University of Nebraska, Lincoln - 2016

Institution Information

Contact Information

Institution's Mailing Address

Institution Name: University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Mailing Address: 114 Othmer Hall
P.O. Box 880642
City: Lincoln
State: NE
Postal Code: 68588
Country: United States
Phone 402-472-3181
Fax: 402-472-7792
Website: http://engineering.unl.edu/

Undergraduate Admission Inquiries

Justin Brown
Director
Scholarships and Financial Aid
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
17 ADMN
Lincoln, NE 68588-0411
Phone: 402-472-2030
justin.brown@unl.edu

Maggie Jobes
Director of Recruitment
Dean's Office
University of Nebraska Lincoln
OTHM 209
Lincoln, NE 68588-0642
Phone: 402-472-7094
maggie.jobes@unl.edu

Graduate Admission Inquiries

Lily Wang
Associate Dean, Graduate Programs & Faculty Development
Architectural Engineering
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
101A PKI
Omaha, NE 68182-0681
Phone: 402-554-2065
lwang4@unl.edu

Anuradha Subramanian
Professor - Graduate Chair
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
207L Othmer Hall
Lincoln, NE 68588-0643
Phone: 402-472-3463
asubramanian2@unl.edu

Hamid Sharif
Professor - Graduate Chair
Telecommunications Engineering
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
200C PKI
Omaha, NE 68182-0572
Phone: 402-554-3628
hsharif@unl.edu

Jinsong Huang
Associate Professor - Grad Chair
Materials Engineering
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
W308 Nebraska Hall
Lincoln, NE 68588-0526
Phone: 402-472-2640
jhaung2@unl.edu

Wei Qiao
Associate Professor - Graduate Chair
Electrical Engineering
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
223N Scott Engieering Center
Lincoln, NE 68588-0511
Phone: 402-472-9619
wqiao3@unl.edu

Jason Cruise
Assoc Dir, Admissions Operations & Tech
Office of Graduate Studies
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
116 SEH
Lincoln, NE 68588-0619
Phone: 402-472-2845
jcruise2@unl.edu

Jeyam Subbiah
Associate Professor
Biological Systems Engineering
University of Nebraska Lincoln
212 L.W. Chase Hall
Lincoln, NE 668583-0726
Phone: 402-472-4944
jeyam.subbiah@unl.edu

Linxia Gu
Associate Professor - Graduate Chair
Biomedical Engineering
University of Nebraska Lincoln
NH W317.2
Lincoln, NE 68588-0526
Phone: 402-472-7680
lgu@unl.edu

Terry Stentz
Associate Professor - Graduate Chair
Construction Engineering & Management
University of Nebraska Lincoln
113 NH
Lincoln, NE 68588-0500
Phone: 402-472-5078
tstentz1@unl.edu

Micah Chafee
Program Coordinator
Engineering Management
University of Nebraska Lincoln
PKI 100
Omaha, NE 68182-0176
Phone: 402-554-6009
mchaffee4@unl.edu

Yusong Li
Associate Professor - Grad. Chair
Civil Engineering
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
SLNK N114
Lincoln, NE 68588-6105
Phone: 402-472-5972
yli7@unl.edu

John Reid
Professor - Grad. Chair
Mechanical & Materials Engineering
University of Nebraska Lincoln
NH W359
Lincoln, NE 68588-0526
Phone: 402-472-3084
jreid@unl.edu

Josephine Lau
Associate Professor - Grad. Chair
Durham School Of Architectural Engineering & Construction
University of Nebraska - Lincoln
PKI 203D
Omaha, NE 68182-0681
Phone: 402-554-2079
jlau3@unl.edu

Institution Information

General Information


Type of institution: PUBLIC
Academic Year: SEMESTERS
Setting of Main Engineering Campus URBAN

Main Campus Information

Is the main campus located in a city with a population greater than 100,000?: Yes
Name of this city, or if no, the name of the nearest city of any size?: Lincoln
This city's population (approx.): 277,348
Distance from Main Campus: 0

Total Enrollment

Total Undergraduate enrollment: 20,833
Total Graduate enrollment: 4,567
Total Professional and other enrollment: 497

Non-Engineering Degree Granting Colleges

Business, Communications, Education, Fine arts, Law, Liberal arts, Natural sciences, Architecture, Agricultural Sciences, Arts & Sciences, Education and Human Sciences

Institution Information

General Admissions

Entrance Requirements and Recommendations

Requirements

You are guaranteed admission if you meet the core course requirements and at least one performance requirement. If you don't meet these requirements, we strongly encourage you to apply anywayâ€"your admission will be determined by a committee appointed by the Director of Admissions and your complete academic profile will be considered.
Performance Requirements

First-Year applicants should:

Score 20 or higher on the ACT, writing portion not required.
Or, score a total of 950 or higher on the SAT Critical Reading and Math sections.
Or, rank in the top half of their high school graduating class.
All first-year applicants under the age of 23 are required to submit an official ACT or SAT score.

Core Course Requirements

There are 16 units of academic courses required for admission.

A unit is one year of high school study or a semester/quarter of college coursework.
High School Classes

Here is a list of Nebraska high school classes that count toward core course requirements.
Ways to Meet Admission Requirements

If you are missing courses required for admission, there are ways to remove the deficiencies before you enroll.
Core Courses
Required academic courses
Category Requirements
English 4 units of English:
Units must include intensive reading and writing experiences.
Mathematics 4 units of math:

Algebra
Algebra II
Geometry
1 additional unit that builds on knowledge and concepts learned in Algebra II

Social Sciences 3 units of social sciences:

1 unit drawn from American and/or world history
1 additional unit drawn from history
American government and/or geography
a 3rd unit drawn from any social science discipline

Natural Sciences 3 units of natural sciences:

At least 2 units selected from:
biology
chemistry
physics
earth sciences
1 unit must include laboratory instruction

Foreign Language 2 units of foreign language:

Both units must be in the same language.
Students who are unable to take 2 years of foreign language in high school may still qualify for admission.
NOTE: Some University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln degree programs require the equivalent of 4 years of high school foreign language in the same language in order to graduate.
View foreign language requirements by degree.

College Specific Requirements

All colleges at the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln require students meet the minimum core course and performance admission requirements. (as listed above)

Some colleges have additional requirements that students must meet in order to be admitted to their requested college.
The Explore Center

If you do not meet college specific requirements you can still be admitted through our Explore Center.

you will be advised by the Explore Center until you meet the college specific requirements for your desired college.
once you've met your college's requirements, you will have the opportunity to transfer into the college you requested.

Colleges With NO Additional Requirements

The colleges below do not have additional requirements beyond core course and performance requirements.

College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources
College of Arts & Sciences
College of Education & Human Sciences
College of Journalism & Mass Communications

Colleges With Additional Requirements

College of Architecture
Architecture course requirements
Category Requirements
Math

1 full unit of Pre-Calc/Trig
OR 1/2 unit Pre-Calc/Trig
1/2 unit Math/Calc

ACT/SAT scores

ACT composite score of 22 or higher.
OR an SAT combined score of 1030 or higher.

Transfer & Readmit Students In addition to the above requirements, must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0.
College of Business Administration
Business administration course requirements
Category Requirements
Transfer & Readmit Students Must have a cumulative GPA of 2.5.
College of Engineering
Engineering course requirements
Category Requirements
First-Year College Students
Math

1 full unit of geometry AND

As part of the 4 units required you must take:

pre-calculus
OR trigonometry
OR calculus

Natural Sciences As part of the 3 units required you must take:

chemistry
AND physics

ACT/SAT Scores

ACT composite score of 24 or higher
OR an SAT combined score of 1110 (old) or 1180 (new) or higher

Domestic Transfer Students

Must have a cumulative and last-term GPA of at least 2.5.

Hixson-Lied College of Fine & Performing Arts

AUDITION AND/OR PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS

You must also meet any audition or portfolio requirements listed below:
Audition requirements
Category Requirements
Art, Art History: No auditions or special applications.
Music, Dance: Auditions are required.

audition requirements
view audition dates by major/minor
schedule an audition

Theatre emphasis in:

performance

Auditions are required.

View the Johnny Carson School of Theatre & Film audition information.
Theatre emphasis in:

design/technical production

No portfolio or audition required.

However, there is an optional portfolio for an additional scholarship.
Theatre emphasis in:

directing & management

Application and portfolio required.

Requirements for the application and portfolio.
Theatre emphasis in:

film/new media

Supporting materials required.

View additional required materials.
Transfer & Readmit Students Film & New Media majors must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 and a semester GPA of 3.0.
College of Public Affairs & Community Service
Public affairs and community service course requirements
Category Requirements
Transfer & Readmit
Students Must have a cumulative GPA of 2.5.
College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources
PGA Golf Management Requirements
Category Requirements
PGA Golf Management
Students A 12 Handicap is required for students entering into this program. For more information, please visit: http://pgm.unl.edu/requirements.
Admission of Students on the Basis of Special Merit

Applicants who do not qualify for assured admission will automatically be considered for full admission to the University on the basis of special merit. The special merit process will make provisions for a variety of circumstances, including allowance for the special consideration to be given to: non- traditional students; returning adult students; students educated at home schools; students who do not meet the required performance criteria but who have performed at a high level of accomplishment towards the conclusion of their high school careers (sometimes called "late bloomers"); students who can provide evidence of special talents, such as outstanding musical performers; those with unique educational experience or career achievements, etc. Such students will be encouraged to provide evidence of their ability to do University level work. In addition, special consideration will be given to members of under-represented groups who present evidence of being able to succeed. Such applications will be considered by University admissions personnel following established policies and procedures. It must be emphasized that students once admitted through this process will be considered fully admitted and will not be considered by the University to have a provisional status. However, some students may have to complete specific University courses to compensate for having not completed all of the required core courses or equivalent educational attainments.
Admissions Committee

Per Admissions Office Procedures Manual in Accordance with RP- 5.2.1-4bâ€"an Admissions Committees may admit students that do not meet the Board of Regents assured admissions requirements for full admission. These decisions are based upon a holistic review of an individual applicants student record including but not limited to: academic achievement (GPA, academic courses, class rank, standardized test scores), high school course availability, recommendation letters, and retention services. The Admissions Committee will utilize this information through the holistic review process to determine whether there are other indicia in the record that would contribute to the applicant's academic success at the University. The Office of Admissions has three committees that perform the above described work: First-Year college students; Transfer/International and Special Circumstances.

The Special Circumstances Committee will holistically review applicants with special merit that are required to participate in intrusive and successful retention programs such as, but not limited to, Nebraska College Preparatory Academy, William H. Thompson Scholars, and Nebraska Athletics Support Services. The Director of Admissions must approve retention programs to be considered for the Special Circumstances Committee. Members of this committee will be appointed by the Director of Admissions.
Don't Forget

After meeting these requirements, you have to apply for admission and pay the $45 application fee to be considered for admission.
Applications After Published Admissions Deadlines

Any application received after the published deadline will be placed on a wait-list. The admissions committee will prioritize the wait-list based upon candidates that meet UNL's assured admission requirements.

Find out more about University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln assured admission requirements.

Please note there is no guarantee of admission for wait-list applicants.

Recommendations

none provided

Engineering Information

Head of Engineering

Head of Engineering

David Jones
Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs
Dean's Office
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
114 Othmer Hall
Lincoln, NE 68588-0642
Phone: 402-472-6051
djones1@unl.edu

Lance Perez
Dean College of Engineering
College of Engineering
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
114 Othmer Hall
Lincoln, NE 68588-0642
Phone: 402-472-5259
Fax: 402-472-7792
lperez1@unl.edu

Engineering Information

Engineering Degrees Offered

Types of Engineering Degrees

Bachelor's:B.S.
Master's:M.S. with thesis, M.S. without thesis, but with project or report, M.Eng., MARE
Doctoral:Ph.D.

Computer Science Degrees Awarded Outside the College/School of Engineering

Bachelor's, Master's, Doctoral

Engineering Information

Engineering Departments

Engineering Department(s) Degree Granting Level Department Chair Discipline
Biological Systems Engineering Both Mark Riley Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Both Hendrik Viljoen Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering Both Daniel Linzell Civil Engineering
Computer Science and Engineering Both Matthew Dwyer Computer Science (inside engineering)
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Both Jay Puckett Architectural Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Both Jerry Hudgins Electrical/Computer Engineering
Engineering - Dean's Office Both Lance Perez Engineering (General)
Mechanical & Materials Engineering Both Jeffrey Shield Mechanical Engineering

Engineering Information

Research Centers

  • INCOLL - Research center WITHIN the college of engineering
  • INDEPT - Research center WITHIN an engineering department
  • INUNIV - Research center WITHIN university system
  • OUTUNIV - Research center OUTSIDE the university
Center/Lab Discipline Research Class Head Chair
Abacus Distributed Storage Lab Computer Science (inside engineering) INCOLL
Acoustic Listening Lab Architectural Engineering INCOLL Lily Wang
Acoustic Sound Booth Architectural Engineering INCOLL Lily Wang
Advanced Composites Lab Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering INCOLL Yuris Dzenis
Advanced Electronics Engineering Lab Computer Engineering INCOLL
Advanced Nanomaterials & Nanomanufacturing Laboratory Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering INCOLL Yuris Dzenis
Advanced Telecommunications Engineering Lab Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL Hamid Sharif
Applied Electromagnetics Research Facility Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL
Atmospheric Trace Gas Laboratory Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr. INCOLL
Atomic Force Microscopy Laboratory Mechanical Engineering INCOLL
Biological Process Development Facility Chemical Engineering INCOLL Wallace Buchholz
Biomaterials & Mechanotransduction Lab Mechanical Engineering INCOLL Jung Yul Lim
Biomechanics and Materials Lab Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering INCOLL Yuris Dzenis
Biomechanics, Biomaterials and Biomedicine Core Facility Engineering (General) INCOLL
Biomedical Imaging and Biosignal Laboratory Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr. INCOLL
Bioseperations and Biomaterials Group Biomedical Engineering INCOLL Anuradha Subramanian
Building Systems Laboratory Architectural Engineering INCOLL
Catalytic and Sorbent Materials Lab Chemical Engineering INCOLL Gustavo Larsen
Center for Communications and Information Science Computer Science (inside engineering) INCOLL
Center for Electro-Optics Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL Dennis Alexander
Center for Ergonomics and Safety Research Mechanical Engineering INCOLL
Center for Laser Analytical Studies of Trace Gas Dynamics Electrical Engineering INCOLL
Center for Microelectronic & Optical Materials Research Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering INCOLL
Center for Nontraditional Marco, Micro and Nano Machining Research Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering INCOLL Kamlakar Rajurkar
Communications and Signal-Processing Lab Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL
Complex Materials Optics Network Electrical Engineering INCOLL Mathias Schubert
Computational Thermal-Fluid Sciences Laboratory Environmental Engineering INCOLL
Constraint Systems Lab Computer Science (inside engineering) INCOLL Berthe Choueiry
Cyber-Physical Networking Lab Computer Science (inside engineering) INCOLL Mehmet Can Vuran
Digital and Computer Lab Computer Engineering INCOLL
DSP/ Controls Lab Computer Engineering INCOLL
Dynamics and Vibrations Laboratory Mechanical Engineering INCOLL Joseph Turner
Educational Robotics Programs Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL
Empirically-based Software Quality Research & Development Lab Computer Science (inside engineering) INCOLL
Energy Systems Lab Electrical Engineering INCOLL
Engineering Biomaterials and Gene Delivery Lab Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr. INCOLL Angela Pannier
Engineering Properties & Processing Lab Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr. INCOLL
Environemtal Engineering & Bioremediation Lab Environmental Engineering INCOLL
FOCuS Lab Chemical Engineering INCOLL Srivatsan Kidambi
General Electrical Lab Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL
Geotechnical Lab Architectural Engineering INCOLL
Hydraulics Lab Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr. INCOLL
Innovative Design & Ergonomic Analysis Lab Mechanical Engineering INCOLL
Intelligent Ubiquitous Computing Lab Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL Song Ci
Laboratory for Dynamic Materials Characterization Mechanical Engineering INCOLL Ruqiang Feng
Land Measure & Surveying Lab Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr. INDEPT
Laser Assisted Nano Engineering Lab Electrical Engineering INCOLL Yongfeng Lu
Lighting & Electrical Lab Architectural Engineering INCOLL Clarence Waters
Lightwave Communication Research Lab Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL
Materials Testing Lab Architectural Engineering INCOLL
Mesoscale Engineering Laboratory Chemical Engineering INCOLL Ravi Saraf
Micro/Nanoscale Thermal Science Laboratory Mechanical Engineering INCOLL
Microstructures and Magnetic Materials Lab Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering INCOLL Jeffrey Shield
Mid-America Transportation Center Civil Engineering INCOLL Laurence Rilett
Midwest Roadside Safety Facility Civil Engineering INCOLL Ronald Faller
Nanostructures Research Lab Electrical Engineering INCOLL
Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research Engr. Science and Engr. Physics INCOLL Michael Nastasi
Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience Engineering (General) INUNIV David Sellmyer
Nebraska Intelligent MoBile Unmanned Systems Lab Computer Science (inside engineering) INCOLL
Nebraska Tractor Test Lab Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering INUNIV Roger Hoy
Nebraska Transportation Center Civil Engineering INCOLL Laurence Rilett
Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory Mechanical Engineering INCOLL Yuris Dzenis
Organic Electronics and Nanoelectronics Lab Mechanical Engineering INCOLL Jinsong Huang
Passive Solar Research Group Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL
Plant Biophysics Lab Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr. INCOLL
Polymer Composites Laboratory Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering INCOLL Yuris Dzenis
Polymer Mechanics Laboratory Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering INCOLL Mehrdad Negahban
Portland Cement & Bituminous Material Lab Architectural Engineering INCOLL
Power & Energy Systems Lab Electrical Engineering INCOLL Wei Qiao
Power Laboratory Mechanical Engineering INCOLL
Robotic and Mechatronics Lab Mechanical Engineering INCOLL Shane Farritor
Smart Building Laboratories & Field Test Beds Architectural Engineering INCOLL
Soil & Water Properties Lab Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr. INDEPT
Solid State Laboratories Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL
Structural Dynamics Lab Architectural Engineering INCOLL George Morcous
Structural Laboratory Architectural Engineering INDEPT
Structures & Materials Research Lab Civil Engineering INCOLL Christopher Tuan
Surface Mechanics and Tribology Laboratory Mechanical Engineering INCOLL Ruqiang Feng
Systems Biology and Biomedical Informatics Lab Computer Science (outside engineering) INCOLL Juan Cui
Terry Research Lab Mechanical Engineering INCOLL Benjamin Terry
The Holland Computing Center Computer Science (inside engineering) INCOLL David Swanson
Translational aand Regenerative Medicine Imaging Lab Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr. INCOLL
Trauma Mechanics Research Iniative Engineering (General) INCOLL Ruqiang Feng
Ultrasonic Materials Characterization Laboratory Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering INCOLL Joseph Turner
Value-Added Processing & Food Engineering Lab Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr. INCOLL
Wireless Communications Laboratory Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL

