering Degrees Offered

Types of Engineering Degrees

Bachelor's:B.S.
Master's:M.S. with thesis, M.S. without thesis, but with project or report
Doctoral:Ph.D.

Computer Science Degrees Awarded Outside the College/School of Engineering

Engineering Information

Engineering Departments

Engineering Department(s) Degree Granting Level Department Chair Discipline
Bioengineering Both David Grainger Biomedical Engineering
Chemical Engineering Both Milind Deo Chemical Engineering
Civil & Environmental Engineering Both Michael Barber Civil Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Both Gianluca Lazzi Electrical/Computer Engineering
Geological Engineering Both Thure Cerling Other Engineering Disciplines
Materials Science & Engineering Both Feng Liu Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Both Timothy Ameel Mechanical Engineering
Metallurgical Engineering Both Manoranjan Misra Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mining Engineering Both Michael Nelson Mining Engineering
School of Computing Both Ross Whitaker Computer Science (inside engineering)

Engineering Information

Research Centers

  • INCOLL - Research center WITHIN the college of engineering
  • INDEPT - Research center WITHIN an engineering department
  • INUNIV - Research center WITHIN university system
  • OUTUNIV - Research center OUTSIDE the university
Center/Lab Discipline Research Class Head Chair
Carbon Capture Multidisciplinary Simulation Center Chemical Engineering INCOLL Philip Smith
Cardiovascular Research and Training Institute Biomedical Engineering INUNIV Kenneth Spitzer
Center for Controlled Chemical Delivery Biomedical Engineering INUNIV Sung Wan Kim
Center for Engineering Innovation Electrical Engineering INCOLL Florian Solzbacher
Center for Extreme Data Management Analysis and Visualization Computer Science (inside engineering) INDEPT Valerio Pascucci
Center for Neural Interfaces Biomedical Engineering INDEPT Gregory Clark
Center of Excellence for Biomedical Microfluidics Mechanical Engineering INDEPT Bruce Gale
Energy and Geoscience Institute Civil/Environmental Engineering INDEPT Raymond Levey
Global Change & Sustainability Center Civil/Environmental Engineering INUNIV Brenda Bowen
Institute for Clean and Secure Energy Chemical Engineering INDEPT Philip Smith
Nano Institute Chemical Engineering INDEPT Marc Porter
NSF Materials Research Science & Engineering Center Electrical/Computer Engineering INDEPT Ajay Nahata
NVIDIA CUDA Center of Excellence Computer Science (inside engineering) INDEPT Christopher Johnson
Scientific Computing & Imaging Institute Computer Science (inside engineering) INDEPT Christopher Johnson
U.S.- Pakistan Center for Advanced Studies in Water Civil/Environmental Engineering INUNIV Steven Burian
University of Utah Robotics Center Mechanical Engineering INCOLL John Hollerbach
Utah Center for NanoBioSensors Chemical Engineering INDEPT Marc Porter
Utah Center of Trace Explosives Detection Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering INDEPT Ling Zang
Utah Nanofab Electrical Engineering INCOLL Bruce Gale

Engineering Information

Degree Programs

Bachelor's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Bioengineering Biomedical Engineering (B.S.) Biomedical Engineering
Chemical Engineering Chemical Engineering (B.S.) Chemical Engineering
Civil & Environmental Engineering Civil Engineering (B.S.) Civil Engineering
Civil & Environmental Engineering Construction Engineering (B.S.) Civil Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Computer Engineering (B.S.) Computer Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering (B.S.) Electrical Engineering
Geological Engineering Geological Engineering (B.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Materials Science & Engineering Materials Science& Engineering (B.S) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) Mechanical Engineering
Metallurgical Engineering Metallurgical Engineering (B.S.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mining Engineering Mining Engineering (B.S.) Mining Engineering
School of Computing Computer Science (B.S.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
School of Computing Computer Engineering (B.S.) Computer Engineering

Master's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Master's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Bioengineering Bioengineering (M.S.) Biomedical Engineering
Chemical Engineering Chemical Engineering (M.S.) Chemical Engineering
Chemical Engineering Petroleum Engineering (M.S.) Petroleum Engineering
Civil & Environmental Engineering Civil & Environmental Engineering (M.S.) Civil Engineering
Civil & Environmental Engineering Nuclear Engineering (M.S.) Nuclear Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering (M.S.) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Geological Engineering Geological Engineering (M.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Materials Science & Engineering Materials Science and Engineering (M.S.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) Mechanical Engineering
Metallurgical Engineering Metallurgical Engineering (M.S.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Metallurgical Engineering Metallurgical Engineering (M.E.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mining Engineering Mining Engineering (M.S.) Mining Engineering
Mining Engineering Mining Engineering (M.E.) Mining Engineering
School of Computing Computer Science (M.S.) Computer Science (inside engineering)

Doctoral Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Doctoral Degree Program(s) Discipline
Bioengineering Bioengineering (Ph.D.) Biomedical Engineering
Chemical Engineering Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) Chemical Engineering
Civil & Environmental Engineering Civil & Environmental Engineering (Ph.D.) Civil Engineering
Civil & Environmental Engineering Nuclear Engineering (Ph.D.) Nuclear Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Geological Engineering Geological Engineering (Ph.D) Other Engineering Disciplines
Materials Science & Engineering Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) Mechanical Engineering
Metallurgical Engineering Metallurgical Engineering (Ph.D.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mining Engineering Mining Engineering (Ph.D.) Mining Engineering
School of Computing Computer Science (Ph.D.) Computer Science (inside engineering)

Engineering Information

Areas of Expertise

Engineering Departments Areas of Expertise
Bioengineering
  1. Bioinnovate: Biodesign, Medical Devices
  2. Bioinstrumentation: Sensors and Integrated Devices, Controls and Signal Processing
  3. Biomaterials & Therapeutics: Biomedical Polymers, Biomolecular Engineering, Tissue Engineering, Drug Delivery and Nanomedicine
  4. Biomechanics: Molecular, Cell, Tissue, Organ and System, Biofluid-solid Interactions, Biological Transport Phenomena, Biomimetics and Biorobotics
  5. Cardiac Electrophysiology & Biophysics: Cardiovascular Engineering, Electrocardiography and Simulation Techniques
  6. Computational Systems and Synthetic Bioengineering: Statistical Modeling and Analysis of Biological Networks, Experimental, computational and theor
  7. Neural Interfaces: Electrophysiology, Neural Engineering and Prosthetics
  8. Imaging: Medical Imaging, Optical Systems, Imaging Methods and Hardware
Chemical Engineering
  1. Biomedical and Biotechnology
  2. Energy and Fuels
  3. Environmental Sustainability
  4. Materials and Nanotechnology
  5. Multi-Scale Simulation
  6. Nuclear Engineering
  7. Petroleum Engineering
Civil & Environmental Engineering
  1. Structures Engineering
  2. Project Management
  3. Water Resources Engineering
  4. Transportation Engineering
  5. Environmental Engineering
  6. Nuclear Engineering
  7. Geotechnical Engineering
  8. Construction Engineering
  9. Engineering Management
Electrical and Computer Engineering
  1. Control Systems and Power Engineering
  2. Communications, Image Processing, and Signal Processing
  3. Microwaves, Electromagnetics, and Antenna Design
  4. Computer Engineering and VLSI System Design
  5. Micro- and Nano-Device Fabrication, Semiconductors, and Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS)
  6. Optics and Optoelectronics
  7. RF and Mixed-Signal Integrated Circuits Design
  8. Design Automation for VLSI, Embedded and Biological Systems
  9. Metamaterials
Geological Engineering
  1. Geoengineering
  2. Geological Hazards
  3. Groundwater Remediation
  4. Geomechanics
  5. Fluidflow & Contaminant Transport in the Subsurface
Materials Science & Engineering
  1. Composites
  2. Ceramics
  3. Polymers
  4. Biomaterials
  5. Nanomaterials
  6. Computational Materials
  7. Electronic Materials
Mechanical Engineering
  1. Sustainable Energy Systems Engineering
  2. Mechanical Design and Manufacturing
  3. Automatic Control and Robotics
  4. Experimental and Computational Mechanics
  5. Environmental Fluid Mechanics
  6. Heat Transfer
  7. Ergonomics and Safety
  8. Micro and Nanoscale Engineering and Nanoscale Thermal Transport
  9. Biomechanics
  10. Large Scale Simulation Methods
Metallurgical Engineering
  1. Mineral Processing/Particle Technology
  2. Chemical Metallurgy
  3. Physical Metallurgy
  4. Product/Process Design and Analysis
Mining Engineering
  1. Mine Equipment Automation
  2. Rock Mechanics, Subsidence, Slope Stability
  3. Mine Ventilation & Simulation
  4. Information Management
  5. Open-pit Mine Planning/Design
  6. Blasting
  7. Safety & Health Risk Management Systems
School of Computing
  1. Algorithms & Computational Geometry
  2. Computer Engineering, Hardware Systems including Architecture & VLSI
  3. Databases & Information Management
  4. Digital Media & Game Engineering
  5. Formal Methods, Logic, Theorem Proving
  6. Graphics & Visualization
  7. Machine Learning & Natural Language Processing
  8. Systems & Networking, Programming Languages & Compilers
  9. Robotics
  10. Scientific Computing, Image Processing, Parallel Computing, Computational Science

Engineering Information

Societies

Honor Societies

National Groups

  • Alpha Nu Sigma (Nuclear)
  • Chi Epsilon Honor Soc.
  • Phi Kappa Phi
  • Pi Tau Sigma Mechanical Engineering Honor Society
  • Tau Beta Pi