Engineering Information

Degree Programs

Bachelor's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Biological Systems Engineering Agricultural Engineering (BSAE) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Biological Systems Engineering Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Chemical Engineering (BSCHE) Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (BSCE) Civil Engineering
Computer Science and Engineering Computer Science (BS) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Computer Science and Engineering Software Engineering (BSSE) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Construction Engineering (BSCN) Architectural Engineering
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Architectural Engineering (BSAR) Architectural Engineering
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Construction Management (BSCM) Architectural Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electronics Engineering (BSEL) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering (BSEE) Electrical Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Computer Engineering (BSCP) Computer Engineering
Engineering - Dean's Office Pre-Engineering Engineering (General)
Note: Pre-Enineering is not a degree program.
Mechanical & Materials Engineering Mechanical Engineering (BSME) Mechanical Engineering

Master's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Master's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Biological Systems Engineering Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering (MS) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Chemical Engineering (MS) Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering Environmental Engineering (MS) Environmental Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (MS) Civil Engineering
Computer Science and Engineering Computer Science (MS) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Architectural Engineering (MARE) Architectural Engineering
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Architectural Engineering (MS) Architectural Engineering
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Construction Engineering and Management (MS) Architectural Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Telecommunications Engineering (MS) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering (MS) Electrical Engineering
Engineering - Dean's Office Engineering Management (MEM) Engineering Management
Note: This degree is offered online with courses provided through the College of Engineering and the College of Business Administration's online MBA program.
Mechanical & Materials Engineering Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (MS) Mechanical Engineering

Doctoral Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Doctoral Degree Program(s) Discipline
Biological Systems Engineering Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Note: This degree has been discontinued.
Biological Systems Engineering Biological Engineering (PhD) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering (PhD) Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (PhD) Civil Engineering
Computer Science and Engineering Computer Science (PhD) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Architectural Engineering (PhD) Architectural Engineering
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Construction (PhD) Architectural Engineering
Note: This degree has been discontinued.
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Construction Engineering & Management Architectural Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Computer Engineering (PhD) Computer Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering (PhD) Electrical Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Computer Engineering-Comp & Elec Eng (PhD) Computer Engineering
Engineering - Dean's Office Biomedical Engineering (PhD) Biomedical Engineering
Engineering - Dean's Office Materials Engineering (PhD) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical & Materials Engineering Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (PhD) Mechanical Engineering

Engineering Information

Areas of Expertise

Engineering Departments Areas of Expertise
Biological Systems Engineering
  1. Bioprocess engineering
  2. Ecological engineering
  3. Biomedical engineering
  4. Soil and Water Environmental
  5. Spatial and Temporal Variability
  6. Design and Analysis of Biological Systems
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  1. Biological Process Development
  2. Nano-fabrication methods
  3. Biotechnology
  4. Computer Aided Processing
  5. Material Science
  6. Environmental
Civil Engineering
  1. Geotechnical Engineering
  2. Ecological Effects & Social Needs
  3. Structural Engineering
  4. Transportation Engineering
  5. Environmental Engineering
  6. Water Resources Engineering
Computer Science and Engineering
  1. Firmware Development
  2. Embedded Systems Engineering
  3. Software Engineering
  4. VLSI Design Engineering
  5. Internet Programming
  6. Network Engineering
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction
  1. Project Management
  2. Construction Mgmt.
  3. Energy System Design
  4. Facility Mgmt.
  5. Commercial Construction
  6. Highway/Heavy Construction
Electrical and Computer Engineering
  1. Controls Systems
  2. Digital Signal Processing
  3. Solid State Devices and Materials
  4. Communications
  5. Remote Sensing and Electromagnetic Fields
  6. Lasers & Optics
  7. Design with Microprocessors
  8. Hardware/software integration
  9. Digital Design
  10. Computer architecture and parrallel processing
Engineering - Dean's Office
  1. Undeclared Studies
Mechanical & Materials Engineering
  1. Materials Sciences
  2. Biomedical Engineering
  3. Thermal & Fluid Flow Sciences
  4. Alternative Fuels
  5. Environmental Control
  6. Energy Storage & Conversion

Engineering Information

Societies

Honor Societies

Local Groups

  • Alpha Lambda Delta
  • Mortar Board
  • Omicron Delta Kappa
  • Phi Beta Kappa
  • Phi Eta Sigma
  • Tau Beta Pi
  • The Innocents Society

Student Organizations

National Groups

  • ACM
  • ASM international
  • Acoustical Society of America
  • Am. Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics
  • Am. Inst. of Chemical Engineers
  • Am. Inst. of Industrial Eng.
  • Am. Soc. of Civil Engineers
  • Am. Soc. of Mechanical Engineers
  • Am. Society of Heating, Refrigerating and AC Engr.
  • Architectural Engineering Institute
  • Assoc. for Computing Machinery
  • Associated General Contractors of America
  • Biomedical Engineering Society
  • Chi Epsilon
  • Earthquake Engineering Research Institute
  • Engineers without Borders
  • Eta Kappa Nu
  • Illuminating Eng. Soc. of North Am.
  • Inst. of Transportation Engineers
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
  • National Society of Black Engineers
  • Natl. Assoc. of Home Builders
  • Pi Tau Sigma
  • Soc. for Automotive Engineering
  • Soc. of American Military Engineers
  • Soc. of Women Engineers
  • Society of Automotive Engineers
  • Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Water Environment Federation

Local Groups

  • Am Society of Agricultural Biological Engineers
  • Architectural Engineering Student leadership & Advisory Committee
  • College of Engineering Diplomats
  • College of Engineering Student Advisory Board
  • Emerging Green Builders
  • Engineering Ambassadors Network
  • Engineering Diplomats
  • Engineering Student Advisory Board (eSAB)
  • Husker Motorsports, Formula Society of Automotive Engineers
  • Husker Racing, Baja
  • Intl Assoc. for the Exchange of Students for Technical Experience
  • Latinos in Science and Engineering (MAES/SHPE)
  • Mechanical Electrical Specialty Contractors
  • Mechanized Systems Management Club
  • Nebraska Blueprint
  • Nebraska Society of Professional Engineers
  • Omaha NESCO
  • Sigma Lambda Chi
  • Soil and Water Resources Club
  • Structural Engineering Association of Nebraska (SEAoN)
  • Student Consortium of Speciality Contractors
  • UNL Maker Club
  • UNL Quarter Scale Tractor Team

Engineering Information

Support Programs

College's Under-Represented Student Groups

National Groups

  • African Students Association
  • African Students Association
  • Chinese Student Association
  • Indian Students' Association
  • Korean Student Association
  • Malaysian Students' Association
  • Muslim Student Association
  • Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Society of Women Engineers
  • Taiwanese Students Association
  • Vietnamese Students Association

Local Groups

  • Afghan Student Association
  • Afrikan Peoples Union
  • Asian World Alliance
  • Black Graduate Student Association
  • Black Men Organized for Retnetion and Education
  • Diversity Enhancement Team
  • Iranian Student Organization
  • Iraqi Student Union
  • Mexican American Student Association (MASA)
  • Nepalese Students Association
  • Pakistan Students Association
  • Students of Color Career Advisory Comm.
  • The Academy of National Hispanic Scholars
  • University of Nebraska Inter-Tribal Exchange

Other Student Support Programs

ďż˝ ASUN Student Legal Services Center (402) 472-3350.
ďż˝ ASUN NU On Wheels
ďż˝ Career Services www. unl.edu/careers
ďż˝ Career Decisions www.unl.edu/careers
ďż˝ Career Resource Library
ďż˝ Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)
ďż˝ Daily Nebraskan www.DailyNebraskan.com
ďż˝ E-Involvement
ďż˝ Gender Related Programs
ďż˝ GLBT and Ally Programs and Services
ďż˝ International Student and Scholar www.unl.edu/iaffairs
ďż˝ International Affairs www.unl.edu/iaffairs
ďż˝ Leadership Development
ďż˝ Student Employment and Internships www.unl.edu/careers/seic
ďż˝ Nebraska Unions
ďż˝ Need-Based Assistance
ďż˝ Nformation www.unl.edu
ďż˝ NU Directions
ďż˝ NU Portfolio
ďż˝ Off Campus Housing (402) 472-2652.
ďż˝ Services for Students with Disabilities (402) 472-3787.
ďż˝ Student Government www.unl.edu/asun
ďż˝ Student Ombuds Services (402) 472-3755.
ďż˝ Student Involvement www.si.unl.edu
ďż˝ Service Learning
ďż˝ Student Organization and Activity Resources (SOAR)
ďż˝ University Program Council
ďż˝ University Bookstores
ďż˝ University Child Care (402) 472-2101
ďż˝ University Health Center www.unl.edu/health
ďż˝ Job Seeking Services
ďż˝ Office of TRIO Programs Student Support Services (SSS)
ďż˝ Upward Bound Project (UB)
ďż˝ Upward Bound Math/Science (UBMS) (402) 472-4050

Engineering Information

Student Projects

Student Design Projects Description

Biological Systems Engineering

Team 6 Project Name: Runoff and Sedimentation Prevention of the Rogers Memorial Farm

Project Team:
Zachary Hermanek
Blake Wagner
Logan Neal
Margaret Gilseth

Project Description:
This project works to address and solve the issue of storm run-off that disrupts agriculture areas and can damage crops and vital farmland. We worked with Rogers Memorial Farm to implement a new water management system that would eliminate its current wetlands and prevent future flooding from occurring.


Team 7 Project Name: Toddler Pool Alert System

Project Team:
Megan White
Aaron Cronican
Collin Erickson
Tim Jensen

Project Description:
Drowning ends the lives of too many young children, and it is largely due to inferior current pool safety systems. This team hopes to help save lives by designing a pool safety device that improves response time, reduces false positives, and alerts parents before their child even enters the water.


Team 8 Project Name: Non-Ferrous Foreign Object Detection in Beef Trim Processing Lines

Project Team:
Alex Van Lent
Nathan Rice
Yen Xin Lu
Willie Stennis

Project Description:
No hamburger lover wants to bite into a tainted burger. This project will evaluate current methods to detect objects, which are not fully effective in finding small non-ferrous objects. They will then recommend a more effective method to Cargill Meat Solutions ™.


Team 9 Project Name: Fountain Wars

Project Team:
Julia Franck
Mitch Maguire
Justin Herting
Karissa Brehm

Project Description:

Heads up! This team has built and designed a beach ball launcher. The UNL Fountain Wars team will take it to the ASABE Fountain Wars competition this summer, where it will perform tasks based on specific guidelines. The team is working to continue the legacy of several years of successful UNL teams at this competition.


Team 11 Project Name: University of Nebraska-Lincoln Quarter Scale Tractor

Project Team:
Ryan Hanousek
Micah Bolin
Sydney Gard

Project Description:
This team is helping the push for advancements in farming technology. They are designing and building a quarter scale tractor that they take to the national competition every year to test whether it’s safe, practical and economical. In 2015, a UNL team won the quarter scale tractor national championship. This year’s tractor has a data management system that allows operators to view all of the tractor’s gauges on a screen on the arm rest. They will bring this tractor to display at the showcase.


Team 20 Project Name: Cambridge, NE Wastewater Treatment Plant

Project Team:
Paula Sandoval
Mackenzie Miller
Kevan Reardon
Christian Jewett
Kyle Olson

Project Description:
Wastewater treatment is a necessary process; expensive wastewater treatment isn’t. This group is going to develop a step-by-step plan to implement an alternative way for wastewater treatment plants to aerate their oxidation ditches in a less excessive way than the current process. They will do this for the Wastewater Treatment plant in Cambridge, Nebraska.


Team 26 Project Name: Development of a Non-Occluding Stent Graft Expansion Device

Project Team:
Samantha Nelson
Halle Swann
Christopher Davidson
Jaideep Sahni

Project Description:
Aortic aneurysms occur when there is abnormal widening of the aorta due to the weakening of the blood vessel wall. Current treatments for this condition is endovascular stent graft repair. The current method for this involves occlusion (blockage) of blood flow in the aorta which leads to an increase in blood pressure. This team intends to find a new method of sealing the stent graft which will lead to a decrease in occlusion.


Team 28 Project Name: Battlefield Wound Dressing for Abdominal Compartment Syndrome

Project Team:
Drew Dudley
Sophie Walsh
Ellie Ahlquist
Cody Houdesheldt

Project Description:
Many soldiers develop abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS), a build-up of pressure in abdominal organs that causes organ dysfunction, due to trauma. The objective of this project is to develop a wound covering with the ability to signal to physicians when organ oxygenation has decreased to a life-threatening level,


Team 31 Project Name: Child Motion Feedback Sensor

Project Team:
Katelyn Watts
Michael Moeller
Brinson Chapp
Zach Janecek

Project Description:
This team has designed a device to help stimulate cognitive development in developmentally disabled infants. The device can be hidden behind a favorite toy of an infant, with feedback coming from a gooseneck arm that encourages intentional motor movement.


Team 34 Project Name: UNL ASABE Robotics Design Team

Project Team:
Adam Frerichs
Dillon Clayton
Josh Krueger
Josh Meyer
Adam Frerichs

Project Description:
This team continues to design new and exciting robots for the ASABE Robotics Competition. For this year’s competition, they have developed a fully autonomous robot that has the ability to gather ping pong balls. The objective is to meet the emphasis for this year’s competition which is to develop a robot that simulates the harvest of a citrus crop.


Team 35 Project Name: Device to Measure Frailty Preceding Surgery

Project Team:
Zac Duncan
Nicole Schwery
Zhichen Wang
Dillon Soukup

Project Description:
How at risk are you to complications after surgery? This team has designed a device to help you find out. The device is a chair that can collect and store data from tests commonly used to assess the physical aspect of frailty. The chair has the ability to collect information on four aspects of physical frailty: walking speed, grip strength, get-up-and-go time, and weight.


Team 38 Project Name: Cooling System for Poppycock Production Line

Project Team:
Ashley Eure
Megan Tucker
Eric Davis
Danni Liu

Project Description:
Production of a popcorn snack with a candy coating is failing to meet cluster size restrictions due to insufficient cooling, which creates popcorn clumps that clog the packaging line. This design consists of ductwork and a filter that will allow cold air to be circulated out and back into the tunnel through which the product moves on a conveyor. In this process, the air is filtered of any paint flakes by the filter attached at to the duct.


Team 49 Project Name: Mechanical System to Allow for Two Dimensional Walking of Pediatric Patients

Project Team:
Jake Meyer
Jared Thomsen
David Marshall
Jackie Hernandez
Luke Samuelson

Project Description:
Children with developmental disabilities require most or all of their weight to be supported by a two-dimensional walking system. Our design supports the weight of the children while allowing for variances in age, height, and weight. Existing resources at the Munroe-Meyer Institute limited the freedom for children to play or for therapists to effectively assist with gait motion. The goal of our design processes was to effectively remedy these limitations without infringing upon any other necessary components of the apparatus..


Team 58 Project Name: Development of 3-Dimensional Calibration Platform

Project Team:
Nick Vandenberg

Project Description:
This team deigned and built a functional prototype of a calibration platform for ultrasound research that would allow programmable movement of an ultrasound transducer in three dimensions.

Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

Team 5 Project Name: Production of Propylene Glycol from Crude Glycerol

Project Team:
Mackensey Fagan
Alan Akil
Feng Chen
Jordan Horan
Trieu Nguyen

Project Description:
We all want to find a “greener” way of doing things. This project will consist of implementing an environmentally feasible way to produce propylene glycol from crude glycerol. Nothing will be wasted; excess water will be used with wind power to make hydrogen and electricity. The crude glycerol itself will be made using a second-generation bio plant.


Team 10 Project Name: Sustainable Algae Biodiesel and Glycerol Carbonate Utilizing Waste Water Nutrients​

Project Team:
Than N Nguyen
Pat Iverson
Eric Bertone
John Platel

Project Description:

Most processes can be designed to be cheaper, less time-consuming and safer. By using algae grown in waste water, this team will develop a sustainable way to produce biodiesel and glycerol carbonate. Biodiesel is a fuel source that burns cleaner than fossil fuel and doesn’t add to the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Using waste water as a nutrient source will provide an alternative to the current less safe and costlier extraction methods.


Team 13 Project Name:Green Dimethyl Ether Production

Project Team:
Katelyn Coleman
Carina Winters
Matthew Sis
Max Meier

Project Description:
There may be a green, alternative automobile fuel source with Dimethyl ether (DME), which has been used as a propellant and feedstock for other processes. This team will assess whether there can be a process to produce 50,000 metric tons of 99.5 wt% DME per year.


Team 15 Project Name: Sewage Sludge Gasification for Alcohol Production

Project Team:
Kelly Hudek
Zully Perez
Connor Aylor
Christine Jisa
Pedro Galvao

Project Description:
As the population increases, wastewater treatment plants must deal with processing more and more sewage sludge in efficient and environmentally friendly ways. As one way to address this problem, this team presents gasification: a process that converts carbon-based materials into carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. This gas mixture is further reacted to produce methanol and other useful chemical products that can be sold to offset production costs.


Team 18 Project Name: Sustainable DMC Production

Project Team:
Wil Lage
Clay Cameron
Tanner Gosda
Jacob Baumgartner
Jules Hansen

Project Description:
You may not realize how important Dimethyl Carbonate is in daily life. It is a highly organic solvent and has been used in paints, lithium batteries and as a fuel additive. This group intends to design and test a more sustainable and green DMC production process. They intend to achieve this by using the reaction of urea and methanol, both of which are self-produced using green materials.


Team 27 Project Name: Production of Yeast for Second Generation Ethanol Production

Project Team:
Eric Berglund
Jack Rauch
Parviz Kholmatov
Jacob Olson

Project Description:
A new yeast strain has been developed which benefits second generation fuel ethanol production. The new yeast will increase the conversion of sugars in biomass to ethanol. This group will design a plant that will develop the new yeast strain. They will implement a cost-saving and sustainable way of growing yeast in batches by using a continuous cultivator rather than multiple large tanks.


Team 36 Project Name: CO2 Capture and Reuse From Anaerobic Digestion Biogas

Project Team:
Bradley Schrag
Matt Thompson
Chaise Surmeier
Samuel Baumgartner

Project Description:
With the increasing concern of global warming, CO2 emission reductions are an area of growing focus throughout the world. Anaerobic digestion is a relatively recent process that has been developed to convert organic compounds into biogas (a mixture of gases produced by the breakdown of organic matter in the absence of oxygen) that can be collected and used for electricity generation. This process uses sewage sludge, manure, processing residues, agriculture residues, and energy crops. Our process to capture and convert CO2 into usable energy can help address climate change by producing 9,400 tonnes of methane annually from Platte County for use in methanol production.


Team 37 Project Name: Biodiesel Production using Enzymatic and Inorganic Catalyst

Project Team:
Alfred Berchtold
Robert Nickel
Chris Duerschner
Devin Jensen

Project Description:
This project’s purpose is to find a new process of producing biodiesel. The current process uses a large supply of food supply oil, caustic and acid material, waste water, methanol and waste glycerol. This new process will be less expensive and reduce the depletion of other resources, instead producing biodiesel from a non-food supply source â€" Jatropha curcas oil.



Civil Engineering

Team 1 Project Name: UNL East Campus Green Infrastructure Design

Project Team:
Baylor Bestgen
David Engelhaupt
Scott Fischer
Brandon Purintun
Matthew Schwindt
Nho Vo

Project Description:
A poorly designed parking lot can become a floodplain when stormy weather hits. This team will design a parking lot with Best Management Practices implemented to reduce and filter that pesky stormwater runoff. They will accomplish this using bioswales, bioretention areas, and permeable pavements.


Team 3 Project Name: UNL-East Campus Parking Lot Retrofit

Project Team:
Greg Rademacher
Dennis Stille
Jeremiah Dixon
Christian Jensen
Mark Friend
Richard McKeever

Project Description:

The University of Nebraska â€" Lincoln is seeking design proposals for a 10-acre site adjacent to the Dental College on East Campus. The property consists of three parking lots, tennis courts, a basketball court, and open space which the University wishes to redevelop to enhance the campus environment. Stormwater management will seek to reduce both flooding and pollution issues in the Dead Man’s Run watershed. The mandatory elements of this project also include the layout and design of a surface parking and the design of an outdoor interpretive display to educate student, faculty and the general public about the environmentally beneficial, i.e. “green” features of the project.


Team 44 Project Name: UNL Surface Parking Lot Green Infrastructure Retrofit

Project Team:
Timothy Adams
Cade Karlberg
Taylor Reinsch
Zach Hammelmann

Project Description:
We are designing a retro fit an east campus green space that will provide more parking, mitigate flood problems, and create a new recreation space.


Team 55 Project Name: Raster Consulting

Project Team:
Cody Preisler
Ryan Roenigk
Jace Furley

Project Description:
This team designed a parking lot located on UNL's East Campus, including best management practices to protect local streams. There is a new green space for future students to use and an interactive display for the public to learn more about best management practices.


Team 56 Project Name: East Campus Green Retro-Fit

Project Team:
Jordan Vavrina
Wei Lin Lee
Brandon Wilfong

Project Description:


Computer Science & Engineering/Raikes School


Team 2 Project Name: Hudl Recommended Basketball Highlights

Project Team:
Derek Nordgren
Michael Hollman
Brendan Smith
Trevor Poppen
Darren Johnson

Project Description:
How does a talented athlete stand out when there’s so much competition? The team will work with Hudl to provide athletes with brief “highlight” footage consisting of only their best plays. These “best plays” can be pinpointed by using the crowd noise as an indicator of a play’s “highlight worthiness.” They will then single out these plays into 10-second video clips for the athletes to review.


Team 17 Project Name: Raikes School Design Studio College of Law Project

Project Team:
Patrick Luddy
Sydney Goldberg
Eric Sinovic
Quan Tran
Ryan Long
Ian Howell
Cooper Knaak

Project Description:
Most students have the same question after school: what do I do now? The NU College of Law’s Build Your Character program helps law students answer this query. This team will make the program even more convenient by developing Android and iOS apps. It helps give them the ability to “develop real world skills and more fully prepare for post-school life.” The app tracks progress through a student’s time at law school and chart the traits gained, allowing them to see where they excel and need to improve.


Team 39 Project Name: Nelnet Business Solutions: Project Honeycomb

Project Team:
Tracy Moody
Caleb Zatorski
Hoang Nguyen
Samuel Lindvall
Joel Mohrmann
Katy Stuckey

Project Description:
Project Honeycomb solves the problems of applications having vastly different user experiences by providing a suite of shared services to the client’s ecosystem. It seeks to unify user experience by providing central authentication, a customizable look and feel, central navigation, and a data store for user and institution information.


Electrical & Computer Engineering


Team 4 Project Name: Air-Data Receiving Electronic System

Project Team:
Trevor Hoke
Travis Zoucha
Evan Stohlmann
Jun Jie Liang

Project Description:

Optimizing employee workflow is the focus of this team’s senior project. Working with the Air-Data Receiving Electronic System (ARES, they will streamline data collection from company-owned meters by the employee, and the collected data will be transferred to an online database using the ARES desktop application.


Team 12 Project Name: Destroyer Bot 3000

Project Team:
Steven Pasika
Eric Thomas
Jess Hipke
Justin Hood

Project Description:
The Destroyer Bot 3000 may sound intimidating, but this team describes it as “fun for the whole family.” Standing about a foot tall, it’s a remote-controlled, robot that balances itself on a bowling ball. Its motors allow for a plenty of maneuverability, allowing it to turn and move quickly.


Team 14 Project Name: Video Controlled Robots

Project Team:
Michael Blaisdell
Dylan Fromm
Tyrell Galloway
Kossivi Acolatse

Project Description:
You may have heard of remote-controlled robots, but what about video-controlled robots? The three robots built by this team can be located and directed by real time input from a webcam. This is achieved with the use of a small computer, radio transmitters and a circuit board. At the showcase, the robot will move an object to a predetermined location.


Team 16 Project Name: Vertical

Project Team:
Michael Gharzai
Saleh Bahaisami
Will Bachmann

Project Description:
Whether just at home or for a mass industry, we may be on the verge of a more efficient way of growing plants. This project will achieve this using nutrient supplemented water, which will be pumped and regulated by a micro controller. The system will read sensors and display information to the user on a raspberry pi computer.


Team 19 Project Name: Trend Tracker

Project Team:
Andrew Peterson
Cyle Kling
Joel Thiessen
David Danielson

Project Description:
It’s time to hit the stores again, but you want to beat the crowd. What are the busiest times? When is the best time to head out? Trend Tracker can help answer these questions! It’s a location tracking system that records the traffic patterns of shopping carts using ultrasonic frequencies.


Team 21 Project Name: GCP Sensor Network

Project Team:
Cameron Entzminger
Royce Wilson
Cody Boardman
Michael Tritz

Project Description:
This team is working with the Biology Department at UNO by creating a cost-effective means for measuring microclimate variation at the Glacier Creek Preserve. Their sensor network accomplishes this with seven solar powered sensor notes that gather data about soil moisture content, soil temperature, and air temperature.


Team 22 Project Name: Salvadoodle Doodler

Project Team:
Shane Kraus
Andrew Nelson
Andy He
Alex Hinton

Project Description:
The team is building a unique mobile plotter (robot) capable of drawing vector graphics, in the same vein as 2-D plotters. The robot will have motor control and instruction processing done by an LPC1115 microcontroller, and stepper motors will provide the robot with a precise method of locomotion. The Salvadoodle Doodler will doodle a place in your heart.


Team 23 Project Name: Ulticube

Project Team:
Casey Murphy
Trevor Sutter
Ryan Humphrey
Micah Moravec

Project Description:
Ulticube is a cube of 6-inch sides that attempts to balance on one of its edges. It uses the angular momentum of a spinning metal flywheel to balance itself.


Team 25 Project Name: 3D Scanner

Project Team:
Michael Harper
Sam Murray
Seth Bashford
Aaron Krause

Project Description:
Uh oh, your coffee cup just broke. Well, I guess you’ll have to print another one. The 3D Scanner is a device that takes a real world object, scans it, and generates a computer model of the object. The model can then be 3D printed to create a clone, or it can be modified at will.


Team 42 Project Name: 2-1B Spheroid

Project Team:
Morgan Erickson
Keaton Koehler
Kevin Stearns
Alex Tran

Project Description:
With the “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” creating worldwide buzz, robots are in the spotlight, especially the BB8 droid. This remote-controlled vehicle is enclosed in a ball with a moveable head that stays on top even as the outer shell rolls around it. Inspired by BB8, we created the 2-1B Spheroid, another remote-controlled robot with a moveable head that also contains a camera that will stream a view of the spheroid as it moves.


Team 43 Project Name: G88 Facelock

Project Team:
Mitchell Faltin
Andrew Thielen
Matt Lawrence
Andrew Brown

Project Description:
A facial recognition security software on a lightweight platform


Team 46 Project Name: Stingray Monitoring System (SMS)

Project Team:
Ryan Durr
Heath Gress
Troy Green
Zeyang Cai

Project Description:
This system monitors the dissolved oxygen levels, temperatures and other items in backup aquatic tanks that the Henry Doorly Zoo in Omaha uses to house its stingray population and other aquatic creatures. Sensors can be programmed to send alerts via text message or email when levels fall outside accepted parameters. Last July, the Brookfield Zoo in Chicago lost all 54 of its stingrays in less than a day after oxygen levels dropped in their tanks for less than half of an hour.


Team 54 Project Name: G87: Robotic Hand

Project Team:
Yuanfang Shi
Dong Zhang
Casey Simonson
Yuanfang Shi

Project Description:
The mimicking hand is able to move along with the user's inputted hand movements based off of our unique code. Most of the materials were 3D printed right here at the UNL EE shop.


Team 57 Project Name: Drone Surveillance

Project Team:
Brandon Guenther
Jack Olson
Joe Gonzalez
Kossivi Agbenohevi

Project Description:
A mobile surveillance system that uses a drone with an attached camera. The drone only responds to grid detection system.


Mechanical & Materials Engineering

Team 24 Project Name: Apollo One Chair

Project Team:
Adam Vlach
John Hall
Parise Reynolds
Nicholas Perez

Project Description:
It’s time to bring the wobbly old school desk into the 21st century. The Apollo One Chair is meant to do just that. The chair is comfortable, accessible to students of nearly every shape and size, and it has a built-in battery pack to charge any electronics. The Apollo One Chair will help develop a more satisfied and productive classroom.


Team 29 Project Name: NASA Rover Robotic Arm

Project Team:
Devin Flemming
Weston Lewis
Alan Goodenburger
Blake Stewart

Project Description:
Who knows what strange, unearthly samples the NASA rover could collect? Of course, it actually needs something to collect those samples with! NASA has funded this team to develop a robot arm for their own robot to show off at the yearly NASA RASC-AL Robo Ops competition. The arm must be able to pick up 2 to 8 cm diameter rocks weighing up to 150 grams. It must also be able to accommodate long distance operation, in light rain and be easily operable.


Team 30 Project Name: Husker Motorsports

Project Team:
James Peck
Sam Buller

Project Description:
Ready! Set! Go! Husker Motorsports is a student group that designs, builds, markets, and races a miniature race-car each year at competitions in the U.S. and Canada. Each year they construct a brand new car to compete. Though it’s not a Senior Project, the group will present their project since it is heavily involved in design work.


Team 32 Project Name: Semi-Automation of a Bung Torquing Process

Project Team:
Geena Brown
John Ebke
Anthony Bertrand

Project Description:
This team is designing a project that will help Garner Industries expand their existing plastic injection molded product line to include the manufacture of 55-gallon drum lids. They are designing a machine that can automate this process. The machine uses two individually driven servo motors to twist the plugs to a specified torque.


Team 33 Project Name: Water Desalination Unit

Project Team:
Andrew Benson
Adam Aldana
Joseph Beeson
Richard Kruse
Travis Stoltenberg

Project Description:
As the demand for clean drinking water increases throughout the world, it is important to find new ways to supply it. This team’s project is a desalination device which utilizes heat to boil the water and capture and condense the water vapor into clean drinking water. The device will largely be used in third world countries, or in disaster situations.


Team 40 Project Name: Automated CNC Coolant Delivery Arm

Project Team:
Alex Culp
Merrit Blackburn
Karl Woerth
Daniel McAllister

Project Description:
A robotic arm for CNC mill coolant delivery, to be mounted on an existing machining head. The arm will rotate around the head to apply coolant from the opposite side of the tool as existing nozzles, and rotate out of the way when the mill needs to change tools. This allows for coolant to reach all sides of the tool and ensure proper cooling.


Team 41 Project Name: Design of Front Wing for a Formula SAE Car

Project Team:
Rachel Horzewski
James Peck
Brittney Bridger-Burton
Ryan Coughlin

Project Description:
The purpose of this project was to design a front wing for a Formula SAE vehicle as part of the aerodynamics package created for the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Formula SAE team. In addition to creating the design, analysis was performed for manufacturability and cost as well as justification for including the wing on the vehicle despite its added weight. As a final component of the design project, our team created a wind tunnel testing plan that includes a portable, self-contained model setup that can be used in a number of different wind tunnels.


Team 45 Project Name: Load-Triggered Automatically Locking Walker

Project Team:
Phillip Knutson
Allen Pille
Huanqing Wang

Project Description:
The goal of this project is to design a walking aid device which will prevent the user from falling to either side. This is accomplished by deploying a pair of braces when a fall is imminent. An imminent fall is detected by sensing a difference in the force pressing on each of the handles. The entire system is designed to be electronics-free.


Team 47 Project Name: Airbus Shopfloor Challenge Robot - "Diane the Delta Drill"

Project Team:
Alex Drozda
Tory Weeder
Colton Bailey
Kyle Stewart

Project Description:
Our robot automates the construction process of an airliner, allowing a robotic parallel arm system to drill holes in confined or difficult-to-access spaces. This cuts down on machining costs as fewer drilling errors will be made. For an Airbus competition, the Delta Robot will drill holes in a tilted platform, using various sensors to determine the height and angle of the platform and orient the drill accordingly.


Team 50 Project Name: Husker Race to Uganda

Project Team:
Maggie Clay
Melissa Kesterson
Zachary Boyer
Dana Fuchs
Zachary Gardner
Collin Humphrey
Scott Schenkelberg
Josiah Johnson

Project Description:
We worked to fabricate and install a machine that could be used to flatten drinking straws for the Kinawataka Women Initatives group in Kampala, Uganda. This required the students traveling to Kampala over spring break to install the machine. Other aspects of this project included working in collaboration with a group of students from the business college as well as analyzing the design. After this analysis was complete a low cost alternative was design for the women.