Local Groups

  • Society of Kennecott Scholars

Student Organizations

National Groups

  • AIAA
  • ASM-TMS
  • Air and Waste Management Association
  • Am. Ceramic Society
  • Am. Indian Science and Eng. Soc.
  • Am. Nuclear Society
  • Am. Soc. of Civil Engineers
  • Am. Soc. of Mechanical Engineers
  • Am. Soc. of Safety Eng.
  • American Institute of Chemical Engineers
  • Assoc. of Computing Machinery
  • Eng. Medicine and Biology Soc.
  • Engineers Council
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
  • National Society of Black Engineers
  • Natl Society of Professional Eng
  • Soc. for Automotive Engineering
  • Soc. of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Soc. of Women Engineers
  • Tau Beta Pi

Local Groups

  • American Concrete Institute
  • American Water Resource Association
  • Bench To Bedside
  • Biomedical Engineering Society
  • Chemical Engineering Car Club
  • Chi Epsilon
  • Engineers Without Borders
  • Formula U
  • Graduate Student Advisory Committee
  • IEM Mechanical Engineering Mentoring Society
  • Institute of Nuclear Materials Management
  • Institute of Transportation Engineers
  • OSTEM
  • Power Energy U, Power and Energy Systems
  • Recreational Un-Manned Aerial Vehicle Club
  • Robo Utes
  • SLAM Drones
  • Society of Ethnic Student Engineers (SESE)
  • Society of Scientists and Engineers in Law
  • Student Advisory Committee
  • The Sponge

Engineering Information

Support Programs

College's Under-Represented Student Groups

National Groups

  • Am. Indian Science & Engineering Soc.
  • MEP and MESA Programs
  • National Society of Black Engineers
  • Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Society of Women Engineers

Local Groups

  • Society of Ethnic Student Engineers ("SESE")

Other Student Support Programs

ELEAP offers first-year students a chance to work in interdisciplinary teams on a research project dealing with issues surrounding sustainability in engineering. Students in the Engineering Honors Program may receive Honors credit for the two semester class. All students fulfill 3 general education course requirements with the two semesters.

UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES PROGRAM (UROP) provides undergraduate students and faculty members the opportunity to work together on research or creative projects. UROP provides assistantships up to $1200 per semester to a student who assists with a faculty member's research or creative project, or who carries out a project of her/his own under the supervision of a faculty member. Students may apply for a UROP assistantship for any semester (summer included), and are eligible to apply for a one semester renewal of their assistantship. Renewals and summer semester may be funded up to $600.

HONORS IN ENGINEERING provides students in the College of Engineering the opportunity to earn an Honors Designation at graduation from the University Honors College while taking engineering courses. Honors in Engineering Students participate in undergraduate research and work with a faculty advisor on a senior thesis.

LIVING LEARNING COMMUNITY The College of Engineering sponsors 3 opportunities for students to live and learn with fellow engineering students. There is a floor in the Sage Point residence hall, apartment living in the Donna Garff Marriott Honors housing and the Kennecott House in Officers Circle. Each provides programming to connect students with alumni and faculty and additional academic support.

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING TUTORING CENTER offers students a study room staffed by advanced standing engineering students where they can get additional help with homework in all classes engineering students are required to take.

STUDY ABROAD through international exchange programs at partner universities around the world.

CLEAR Program (Communication, Leadership, Ethics and Research)
The CLEAR Program at the University of Utah’s College of Engineering prepares engineering undergraduates for success in their careers through improving their oral and written communication, teamwork skills and ethical understanding.
By working with our engineering faculty, CLEAR instructors develop speaking and writing assignments, teach technical writing and communication lessons in the classroom, provide feedback to students and consult on best practices for speaking, writing and teamwork.
Our program is unique and innovative due to the emphasis placed on communication, teamwork, and ethics, the integrated nature of the professional skills instruction, and the situated, developmental approach to teaching and learning.
The CLEAR program reaches more than 1,000 students across six departments in the College each year. Through continual exposure to writing, communication, teamwork and ethics, our graduates are better prepared to join the engineering workforce and contribute to society.

Engineering Information

Student Projects

Student Design Projects Description

School of Computing:

Senior Capstone Project CS4500. This course is the capstone experience for graduating Computer Science seniors. It involves the development of self-selected student teams, with the emphasis on applying sound, disciplined software engineering practice. Projects are defined and selected at the beginning of the semester, after which progress is demonstrated through documentation, meetings, and demos. The class culminates in a Demo Day at which students present their projects to faculty, students and project sponsors.

Electrical Engineering:

The senior students are matched up with their senior projects at the end of the junior year. The students may sign up for a Clinic project (usually involving five students), an individual project from the student's employment situation, a project suggested by a faculty member in the College of Engineering, or an idea the student would like to pursue. All students work on a team consisting of two or more students. The student meet weekly during the Fall and Spring semesters of their senior year. During the meetings, they complete the research on their projects, prepare oral presentations, prepare demonstrations, prepare a poster, and write their final reports. Each team group prepares a poster and demonstration of their project which they present at the annual Technical Open House in the Spring semester. The team group also writes a final report.

The real motivation in this very structured senior project procedure is to have the students participate in an engineering job prior to obtaining employment beyond their degrees. The student must be in charge of the project or the part of the project in which he or she participates. Each team group organizes the work into parts and each student is responsible for their part of the project. Additionally, each student submits a contract that organizes their work into three main milestones. This latter attitude toward the senior project is very meaningful in setting a level of performance that makes the students achieve some success before receiving their BS degrees.

Bioengineering:

As part of the Biomedical Engineering B.S. degree requirements, undergraduate students are required to complete a two-semester capstone design sequence (Bioen 3801-4801, 6 cr. hrs) and a three-semester senior project sequence (Bioen 4200, 4201, 4202, 5 cr. hrs). In the capstone design sequence, students work in interdisciplinary teams to design, build and test biomedical devices or systems (e.g., glucose sensor, closed-loop drug infusion system, vestibular evoked potential, etc.). The course sequence also includes didactic instruction covering the design process, biomedical device development, regulatory issues, intellectual property, ethical issues, current issues in world and national health care, and entreprenurial bioengineering topics. A very significant fraction of the time is devoted to open-ended hands-on design including the technical details required for design success.
All students participate in a senior project (Bioen 4200, 4201, 4202) that is over and above the design projects included in the capstone sequence. Students select approved senior projects consistent with their career goals, and work on their projects in industry, clinical medicine, or bioengineering research laboratories. The senior project course sequence includes extensive training in communication, including written, oral and poster formats. In addition to these major capstone experiences (capstone design and senior project), eight of the required classes include significant design components (Fundamentals of Bioengineering I and II; Biocomputational Methods, Biosignals, Biosystems, Biotransport, Biomechanics and Biomaterials).

Civil and Environmental Engineering:

The format of CVEEN 4910 Professional Practice and Design is structured around civil infrastructure projects wherein the students manage the process of producing the necessary documents and work products that constitutes a preliminary engineering study for a “client.” This role is played by representatives of city, county, state or University agencies that have specific needs for preliminary evaluations regarding: alternatives development, feasibility, cost and schedule for future projects sponsored by their respective agencies. To this end, the students work with the client to develop evaluation and design criteria which lead to the selection of a “preferred alternative,” which is presented to the client. Following this selection, students continue in completing preliminary design for the preferred alternative, which typically includes deliverables or evaluations pertaining to: design drawings, calculations and project layout; estimated project cost; construction schedule; and considerations of sustainability, safety, environmental impact, etc. Client involvement and feedback to the students is a critical part of the learning process that is included in the course.

The course framework requires frequent communication and evaluations to create viable solutions and preliminary design. To initiate the project, establish workflow and define deliverables, students are divided into teams that are responsible for specific elements or aspects of the project. These teams are multi-disciplinary and have activities associated with project management, environmental policy, water resources management, civil site planning and layout, transportation, structures, geotechnical, etc. according to the tasks and needs of the project. Each project is led by a project management (PM) team, which is ultimately responsible for coordination and completion of the project. This PM team works with other student sub-teams and their respective team leaders, and the whole constitutes the “Student Engineering Associates” (SEA) of the University of Utah, which affixes its name and logo to all work products.

In addition to evaluating, designing and detailing this extramural project, the student receives instruction in the following professional practice topics:

• Ethics
• Leadership
• Project Scheduling
• Project Management and Conflict Resolution
• Construction Documents
• Cost Estimating
• Alternative Dispute Resolution
• Sustainability
• Value engineering
• Quality Assessment and Quality Control
• Safety
• Life Long Learning
• Public Service Responsibilities of Engineers




Materials Science and Engineering:

The senior project is the capstone design project tying together many aspects of materials science and engineering. Each student’s project will demonstrate their knowledge in a number of areas, including thermodynamics, kinetics, processing, characterization, and materials properties. It should also include an understanding of the structure, properties, processing, and performance of the material. The project will demonstrate the student’s ability to apply these concepts to solve applied materials problems rather than perform basic research or operate lab equipment. Each team will consist of 2 " 4 students, depending on the size of the senior class and the nature of the project. The student’s faculty adviser will oversee the design and technical aspects of the student’s project.

Mechanical Engineering:

Mechanical engineering students conceptualize and produce an engineered system product through the capstone senior design sequence at the University of Utah. Student teams are established and begin with problem identification and definition, benchmarking and background research, idea generation techniques, needs analysis, scheduling, budgeting, construction, testing, analysis and optimization. Engineering analysis and testing of beta prototypes, final design parameters and economics analysis are required. Students focus on the use of integrated experimental/numerical simulation tools in a research and development environment to analyze and optimize the design of engineering systems, components or processes. The need for concurrent design for failure prevention, reliability and quality at the earliest time after conceptualization is emphasized. Completion of the capstone senior design project involves extensive oral and written reporting to document the design progress. The capstone design experience provides students with an opportunity to practice implementing principles of the design process with an emphasis on design methodology. This experience culminates in a demonstration of the final product.

Chemical Engineering:

There are aspects of design in several courses in the department including heat transfer, fluid mechanics and the unit operations laboratory. The sophistication of the design in these courses is rather limited, but from the early days of the training of our chemical engineering undergraduates there is a discussion of design. The real effort to teach chemical process and product design is handled in a two-course capstone design sequence (CH EN 4253 and 5253). In this sequence the students start with smaller units performing designs and cost analysis. They build up to multiple units in a section of a process, e.g., multiple distillation units in a separation block. These designs are heat integrated and attempt to find operating optimums. Finally, a complete plant is designed with heat and mass integration providing a comprehensive design report for the complete chemical plant. Approximately one-half of the students perform the AICHE student contest design problem each year and the other one-half of the students do a design for a local industrial client that has been hand selected by the professor.

Metallurgical Engineering:

Students in metallurgical engineering are exposed to small design projects in several courses during their junior- and senior-level courses. They perform capstone designs in extractive and physical metallurgy that focus on metallurgical process synthesis, flowsheet development, and associated economic analysis. For extractive metallurgy, the students utilize metallurgical data from mining properties typical of those from within the state of Utah. From the data, they determine an appropriate process flowsheet, perform mass and energy balances, and size equipment. The designed process is then cost estimated, and a preliminary economic evaluation is performed to determine if the project would meet certain economic hurdles. For physical metallurgy, the students are required to design a metallurgical process to deliver certain physical properties for a metal part. The students are required to utilize previously learned skills to perform necessary metallurgical testing and physical characterization of metal parts.

Mining Engineering:

Before they graduate, mining engineering students at the University of Utah are provided an actual engineering experience from concept to production through a senior design project. They begin with problem identification and definition, team organization, background research, idea generation techniques, needs analysis, scheduling, budgeting, construction, and optimization of proposed design including engineering analysis, and economic analysis of final the design. Students focus on optimization of engineering systems, components and processes. Emphasis is on economic viability and environmental responsibility. Completion of the senior design project includes oral and written reporting documenting the design process. It provides the student with principles of the design process with an emphasis on methodology in design and culminates in a demonstration of the final product including verification and documentation of how the final product meets all stakeholder needs. Students frequently submit senior design projects to national competition.

Geological Engineering:

Students in geological engineering are exposed to design projects in multiple courses at several levels in curriculum. Students are required to address simple design requirements as parts of assignments in stratigraphy, fluid dynamics, and groundwater courses, which are mostly taken in the junior and senior years. During the senior year, two capstone design courses are integral parts of the geological engineering curriculum. The solute and groundwater remediation course, GEO 5390, requires a multi-student team to construct a remediation scheme for a real-world groundwater contamination problem. The capstone geological engineering design course, GEO 5150, involves the solution of a significant design problem in the area of geotechnical engineering. In the past, this has involved integration of field data, state-of-the-art computer software, cost estimates, and environmental assessment. Both design experiences emphasize a multi-disciplinary team approach with effective oral and written communication.

Engineering Information

College Description

Engineering College Description and Special Characteristics

The College of Engineering consists of seven departments: bioengineering, chemical engineering, civil and environmental engineering, electrical and computer engineering, materials science and engineering, mechanical engineering and computer science. The College also features four specialty degree-granting programs: computer engineering, entertainment arts and engineering, nuclear engineering and petroleum engineering.

In 2014, the College began offering a data center engineering certificate program to prepare undergraduates and master's students for work in data center design, operations and management, as well as a big data certificate program to provide graduate students and professional computer scientists the skills to process, analyze and manage large, complex data.

The College also provides a new Master of Science degree in Petroleum Engineering that is designed for both engineering graduates and full-time working professionals. The program covers petroleum engineering and geology fundamentals as well as discussions on geopolitical, economic, and environmental constraints on energy technologies.

Well known for its pioneering efforts in computer graphics, scientific visualization, fossil energy, robotics, neural interfaces and MEMS, the College has emerging strengths in data science, nanotechnology and nuclear engineering. College research is a major source of technology innovation that benefits companies seeking to maintain a competitive advantage and leads to spin-off companies that create new jobs.

Notable alumni of the College of Engineering include: John Warnock (Adobe), Edwin Catmull (Pixar), Simon Ramo (TRW) and Mark Fuller (WET Design).

Engineering Information

Engineering Faculty & Research

Teaching, Tenure-Track View Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Full Professors Assoc. Professors Assistant Professors Program Total
Bioengineering 12 7 4 23
Chemical Engineering 13 3 7 23
Civil & Environmental Engineering 8 8 7 23
Electrical and Computer Engineering 15 10 9 34
Geological Engineering 3 1 1 5
Materials Science & Engineering 7 3 1 11
Mechanical Engineering 8 13 13 34
Metallurgical Engineering 9 1 3 13
Mining Engineering 2 1 1 4
School of Computing 20 6 15 41
Totals: 97 53 61 211

Teaching, Non-Tenure-Track

Engineering Department(s) FT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel PT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Teach. Personnel
Bioengineering 3 4 7 0.96
Chemical Engineering 3 2 5 0.53
Civil & Environmental Engineering 2 6 8 1.55
Electrical and Computer Engineering 4 2 6 0.92
Geological Engineering 0 2 2 0.75
Materials Science & Engineering 0 3 3 1.15
Mechanical Engineering 4 10 14 2.92
Metallurgical Engineering 1 1 2 0.61
Mining Engineering 0 3 3 0.69
School of Computing 14 15 29 7.20
Totals: 31 48 79 17.28

Non-Teaching, Research

Engineering Department(s) Non-Teach. FT Research Personnel Non-Teach. PT Research Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Non-Teach. Research Personnel
Bioengineering 12 4 16 3.66
Chemical Engineering 11 4 15 1.25
Civil & Environmental Engineering 16 1 17 0.52
Electrical and Computer Engineering 6 5 11 2.23
Geological Engineering 2 1 3 0.10
Materials Science & Engineering 10 2 12 0.88
Mechanical Engineering 3 3 6 0.82
Metallurgical Engineering 3 0 3 0.00
Mining Engineering 0 3 3 0.30
School of Computing 13 5 18 2.08
Totals: 76 28 104 11.84

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

  • American Indian or Alaska Native (Am Ind): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.
  • Asian: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
  • Black or African American (B/AfrA): A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as "Haitian" or "Negro" can be used in addition to "Black or African American."
  • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (Haw): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
  • Hispanic or Latino (Hisp): A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. The term, "Spanish origin," can be used in addition to "Hispanic or Latino."
  • White: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Full Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Bioengineering 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 11 1
Chemical Engineering 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 8 2 0 0 11 2
Civil & Environmental Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 2 0 0 6 2
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 11 1 0 0 14 1
Geological Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0
Materials Science & Engineering 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 1
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 8 0
Metallurgical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 9 0
Mining Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
School of Computing 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 14 3 0 0 17 3
Totals: 5 1 2 0 0 0 18 1 0 0 0 0 62 8 0 0 87 10

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Associate Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Bioengineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 6 1
Chemical Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Civil & Environmental Engineering 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 5 3
Electrical and Computer Engineering 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 8 2
Geological Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Materials Science & Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 8 2 0 0 11 2
Metallurgical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Mining Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
School of Computing 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 6 0
Totals: 2 0 3 0 0 0 12 1 0 0 0 0 28 7 0 0 45 8

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Assistant Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Bioengineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 3 1
Chemical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 6 1
Civil & Environmental Engineering 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 2 5
Electrical and Computer Engineering 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 8 1
Geological Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Materials Science & Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Mechanical Engineering 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 0 0 10 3
Metallurgical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 1
Mining Engineering 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
School of Computing 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 7 2 0 0 12 3
Totals: 6 4 0 0 0 0 9 2 0 0 0 0 30 10 0 0 45 16

Undergraduate

Admissions/Transfers

Undergraduate Admission to the College of Engineering

Prospective undergraduate students must apply through the University’s Admission Office. Students may be directly admitted to the College of Engineering if they are academically ready to take first semester engineering courses. All other students enter the University of Utah in a pre-major status and are then admitted to the College when academically ready.

Undergraduate Admission to an Engineering Department

All students must satisfy a set of prerequisite courses before being allowed to take advanced engineering courses (2000 level and above). The level at which students begin their studies depends upon prior preparation and scores from the SAT/ACT and AP/IB test credits.


Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

International applicants graduating from high school in the United States must meet the same requirements as domestic applicants. In addition, a minimum TOEFL score of 80 on the iBT (550 pBT) or better, or a minimum IELTS band score of 6.5 or better is required. International applicants graduating from secondary schools outside the US must have completed all requirements for graduation with satisfactory grades and must have received a diploma or certificate of graduation. In addition, applicants must be eligible for admission to a major university in the country in which they graduated. International students on visas are not eligible to enroll as provisional or non-matriculated students. To qualify for admission to the university as a transfer student, any international student who begins academic studies at another college or university must complete at least one year of satisfactory work (30 semester hours of general academic credit with a 2.60 GPA, or better) before transferring to the University of Utah

Admission to the university does not guarantee immediate entry into all majors.