Engineering Information

College Description

Engineering College Description and Special Characteristics

As the only engineering college in Nebraska, we take our role very seriously. We provide our students with professors with national and international expertise in their fields, the latest technology, quality facilities, a vast network of successful alumni and friends of the college, and caring staff. The UNL College of Engineering is also unique in its variety of locations: three campuses in Nebraska's two largest cities.

College of Engineering Role and Mission

The College of Engineering enthusiastically embraces its unique role as the singular intellectual and cultural resource for engineering instruction, research, and outreach within the state. It provides the people of Nebraska with comprehensive engineering academic programs to fulfill their highest aspirations and ambitions.

The missions of the College of Engineering are to:
•deliver relevant and challenging educational programs to attract an outstanding diverse student body
•prepare graduates for rewarding careers in their chosen professions and encourage graduates to extend their level of knowledge through lifelong learning
•conduct leading edge research advances engineering science and stimulate the intellectual development and creativity of both students and faculty,
•extend exemplary engineering service and transfer knowledge that contributes to the well-being and betterment of society.

Engineering Information

Engineering Faculty & Research

Teaching, Tenure-Track View Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Full Professors Assoc. Professors Assistant Professors Program Total
Biological Systems Engineering 15 8 12 35
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 7 4 5 16
Civil Engineering 9 13 7 29
Computer Science and Engineering 12 8 9 29
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction 7 16 6 29
Electrical and Computer Engineering 20 13 3 36
Engineering - Dean's Office 0 0 0 0
Mechanical & Materials Engineering 20 8 8 36
Totals: 90 70 50 210

Teaching, Non-Tenure-Track

Engineering Department(s) FT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel PT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Teach. Personnel
Biological Systems Engineering 2 1 3 0.40
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 1 1 2 0.60
Civil Engineering 1 2 3 0.90
Computer Science and Engineering 6 0 6 0.00
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction 1 10 11 2.56
Electrical and Computer Engineering 5 0 5 0.00
Engineering - Dean's Office 0 0 0 0.00
Mechanical & Materials Engineering 2 7 9 2.24
Totals: 18 21 39 6.70

Non-Teaching, Research

Engineering Department(s) Non-Teach. FT Research Personnel Non-Teach. PT Research Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Non-Teach. Research Personnel
Biological Systems Engineering 6 1 7 0.63
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 7 0 7 0.00
Civil Engineering 6 0 6 0.00
Computer Science and Engineering 3 0 3 0.00
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction 3 0 3 0.00
Electrical and Computer Engineering 13 0 13 0.00
Engineering - Dean's Office 0 0 0 0.00
Mechanical & Materials Engineering 17 2 19 1.36
Totals: 55 3 58 1.99

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

  • American Indian or Alaska Native (Am Ind): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.
  • Asian: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
  • Black or African American (B/AfrA): A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as "Haitian" or "Negro" can be used in addition to "Black or African American."
  • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (Haw): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
  • Hispanic or Latino (Hisp): A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. The term, "Spanish origin," can be used in addition to "Hispanic or Latino."
  • White: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Full Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Biological Systems Engineering 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 15 0
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 6 1
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 9 0
Computer Science and Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 11 1
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 20 0
Engineering - Dean's Office 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical & Materials Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 12 1 0 0 19 1
Totals: 0 0 5 0 1 0 31 1 0 0 0 0 50 2 0 0 87 3

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Associate Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Biological Systems Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 7 1
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 1
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 4 4 0 0 8 5
Computer Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 6 2
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 9 2 0 0 11 5
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 11 2
Engineering - Dean's Office 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical & Materials Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 6 2
Totals: 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 7 0 1 0 0 32 10 0 0 52 18

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Assistant Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Biological Systems Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 6 3 0 0 9 3
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 4 1
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 6 1
Computer Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 7 2
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 6 0
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 1
Engineering - Dean's Office 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical & Materials Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 8 0
Totals: 0 0 1 0 2 0 17 3 2 0 0 0 20 5 0 0 42 8

Undergraduate

Admissions/Transfers

Undergraduate Admission to the College of Engineering

Freshman Admission Requirements

In addition to university requirements, students must meet the following College of Engineering requirements:

4 years of high school math, including:

2 years of algebra l
1 year of geometry l
1 year of trigonometry, pre-calculus or calculus

3 years of natural science, including:

1 year of physics l
1 year of chemistry

ACT composite of 24 or higher or SAT total score (Critical Reading and Math only) of 1180 or higher (if the minimum admission has not been met, a student still may be admitted based on an individual review of his/her application).

UNL Admission Information and Requirements
If you will be enrolling in our Omaha programs, you'll apply through the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO), while still remaining a Nebraska Engineering student.

Transfer Student Admission Requirements

2.5 transfer cumulative GPA
Ready to take Calculus (MATH 106) in math course sequence


Undergraduate Admission to an Engineering Department

Freshman Admission Requirements

In addition to university requirements, students must meet the following College of Engineering requirements:

4 years of high school math, including:

2 years of algebra l
1 year of geometry l
1 year of trigonometry, pre-calculus or calculus

3 years of natural science, including:

1 year of physics l
1 year of chemistry

ACT composite of 24 or higher or SAT total score (Critical Reading and Math only) of 1180 or higher (if the minimum admission has not been met, a student still may be admitted based on an individual review of his/her application).

UNL Admission Information and Requirements
If you will be enrolling in our Omaha programs, you'll apply through the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO), while still remaining a Nebraska Engineering student.
Transfer Student Admission Requirements

2.5 transfer cumulative GPA
Ready to take Calculus (MATH 106) in math course sequence


Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

International Freshmen

Application Fee
There is a $45 application fee payable online with a credit card.

Deadlines
Summer/Fall 2017 â€" May 1, 2017
Spring 2017 â€" December 1, 2016

Additional Documents
In addition to the online application, International Freshmen students are required to submit:
Secondary school transcript
Secondary school certificate/diploma
English proficiency scores
Bank statement

English Proficiency Deadlines
To be fully-admitted, you must meet English proficiency by the following deadlines:
Fall Term â€" July 15
Spring Term â€" December 1
Summer Term â€" May 1

Thanks for your interest in the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln! Here is a complete list of all the documents and requirements you will need to complete for your application.
Send all admission materials to:

Office of Admissions
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
1410 Q St
P.O. Box 880417
Lincoln, NE 68588-0417

You can contact the University to apply for admission by yourself. You are not required to use an agent to apply for admission or enroll at the University of Nebraska. If you chose to use someone to assist you in applying for admission or enroll for classes, that is your responsibility.
Official Secondary School Transcripts and Certificate/Diploma

Send in your original secondary school transcripts.

Include the original native language transcript and an English language translation.
Copies and English translations must be stamped by the issuing institution, Education USA, Embassy, or a certified notary confirming it is a literal translation.

Submit a certificate or diploma confirming graduation from a secondary education institution.

Include the original certificate or diploma in your native language as well as an English translation.
Copies and English translations must be stamped by the issuing institution, Education USA, Embassy, or a certified notary confirming it is a literal translation.

Completed Coursework Requirements

A broad section of course work in English
Native language courses
Math
Natural Sciences
Social Sciences

English Proficiency

Non-native English speakers must submit an IELTS or TOEFL score demonstrating proficiency in English. Contact your IELTS testing center or TOEFL to have your official scores sent directly to the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln.

If you do not meet proficiency requirements, you can still be offered conditional admission.

View English proficiency requirements.
ACT/SAT Requirements

ACT/SAT tests are not required for admission to UNL but may be required for entry into specific colleges.

Colleges that require ACT/SAT scores:

College of Architecture
College of Engineering

Bank Statement Requirements

In order to be issued an I-20, you must submit a bank statement showing sufficient support for the first year of study.

You will still be evaluated for admission without submitting the bank statement, but admission letters and I-20s will not be sent until the bank statement requirement has been met.

Statements must include:

Student's name
NUID Number

NOTE: Scholarship letters can be used in place of bank statements.

International Transfer

Application Fee
There is a $45 application fee payable online with a credit card.

Deadlines
Summer/Fall 2017 â€" May 1, 2017
Spring 2017 â€" December 1, 2016

Additional Documents
In addition to the online application, International Transfer students are required to submit:
Secondary school transcript
Secondary school certificate/diploma
University Transcript
English proficiency scores
Bank statement

English Proficiency Deadlines
To be fully-admitted, you must meet English proficiency by the following deadlines:
Fall Term â€" July 15
Spring Term â€" December 1
Summer Term â€" May 1

Thanks for your interest in the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln! Here is a complete list of all the documents and requirements you will need to complete for your application.
Send all admission materials to:

Office of Admissions
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
1410 Q St
P.O. Box 880417
Lincoln, NE 68588-0417

You can contact the University to apply for admission by yourself. You are not required to use an agent to apply for admission or enroll at the University of Nebraska. If you chose to use someone to assist you in applying for admission or enroll for classes, that is your responsibility.
Official Secondary School Transcripts and Certificate/Diploma

Send in your original secondary school transcripts.

Include the original native language transcript and an English language translation.
Copies and English translations must be stamped by the issuing institution, Education USA, Embassy, or a certified notary confirming it is a literal translation.

Submit a certificate or diploma confirming graduation from a secondary education institution.

Include the original certificate or diploma in your native language as well as an English translation.
Copies and English translations must be stamped by the issuing institution, Education USA, Embassy, or a certified notary confirming it is a literal translation.

Completed Coursework Requirements

A broad section of course work in English
Native language courses
Math
Natural Sciences
Social Sciences

English Proficiency

Non-native English speakers must submit an IELTS or TOEFL score demonstrating proficiency in English. Contact your IELTS testing center or TOEFL to have your official scores sent directly to the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln.

If you do not meet proficiency requirements, you can still be offered conditional admission.

View English proficiency requirements.
ACT/SAT Requirements

ACT / SAT tests are not required for admission to UNL but may be required for entry into specific colleges.

Colleges that require ACT / SAT scores:

College of Architecture
College of Engineering

Bank Statement Requirements

In order to be issued an I-20, you must submit a bank statement showing sufficient support for the first year of study.

You will still be evaluated for admission without submitting the bank statement, but admission letters and I-20s will not be sent until the bank statement requirement has been met.

Statements must include:
Student's name
NUID Number

NOTE: Scholarship letters can be used in place of bank statements

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

Residency Policy

Determining your residency status is an important part of your application for admission at the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln. Residents of the state of Nebraska will be billed in-state tuition and non-residents will be billed out-of-state tuition. Don't worry it's pretty simple, here's the gist.

You will be classified as a non-resident if:

You are not attending a Nebraska high school
Or, you are not a graduate of an accredited Nebraska high school

Qualifying for Residency Status For The Purpose of In-State Tuition

Persons of legal age (19 or older) or emancipated minors who:
have established a home in Nebraska for at least 12 months.*
AND can verify by documentation that he/she intends to make Nebraska their permanent residence.
Dependent students whose parent/guardian has established a home in Nebraska.
Persons who are married to Nebraska residents who had established a home in Nebraska prior to the marriage.
Permanent resident aliens or individuals who have been granted asylum or refugee status and who have established a home in Nebraska for at least 12 months.
Dependents or spouses of permanent university, state college, or community college employees in the State of Nebraska who have at least part-time (.5 FTE) employment status.
Active duty military personnel and their dependents whose permanent duty station or home of record is in Nebraska.
Persons who graduated from an accredited high school in Nebraska and were legal residents of Nebraska at the time of graduation.
Individuals who previously attended the University of Nebraska or one of the Nebraska state colleges as a resident within the last two years.
Individuals, and their spouses and dependents, who were recruited for full-time employment to the state of Nebraska because of their special talents or skills.
Members of tribes who live outside the state of Nebraska qualify for in-state tuition rates upon providing documentation of membership.
You need to apply for residency classification in order to determine if you qualify for in-state tuition.

NOTE: *Individuals who move to Nebraska primarily to enroll in a post-secondary institution in Nebraska will be considered a non-resident for tuition purposes for the duration of his/her attendance.
Native American Tribes Indigenous to Nebraska OR Tribes Migrated to or from the State of Nebraska

The following have been identified as Native American tribes indigenous to Nebraska or tribes that historically migrated to or from the state of Nebraska: Arapaho, Hidatsa, Missouria, Sac and Fox, Arikara, Jicarilla, Apache, Omaha, Dakota Sioux, Northern Cheyenne, Iowa, Otoe, Lakota Sioux, Southern Cheyenne, Kickapoo, Pawnee, Nakota Sioux, Comanche, Kiowa, Ponca, Santee Sioux, Crow, Mandan, Potawatomie, and Winnebago

It is the responsibility of the student to submit a copy of his or her tribal card to the Office of Admissions if he/she wants to be considered a resident for tuition purposes. Students who do not provide this documentation will be determined to be non-residents without further notification.
Housing

All incoming students under the age of 19 or students who have not completed or transferred 27 or more accepted semester hours of post-secondary education as of the first day of fall semester classes are required to live in University-approved on-campus housing.

Residency Requirements

Residency Policy

Determining your residency status is an important part of your application for admission at the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln. Residents of the state of Nebraska will be billed in-state tuition and non-residents will be billed out-of-state tuition. Don't worry it's pretty simple, here's the gist.

You will be classified as a non-resident if:

You are not attending a Nebraska high school
Or, you are not a graduate of an accredited Nebraska high school

Qualifying for Residency Status For The Purpose of In-State Tuition

Persons of legal age (19 or older) or emancipated minors who:
have established a home in Nebraska for at least 12 months.*
AND can verify by documentation that he/she intends to make Nebraska their permanent residence.
Dependent students whose parent/guardian has established a home in Nebraska.
Persons who are married to Nebraska residents who had established a home in Nebraska prior to the marriage.
Permanent resident aliens or individuals who have been granted asylum or refugee status and who have established a home in Nebraska for at least 12 months.
Dependents or spouses of permanent university, state college, or community college employees in the State of Nebraska who have at least part-time (.5 FTE) employment status.
Active duty military personnel and their dependents whose permanent duty station or home of record is in Nebraska.
Persons who graduated from an accredited high school in Nebraska and were legal residents of Nebraska at the time of graduation.
Individuals who previously attended the University of Nebraska or one of the Nebraska state colleges as a resident within the last two years.
Individuals, and their spouses and dependents, who were recruited for full-time employment to the state of Nebraska because of their special talents or skills.
Members of tribes who live outside the state of Nebraska qualify for in-state tuition rates upon providing documentation of membership.
You need to apply for residency classification in order to determine if you qualify for in-state tuition.

NOTE: *Individuals who move to Nebraska primarily to enroll in a post-secondary institution in Nebraska will be considered a non-resident for tuition purposes for the duration of his/her attendance.
Native American Tribes Indigenous to Nebraska OR Tribes Migrated to or from the State of Nebraska

The following have been identified as Native American tribes indigenous to Nebraska or tribes that historically migrated to or from the state of Nebraska: Arapaho, Hidatsa, Missouria, Sac and Fox, Arikara, Jicarilla, Apache, Omaha, Dakota Sioux, Northern Cheyenne, Iowa, Otoe, Lakota Sioux, Southern Cheyenne, Kickapoo, Pawnee, Nakota Sioux, Comanche, Kiowa, Ponca, Santee Sioux, Crow, Mandan, Potawatomie, and Winnebago

It is the responsibility of the student to submit a copy of his or her tribal card to the Office of Admissions if he/she wants to be considered a resident for tuition purposes. Students who do not provide this documentation will be determined to be non-residents without further notification.
Housing

All incoming students under the age of 19 or students who have not completed or transferred 27 or more accepted semester hours of post-secondary education as of the first day of fall semester classes are required to live in University-approved on-campus housing.


Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

Transfer

Transcript
You will self-report your academic record. Use an unofficial transcript to fill in your information.

Deadlines
Summer/Fall 2017 â€" May 1, 2017
Spring 2017 â€" December 1, 2016

Application Fee
There is a $45 application fee payable with a credit card or a check. Make the check out to the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln and put the applicant's name on the memo line. If you have applied for undergraduate admission at UNK or UNO within the last year and submitted an application fee to either of those campuses, you do not need to pay the $45 admission fee.

Personal Statement
To be considered for leadership and diversity scholarships, you must write a 350-word essay all about you. Focus on leadership, career goals and community service.

You are guaranteed admission if you meet the core course requirements and the performance requirements. If you don't meet these requirements, we strongly encourage you to apply anywayâ€"your admission will be determined by a committee appointed by the Director of Admissions and your complete academic profile will be considered.
Performance Requirements

Transfer applicants should:

Demonstrate a 2.0 ("C" average) cumulative grade point average (GPA) on all college-level coursework.
Have a 2.0 GPA for the most recent term of attendance.

Core Course Requirements

There are 16 units of academic courses required for admission.

A unit is one year of high school study or a semester/quarter of college coursework.
High School Classes

Here is a list of Nebraska high school classes that count toward core course requirements.
Ways to Meet Admission Requirements

If you are missing courses required for admission, there are ways to remove the deficiencies before you enroll.
Core Courses
Required academic courses
Category Requirements
English 4 units of English:
Units must include intensive reading and writing experiences.
Mathematics 4 units of math:

Algebra
Algebra II
Geometry
1 additional unit that builds on knowledge and concepts learned in Algebra II

Social Sciences 3 units of social sciences:

1 unit drawn from American and/or world history
1 additional unit drawn from history
American government and/or geography
a 3rd unit drawn from any social science discipline

Natural Sciences 3 units of natural sciences:

At least 2 units selected from:
biology
chemistry
physics
earth sciences
1 unit must include laboratory instruction

Foreign Language 2 units of foreign language:

Both units must be in the same language.
Students who are unable to take 2 years of foreign language in high school may still qualify for admission.
NOTE: Some University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln degree programs require the equivalent of 4 years of high school foreign language in the same language in order to graduate.
View foreign language requirements by degree.