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

All prospective non-resident students must meet the same entrance requirements as resident students.

The Utah law that governs residency for tuition purposes states that an Undergraduate Domestic Non-Resident Student must reside (be physically present) in Utah for twelve continuous months. In addition to the twelve continuous months, the student cannot be claimed as a dependent on the tax returns of a person who is not a resident of Utah. The student must also take overt steps to establish intent to become a resident of Utah by obtaining a Utah driver's license, Utah vehicle registration, and Utah voter registration, dated at least 90 days prior to the first day of class of the term for which the student is seeking resident status. An adult who enrolls as a student at a Utah institution within twelve months of arriving in Utah is presumed to have moved to Utah for the purpose of attending an institution of higher education and is declared a nonresident for tuition purposes.

Residency Requirements

A student who has been admitted to the University must reside in Utah for one continuous year prior to the beginning of the academic period for which registration as a resident student is sought and must provide evidence that residency is not maintained elsewhere. If it is evident that the student is in Utah to attend school, residency will not be granted. For additional information regarding the University of Utah Residency for Tuition Purposes visit http://admissions.utah.edu/apply/residency/

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

To be considered a transfer student, a student must have completed 30 semester hours of transferable college coursework. The coursework must be earned after high school graduation and must be completed by the beginning of the student's admit term. Concurrent enrollment and test credits (AP, CLEP, etc.) are not counted in the 30 semester hour requirement.

Applicants transferring from another college or university are expected to have previously graduated from an accredited high school. If the student seeking transfer admission has completed less than 30 semester hours of acceptable transfer work, a high school transcript and ACT or SAT test scores are required. Applicants who have not graduated from high school seven years prior to the term of admission must have the high school preparation described in the freshman section (http://www.sa.utah.edu/admiss/requirements.html).

Applicants with 30 semester hours or more of transferable work and a cumulative college-level GPA of 2.6 or higher are likely to be admitted. Those with a cumulative GPA below 2.6 will likely be denied. Students who have an associate of arts or an associate of science degree from a regionally accredited institution may be admitted with a 2.35 or higher GPA. Students not meeting the admission criteria may be considered for admission on an exception basis if their special talents or diversity enhances the institution's life and character. The Credits and Admissions Committee will review additional information for applicants requesting special consideration. Admissions requirements, deadlines and fees are subject to change without prior notice.

Transfer credit earned in residence at other regionally accredited collegiate institutions is normally accepted for advanced standing if the work is parallel in nature to programs offered at this university, and if grades of C- or better have been earned in the credited courses. No transfer credit toward a bachelor's degree is allowed for courses graded below C- by the College of Engineering and its Departments. To minimize the possibility of taking college courses that do not count toward major requirements (or admission into a major), students should contact the department of their desired University of Utah major prior to enrolling in a junior college, or at least during their first year of junior college.

Number of Transfer Students from:

A two-year community junior college where they were full-time students: 176
A four-year college or university where they were full-time students: 151

Undergraduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): All Students

Undergraduate Group 1
Tuition & Fees: $8,517
Room & Board: $9,936
Books & Supplies: $1,232
Other Expenses: $3,678
Estimated avg. course load per term: 15
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Federal Tax Return Forms (IRS), Institution's Own Application Form, Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

Additional Financial Aid Information

All prospective undergraduate students must apply through the University’s Admission Office. All students enter the University of Utah in a pre-major status.

Undergraduate

New Applicants

New Undergraduate Applicants

A. Number of undergraduate applicants to the engineering college: 2,244
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 1,820
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 599
Percentage of entering students (excluding transfer students) ranked in the top quarter (25%) of their high schools: 0%
Note: *This data is no longer available for collection.

Newly Enrolled Test Scores

Scores Reflect 75th to 25th percentile

SAT 75th 25th
Math Range: 0 0
Reading Range: 0 0
Writing Range: 0 0
Combined Range: 0 0
ACT 75th 25th
Math Range: 0 0
Composite Range: 0 0

Undergraduate

Enrollments by Class

Undergraduate Engr. Programs Fresh
1st Year
Soph
2nd Year
Junior
3rd Year
Senior
4th/5th Year
Full Time Total Part Time Total
Biomedical Engineering (B.S.) 64 69 72 179 384 54
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 40 47 76 213 376 84
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 21 20 34 108 183 68
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 44 28 37 65 174 58
Computer Science (B.S.) 178 158 165 256 757 269
Construction Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 35 31 37 102 205 69
Geological Engineering (B.S.) 0 5 6 4 15 2
Materials Science& Engineering (B.S) 10 8 22 41 81 5
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 76 106 151 311 644 224
Metallurgical Engineering (B.S.) 6 11 9 17 43 9
Mining Engineering (B.S.) 5 9 16 31 61 1
Totals: 479 492 625 1327 2923 843

Freshmen

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Biomedical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 1 0 3 3 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 19 2 4 0 35 5
Women 2 0 0 0 8 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 2 3 0 29 2
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 16 2 2 0 26 3
Women 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 1 0 0 14 1
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 2 0 0 16 3
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 5 1
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 1 0 4 1 1 0 6 1 1 0 0 0 25 4 4 0 43 6
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 14 0 0 0 16 0 0 0 17 1 4 0 0 0 106 16 4 0 161 17
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 11 2 2 0 17 2
Construction Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 1 0 17 3 2 0 29 3
Women 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 6 1
Geological Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Materials Science& Engineering (B.S)
Men 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 1 0 8 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 5 0 1 0 10 1 2 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 47 10 2 1 72 12
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0
Metallurgical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 4 2
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Mining Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 5 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 40 1 3 0 59 7 4 0 38 2 11 1 1 0 298 47 25 1 479 59

Sophomores

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Biomedical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 24 2 4 0 39 2
Women 0 0 0 0 4 1 1 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 20 0 1 1 30 2
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 7 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 0 0 18 6 1 0 33 7
Women 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 2 2 0 14 3
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 10 3 0 0 15 5
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 5 1
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 21 4 0 0 25 6
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 3 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 12 1 2 0 10 8 2 0 11 2 0 1 1 0 90 27 9 1 137 40
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 12 2 2 0 21 2
Construction Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 21 8 0 1 27 11
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 4 0
Geological Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Materials Science& Engineering (B.S)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 2 0 5 1
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 13 0 0 0 3 4 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 69 15 4 0 91 20
Women 4 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 3 2 0 15 4
Metallurgical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 1 7 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 0
Mining Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 8 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Totals: 48 1 2 0 33 18 4 0 39 6 1 1 1 1 334 74 30 4 492 105

Juniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Biomedical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 1 0 6 1 0 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 27 8 1 0 43 10
Women 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 14 3 5 0 29 4
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 8 1 1 0 3 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 34 6 3 0 51 10
Women 5 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 13 2 1 0 25 2
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 5 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 17 7 2 2 26 10
Women 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 1 0 0 8 2
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 0 1 4 1 0 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 19 12 2 2 33 17
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 0 0 4 2
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 8 0 1 1 9 8 0 0 11 3 1 0 0 0 102 38 10 3 142 53
Women 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 5 2 0 0 0 0 15 4 0 0 23 7
Construction Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 6 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 4 2 0 1 0 0 21 9 1 1 34 15
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 3 1
Geological Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 5 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Materials Science& Engineering (B.S)
Men 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 0 0 0 17 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 2 0 5 1
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 23 2 1 1 7 8 0 0 5 1 1 0 0 0 93 19 2 1 132 32
Women 6 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 2 1 0 19 2
Metallurgical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 6 0
Women 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0
Mining Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 1 0 10 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 6 0
Totals: 73 3 5 4 46 25 0 0 49 11 4 1 0 0 417 116 31 9 625 169

Seniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Biomedical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 5 1 1 1 6 1 0 0 14 4 0 0 0 0 68 9 8 1 102 17
Women 4 3 0 0 6 0 0 0 13 2 1 0 0 0 47 7 6 0 77 12
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 19 2 1 0 12 9 1 0 10 2 1 0 0 0 110 35 6 0 160 48
Women 4 0 1 0 3 1 1 0 10 2 0 0 0 0 29 5 5 2 53 10
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 2 1 0 11 4 0 0 2 2 2 1 0 0 63 28 1 1 84 38
Women 0 0 1 0 4 3 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 15 3 1 1 24 8
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 5 0 0 0 3 4 0 0 7 1 0 0 0 0 47 19 0 1 62 25
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 3 2
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 21 2 2 3 17 7 1 0 20 7 2 0 1 0 155 112 10 5 229 136
Women 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 4 2 1 2 0 0 16 4 3 2 27 12
Construction Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 23 2 1 0 4 2 0 1 7 7 1 0 1 0 47 22 3 1 87 35
Women 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 11 1 0 1 15 3
Geological Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1
Materials Science& Engineering (B.S)
Men 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 1 3 0 28 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 10 1 1 0 13 1
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 15 3 0 1 22 11 0 0 14 5 0 1 0 1 210 115 11 2 272 139
Women 4 0 1 0 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 28 10 3 2 39 15
Metallurgical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 5 0 0 14 6
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0
Mining Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 19 0 1 0 23 1
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 0 0 0 8 0
Totals: 113 15 11 5 98 48 3 1 108 38 9 4 3 1 920 379 62 19 1327 510

Undergraduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Biomedical Engineering (B.S.) 2 1 5 0 9 0 1 50 1 69 53 16
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 8 0 3 0 2 0 0 40 2 55 41 14
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 4 0 5 0 4 0 0 51 1 65 55 10
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 23 0 26 24 2
Computer Science (B.S.) 11 1 4 1 6 0 0 71 7 101 89 12
Construction Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 2 0 2 0 9 1 0 36 2 52 45 7
Geological Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 3 0
Materials Science& Engineering (B.S) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 18 2 20 18 2
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 6 2 6 1 7 1 0 115 4 142 133 9
Metallurgical Engineering (B.S.) 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 8 0 13 13 0
Mining Engineering (B.S.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 19 0 20 19 1
Totals: 37 4 29 2 39 2 1 433 19 566 493 73

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Biomedical Engineering (B.S.) 2 0 1 0 5 0 0 0 5 4 0 0 1 0 38 12 1 0 69
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 5 3 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 33 7 0 2 55
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 2 2 0 0 4 1 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 44 7 1 0 65
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 22 1 0 0 26
Computer Science (B.S.) 10 1 1 0 4 0 1 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 62 9 5 2 101
Construction Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 7 2 1 0 0 0 31 5 2 0 52
Geological Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3
Materials Science& Engineering (B.S) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 2 2 0 20
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 6 0 2 0 5 1 1 0 6 1 1 0 0 0 108 7 4 0 142
Metallurgical Engineering (B.S.) 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 13
Mining Engineering (B.S.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 18 1 0 0 20
Totals: 31 6 4 0 26 3 2 0 30 9 2 0 1 0 382 51 15 4 566

Undergraduate

Dual Degrees

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

None offered.

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degrees Awarded

0

Undergraduate

Program Comparisons

  • ABET - Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
  • CEAB - Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board
Degree Program ABET/CEAB Accred. Nominal Program Length
(yrs.)
Average Program Length
(yrs.)
Time: Day/Even./
Both
Co-op: None/Opt./
Required
Grads in Co-op Progs.
Biomedical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.50 Day Optional
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Day Optional
Civil Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Both Optional
Computer Engineering (B.S.) no Both None
Computer Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Day Optional
Computer Science (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Both Optional
Construction Engineering (B.S.) no 4.00 Both None
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Day Optional
Geological Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Both None
Materials Science& Engineering (B.S) yes 4.00 5.00 Day None
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Both Optional
Metallurgical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day None
Mining Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Day None

Graduate

Admissions Information

Graduate Admission to the College of Engineering

All admissions are handled through the University's Graduate School. Minimum requirements are: 1) an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0 based on all undergraduate work or work completed during the last two years of undergraduate study, whichever is higher; 2) a bachelor's degree from a fully accredited college or university; and 3) recommendation of the faculty in the college or department in which the applicant wishes to study.

Graduate Admission to an Engineering Department

Each department has specific admission criteria. For details, visit the websites at www.coe.utah.edu. However, most departments require GRE scores, TOFEL scores for non-English speaking students, and a previous BS degree in an engineering-related field. Some departments require letters of recommendation, as well.

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

Different departments have different admission requirements, but in general, international students must have TOEFL scores of 550 or better, have a BS from an accredited institute, college or university, and earned a 3.0 or better GPA. Applicants are expected to have a GRE score above 75th percentile in quantitative and analytical sections. Applicants with an undergraduate or graduate degree from an accredited college or university in the United States may not be required to take the TOEFL. Official degrees, transcripts and diplomas must be in the original language with official English translations.

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

Non-resident students have the same entrance requirements as resident students.

Residency Requirements

In order to qualify for residency status for tuition purposes a person must demonstrate that Utah is the place where the person intends to remain and to which the person expects to return when leaving Utah without intending to establish a new domicile elsewhere. An adult person who enrolls as a student at a Utah institution within twelve months of arriving in Utah is presumed to have moved to Utah for the purpose of attending an institution of higher education and is a non-resident for tuition purposes. It is presumed that a non-resident student continues to reside in Utah primarily for the purpose of pursuing higher education and continues to be a non-resident student so long as he or she is enrolled as a student at a Utah institution of higher education. The burden of rebutting these presumptions and establishing that a person is in Utah for other than educational purposes is upon the person. For more information about Utah Residency Requirements for Tuition Purposes visit http://admissions.utah.edu/apply/residency/

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

Applicants transferring from another college or university are expected to have previously graduated from an accredited high school. If the student seeking transfer admission has completed less than 30 semester hours of acceptable transfer work, a high school transcript and ACT or SAT test scores are required. Applicants who have not graduated from high school seven years prior to the term of admission must have the high school preparation described in the freshman section (http://www.saff.utah.edu/admiss requirements.html). Applicants with 30 semester hours or more of transferable work and a cumulative college-level GPA of 2.5 or higher are likely to be admitted. Applicants with a cumulative GPA of 2.35 to 2.49 may be admitted. Those with a cumulative GPA below 2.35 will likely be denied. The Credits and Admissions Committee will review additional information for applicants requesting special consideration.

Graduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): All Students

Graduate Group 1
Tuition & Fees: $8,356
Room & Board: $9,936
Books & Supplies: $1,232
Other Expenses: $3,678
Estimated avg. course load per term: 9
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Federal Tax Return Forms (IRS), Institution's Own Application Form, Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

Graduate

New Applicants

New Graduate Applicants

A. Number of graduate applicants to the engineering college: 2,472
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 863
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 370

Graduate

Enrollments by Class

Master's

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Bioengineering (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 13 5 0 0 15 5
Women 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 6 4 0 0 11 4
Chemical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 8 7
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 3
Civil & Environmental Engineering (M.S.)
Men 11 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 13 0 0 24 17
Women 5 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 2 9 4
Computer Science (M.S.)
Men 90 3 1 1 5 0 0 0 8 1 1 0 1 0 45 6 5 0 156 11
Women 26 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 41 1
Electrical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 36 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 25 11 0 0 62 17
Women 20 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 21 1
Geological Engineering (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Materials Science and Engineering (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 3 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 16 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 40 18 2 1 61 23
Women 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 1 7 4
Metallurgical Engineering (M.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Metallurgical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 6 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 14 1
Women 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 1
Mining Engineering (M.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mining Engineering (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 1 4 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 1
Nuclear Engineering (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Petroleum Engineering (M.S.)
Men 3 5 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 4 5 0 0 9 14
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2
Totals: 227 18 7 3 8 9 0 0 20 6 2 3 1 0 181 76 8 5 454 120

Doctoral

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Bioengineering (Ph.D.)
Men 4 4 4 2 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 53 15 3 0 68 22
Women 4 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 21 2 2 0 31 2
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 25 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 13 4 0 0 41 8
Women 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 1 15 1
Civil & Environmental Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 20 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 6 1 0 28 9
Women 9 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 11 1
Computer Science (Ph.D.)
Men 52 10 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 29 13 1 0 84 25
Women 17 6 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 2 0 0 23 9
Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 51 18 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 11 12 1 0 66 31
Women 11 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 14 4
Geological Engineering (Ph.D)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 3 0 0 9 4
Women 8 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 1
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 31 3 1 1 0 1 0 0 3 4 1 0 0 0 36 22 0 0 72 31
Women 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 1 0 12 2
Metallurgical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 19 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 25 2
Women 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1
Mining Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Nuclear Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 1 2 0 13 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 3 0
Totals: 274 54 10 3 6 1 0 0 17 12 1 0 0 0 211 83 12 1 531 154

Graduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Bioengineering (M.S.) 1 3 0 0 1 0 0 17 0 22 20 2
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 11 7 4
Civil & Environmental Engineering (M.S.) 6 1 0 0 1 0 0 17 1 26 20 6
Computer Science (M.S.) 61 0 0 0 4 1 0 33 0 99 86 13
Electrical Engineering (M.S.) 22 0 0 0 5 0 0 17 1 45 37 8
Geological Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0
Materials Science and Engineering (M.S.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 2 1
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 2 1 2 0 1 0 0 27 3 36 32 4
Metallurgical Engineering (M.E.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0
Metallurgical Engineering (M.S.) 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 6 4 2
Mining Engineering (M.E.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0
Mining Engineering (M.S.) 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 6 6 0
Nuclear Engineering (M.S.) 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 8 6 2
Petroleum Engineering (M.S.) 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 9 7 2
Totals: 113 6 2 0 13 1 0 133 6 274 230 44

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Bioengineering (M.S.) 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 2 0 0 22
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 0 0 11
Civil & Environmental Engineering (M.S.) 5 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 14 3 0 1 26
Computer Science (M.S.) 53 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 1 0 0 30 3 0 0 99
Electrical Engineering (M.S.) 16 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 16 1 1 0 45
Geological Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Materials Science and Engineering (M.S.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 2 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 25 2 3 0 36
Metallurgical Engineering (M.E.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Metallurgical Engineering (M.S.) 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 6
Mining Engineering (M.E.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Mining Engineering (M.S.) 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 6
Nuclear Engineering (M.S.) 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 1 0 8
Petroleum Engineering (M.S.) 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 9
Totals: 92 21 5 1 1 1 0 0 9 4 0 1 0 0 118 15 5 1 274

Master's Degree Programs

Master's Degree Program Degree Type
Master's w/ Thesis Master's w/o Thesis or with Proj./Report Program Totals
Bioengineering (M.S.) 2 20 22
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 2 9 11
Civil & Environmental Engineering (M.S.) 12 14 26
Computer Science (M.S.) 6 93 99
Electrical Engineering (M.S.) 4 41 45
Geological Engineering (M.S.) 1 0 1
Materials Science and Engineering (M.S.) 1 2 3
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 10 26 36
Metallurgical Engineering (M.E.) 1 0 1
Metallurgical Engineering (M.S.) 6 0 6
Mining Engineering (M.E.) 0 6 6
Mining Engineering (M.S.) 6 0 6
Nuclear Engineering (M.S.) 6 2 8
Petroleum Engineering (M.S.) 0 9 9
Totals: 57 222 279