College Specific Requirements

All colleges at the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln require students meet the minimum core course and performance admission requirements. (as listed above)

Some colleges have additional requirements that students must meet in order to be admitted to their requested college.
The Explore Center

If you do not meet college specific requirements you can still be admitted through our Explore Center.

you will be advised by the Explore Center until you meet the college specific requirements for your desired college.
once you've met your college's requirements, you will have the opportunity to transfer into the college you requested.

Colleges With Additional Requirements

College of Engineering
Engineering course requirements
Category Requirements
First-Year College Students
Math

1 full unit of geometry AND

As part of the 4 units required you must take:

pre-calculus
OR trigonometry
OR calculus

Natural Sciences As part of the 3 units required you must take:

chemistry
AND physics

ACT/SAT Scores

ACT composite score of 24 or higher
OR an SAT combined score of 1110 (old) or 1180 (new) or higher

Domestic Transfer Students

Must have a cumulative and last-term GPA of at least 2.5.

Hixson-Lied College of Fine & Performing Arts

Applicants who do not qualify for assured admission will automatically be considered for full admission to the University on the basis of special merit. The special merit process will make provisions for a variety of circumstances, including allowance for the special consideration to be given to: non- traditional students; returning adult students; students educated at home schools; students who do not meet the required performance criteria but who have performed at a high level of accomplishment towards the conclusion of their high school careers (sometimes called "late bloomers"); students who can provide evidence of special talents, such as outstanding musical performers; those with unique educational experience or career achievements, etc. Such students will be encouraged to provide evidence of their ability to do University level work. In addition, special consideration will be given to members of under-represented groups who present evidence of being able to succeed. Such applications will be considered by University admissions personnel following established policies and procedures. It must be emphasized that students once admitted through this process will be considered fully admitted and will not be considered by the University to have a provisional status. However, some students may have to complete specific University courses to compensate for having not completed all of the required core courses or equivalent educational attainments.
Admissions Committee

Per Admissions Office Procedures Manual in Accordance with RP- 5.2.1-4bâ€"an Admissions Committees may admit students that do not meet the Board of Regents assured admissions requirements for full admission. These decisions are based upon a holistic review of an individual applicants student record including but not limited to: academic achievement (GPA, academic courses, class rank, standardized test scores), high school course availability, recommendation letters, and retention services. The Admissions Committee will utilize this information through the holistic review process to determine whether there are other indicia in the record that would contribute to the applicant's academic success at the University. The Office of Admissions has three committees that perform the above described work: First-Year college students; Transfer/International and Special Circumstances.

The Special Circumstances Committee will holistically review applicants with special merit that are required to participate in intrusive and successful retention programs such as, but not limited to, Nebraska College Preparatory Academy, William H. Thompson Scholars, and Nebraska Athletics Support Services. The Director of Admissions must approve retention programs to be considered for the Special Circumstances Committee. Members of this committee will be appointed by the Director of Admissions.

Number of Transfer Students from:

A two-year community junior college where they were full-time students: 81
A four-year college or university where they were full-time students: 94

Undergraduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): In-State / Out-of-State

Undergraduate Group 1 Undergraduate Group 2
Tuition & Fees: $9,683 $27,713
Room & Board: $10,670 $10,670
Books & Supplies: $1,012 $1,012
Other Expenses: $1,880 $1,880
Estimated avg. course load per term: 15 15
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

Additional Financial Aid Information

Please go to:
http://admissions.unl.edu/cost-aid/financial-aid.aspx

Undergraduate

New Applicants

New Undergraduate Applicants

A. Number of undergraduate applicants to the engineering college: 1,411
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 1,257
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 856
Percentage of entering students (excluding transfer students) ranked in the top quarter (25%) of their high schools: 56%
Note: Too few SAT scores are being recorded to determine range.

Newly Enrolled Test Scores

Scores Reflect 75th to 25th percentile

SAT 75th 25th
Math Range:
Reading Range:
Writing Range:
Combined Range:
ACT 75th 25th
Math Range: 31 25
Composite Range: 31 25

Undergraduate

Enrollments by Class

Undergraduate Engr. Programs Fresh
1st Year
Soph
2nd Year
Junior
3rd Year
Senior
4th/5th Year
Full Time Total Part Time Total
Agricultural Engineering (BSAE) 13 14 16 18 61 0
Architectural Engineering (BSAR) 35 32 28 52 147 13
Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE) 44 32 60 97 233 8
Chemical Engineering (BSCHE) 80 51 54 96 281 12
Civil Engineering (BSCE) 83 98 110 152 443 57
Computer Engineering (BSCP) 100 45 65 54 264 27
Computer Science (BS) 167 93 111 102 473 33
Construction Engineering (BSCN) 8 10 14 12 44 9
Construction Management (BSCM) 22 48 82 99 251 19
Electrical Engineering (BSEE) 46 50 65 91 252 33
Electronics Engineering (BSEL) 7 3 12 19 41 16
Mechanical Engineering (BSME) 169 131 157 193 650 38
Pre-Engineering 155 33 18 4 210 9
Software Engineering (BSSE) 38 0 0 0 38 1
Totals: 967 640 792 989 3388 275

Freshmen

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Agricultural Engineering (BSAE)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 1 0 12 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Architectural Engineering (BSAR)
Men 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 19 1 1 0 24 1
Women 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 11 0
Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE)
Men 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 17 0
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 23 0 2 0 27 0
Chemical Engineering (BSCHE)
Men 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 41 0 2 0 53 0
Women 3 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 18 0 1 0 27 0
Civil Engineering (BSCE)
Men 7 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 58 2 2 0 70 3
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 13 0
Computer Engineering (BSCP)
Men 7 0 3 0 4 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 73 1 3 0 92 1
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 8 1
Computer Science (BS)
Men 38 0 2 0 6 1 0 0 5 0 7 0 0 0 80 1 3 1 141 3
Women 4 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 0 0 13 0 0 0 26 1
Construction Engineering (BSCN)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 7 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Construction Management (BSCM)
Men 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 19 1 0 0 22 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (BSEE)
Men 9 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 20 1 2 0 39 1
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 7 0
Electronics Engineering (BSEL)
Men 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 3 0 0 7 3
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering (BSME)
Men 13 0 3 0 8 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 126 1 5 0 157 1
Women 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 12 0
Pre-Engineering
Men 6 1 2 0 17 0 0 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 101 3 6 0 137 4
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 4 0 18 0
Software Engineering (BSSE)
Men 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 28 1 1 0 33 1
Women 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 5 0
Totals: 104 1 16 0 61 1 0 0 29 2 16 1 0 0 707 15 34 1 967 21

Sophomores

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Agricultural Engineering (BSAE)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 0 0 0 14 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Architectural Engineering (BSAR)
Men 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 1 0 0 21 1
Women 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 1 0 0 11 1
Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE)
Men 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 1 0 0 19 1
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 13 0
Chemical Engineering (BSCHE)
Men 11 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 20 1 0 0 35 2
Women 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 1 0 16 0
Civil Engineering (BSCE)
Men 11 0 1 1 5 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 54 4 2 1 76 6
Women 4 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 22 0
Computer Engineering (BSCP)
Men 3 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 30 1 0 0 41 1
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0
Computer Science (BS)
Men 21 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 6 0 1 1 0 0 39 1 2 0 73 2
Women 7 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 1 0 20 0
Construction Engineering (BSCN)
Men 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 9 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Construction Management (BSCM)
Men 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 38 1 1 0 45 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 1
Electrical Engineering (BSEE)
Men 13 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 27 1 0 2 45 3
Women 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 5 1
Electronics Engineering (BSEL)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 3 2
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering (BSME)
Men 10 0 1 0 11 0 0 0 5 0 2 0 0 0 93 3 1 0 123 3
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 8 0
Pre-Engineering
Men 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 25 2 0 0 30 2
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Software Engineering (BSSE)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 99 0 12 2 33 1 0 0 26 1 14 1 0 1 448 19 8 3 640 28

Juniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Agricultural Engineering (BSAE)
Men 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 13 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0
Architectural Engineering (BSAR)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 15 1 0 1 17 2
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 11 0
Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE)
Men 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 31 0 2 0 37 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 20 1 0 0 23 1
Chemical Engineering (BSCHE)
Men 12 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 22 0 1 0 39 0
Women 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 12 2 0 0 15 3
Civil Engineering (BSCE)
Men 11 0 2 0 3 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 4 0 61 10 4 0 86 12
Women 3 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 15 1 1 0 24 1
Computer Engineering (BSCP)
Men 5 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 6 0 2 0 0 0 44 4 3 0 62 5
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 3 3
Computer Science (BS)
Men 26 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 5 1 2 0 0 0 57 4 5 0 100 5
Women 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 11 0
Construction Engineering (BSCN)
Men 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 0 0 12 2
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Construction Management (BSCM)
Men 3 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 67 0 0 0 77 1
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 5 1
Electrical Engineering (BSEE)
Men 16 0 1 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 0 0 30 1 2 0 57 5
Women 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 8 1
Electronics Engineering (BSEL)
Men 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 8 1 1 0 12 3
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering (BSME)
Men 21 0 2 0 4 1 0 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 107 1 5 0 143 3
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 14 0
Pre-Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 16 0 0 0 18 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Software Engineering (BSSE)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 122 0 14 1 29 5 2 0 23 4 17 9 4 0 557 29 24 1 792 49

Seniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Agricultural Engineering (BSAE)
Men 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 0 0 0 17 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0
Architectural Engineering (BSAR)
Men 9 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 26 2 0 0 35 6
Women 5 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 1 0 17 2
Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE)
Men 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 0 39 1 1 0 47 2
Women 4 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 41 2 0 1 50 4
Chemical Engineering (BSCHE)
Men 10 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 0 0 53 6 1 0 70 7
Women 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 20 0 0 0 26 0
Civil Engineering (BSCE)
Men 9 1 2 2 13 1 0 0 2 1 7 3 0 0 91 23 1 1 125 32
Women 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 18 3 0 0 27 3
Computer Engineering (BSCP)
Men 4 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 38 14 1 0 48 14
Women 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 6 2
Computer Science (BS)
Men 12 3 1 2 3 1 0 0 2 3 1 0 0 0 70 11 2 0 91 20
Women 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2 0 0 11 2
Construction Engineering (BSCN)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 7 4 0 0 10 6
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Construction Management (BSCM)
Men 3 0 3 1 4 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 81 9 3 0 96 12
Women 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 3 2
Electrical Engineering (BSEE)
Men 11 1 1 0 3 2 0 0 2 1 5 2 0 0 57 15 0 0 79 21
Women 6 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 12 1
Electronics Engineering (BSEL)
Men 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 11 6 0 0 17 8
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Mechanical Engineering (BSME)
Men 14 2 1 1 7 2 0 0 3 1 2 0 0 0 142 22 4 1 173 29
Women 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 15 1 0 1 20 2
Pre-Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 3 2
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Software Engineering (BSSE)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 102 11 19 7 37 11 0 0 32 8 21 12 0 0 762 123 16 5 989 177

Undergraduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Agricultural Engineering (BSAE) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 13 10 3
Architectural Engineering (BSAR) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 28 0 28 23 5
Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE) 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 25 2 31 20 11
Chemical Engineering (BSCHE) 3 2 1 0 1 0 0 25 0 32 25 7
Civil Engineering (BSCE) 2 8 1 0 2 1 0 67 0 81 71 10
Computer Engineering (BSCP) 1 2 2 0 5 1 0 37 1 49 48 1
Computer Science (BS) 7 0 1 0 2 0 0 40 1 51 45 6
Construction Engineering (BSCN) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 5 5 0
Construction Management (BSCM) 0 1 4 0 1 1 0 62 0 69 66 3
Electrical Engineering (BSEE) 10 1 1 0 2 1 0 34 3 52 50 2
Electronics Engineering (BSEL) 4 1 0 0 2 0 0 8 0 15 14 1
Mechanical Engineering (BSME) 7 2 7 0 2 2 0 86 0 106 97 9
Pre-Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Note: Pre-Engineering is not a degree program.
Software Engineering (BSSE) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 36 17 18 0 19 6 0 429 7 532 474 58

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Agricultural Engineering (BSAE) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 3 0 0 13
Architectural Engineering (BSAR) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 23 5 0 0 28
Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE) 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 16 9 1 1 31
Chemical Engineering (BSCHE) 3 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 19 6 0 0 32
Civil Engineering (BSCE) 2 0 8 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 57 10 0 0 81
Computer Engineering (BSCP) 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 0 0 36 1 1 0 49
Computer Science (BS) 6 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 36 4 0 1 51
Construction Engineering (BSCN) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 5
Construction Management (BSCM) 0 0 1 0 3 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 60 2 0 0 69
Electrical Engineering (BSEE) 9 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 33 1 3 0 52
Electronics Engineering (BSEL) 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 15
Mechanical Engineering (BSME) 7 0 2 0 7 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 77 9 0 0 106
Pre-Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Note: Pre-Engineering is not a degree program.
Software Engineering (BSSE) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 33 3 16 1 17 1 0 0 18 1 6 0 0 0 379 50 5 2 532

Undergraduate

Dual Degrees

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degrees Awarded

Undergraduate

Program Comparisons

  • ABET - Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
  • CEAB - Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board
Degree Program ABET/CEAB Accred. Nominal Program Length
(yrs.)
Average Program Length
(yrs.)
Time: Day/Even./
Both
Co-op: None/Opt./
Required
Grads in Co-op Progs.
Agricultural Engineering (BSAE) yes 4.00 4.60 Day None
Architectural Engineering (BSAR) no 4.00 4.10 Both None
Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE) yes 4.00 4.70 Both None
Chemical Engineering (BSCHE) yes 4.00 4.50 Day None
Civil Engineering (BSCE) yes 4.00 4.50 Both None
Computer Engineering (BSCP) yes 4.00 4.30 Both None
Computer Science (BS) no 4.00 4.50 Both None
Construction Engineering (BSCN) yes 4.00 5.00 Both None
Construction Management (BSCM) no 4.00 4.80 Both None
Electrical Engineering (BSEE) yes 4.00 4.60 Both None
Electronics Engineering (BSEL) yes 4.00 5.00 Both None
Mechanical Engineering (BSME) yes 4.00 4.60 Day None
Pre-Engineering no Both None
Note: Pre-Engineering is not a degree program.
Software Engineering (BSSE) no Day None

Graduate

Admissions Information

Graduate Admission to the College of Engineering

Eligibility
An applicant with any of the following is eligible for graduate admission:
A four-year U.S. bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university.
An equivalent degree as evaluated by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Office of Graduate Studies.
UNL senior standing within 9 hours of graduation. See Hold for Graduate Credit.

1. Application, communication, and materials
Submit the following to Graduate Studies:
Application for Graduate Admission
$50.00 non-refundable application fee
A transcript confirming eligibility, uploaded to MyRED (see transcript requirements)
If your native language is not English: verification of English proficiency
Submit items required by your academic dept.:
If pursuing a degree or certificate: Consult its program summary for dept.-specific items.
Otherwise: Non-degree, non-cert. students typically have no additional dept. items.

Submitting the Application for Graduate Admission form begins a series of email communications:

On our next business day you'll receive email:
From Graduate Studies, summarizing your application objective. Alert us promptly if this doesn't match what you intended to apply for.
From TrueYou, providing your NU ID number and a temporary password if you don't already have an active TrueYou account. Once you've set up your TrueYou account you can use MyRED to check your application status. See About MyRED for details.
Within 24 hours of those messages you'll receive email about GAMES, if applicable. Nearly all of our degree programs use the Graduate Admissions Management and Evaluation System (GAMES) for online submission of their departmental materials.
Within 10 days of applying, typically much sooner, you'll receive email from the admissions evaluator assigned to your application.

2. Review

2.1. Preliminary Grad Studies review
Once we have your application, fee, and uploaded transcripts, we will review your file and contact you if additional information is needed by Graduate Studies. You can monitor your application's progress via the Graduate Application Status page (under Admissions) in MyRED.
When the preliminary review is complete we will notify your academic department of your eligibility for admission.
Once all materials have been received, allow 3 to 5 business days for this step.


2.2. Departmental review
Each academic department has a Graduate Admissions Committee to decide whether a student will be accepted into their program. Non-degree applicants skip this step.
Your application will be reviewed only after you have submitted all required program-specific application materials. We recommend verifying receipt of all materials before the department's stated deadline â€" via GAMES if your program uses GAMES, otherwise by contacting your department directly.
Department graduate committees meet on varying schedules; contact your department for information regarding your application status.


2.3. Final Graduate Studies review
As soon as the department notifies Graduate Studies of their admission recommendation, we will conduct a final review of your file. This includes checking that all eligibility, English proficiency, and funding requirements have been met.
If additional materials are needed Graduate Studies will notify you by email.
If you are not a US citizen and you expect to hold an F or J visa we will ask you to submit the Financial Resource Certification (FRC) form with documentation. The FRC is not needed if your department offers you an assistantship sufficient to cover those expenses.