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Bioengineering (Ph.D.) 3 1 1 0 3 0 0 15 0 23 21 2
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) 6 0 0 0 2 0 0 7 0 15 14 1
Civil & Environmental Engineering (Ph.D.) 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 7 7 0
Computer Science (Ph.D.) 7 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 13 12 1
Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.) 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 8 5 3
Geological Engineering (Ph.D) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 4 3 1
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) 5 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 8 6 2
Metallurgical Engineering (Ph.D.) 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 6 5 1
Mining Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0
Nuclear Engineering (Ph.D.) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0
Totals: 40 2 2 0 6 0 0 38 0 88 77 11

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Bioengineering (Ph.D.) 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 14 1 0 0 23
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 15
Civil & Environmental Engineering (Ph.D.) 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7
Computer Science (Ph.D.) 7 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 13
Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.) 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 8
Geological Engineering (Ph.D) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 4
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 8
Metallurgical Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 6
Mining Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Nuclear Engineering (Ph.D.) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Totals: 34 6 2 0 1 1 0 0 5 1 0 0 0 0 35 3 0 0 88

Graduate

Research Expenditures

Expenditures by Research Department

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Engineering Department External Funding Source
Bioengineering
Total#: 125 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $12,633,000 Industry: $1,228,000 Priv/Non: $1,178,000
State: $66,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $15,105,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Chemical Engineering
Total#: 51 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $6,928,000 Industry: $995,000 Priv/Non: $105,000
State: $281,000 Local: Total Expn.: $8,309,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Civil & Environmental Engineering
Total#: 100 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $5,969,000 Industry: $5,066,000 Priv/Non: $210,000
State: $721,000 Local: $84,000 Total Expn.: $12,050,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Total#: 66 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $6,109,000 Industry: $322,000 Priv/Non: $71,000
State: $8,000 Local: Total Expn.: $6,510,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Geological Engineering
Total#: 18 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $399,000 Industry: $30,000 Priv/Non: $21,000
State: $149,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $599,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Materials Science & Engineering
Total#: 33 Foreign: $27,000 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $3,888,000 Industry: $157,000 Priv/Non: $129,000
State: $79,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $4,280,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Mechanical Engineering
Total#: 60 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $3,509,000 Industry: $345,000 Priv/Non: $76,000
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $3,930,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Metallurgical Engineering
Total#: 37 Foreign: $1,000 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $4,322,000 Industry: $450,000 Priv/Non: $83,000
State: $51,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $4,907,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Mining Engineering
Total#: 5 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $273,000 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $147,000
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $420,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
School of Computing
Total#: 134 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $21,494,000 Industry: $1,348,000 Priv/Non: $75,000
State: $364,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $23,281,000
Totals:
Total#: 629 Foreign: $28,000 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $65,524,000 Industry: $9,941,000 Priv/Non: $2,095,000
State: $1,719,000 Local: $84,000 Total Expn.: $79,391,000

Expenditures by Research Center

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Center/Lab External Funding Source
Carbon Capture Multidisciplinary Simulation Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Cardiovascular Research and Training Institute
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Controlled Chemical Delivery
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Engineering Innovation
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Extreme Data Management Analysis and Visualization
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Neural Interfaces
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center of Excellence for Biomedical Microfluidics
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Energy and Geoscience Institute
Total#: 52 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $2,833,000 Industry: $5,246,000 Priv/Non: $159,000
State: $0 Local: Total Expn.: $8,238,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Global Change & Sustainability Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Institute for Clean and Secure Energy
Total#: 23 Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: $4,886,000 Industry: $628,000 Priv/Non: $23,000
State: $63,000 Local: Total Expn.: $5,600,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Nano Institute
Total#: 11 Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: $1,661,069 Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $1,661,069
Center/Lab External Funding Source
NSF Materials Research Science & Engineering Center
Total#: 1 Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: $1,961,000 Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $1,961,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
NVIDIA CUDA Center of Excellence
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Scientific Computing & Imaging Institute
Total#: 74 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $11,387,000 Industry: $1,025,000 Priv/Non: $8,000
State: $367,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $12,787,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
U.S.- Pakistan Center for Advanced Studies in Water
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
University of Utah Robotics Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Utah Center for NanoBioSensors
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Utah Center of Trace Explosives Detection
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Utah Nanofab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0


Grand Totals:
Total#: 629 Foreign: $28,000 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $65,524,000 Industry: $9,941,000 Priv/Non: $2,095,000
State: $1,719,000 Local: $84,000 Total Expn.: $79,391,000

The following text was offered to each school as a guideline for the calculation of externally-funded research expenditures:

Include all expenditures associated with grants and contracts specifically budgeted for externally sponsored research and associated programs and expenditures associated with all gifts auditably used for research. Include expended funds provided by the following external sources:

  1. Federal Government
  2. State Government
  3. Foreign Governments
  4. Industry
  5. Non-Profit Organizations (e.g. foundations)
  6. Individuals
  7. Local Government

The expenditures reported should be only those funds provided by organizations, agencies, and individuals external to the institution. Cost sharing/matching funds should be included only if provided from sources external to the institution.

Only State government funds that were obtained competitively or as matching funds associated with other externally funded programs should be included. State funds that are part of the normal operating budget should not be included regardless of purpose.

For all joint or contracted projects or sub-projects, only the portion of the center research performed by faculty, staff, and students of the affiliated engineering school should be credited to that school. Expenditures for capital costs of research laboratory building construction should not be included.

Expenditures for research laboratory renovations should not be included unless the renovation funds expended came from grants and contracts expressly intended for the direct support of engineering research.

Any portion of academic year and/or summer salary for any researcher that is not derived from external research grants or contracts should not be counted.

Total #: Report total number of individual grants, not the total dollar amount of the expenditures.

Expenditures: Report actual expenditures (as opposed to authorization amounts) in U.S. dollars.

Time frame for expenditures: Report expenditures for your current fiscal year.

Research centers listed as "WITHIN an engineering department" on the Research Centers page (screen 7) of the College of Engineering Profile, will not have their expenditures added to the school's total research expenditures. Such expenditures can be included in the department total, while still being listed for the appropriate center. This allows users to list the expenditures in two areas without double-counting.

Graduate

Research Description

Research Description By Graduate Engineering Department

Bioengineering

The Department of Bioengineering at the University of Utah, established in 1974, is an internationally renowned center of interdisciplinary basic and applied medically related research. It has a rich history in artificial organs including the heart-lung machine, the intra-aortic balloon pump heart assist device, the artificial eye, the artificial heart and the dialysis machine, the first of which was engineered out of sausage casing and part of a Ford automobile water pump during WWII by Willem Kolff. Additionally, the department has a history of developments in biomaterials, drug delivery and entrepreneurial activity. Current research activities of the department include biobased engineering, biosensors, medical imaging, biomaterials, biomechanics, computation/modeling, drug/gene delivery, neural interfaces, computational bioengineering, tissue engineering and other specialty areas.

Chemical Engineering

Biotechnology, catalysis, combustion, energy, fuels, reaction engineering, multi-scale simulation, molecular modeling, rheology, nanomaterials, environmental engineering, polymer science, ceramics processing, process identification and control.

Civil & Environmental Engineering

Environmental Engineering: environmental processes, metagenomics and metatranscriptomics, water reuse, green house gas emissions, tracking water management, environmental chemistry, surface water quality, anaerobic processes, solid and radioactive hazardous waste treatment, biomass energy, resource recovery, antibiotic resistance bacteria, sanitation, public health, climate impacts on environmental systems, physicochemical processes, environmental engineering, nuclear engineering, radiation protection, health physics, remediation of organic and heavy metal contaminants, water and soil quality, water quality assessment.

Water Resources: Hydrology, storm water management, water resources planning and management, water resources systems analysis, drinking water, water-energy-food nexus, water infrastructure, resiliency and sustainability, hydraulics, open channel flow, flood modeling, carbon sequestration, subsurface contaminant transport, green infrastructure, low-impact development, risk assessment, uncertainty analysis, life-cycle assessment, climate impacts on water resources, remote sensing of water use and water quality, water quality management, wetlands restoration and creation, remediation of contaminated sediments, geothermal engineering, groundwater contamination, heat transfer, imaging, parallel computing, reservoir engineering, rock mechanics, sediment transport, multiphase flow, surface/ground water interaction, and river mechanics.

Geotechnical engineering: Soil improvement and stabilization, collapsible soils, geosynthetics, geoenvironmental characterization of aquifer and reservoir heterogeneity, examining geochemical regimes associated with groundwater flow systems and petroleum reservoirs, numerical simulation of groundwater flow and petroleum production, GIS applications for diverse spatial databases, applications of structural analysis and geological mapping for assessing geohazards.

Transportation engineering: Traffic signal systems, public transportation, transit signal priority, traffic modeling and simulation, intelligent transportation systems, traffic flow theory, highway and street design, road safety, non-motorized transportation, traffic operations, project development, risk and reliability analysis, congestion pricing, large-scale transportation network simulation and modeling, transportation network performance assessment, GIS-based transportation asset management, transportation network complexity, driving simulation, big data applications in transportation, spatial data management and analysis, data information systems, connected vehicles, vehicle automation, vehicle communication, artificial intelligence, agent-based traffic control.

Steel and Concrete Structural Engineering: Structural dynamics as applied to building systems with emphasis on earthquake engineering and vibration problems, structural control, structural optimization, reliability engineering, computer-aided analysis and design, bridge engineering, system reliability of steel connections, finite element modeling of steel connections, rehabilitation using fiber reinforced polymer composite materials.