3. Admission and enrollment
If you're admitted Graduate Studies will notify you by email.
We'll mail your Certificate of Admission along with other important information for incoming students.
International students will be asked to complete the Visa Data Form to verify information for the Form I-20 or Form DS-2019. We will express mail your Certificate of Admission, your I-20 or DS-2019, and information for new students.
You'll be eligible to enroll for the entry term shown on your Certificate of Admission. If you're an international student you'll become eligible when you check in on campus.
MyRED is the self-service system where you'll register for classes. See Enrollment Toolbox for links to course descriptions, schedules, etc.
Arriving on Campus, Relocating to Lincoln, and Arriving in the United States may also help you prepare for your journey.

Graduate Admission to an Engineering Department

Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the admissions information. Telephone number is (402) 472-2875.

For individual departments and programs; http://engineering.unl.edu/graduate-programs/prospective-students/

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

International students comprise a significant portion of our applicants and our graduate student body. At the Fall 2013 census, international students representing 108 countries made up 23% of our total graduate enrollment.

While many aspects of the application process are the same for all students, applicants from outside the U.S. have a few additional application requirements. Our international applicants come from a wide variety of linguistic and educational backgrounds and are affected by U.S. immigration regulations.

Application for Graduate Admission

If you are not a U.S. citizen or you have been educated outside the U.S. you may be asking yourself these questions:
•Is my degree equivalent to a U.S. bachelor's degree?
•What academic records will I need to provide?
•Will I have enough money to support myself and my family?
•Am I prepared for graduate coursework taught in English?
•Am I allowing enough time to meet deadlines and to schedule my visa appointment?
•Will I need a form from UNL for a visa interview?
•How should I prepare for arriving in the United States?

These resources will help you answer your questions.

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

http://www.unl.edu/gradstudies/home

Residency Requirements

Students applying for residence will be required to have established a home in Nebraska at least 12 months immediately preceding the semester or term for which resident status is sought.

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

Contact Graduate Studies:
http://www.unl.edu/gradstudies/home

Graduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): In-State / Out-of-State

Graduate Group 1 Graduate Group 2
Tuition & Fees: $7,398 $19,755
Room & Board: $10,670 $10,670
Books & Supplies: $1,012 $1,012
Other Expenses: $2,052 $2,052
Estimated avg. course load per term: 9 9
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Family Financial Statement (FFS), Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

Additional Financial Aid Information

See Scholarships and Financial Aid
(http://www.unl.edu/scholfa/)

Graduate

New Applicants

New Graduate Applicants

A. Number of graduate applicants to the engineering college: 850
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 290
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 127

Graduate

Enrollments by Class

Master's

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering (MS)
Men 5 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 7 1 0 14 8
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Architectural Engineering (MARE)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 5 0 0 14 5
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 3 2
Architectural Engineering (MS)
Men 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 1
Women 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2
Chemical Engineering (MS)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Civil Engineering (MS)
Men 11 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 9 0 0 27 13
Women 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 6 0
Computer Science (MS)
Men 14 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 9 1 1 2 26 16
Women 2 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 7
Construction Engineering and Management (MS)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (MS)
Men 5 3 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 4 0 0 14 8
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Management (MEM)
Men 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 2 20 0 1 4 26
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2
Environmental Engineering (MS)
Men 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 4 1
Women 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0
Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (MS)
Men 11 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 14 2 2 0 29 9
Women 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0
Telecommunications Engineering (MS)
Men 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 2 7
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Totals: 65 34 4 3 3 3 0 0 4 6 2 3 0 0 84 57 4 3 166 109

Doctoral

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Architectural Engineering (PhD)
Men 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 15 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Biological Engineering (PhD)
Men 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 12 0
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0
Biomedical Engineering (PhD)
Men 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 12 0
Women 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering (PhD)
Men 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 2 0 14 0
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0
Civil Engineering (PhD)
Men 35 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 38 0
Women 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 15 0
Computer Engineering (PhD)
Men 9 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 13 0
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Computer Engineering-Comp & Elec Eng (PhD)
Men 7 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 9 0
Women 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Computer Science (PhD)
Men 29 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 45 0
Women 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 13 0
Construction (PhD)
Men 6 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 9 0
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Construction Engineering & Management
Men 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Electrical Engineering (PhD)
Men 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 2 0 53 0
Women 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 11 0
Materials Engineering (PhD)
Men 16 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 22 0
Women 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 11 0
Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (PhD)
Men 32 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 39 0
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 5 0
Totals: 285 0 4 0 3 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 0 0 66 0 5 0 369 0

Graduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering (MS) 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 5 0 10 7 3
Architectural Engineering (MARE) 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 24 0 27 20 7
Architectural Engineering (MS) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 2 1
Chemical Engineering (MS) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 2 0
Civil Engineering (MS) 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 22 16 6
Computer Science (MS) 7 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 12 10 2
Construction Engineering and Management (MS) 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 7 4 3
Electrical Engineering (MS) 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 4 3 1
Engineering Management (MEM) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 11 11 0
Environmental Engineering (MS) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 2 0
Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (MS) 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 6 0 10 7 3
Telecommunications Engineering (MS) 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0
Totals: 34 3 2 0 3 0 0 69 1 112 86 26

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering (MS) 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 10
Architectural Engineering (MARE) 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 18 6 0 0 27
Architectural Engineering (MS) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 3
Chemical Engineering (MS) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2
Civil Engineering (MS) 7 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 3 0 0 22
Computer Science (MS) 5 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 12
Construction Engineering and Management (MS) 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 7
Electrical Engineering (MS) 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4
Engineering Management (MEM) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 11
Environmental Engineering (MS) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2
Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (MS) 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 10
Telecommunications Engineering (MS) 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Totals: 22 12 2 1 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 56 13 1 0 112

Master's Degree Programs

Master's Degree Program Degree Type
Master's w/ Thesis Master's w/o Thesis or with Proj./Report Program Totals
Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering (MS) 0 0 0
Architectural Engineering (MARE) 0 0 0
Architectural Engineering (MS) 0 0 0
Chemical Engineering (MS) 0 0 0
Civil Engineering (MS) 0 0 0
Computer Science (MS) 0 0 0
Construction Engineering and Management (MS) 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (MS) 0 0 0
Engineering Management (MEM) 0 0 0
Environmental Engineering (MS) 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (MS) 0 0 0
Telecommunications Engineering (MS) 0 0 0
Totals: 0 0 0

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 3 0
Architectural Engineering (PhD) 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 4 3 1
Biological Engineering (PhD) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0
Biomedical Engineering (PhD) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 1 1
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering (PhD) 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 3 1
Civil Engineering (PhD) 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 11 8 3
Computer Engineering (PhD) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
Computer Engineering-Comp & Elec Eng (PhD) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1
Computer Science (PhD) 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 6 6 0
Construction (PhD) 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 0
Construction Engineering & Management 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (PhD) 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 8 6 2
Materials Engineering (PhD) 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 4 0
Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (PhD) 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 9 8 1
Totals: 41 2 0 0 1 1 0 14 0 59 48 11

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3
Architectural Engineering (PhD) 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4
Biological Engineering (PhD) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Biomedical Engineering (PhD) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering (PhD) 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
Civil Engineering (PhD) 6 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 11
Computer Engineering (PhD) 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Computer Engineering-Comp & Elec Eng (PhD) 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Computer Science (PhD) 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 6
Construction (PhD) 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
Construction Engineering & Management 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (PhD) 5 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 8
Materials Engineering (PhD) 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4
Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (PhD) 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 9
Totals: 33 8 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 11 3 0 0 59

Graduate

Research Expenditures

Expenditures by Research Department

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Engineering Department External Funding Source
Biological Systems Engineering
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $2,824,528 Industry: $1,315,262 Priv/Non: $672,134
State: $355,890 Local: $161,220 Total Expn.: $5,329,034
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $233,780 Industry: $861,525 Priv/Non: $472,453
State: $183,282 Local: $104,237 Total Expn.: $1,855,277
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Civil Engineering
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $1,015,272 Industry: $411,036 Priv/Non: $1,391,369
State: $2,120,946 Local: $345,763 Total Expn.: $5,284,386
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Computer Science and Engineering
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $2,185,282 Industry: $38,596 Priv/Non: $1,893,456
State: $10,926 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $4,128,260
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $31,198 Industry: $119,291 Priv/Non: $482,054
State: $156,548 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $789,091
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $4,726,952 Industry: $611,595 Priv/Non: $241,808
State: $81,285 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $5,661,640
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Engineering - Dean's Office
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Mechanical & Materials Engineering
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $3,122,287 Industry: $584,937 Priv/Non: $799,986
State: $1,842,154 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $6,349,364
Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $14,139,299 Industry: $3,942,242 Priv/Non: $5,953,260
State: $4,751,031 Local: $611,220 Total Expn.: $29,397,052

Expenditures by Research Center

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Center/Lab External Funding Source
Abacus Distributed Storage Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Acoustic Listening Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Acoustic Sound Booth
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Advanced Composites Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Advanced Electronics Engineering Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Advanced Nanomaterials & Nanomanufacturing Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Advanced Telecommunications Engineering Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Applied Electromagnetics Research Facility
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Atmospheric Trace Gas Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Atomic Force Microscopy Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Biological Process Development Facility
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Biomaterials & Mechanotransduction Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Biomechanics and Materials Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Biomechanics, Biomaterials and Biomedicine Core Facility
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Biomedical Imaging and Biosignal Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Bioseperations and Biomaterials Group
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Building Systems Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Catalytic and Sorbent Materials Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Communications and Information Science
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Electro-Optics
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Ergonomics and Safety Research
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Laser Analytical Studies of Trace Gas Dynamics
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Microelectronic & Optical Materials Research
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Nontraditional Marco, Micro and Nano Machining Research
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Communications and Signal-Processing Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Complex Materials Optics Network
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Computational Thermal-Fluid Sciences Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Constraint Systems Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Cyber-Physical Networking Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Digital and Computer Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
DSP/ Controls Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Dynamics and Vibrations Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Educational Robotics Programs
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Empirically-based Software Quality Research & Development Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Energy Systems Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Engineering Biomaterials and Gene Delivery Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Engineering Properties & Processing Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Environemtal Engineering & Bioremediation Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
FOCuS Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
General Electrical Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Geotechnical Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Hydraulics Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Innovative Design & Ergonomic Analysis Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Intelligent Ubiquitous Computing Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Laboratory for Dynamic Materials Characterization
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Land Measure & Surveying Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Laser Assisted Nano Engineering Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Lighting & Electrical Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Lightwave Communication Research Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Materials Testing Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Mesoscale Engineering Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Micro/Nanoscale Thermal Science Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Microstructures and Magnetic Materials Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Mid-America Transportation Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Midwest Roadside Safety Facility
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Nanostructures Research Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $486,788 Priv/Non: $6,976
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $493,764
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $2,127,599 Industry: $335,072 Priv/Non: $494,558
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $2,957,229
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Nebraska Intelligent MoBile Unmanned Systems Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Nebraska Tractor Test Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Nebraska Transportation Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Organic Electronics and Nanoelectronics Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Passive Solar Research Group
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Plant Biophysics Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Polymer Composites Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Polymer Mechanics Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Portland Cement & Bituminous Material Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Power & Energy Systems Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Power Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Robotic and Mechatronics Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Smart Building Laboratories & Field Test Beds
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Soil & Water Properties Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Solid State Laboratories
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Structural Dynamics Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Structural Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Structures & Materials Research Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Surface Mechanics and Tribology Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Systems Biology and Biomedical Informatics Lab1
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Terry Research Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
The Holland Computing Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Translational aand Regenerative Medicine Imaging Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Trauma Mechanics Research Iniative
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Ultrasonic Materials Characterization Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Value-Added Processing & Food Engineering Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Wireless Communications Laboratory
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $2,127,599 Industry: $821,860 Priv/Non: $501,534
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $3,450,993

1The department is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.



Grand Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $16,266,898 Industry: $4,764,102 Priv/Non: $6,454,794
State: $4,751,031 Local: $611,220 Total Expn.: $32,848,045

The following text was offered to each school as a guideline for the calculation of externally-funded research expenditures:

Include all expenditures associated with grants and contracts specifically budgeted for externally sponsored research and associated programs and expenditures associated with all gifts auditably used for research. Include expended funds provided by the following external sources:

  1. Federal Government
  2. State Government
  3. Foreign Governments
  4. Industry
  5. Non-Profit Organizations (e.g. foundations)
  6. Individuals
  7. Local Government

The expenditures reported should be only those funds provided by organizations, agencies, and individuals external to the institution. Cost sharing/matching funds should be included only if provided from sources external to the institution.

Only State government funds that were obtained competitively or as matching funds associated with other externally funded programs should be included. State funds that are part of the normal operating budget should not be included regardless of purpose.

For all joint or contracted projects or sub-projects, only the portion of the center research performed by faculty, staff, and students of the affiliated engineering school should be credited to that school. Expenditures for capital costs of research laboratory building construction should not be included.

Expenditures for research laboratory renovations should not be included unless the renovation funds expended came from grants and contracts expressly intended for the direct support of engineering research.

Any portion of academic year and/or summer salary for any researcher that is not derived from external research grants or contracts should not be counted.

Total #: Report total number of individual grants, not the total dollar amount of the expenditures.

Expenditures: Report actual expenditures (as opposed to authorization amounts) in U.S. dollars.

Time frame for expenditures: Report expenditures for your current fiscal year.

Research centers listed as "WITHIN an engineering department" on the Research Centers page (screen 7) of the College of Engineering Profile, will not have their expenditures added to the school's total research expenditures. Such expenditures can be included in the department total, while still being listed for the appropriate center. This allows users to list the expenditures in two areas without double-counting.

Graduate

Research Description

Research Description By Graduate Engineering Department

Biological Systems Engineering

Research is conducted in five focus areas:

Bioengineering for health and productivity
Environmental engineering
Bioprocess engineering for adding value
Site-specific crop management
Water resources and ecosystems engineering

Research endeavors are a valuable component of our mission to the students, faculty, state, region, and world. Research is conducted in university labs, and in the field utilizing four Research and Extension Centers located throughout Nebraska. In addition to research conducted in Nebraska, faculty have also worked overseas in developing agricultural and irrigation systems of benefit to specific locales. Students have the opportunity to be involved in faculty research as part of their education, or to develop research in areas of their own interest.

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Biological Process Development Facility
The BPDF develops vaccines and biotherapeutics derived from recombinant yeast and bacterial expression systems under current Good Manufacturing Practices and Good Laboratory Practices.

Bioseparations and Biomaterials Group

The ability to manipulate the strength and specificity of protein-binding or cell-substrate events provides a tremendous leverage for the development of novel biological products and processes at a molecular level. I am motivated by the desire to solve problems in biology and medicine, and the challenge to develop models and systems based on scientific and engineering principles as applied to biological systems. My broad interests include the areas of bioseparations, biomaterials and functional tissue engineering.

We are primarily interested in better understanding the role of matrix architecture and matrix mechanical properties on the biosynthetic activity and metabolic activities of chondrocytes that are seeded and maintained on such scaffolds. Another area of active research interest in my laboratory is in the area of bioreactors for the development of engineered tissues. We are developing bioreactors that use stimulation via ultrasonics that seek to induce cell growth and proliferation.

Additionally, we are also interested in understanding the cellular mechanisms under ultrasound stimulation. In the area of biomaterials, we are developing surface treatment strategies that passivate platelet responses to implanted biomaterials by selective protein adsorption and also developing surfaces that mimic the anticoagulant pathways found on native endothelial surfaces.

Catalytic and Sorbent Materials
Dr. Larsen's group works on a variety of projects related to catalysis, adsorption, and nanostructured materials design. By means of micro- and nano-fabrication methods based on electrohydrodynamic forces, we are currently designing nanocapsules, nanotubes, and nanofibers of inorganic, hybrid (organic/inorganic), organic, and biological materials for a variety of applications.

Specifically, these submicron structures can be utilized for preparing nanovesicles for controlled release applications, reinforced composites, sorbents and catalysts, and tissue scaffolds. Being highly interdisciplinary, some of the work is done in collaboration with faculty and professionals affiliated with several foreign and domestic academic institutions and industry.

FOCÎĽS LAB
Welcome to the Fabrication of Organoid and Complex ÎĽ (micro/nano)-scale biomimetic Surfaces Laboratory (FOCÎĽS LAB) web page. Our laboratory is located in the Donald F Othmer Hall on the City campus of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. FOCÎĽS LAB is part of the Department of the Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering and associated with the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience (NCNM), and the Department of Biomedical Engineering.

Our research program focuses on the development of novel nanostructured materials with highly controlled architectures and chemistries for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. The materials developed through this research will address some of the key challenges of regenerative medicine and drug delivery. We plan to exploit classical engineering principles to increase understanding of the ways that cells receive information from materials, and what happens to cell function over time when assembled within 3D microenvironments. We will have a strong emphasis on multidisciplinary collaborations with chemists, biologists, material scientists and neuroscientists. Our ultimate goal is to design novel surfaces for understanding the underlying biology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and engineer novel therapeutic approaches.

Mesoscale Engineering Lab
Study electronic and optical phenomena in mesoscales systems to design and synthesize self-assembled (nanoscale) materials and structures for applications in molecular medicine and electronics. The systems we study are both physical and biophysical.