Materials Engineering: Design, characterization methods, and evaluation of concrete, asphalt, and composite construction materials with emphasis on determining infrastructure health and sustainability.

Nuclear Engineering: Nuclear Forensics; New computational methodologies for neutron transport in complex geometries (AGENT code); 3D technologies; Binary radiation targeted therapies in cancer treatment and BNCT for breast cancer; Detection of special nuclear materials; Radiochemistry; Environmental remediation of heavy metals; Mass spectrometry; Coincidence and Multiplicity Counting; Novel Radiation Detection Concepts and Materials; Radiation Detector Development.

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Electromagnetics, optics and optoelectronics, micro- and nano-device fabrication, communications, signal processing, microwaves, computer engineering, control systems, image processing, semiconductors, VLSI system design, power engineering, antenna design, biomedical applications, modeling biological networks, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), RF mixed-signal integrated circuits design and electronic design automation.

Geological Engineering

Rock properties, slope stability analysis, landslide hazard assessment,
soil dynamics, earthquake engineering, stress-strain-strength of
geo-materials, surface water hydrology, surficial processes, fluid
dynamics of earth processes, colloid transport, aqueous organic
geochemistry, subsurface hydrology, dating of young waters.

Materials Science & Engineering

Biomaterials, computational materials and nanomaterials, ceramics, composites, polymers, electronic materials.

Mechanical Engineering

Engineering mechanics, materials engineering, manufacturing engineering, composite materials behavior and mechanics, fatigue, fracture mechanics, behavior of plastics, adhesive bonding, tribology, acoustics, vibrations, biomechanics, design methods, reliability in design, quality in design, ergonomics, safety, systems engineering, fluid mechanics, environmental fluid mechanics, heat transfer, nanoscale thermal transport, aerodynamics, bioheat transfer, microscale thermal fluids, alternative energy systems,thermal energy storage, sustainability, wind power.

Metallurgical Engineering

Mineral processing: Fracture characteristics of particles, comminution, mathematical modeling of specific processes, fluid dynamics of specific operations, flotation, surface chemistry, and novel designs.
Hydrometallurgy: Metal extraction, concentration, purification, electrodeposition, and corrosion. Pyrometallurgy: Thermodynamics, kinetics and modeling of high-temperature chemical processes. Physical metallurgy: Powder metallurgy, phase transformations, mechanical behavior, fatigue and fracture composites, magnetic materials, electronic materials, crystal growth, solidification processing, deformation processing, structure property processing relationships, scanning and electron transmission, electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, surface characterization (AFM, STM, XPS/Auger, ...), nondestructive metal failure detection, rapid solidification, systhesis and processing of advanced inorganic materials, and nanosized and nanostructured materials.

Mining Engineering

Rock mechanics, numerical modeling, geotechnical instrumentation, ventilation of underground coal mines, mine safety, computer applications, mine automation and mine/mill integration, surface and underground mining methods (metal, coal and industrial minerals), acquiring geotechnical data through digital image processing, safety and health, risk management.

School of Computing

Department faculty and students have done pioneering work in interactive graphics, stack machine and dataflow architectures, digital recording, graphical user interfaces, three-dimensional rendering, asynchronous circuits, video games, computer algebra, and computer animation. Faculty and alumni have founded a number of well-known companies, including Adobe Systems, Ashlar, Atari, Cirrus Logic, Evans and Sutherland, Myricom, Netscape, Pixar Pixel-Planes, Silicon Graphics, WordPerfect, and Xmission.

Research Description By Engineering Research Center

Carbon Capture Multidisciplinary Simulation Center

The Carbon-Capture Multidisciplinary Simulation Center (CCMSC) is demonstrating exascale computing with V&V/UQ to more rapidly deploy a new technology for providing low cost, low emission electric power generation to meet the growing energy needs of the U.S.

Cardiovascular Research and Training Institute

Investigators in the Cardiovascular Research and Training Institute conduct cutting edge research in the following specific areas: structural and functional properties of ion channels, cellular electrophysiology, excitation-contraction coupling, regulation of intracellular pH and calcium, cardiac chromatin remodeling, tissue and organ level electrophysiology, computational modeling, and cardiac metabolism.

Center for Controlled Chemical Delivery

The Center for Controlled Chemical Delivery (CCCD) was established at the University of Utah in 1986 as a State of Utah Centers of Excellence Program. CCCD maintains a strong graduate training program and has attained a leading position in worldwide pharmaceutical, polymer and biomedical research. CCCD receives funding from the State of Utah, industry sponsored contracts, and grants from the National Institutes of Health. Through decades of research success, CCCD has gained a leading position in the field of biomedical polymer controlled drug delivery and blood contacting devices.

Center for Engineering Innovation

The Center for Engineering Innovation CEI is the prototyping, advanced engineering services, and technical education center for the University of Utah. We serve industry and public/government collaborators as well as supporting Utah’s academic institutions, through maturing technologies and intellectual property, and de-risking and accelerating the transfer of technologies into the commercial space.

Center for Extreme Data Management Analysis and Visualization

The Center for Extreme Data Management Analysis and Visualization (CEDMAV) focuses on theoretical and algorithmic research, systems development, and tool deployment for dealing with this extreme data in fields such as: geospatial information systems, astrophysics, climate modeling, energy production and distribution, and medical imaging.

Center for Neural Interfaces

The Center for Neural Interfaces was founded in 1995 as a Utah State Center of Excellence. The current focus is on the integration of biomedical technology with the physiological aspect of neuroscience and potential clinical applications. Chronically or acutely implantable neural interface devices based on the Utah Electrode Array are tested and used in the nervous system for recording or initiating neural signals, which may assist with sensory or motor functioning.

Center of Excellence for Biomedical Microfluidics

The Center for Biomedical Microfluidics is dedicated to the discovery, understanding, development and commercialization of microscale and MEMS devices for application to biological, biomedical, and medical problems.

Energy and Geoscience Institute

The Energy & Geoscience Institute (EGI) is a not-for-profit research organization with a 25-year record of conducting multidisciplinary projects worldwide. Through cooperative agreements with universities and research institutes, government agencies and laboratories, and national energy companies worldwide, the Institute undertakes a broad range of projects on all seven continents. EGI's geothermal research is focused on developing new technology for exploration, reservoir delineation, and production of resources in the Western United States, Latin America, and Southeast Asia.

Global Change & Sustainability Center

The Global Change & Sustainability Center coordinates, promotes, and accelerates interdisciplinary research and training on natural and human-built systems, the dynamic interactions and interconnections that exist in those systems, and the role of humans in the environment.

Institute for Clean and Secure Energy

ICSE employs an integrated, multi-disciplinary approach to the study of energy, combustion and high-temperature fuel utilization processes by combining hands-on experimental work with analytical tools and simulation. This approach enables ICSE to develop predictive tools for these highly complex processes, which span multiple scales of time and space. ICSE has the resources and expertise to address and improve the understanding of these processes, which are often associated with applied systems industrial applications.

Nano Institute

The Nano Institute of Utah provides an organization wherein scientists, engineers and clinicians from across the University, the State and elsewhere work together to attain global recognition by conquering interdisciplinary challenges in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The Institute enables Utah researchers from disciplines such as chemistry, physics, biology, engineering, medicine, and pharmacy to create synergistic alliances to drive higher levels of collaborative research, education and commercialization.

NSF Materials Research Science & Engineering Center

The primary mission of the University of Utah’s Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) on Next Generation Materials for Plasmonics and Organic Spintronics is to foster interdisciplinary basic research on new materials, develop the underlying theoretical and experimental science, train the next generation of scientists, create curiosity and excitement in Science, Math, and Engineering among the nation’s youth, transmit the knowledge to the broadest possible segments of our society, and lay the foundation of the next generation science and technology that will revolutionize society. This will be accomplished through various research, educational and outreach programs under the MRSEC. The MRSEC will create new knowledge in Plasmonics and Spintronics and transmit this to K-12 students, teachers, undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, as well as established researchers and scientists in academia. The MRSEC will create and strengthen ties with industry and national laboratories, and will promote collaborations with international scientists

NVIDIA CUDA Center of Excellence

The NVIDIA Center of Excellence at the University of Utah is using GPU technology to make significant advances in a number of scientific applications, including seismic data processing and visualization, MRI and diffusion tensor image reconstruction, cardiac electrical wave propagation simulation, combustion and fluid dynamics simulation, and several projects in large-scale scientific visualization.

Scientific Computing & Imaging Institute

Medical applications of scientific computing to topics in biomedicine are a mainstay of SCI Institute research. The main area of interest continues to be the study of bioelectric fields. Electric and magnetic fields originate from sources within the body and can also be imposed externally, typically as a means of diagnosis or treatment. Bioelectric fields from the heart are responsible for the electrocardiogram (ECG) and SCI Institute research in this area is very active. The overall goal of this research is to represent the electric sources and their behavior in the body by means of a realistic simulation model of the human thorax. Such a model would provide a means of better understanding how much information about the state of the heart is available on the body surface. We have developed geometric models of the human thorax, as well as computational tools for representing the sources of electric fields in the heart. Current areas of interest include developing methods to better estimate the electrical activity in the heart from ECG measurements on the body surface, the inverse problem of electrocardiography. A second specific project in cardiac fields is to develop computation tools for defibrillation. Defibrillators are essential devices in emergency medicine but in recent years have also become implantable. Patients with known instabilities in the electrical activity of the heart can receive potentially life saving protection. The SCI Institute has developed tools for placing electrodes anywhere within an inhomogeneous geometric model of the human thorax and calculating the resulting electric fields.
The brain is also a source of bioelectric fields, and the SCI Institute is developing computer tools to image those fields. Computational methods offer a means to extract from these complex signals such information as the location of focal epilepsy, pathways of communication in the normal and abnormal brain, and perhaps even the evolution of learning. To reach these goals, we have developed high resolution models of the human head from magnetic resonance images and applied advanced signal processing and numerical simulation techniques. Researchers in the SCI Institute study techniques for image processing that fall within a conceptual framework that relies on the geometric structure of images. This conceptual framework also allows us to construct processing algorithms that are the solutions of certain kinds of partial differential equations. Treating images as functions leads to a family of techniques for preprocessing and filtering, feature extraction, segmentation, and surface modeling.

U.S.- Pakistan Center for Advanced Studies in Water

U.S.-Pakistan Center for Advanced Studies in Water at the University of Utah (USPCASW, UU) is a world class education and applied research center dedicated to resolving Pakistan’s water crises through applied research, developing specialist human resource and technologies; academia-industry collaboration; and policy formulation.

University of Utah Robotics Center

The University of Utah Robotics Center (UURC) consists of faculty and graduate students from the School of Computing and the Department of Mechanical Engineering, with a varied research program addresses diverse topics such as intelligent agents, hybrid mobile robots, humanoid robots, haptic interfaces, and personal assistive devices.

Utah Center for NanoBioSensors

The development of ultra-sensitive biological and chemical sensors is one of the grand scientific, engineering, and educational challenges of the 21st century. The Utah Center for NanoBioSensors is addressing this challenge by developing sensor platforms that exploit breakthroughs in nanomaterials, miniaturization, sample collection, preparation strategies, and signal detection.

Utah Center of Trace Explosives Detection

The goal of the Utah Center of Trace Explosives Detection is to prototype our patented sensory materials into portable devices that are suited for infield explosives detection. The sensory materials are composed of well-defined nanofibers fabricated from different building-block molecules.

Utah Nanofab

The Utah Nanofab brings together two teams of experienced researchers, engineers and scientists with backgrounds in nano-fabrication, nano-scale surface analysis, and industrial process design. The Surface Analysis Lab is the Utah Nanofab’s analysis branch. It is home to the ~5,000 square foot microscopy suite containing optical, electron, and ion microscopes. The lab’s team of scientists and researchers have years of experience in the fields of surface topography, surface chemistry and optical and dielectric properties of materials. The Utah Nanofab Cleanroom is the Utah Nanofab’s fabrication and process design branch. We have a team of experts with years of industrial and academic experience in nano-fabrication techniques. Our class 100/1000/10,000 cleanroom provides world-class equipment for lithography, deposition, etching, packaging, and more.

Graduate

Subject Areas of Research

Subject Areas

  • Acoustics
  • Adhesive Bonding
  • Aerodynamics
  • Air-pollution Mitigation
  • Algal Biofuel
  • Algorithms
  • Applied Geophysics
  • Applied Sedimentology
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Automated Vehicles
  • Behavior of Plastics
  • Behavior of Plastics
  • Biofluids
  • Bioinstrumentation
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomechanics
  • Biomedical Computing and Modeling
  • Biomedical Device Design and Manufacturing
  • Biosensors and Molecular/Cell Recognition
  • Blast Injury Mechanics
  • Blasting
  • Bridge Design
  • Carbon Sequestration
  • Catalysis and Reaction Engineering
  • Ceramics
  • Civil Infrastructure Engineering
  • Combustion
  • Communications
  • Composite Materials Behavior and Mechanics
  • Computational Materials and Nanomaterials
  • Computer Applications
  • Computer Engineering
  • Computer Graphics
  • Computer Hardware Systems
  • Computer Networks
  • Computer Operating Systems
  • Computer Programming and Applications
  • Computer-aided Design
  • Concrete Behavior
  • Control Systems
  • Corrosion Fatigue
  • Crashworthiness
  • Databases
  • Design Methods
  • Digital Media
  • Dynamic Testing
  • Earthquake Engineering
  • Educational Software
  • Electromagnetics
  • Electronic Materials
  • Endocrine Diruption
  • Energy Conversion
  • Energy Harvesting
  • Energy Storage
  • Energy and Fuels
  • Engineering Education
  • Environmental Applications
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Fluid Dynamics
  • Ergonomics
  • Extreme Scale Data Management
  • Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites
  • Fiber-reinforced Concrete
  • Field Investigations
  • Fluid Mechanics
  • Fretting Fatigue
  • Gas Dynamics
  • Gas Turbine Blade Cooling and Aerodynamics
  • Geotechnical Engineering
  • Geothermal Engineering
  • Global Learning
  • Groundwater Contamination
  • Haptics
  • Heat Transfer
  • Human Computer Interaction
  • Human Factors Engineering
  • Hybrid Simulation
  • Hydrometallurgy
  • Image Processing
  • Imaging
  • Industrial Safety
  • Inertial Sensing
  • Infrastructure
  • Integrated Circuits Design
  • Investigative Engineering
  • Machine Design
  • Machine Learning
  • Manufacturing Engineering
  • Materials Engineering
  • Mechatronics
  • Micro- and Nano-device Fabrication
  • Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS)
  • Microelectronic Devices
  • Micromechanics
  • Microscale Fluids
  • Microscale Heat Transfer
  • Microscale Thermal Fluids
  • Mine Systems Design and Simulation
  • Mine Ventilation and Air Conditioning
  • Mineral Processing
  • Mobile and Embedded Systems
  • Molecular Engineering
  • Molecular Modeling
  • Multi-scale Simulation
  • NanoComposites
  • Nanomaterials
  • Natural Language Processing
  • Neural Engineering and Prosthetics
  • Neural Interfaces
  • Non-traditional Manufacturing
  • Nuclear Engineering
  • Nuclear Forensics
  • Nuclear Medicine
  • Occupational Biomechanics
  • Occupational Safety
  • Ocular Injury
  • Open-pit Planning and Design
  • Optics and Optoelectronics
  • Parallel Computing
  • Pavements
  • Perception
  • Pharmaceutics and Targeted Drug Delivery
  • Physical Metallurgy
  • Polymer Science
  • Precision Engineering
  • Process Identification and Control
  • Programming Languages
  • Pyrometallurgy
  • Quality Assurance in Design
  • Quantitative Physiology
  • Radiochemistry
  • Radion Detection and Dectors Development
  • Reaction Engineering
  • Real Time Hybrid Simulation
  • Reclamation
  • Rehabilitation Engineering
  • Reliability in Design
  • Remote Sensing and Imaging
  • Renewable Energy
  • Reservoir Engineering
  • Rheology
  • Robotics
  • Rock Mechanics
  • Scientific Computing
  • Seismic Evaluation
  • Seismic Rehabilitation
  • Semi-conductors
  • Sensor Development
  • Signal Processing
  • Smart Grid System
  • Smart Systems
  • Soil Mechanics
  • Solar Energy
  • Steel and Concrete Engineering
  • Structural Engineering
  • Structural Integrity in Design
  • Structure Health Monitoring (SHM)
  • Surface/Groundwater Interaction
  • Surgical Instrumentation Design
  • Sustainability
  • Sustainable Energy Engineering
  • Sustainable Manufacturing
  • Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Inorganic Materials
  • Systems Engineering
  • Systems Safety
  • Thermal Remediation
  • Thermoacoustics
  • Thermodynamics
  • Tissue Engineering
  • Transport in Porous Media
  • Transportation Engineering
  • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Tribology
  • Turbulent Boundary Layers
  • Turbulent Flow
  • VLSI System Design
  • Vibrations
  • Visualization
  • Wastewater Epidemiology
  • Wastewater Processes
  • Water Quality
  • Water Resources
  • Well Logging
  • Wind Engineering
  • Wind Power Engineering

Graduate

Dual Degrees

Graduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

There are now three dual degree programs offered in the Graduate Engineering program. They are:

MS/ME/ MBA

MS/CS/ MBA

MS/ECE/ MBA

Graduate

Student Appointments

Appointments by Department

Appointments - Number of Appointments
Stipend - Average Monthly Stipend

Department Fellowships TA RA Other Total Appts.
Bioengineering
Appointments: 13 7 69 41 130
Stipends: $2,282 $1,487 $2,081 $2,004
Chemical Engineering
Appointments: 12 1 32 11 56
Stipends: $2,472 $2,333 $2,446 $2,333
Civil & Environmental Engineering
Appointments: 10 15 48 0 73
Stipends: $2,056 $1,850 $1,800 $0
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Appointments: 6 25 69 21 121
Stipends: $3,083 $1,493 $2,124 $2,074
Geological Engineering
Appointments: 12 14 37 10 73
Stipends: $2,040 $2,040 $2,040 $2,040
Materials Science & Engineering
Appointments: 1 0 16 0 17
Stipends: $1,250 $0 $1,933 $0
Mechanical Engineering
Appointments: 10 52 52 8 122
Stipends: $1,874 $1,584 $1,776 $1,673
Metallurgical Engineering
Appointments: 2 0 45 3 50
Stipends: $2,000 $0 $1,890 $1,800
Mining Engineering
Appointments: 2 0 6 1 9
Stipends: $1,662 $0 $1,662 $0
School of Computing
Appointments: 6 57 120 22 205
Stipends: $3,020 $1,870 $2,375 $2,375
All Total Appointments 74 171 494 117 856