Civil Engineering

Three major research centers are affiliated with the Civil Engineering Department:

•Mid-America Transportation Center (MATC)

•Nebraska Transportation Center

â—¦Midwest Roadside Safety Facility (MwRSF)

Labs:
Structures & Materials Research Laboratory
Located at the University of Nebraska’s Peter Kiewit Institute, the SMR lab offers structural and material testing services to regional engineering firms for their design validations. The laboratory addresses the needs for infrastructure and construction engineering research and development, a focus area identified by the Nebraska Research Initiatives established by the Nebraska Legislature.

Computer Science and Engineering

Research Areas

Software Engineering
•Methodology, Maintenance, Program Analysis, Software Testing and Reliability
•Faculty: Myra Cohen, Matthew Dwyer, Sebastian Elbaum, Gregg Rothermel, Anita Sarma, Rich Sincovec

Theory & Infomatics
•Algorithms, Bioinformatics, Computational Complexity, Computer Vision, Constraint Processing, Constraint Satisfaction, Data Mining, Databases, GIS, Image Analysis, Intelligent Agents, Languages, Machine Learning, Semantic Modeling, Simulation and Modeling, Visualization
•Faculty: Berthe Choueiry, Jitender Deogun, Steve Reichenbach, Charles Riedesel, Peter Revesz, Stephen Scott, Sharad Seth, Leen Kiat Soh , Vinod Variyam, Hongfeng Yu

Systems
•Collaborative Technologies, Distributed Computing and Storage, Embedded Systems, Sensors and Sensor Networks, Networking, Real-Time Systems, Security
•Faculty: Carrick Detweiler, Steve Goddard, Hong Jiang, Ying Lu, Byrav Ramamurthy, Ashok Samal, Witty Srisa-an, Mehmet Can Vuran, Ziguo Zhong

Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction

Areas of Research

Construction Safety
Education and Training
Energy and Sustainability Research
Infrastructure Systems
Modeling, Simulation, and Visualization
Risk Management & Decision Making

Electrical and Computer Engineering

The department has extensive research facilities for all areas of active research. In addition to computing facilities individually operated by each research group, the department administers a network of high-end UNIX workstations and PCs, which are upgraded regularly. These facilities are used for classroom instruction as well as the individual needs of the students.

For integrated circuits and systems research, a network of workstations is maintained with VLSI CAD software that includes Mentor Graphics, Hspice, Xilinx placement and routing tools, and Tanner. VLSI test facilities include data acquisition and RF and mixed-signal test and measurement instruments for integrated circuit characterization. Communications and signal-processing laboratories are maintained for data compression, error control coding, array signal processing, mobile communications, and biomedical signal processing research activities. Remote sensing and applied electromagnetics.

Research facilities include active and passive remote sensing facility, an optical polarimetric scatterometer, an atomic force/scanning tunneling microscope facility, a mcicrowave anechoic chamber facility. Electrooptics research focuses on femtosecond laser communications and sensor development using nanoparticles, and optical diagnostics and spectroscopy equipment. The solid states laboratories have a full array of material processing and device fabrication facilities along with specialized equipment for measurement, allowing research on thin-film deposition and characterization, ellipsometry for in situ monitoring of growth processes, plasma etching and the study of breakdown phenomena, and diamond film growth at low temperatures.

Other available equipment includes X-ray, TEM and fine-line lithography, electron beam and X-ray direct-write facilities, and cryogenic measurement and magnetooptical measurement equipment, ultrahigh vacuum sputter and e-beam deposition systems, an Auger spectrometer, and scanning electron microscopes.

Nanostructures research includes facilities for the study of self-assembly of quantum dots and wires, their properties in cryogenic, noise-isolated environments, and the creation of nanostructures.

Mechanical & Materials Engineering

Research Areas

Bio Sciences
Computational Methods
Dynamics and Vibration
Manufacturing
Materials Science
Solid Mechanics
Systems, Design and Controls
Thermal/Fluid Sciences

Research Description By Engineering Research Center

Abacus Distributed Storage Lab

The Abacus Distributed Storage Lab(ADSL), located inside the Schorr Center on the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's City Campus, aims to design and develop distributed and parallel storage systems with high scalability, performance, reliability and availability.

Acoustic Listening Lab

This research space houses the architecurual engineering program's sound booth, which is used to conduct experienments related to everyday acoustics.

Advanced Nanomaterials & Nanomanufacturing Laboratory

This unique, $2.1 million multidisciplinary experimental facility on nanomanufacturing, nanomaterials, and nano/micromechanics has been developed by Dr. Yuris Dzenis from 1995-present with funding from NSF, AFOSR, and ARO (Dzenis has served as PI/PD on five equipment grants including NSF ARI, REG, IMR, and DURIP projects). In addition to the equipment below, extensive facilities of UNL's interdepartmental Center for Materials Research and Analysis (SEM, X-ray, metallographic facilities, and others) are available for use at a nominal charge. •Multiple electrospinning stations
•Fume hood and equipment for chemical processing
•Nanoparticle and nanofiber preparation and functionalization facility
•Custom-designed multistage high-temperature environmental oven for continuous nanomanufacturing
•Aerospace-grade composite preparation equipment
•Ultrahigh-speed video imaging system for observation and analysis of electrospinning jet instabilities and dynamic fracture processes
•Multiple mini- and micro-stages for miniature specimen testing, including computerized ultrasensitive stages for in-situ mechanical testing inside SEM and FE-SEM chambers or under continuous AFM or SAM observations
•Comprehensive thermal and thermomechanical materials characterization facility, including TGA, DSC, and multiple DMTAs
•Two servohydraulic machines for mechanical testing of advanced materials and composites with digital test control and data acquisition systems and thermal chamber
•Fixtures for tensile, compressive, bending, and fracture mechanics testing; multiple uniaxial and biaxial extensometers, including water-cooled high temperature extensometer
•Equipment for low- and high-cycle fatigue testing, including isothermal and thermomechanical fatigue evaluation
•Unique multiscale NDE facility comprising state-of-the-art ultrasonic immersion scanner, leading edge scanning acoustic tomograph, "true" scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) with 1.3 GHz imaging capability, and a universal scanning probe microscope with specimen modulation capability
•Atomic force microscope (AFM) with environmental and thermal cells and mechanical testing stage for in-situ observations
•Advanced acoustic emission system with digital transient recorder and extensive signal analysis software
•Stages and fixtures for interfacial testing of composites
The group also has extensive computing facilities for simulating nanomanufacturing processes and material behavior.

Advanced Telecommunications Engineering Lab

The Advanced Telecommunication Engineering Laboratory is a state-of-the-art research facility and a part of the Computer and Electronics Engineering Department at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

We are physically located at the Peter Kiewit Institute in Omaha, Nebraska.

TEL was formed in 1995 and is engaged in research to provide solutions for challenges in telecommunication engineering field with emphasis in all areas of wireless communications. Our work is targeted towards providing technological solutions for our society at large. Our research is directly applied in many different areas, such as the railroad industry, farm and ranch operations, medical domain and various other industries. In support of this objective, we work closely with local and national research agencies including various U.S. government agencies.

TEL is actively conducting research in Wireless Sensor Networks, Network Security, Low-Power Sensing and Operations, Mobile Networking and many other important research aspects.

We always welcome new collaborations and new research challenges.

Atmospheric Trace Gas Laboratory

This laboratory is home to the department's efforts in the areas of agricultural odor dispersion and biosphere-atmosphere gas exchange. Dr. Dave Billesbach heads the latter program and works with other BSE faculty and staff (Schulte, Stowell, and Woldt). The laboratory is used in the design, construction, testing, and calibration of micrometeorological sensors and data collection systems related to measurements of the exchange of trace gases (e.g. H2O, CO2, CH4, volatile fatty acids, and other odorous compounds) between the land surface and the atmosphere.

Several major research projects are currently making use of the facility. Dr. Billesbach is working with a group from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to measure carbon, water, and energy exchange from various ecosystems for the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program at its Southern Great Plains Climate Research Facility (SGP-CRF) near Lamont, Oklahoma.

Atomic Force Microscopy Laboratory

The atomic force microscope (AFM) in this laboratory is a Thermomicroscopes Autoprobe CP Research AFM. The open architecture of this AFM allows easy access to the cantilever. This AFM has been modified to allow for various dynamic modes of operation to be investigated.

The linear and nonlinear vibrations of AFM cantilevers in contact with a specimen surface are exploited for the measurement of material properties with nanoscale resolution. An external function generator, a 200 MHz lock-in amplifier, a 200 MHz digital oscilloscope, and ultrasonic transducers are used in conjunction with the AFM.

Biological Process Development Facility

The UNL BPDF uses a synergistic, multi-disciplinary approach to advance research-derived candidate vaccines and bio-therapeutics from discovery to Phase I/II clinical trials. For over 13 years, UNL-BPDF has provided customers with access to experienced biopharmaceutical process research and development scientists and engineers, state-of-the-art process development capabilities, and cGMP manufacturing facilities.

The UNL BPDF facility features 6,000 square feet of modular clean rooms and 7,000 square feet of support space, including a pure steam generator, a water-for-injection (WFI) condenser, a 1,000-gallon WFI storage tank, and ambient and hot WFI distribution loops. The cGMP facility has 80 Liter and 200 Liter bioreactors and is able to accommodate a 1000 Liter bioreactor. The BPDF is equipped for downstream processing of both secreted and intracellular products derived from yeast or bacteria and is designed to produce Bulk Drug Substances.

Biomaterials & Mechanotransduction Lab

The overall goal of this lab is to understand the mechanisms which render cells responsive to DNA transfer, concentrating on the extracellular environment of the cell, as well as the intracellular processes and subsequent signaling involved during nonviral gene delivery. The lab is also collaborating with researchers both within and outside of the Department of Biological Systems Engineering, working to develop novel imaging and probing techniques to study cellular processes, including transfection kinetics, at the single cell level, as well as developing new biomaterials for gene delivery and tissue engineering applications. The main lab contains an enclosed dark room for fluorescence microscopy and 2 office workstations. Equipment within the main lab includes water purification systems, inverted Leica fluorescence microscope, Sorvall benchtop centrifuge, refrigerated microfuge, a fluorometer/ luminometer, UV/VIS spectrophotometer, Bio-Rad electrophoresis system, 4°C refrigerator, -20°C and -80°C freezers, as well as a bacterial incubator. The biosafety cabinet, Heracell CO2 incubators, cell microscope, liquid nitrogen tank, and a refrigerator are located in the adjacent cell culture lab.

Biomechanics and Materials Lab

Our group aims to regulate cell function and fate via applying biomaterial cues (chemical and topographical micro/nano substrates, surface energy tuning) and mechanical signals (fluid shear, mechanical stretch, impulsive pressurization) and through co-regulation from biomaterials and mechanical signals. Further, by integrating molecular engineering (RNA interference or overexpression) of key signaling molecules, including FAK, ROCK, Cadherin, and NF-ÎşB, we aim to reveal the role of focal adhesion, cytoskeletal tension, cell-cell interaction, and immune response in cells sensing and responding to biomaterials and mechanical signals. The crosstalk between engineered extracellular environments and molecular signaling cascades in cell-biomaterial interaction and cell mechanotransduction will provide high impact mechanistic data for biomaterials science, mechanobiology, and regenerative medicine.

Biomechanics, Biomaterials and Biomedicine Core Facility

The Biomechanics, Biomaterials and Biomedicine Instrumentation Facility (BM3) is the newest addition to the College of Engineering core research facilities at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Located in Room 126A of the Walter Scott Engineering Center (bay area) the facility occupies approximately 1000 sq.ft. of combined laboratory space. The BM3 opened in the summer of 2010 with the mission of providing access to critical research infrastructure to faculty and their collaborators. Please explore our website where you will find more details about each of the instruments currently available in our facility, and how to begin incorporating them in your research.

Biomedical Imaging and Biosignal Laboratory

This laboratory, constructed in 2004, provides support for biomedical engineering research. The laboratory includes a scan area (for imaging human research subjects) and conventional benchtop space. The scan area is partitioned from the rest of the laboratory by hospital curtains for privacy. Major lab equipment includes a Siemens Antares commercial diagnostic ultrasound machine, tissue-mimicking phantoms, a ventilation hood, ultrasonic pulsers/receivers, arbitrary function generators, RF power amplifiers, digital oscilloscopes, and several custom-built translation tables. In addition, several National Instruments DAQ cards are contained within high-power workstations. Computing resources include MATLAB®, LabVIEW, and Visual C++ software. Most experimental setups are capable of full computer control. The laboratory is used for medical imaging studies and biosignal analysis, such as ultrasound mammography for breast cancer screening, echodentography, cardiovascular flow quantification, ECG/EEG instrumentation, and evoked potentials for neurological experiments.

Bioseperations and Biomaterials Group

This lab aids in better understanding the role of matrix architecture and matrix mechanical properties on the biosynthetic activity and metabolic activities of chondrocytes that are seeded and maintained on such scaffolds. Another active area is in the area of bioreactors for the development of engineered tissues.

Catalytic and Sorbent Materials Lab

Dr. Larsen's group works on a variety of projects related to catalysis, adsorption, and nanostructured materials design. By means of micro- and nano-fabrication methods based on electrohydrodynamic forces, we are currently designing nanocapsules, nanotubes, and nanofibers of inorganic, hybrid (organic/inorganic), organic, and biological materials for a variety of applications.

Specifically, these submicron structures can be utilized for preparing nanovesicles for controlled release applications, reinforced composites, sorbents and catalysts, and tissue scaffolds. Being highly interdisciplinary, some of the work is done in collaboration with faculty and professionals affiliated with several foreign and domestic academic institutions and industry.

Center for Electro-Optics

The Center for Electro-Optics and Functionalized Surfaces (CEFS) is a collaborative research group composed of over 30 faculty, postdocs, graduate, and undergraduate students, from a diverse range of disciplines, working together towards a common vision of developing the basic science and methods necessary to generate permanent metallic functionalized surfaces.

Complex Materials Optics Network

The Complex Materials Optics Network (CMON) activities are currently funded by National Science Foundation within Materials Research Science and Engineering Center QSPIN, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, Department of Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering and Technology, John A. Woollam Foundation, J.A.Woollam Co.,Inc., EMCORE Corporation, INO Canada, and OSRAM Opto- semiconductors GmbH (Germany).

CMON funding




The Complex Materials Optics Network (CMON) comprises active research groups within the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The primary focus is optical materials preparation, characterization, and instrumentation development for solving contemporary experimental and theoretical problems in materials sciences and engineering bridging Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Engineering applications. The cluster currently is sectioned into Materials Preparation, Instrumentation, Optical Physics, Photonic Crystals, and Biomaterials groups. Instrumentation developments address Terahertz Ellipsometry, Generalized Ellipsometry, and field-dependent linear and nonlinear spatial- and time-resolving optical probes. Active research areas address magnetic, ferroelectric and multiferroic materials, and nanoscience, nanostructure preparation, charge transport in quantum regime systems, and biointerface properties, for example.


Computational Thermal-Fluid Sciences Laboratory

Research in this laboratory focuses on numerical modelling of heat and fluid flow for a variety of applications. Finite difference, finite element, and Green's function techniques are used to solve problems in laser interaction with micron-sized droplets, heat transfer in thin films, combustion of droplets, curing of advanced thermoset composites, laser interactions with ceramics, energy efficient cycles for machinery, rotational molding of thermoplastics, and inverse problems.

Computing equipment includes eight state-of-the-art Sun Ultra 10 workstations. Each Ultra 10 system consists of 1x440MHz UltraSPARC-IIi processor, 2-MB L2 cache, 256-MB DRAM memory, Creator3D Graphics, 9-GB 7200rpm EIDE Internal disk, and a 48x CD-ROM. In addition, the lab has one Sun Ultra 2, one Sun Ultra 60, and one Sun SPARC 20; all of these systems also have the high end Creator3D Graphics, 256 MB memory and CD-ROM's. Each of the above mentioned systems are connected to a Sun Ultra Enterprise 3000 acting as the primary file server.

The Enterprise 3000 has four processors, 1GB memory, 50GB disk space, and CD-ROM. For detailed numerical calculations, there are two Sun Ultra 80's that have 4 x UltraSparc-II 450 Mhz processors, 1 GB memory, 9 GB Internal disk drive, Creator 3D graphics cards, and CD-ROMs. The lab computers also have access to a laser printer, a magneto-optical disk drive, and one 4mm tape drive. Software includes Fortran and C compilers, the Matlab matrix manipulation package, the IDEAS finite element pre- and post-processor, and various public domain drawing, image processing, and text formatting packages.

Constraint Systems Lab

The Constraint Systems Lab addresses both theoretic and practical aspects of Constraint Processing (CP), a sub-area of Artificial Intelligence. CP provides powerful tools for modeling and solving effectively a wide variety of combinatorial problems spanning over Computer Science, Engineering, and Management.

Cyber-Physical Networking Lab

The Cyber-Physical Networking Laboratory, performs research on the design, analysis, and development of networks that are aware of, can adopt to, and change their environment. The research topics include cross-layer communication, real-time networking, wireless underground sensor networks, mobile sensor networks, and cognitive radio wireless networks.

Dynamics and Vibrations Laboratory

The work carried out in this lab focuses on characterizing the underlying dynamic behavior of structures and structural members. The results are used to complement continuing theoretical work. One particular experiment is a vibrating beam with a contact boundary condition. The beam is excited using a shaker, power amplifier, and a waveform generator. The response is measured using an accelerometer, a power supply, and a signal analyzer. Computers with GPIB boards are used for control of the experiment and data analysis.

In addition, this laboratory contains a Spectraquest machinery fault simulator is used to investigate nonlinear vibrations associated with machinery defects.

Empirically-based Software Quality Research & Development Lab

ESQuaReD, (read as e2), the laboratory for Empirically-based Software Quality Research and Development, performs fundamental research on methodologies and tools for creating sufficiently dependable software. The focus areas are: software verification and validation, program analysis, empirical software engineering, software modeling and design, and domain specific software engineering techniques.

Engineering Biomaterials and Gene Delivery Lab

The overall goal of this lab is to understand the mechanisms which render cells responsive to DNA transfer, concentrating on the extracellular environment of the cell, as well as the intracellular processes and subsequent signaling involved during nonviral gene delivery. The lab is also collaborating with researchers both within and outside of the Department of Biological Systems Engineering, working to develop novel imaging and probing techniques to study cellular processes, including transfection kinetics, at the single cell level, as well as developing new biomaterials for gene delivery and tissue engineering applications. The main lab contains an enclosed dark room for fluorescence microscopy and 2 office workstations. Equipment within the main lab includes water purification systems, inverted Leica fluorescence microscope, Sorvall benchtop centrifuge, refrigerated microfuge, a fluorometer/ luminometer, UV/VIS spectrophotometer, Bio-Rad electrophoresis system, 4°C refrigerator, -20°C and -80°C freezers, as well as a bacterial incubator. The biosafety cabinet, Heracell CO2 incubators, cell microscope, liquid nitrogen tank, and a refrigerator are located in the adjacent cell culture lab.

Engineering Properties & Processing Lab

The laboratory space in room 118 is used primarily for bioprocessing research and portions of several teaching laboratories are also conducted in the space. Research related to lipid extraction from grain sorghum, production of protein and chitosan films, and modeling heat transfer and microbial growth in meat products is conducted in this lab. Instructors who use the laboratory space for teaching could include the topics of engineering properties of biological materials, food processing unit operations and agricultural products processing and handling. Major equipment available in the lab includes two controlled environmental chambers, three chemical hoods, a freeze dryer, centrifuge, two drying ovens, three cross-flow grain dryers, four balances, three freezers and two refrigerators.

Environemtal Engineering & Bioremediation Lab

This laboratory and the adjacent Atmospheric Trace Gas Analysis Laboratory, are focal points of the Department's efforts in air quality research. Environmental engineering faculty sharing these laboratories include Drs. Billesbach, Schulte, Stowell and Woldt. In addition to air quality research equipment, the laboratory includes a walk-in environmental chamber, two biological incubators, two fume hoods and a variety of water quality research and bio-instrumentation equipment. In addition to advanced analytical equipment, a GC-Mass Spectrometer and an electronic nose are located in these laboratories.

FOCuS Lab

Welcome to the Fabrication of Organoid and Complex ÎĽ (micro/nano)-scale biomimetic Surfaces Laboratory (FOCÎĽS LAB) web page. Our laboratory is located in the Donald F Othmer Hall on the City campus of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. FOCÎĽS LAB is part of the Department of the Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering and associated with the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience (NCNM), and the Department of Biomedical Engineering.

Our research program focuses on the development of novel nanostructured materials with highly controlled architectures and chemistries for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. The materials developed through this research will address some of the key challenges of regenerative medicine and drug delivery. We plan to exploit classical engineering principles to increase understanding of the ways that cells receive information from materials, and what happens to cell function over time when assembled within 3D microenvironments. We will have a strong emphasis on multidisciplinary collaborations with chemists, biologists, material scientists and neuroscientists. Our ultimate goal is to design novel surfaces for understanding the underlying biology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and engineer novel therapeutic approaches

Geotechnical Lab

PKI 127 is a teaching and research lab used for evaluation of soil behavior on construction designs.

Hydraulics Lab

This laboratory is well-suited for teaching and research in water measurement, soil erosion, pump operations, pipeline hydraulics, open channel hydraulics, chemigation safety, and irrigation sprinkler profile analysis. Two vertical turbine and one horizontal centrifugal pump can supply up to 2,000 gpm for project needs. Water in the lab is supplied from a 12,500 gallon underground reservoir and is recirculated through the channel and pipe network. Water measurement equipment includes pipeline venturis and flow measurement flumes equipped with electronic transducers and ultrasonic measurement for pipelines.

Innovative Design & Ergonomic Analysis Lab

The Innovative Design and Ergonomic Analysis Lab was established in 2002 to study the ergonomics of the upper limb. It is located in Nebraska Hall 301.

Laboratory for Dynamic Materials Characterization

This laboratory is for studying the dynamic response of materials subjected to impulsive, high strain-rate loadings. The laboratory contains Kolsky (or split-Hopkinson) torsion and compression bars as dynamic loading devices. These apparatuses can produce a rapid rising, trapezoidal pulse of torsion, compression or tension loading, or a combination of these loading pulses. Both the delivery of dynamic loading to a test sample and the result of the sample material response to the loading are in the form of linear elastic stress waves propagating within two long metallic bars (elastic waveguides) and can be determined accurately by analyzing time-resolved measurements of the profiles of these waves in the bars.

Such measurements are obtained using a state-of-the-art electronic system consisting of high-impedance, precision strain gauges, a 12-bit high-resolution digital oscilloscope with multi-channel differential amplifiers, and a PC workstation with control software for automated data acquisition. The experimental technique enables various materials of interest (including ceramics, metals, and polymer melts) to be examined under well-defined dynamic loadings. The following are some of the ongoing projects in the laboratory:
1. Transient Rheometry of Polymer Melts at High Shear Rates

A novel polymer melt rheometer has been developed by incorporating a cone-and-plate rheometric cell and a thermal chamber into the Kolsky torsion bar device. The impulsive loading delivered in the form of guided torsional stress wave pulse can drive the new rheometer to an angular sliding velocity as high as 1600 rad/s in a time less than 100 ms, thus enabling measurements of the transient, large-deformation rheological response of polymer melts at shear rates up to 10000 1/s, shear strains up to 10, and temperatures up to 300 °C. This new technique is currently used to characterize the viscoelastic response of a branched low-density polyethylene melt under high-rate and large-strain shearing deformations. The results are useful for improving the material modeling in computerized analysis and design of the manufacturing processes involving rapid flows of the material, e.g., injection molding and extrusion.

2. Dynamic Tribometry of Fracture Surfaces

A dynamic tribometer has been developed by adding a compression unit into the conventional Kolsky torsion bar device. The modified apparatus produces combined loadings of dynamic compression and torsion, thus providing a new technique for dynamic tribometric experiments at sliding velocities up to 10 m/s and compressive contact stresses up to 1 GPa. This technique is being used in the research work sponsored by the U.S. Army Research Office to investigate the dynamic frictional resistance between closed fracture surfaces. Tribo-pairs formed by pre-fractured specimens are tested under various contact stresses and sliding velocities. The tribometric results are studied in conjunction with the statistical characterization of the fracture surface topography in an attempt to develop an understanding of whether and how a micro- fractured material under high confining stresses can resist dynamic deformation. This scientific issue is important for material and structure designs of advanced armors, particularly those involving the use of hard and brittle solids such as ceramics and ceramic composites.

Land Measure & Surveying Lab

Equipment in this lab meets the land surveying needs for research and teaching. Tripod leveling equipment includes six automatic level systems, a laser system with six targets, and an electronic total surveying station with two theodelites. The lab also has two backpack mapping grade GPS units. For area and distance measure from maps, seven electronic planimeters and map measuring wheels are available.

Laser Assisted Nano Engineering Lab

. Laser Assisted Nano Engineering group (LANE) at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln was established in fall of 2002 by professor Yongfeng Lu. LANE group carries out state of art research in the field of nanotechnology using lasers. We aim to develop novel techniques using lasers for various applications including surface cleaning, building photonic devices, nanoimprinting, nano-manufacturing, nano-Raman and Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy.

Lighting & Electrical Lab

With over 300 lighting options to test and banks of electrical equipment available for exploring, this lab is all about hands-on learning.

Materials Testing Lab

Creating a national infrastructure to withstand time, the elements, and increased traffic starts in this lab space.

Mesoscale Engineering Laboratory

Study electronic and optical phenomena in mesoscales systems to design and synthesize self-assembled (nanoscale) materials and structures for applications in molecular medicine and electronics. The systems we study are both physical and biophysical.

Micro/Nanoscale Thermal Science Laboratory

Research: •Thermal transport in nanoscale and nanostructured materials
•Thermophysical property measurement of single micor/ nanoscale conductive, semiconductive, and nonconductive wires/ tubes
•Highly-controlled growth of nanowires and nanotubes
•Laser-assisted nanomanufacturing
•Laser-materials interaction
•Support

Mid-America Transportation Center

The states that comprise Region VII (Iowa, Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska) have many commonalities and, not surprisingly, the states' respective transportation agencies face many similar issues in providing a safe, efficient and effective transportation infrastructure. For example, the majority of the region's roadway networks are primarily rural, although there are a number of major cities interspersed throughout the area that face traditional urban transportation problems. In addition, the four states experience a considerable amount of freight traffic on the region's roadways, railways and waterways - all of which are located at the crossroads of the nation's transportation system. In Region VII, interstates I-70 and I-80 are vital east-west corridors and interstates I-35 and I-29 are major north-south corridors. Given the region's diverse economy and the growing trade with China, Mexico and Canada, freight traffic is increasing every year and is having a profound effect on the region's infrastructure. Congestion on the roadways, railways and waterways caused by this additional freight traffic will have an increasingly detrimental effect on the safety of the region's citizens, the traveling public, the transportation infrastructure and the region's economy.

The interdisciplinary areas of expertise required to successfully meet the research, education and technology transfer objectives associated with our theme include risk and reliability analysis, structural analysis, materials engineering, transportation system operations and alternative transportation infrastructure financing. MATC will work with the leading faculty members from multiple academic departments of the consortium universities. These academicians will partner with staff from the state transportation agencies and members of the commercial freight industry; engineers from the partner organizations will add comprehensive knowledge to minimize the risk to the critical infrastructure systems of the region (and, by extension, of the nation). This collaboration is established to foster an intellectual climate and physical environment capable of supporting the increasing need to improve safety and reduce risk on the multi-modal transportation system.

Midwest Roadside Safety Facility

The Midwest Roadside Safety Facility (MwRSF), part of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is a research organization with a main focus of researching all aspects of highway design and safety. MwRSF conducts safety performance evaluations of various roadside appurtenances, developing new and innovative design concepts and technologies in the area of highway safety.

In 2009, MwRSF was approved for ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation by the American Association for Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA) in the field of safety performance evaluation of highway features and vehicle testing of crash barriers for the tests identified in the Scope of Accreditation. A copy of MwRSF's accreditation certificate and scope of services can be found by clicking here or online at www.a2la.org (certificate number 2937.01).

MwRSF Mission Statement

MwRSF's mission is to improve the safety of public roadways through the design and testing of roadside hardware.


MwRSF Goals
•Improve highway safety by making the roadside less hazardous for motorists
•Design, develop, and crash test roadside hardware
•Conduct safety performance evaluations of existing roadside features
• Perform computer simulation modeling of vehicle impacts with roadside hardware

Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research

Who we are
The Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research (NCESR), a collaboration between the Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD) and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL), was established in April 2006 to conduct research on renewable energy sources, energy efficiency and energy conservation; and to expand economic opportunities and improve quality of life for Nebraska and the nation.

Mission
To conduct energy research that produces new technologies, processes and systems that provide new or significantly enhanced renewable energy sources and improves the quality of life and economic opportunity for all Nebraskans.

Goal
The overall goal of the Center is to develop research and education programs in energy sciences by fostering interdisciplinary collaboration among University of Nebraska-Lincoln faculty and with other research institutions, public-sector agencies, and private sector companies with similar interests. The Center supports both basic and applied research and has a broad mandate to explore a range of renewable energy opportunities (including biofuels, wind, and solar energy), as well as opportunities for energy conservation.

Vision
The Nebraska Center for Energy Science Research (NCESR) will serve as a catalyst at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) to expand opportunities in a broad spectrum of important and innovative energy research areas, such as renewable energy, improved energy efficiency, the production of new materials that find applications in developing clean energy technologies and other evolving energy science areas. To achieve the vision, the Energy Center plans to: NCESR Vision 2013

Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience

Atomic manipulation, Properties affected by nanoscale dimensions, Self-assembly, Ordered nanoarrays, Quantum dots and wires, Nanoelectronics, Quantum computing, Nanomechanics, Nanooptics, Nanoelectromechanical systems, Nanobiological function and life science, Molecular design.

Nebraska Intelligent MoBile Unmanned Systems Lab

The NIMBUS (Nebraska Intelligent MoBile Unmanned Systems) Lab is an exciting place where the latest research and technology in software and systems engineering, robotics, and sensor networks converges to develop more capable and dependable UAVs.

Nebraska Tractor Test Lab

The University of Nebraska Tractor Test Laboratory (NTTL) is the officially designated tractor testing station for the United States and tests tractors according to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) codes.

Nebraska Transportation Center

The Nebraska Transportation Center facilitates collaboration between university researchers, industry leaders, and government entities. NTC integrates transportation research, education and technology transfer programs across the four NU campuses, making it one of the largest university transportation centers in the region. This unique arrangement fosters interdisciplinary collaboration by bringing together top faculty with different areas of expertise to solve larger transportation issues.

Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory

This laboratory is used for detection and analysis of internal damage and flaws in advanced polymer composites and other engineering materials. The methods utilized include acoustic emission, acousto-ultrasonics, and ultrasonic scanning. A state-of-the-art acoustic emission system is used for studying damage evolution under loading. This system combines a fully digital architecture with high processing dynamics that allows for studying material response under fast dynamic loads.

The system is capable of simultaneous acquisition of acoustic emission parameters and transient data, and is equipped with location software and FFT software. Extensive filtering, cluster analysis, and pattern recognition capabilities, including unique AE signal classification methods developed by the group, enable damage type identification and extraction of histories for different micromechanisms.

This acoustic emission system with a pulser is also used in acousto-ultrasonic experiments. Shape and spectrum analyses of acoustic waves propagated through partially damaged materials are used to evaluate average damage parameters. A leading edge ultrasonic immersion system is used for spatial mapping of internal flaws. In addition to regular A-scan, B-scan, and C-scan, the system provides specialized capabilities such as full digital waveform storage and analysis at each location, digital filtering, FFT analysis, and 3-dimensional imaging. A high signal conversion rate permits use of high resolution transducers with resonant frequencies within a frequency range of scanning acoustic microscopes.

Organic Electronics and Nanoelectronics Lab

Our current research focuses on achieving high performance, low cost thin film electronic materials and devices including Perovskite Solar Cells,Organic Solar Cells, Organic and Nanocomposite Photodetectors, Thin Film Transistors, and other types of Sensors.

Passive Solar Research Group

The University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO)'s Passive Solar Research Group is dedicated to the investigation of alternative energy technology. Their work is focused on finding alternative, ecologically friendly heating and cooling methods.

Plant Biophysics Lab

The plant biophysics laboratory contains three large, reach-in, programmable Conviron E-15® environmental chambers, each with computer support for plant growth modeling, thermodynamics, theoretical energy-based, water use calculations, and plant and turf grass calorimetry. The newest chamber provides approximately 1,400 micro-moles of photosynthetically-active radiation (PAR) or equivalent to one-third full sunlight. Water use measurements and crop stress index development use electronic load cell lysimeters, single leaf porometer systems, psychrometers, self-equilibrating manometers, and leaf temperature measurements, using conventional infrared thermometers and IRT/c's. The laboratory has a low-resolution, pyroelectric thermal imaging system, for assessing spatial emissivity and surface temperatures. CO2 gas exchange and humidity measurements are available. The laboratory has precision pyranometer and PAR sensors. Spectral analyses for reflection and transmission of biological materials can be performed, using a diffraction grating spectroradiometer and integrating sphere. Modern 12- and 16-bit data logging equipment is available, along with computer and network support. Using plants from greenhouses on East Campus for short-term controlled-environment analyses, the environmental chambers have successfully demonstrated dynamic crop temperature responses to moisture stress, infrared heating, such as might be used in greenhouses, and plant-directed drip irrigation.

Polymer Composites Laboratory

Properties of advanced lightweight fiber reinforced polymer composites are studied in this laboratory. The laboratory includes a hot press for manufacturing thermoplastic composites, closed-loop programmable testing machines for quasistatic and fatigue testing, nondestructive evaluation equipment, and modern data acquisition hardware and software. A specialized press-clave to produce thermoset composites, thermal analysis equipment, and devices for mechanical characterization of interfaces between fibers and matrices are available.

Polymer Mechanics Laboratory

This laboratory is equipped to conduct extension and shear testing of polymers at elevated temperatures. Automated data acquisition and control is available for the application of complex loading patterns and for conducting long-term testing. A vacuum oven is available for sample preparation and conditioning.

Portland Cement & Bituminous Material Lab

This teaching/research lab is used to evaluate the behaviors of concrete and asphalt in different environments.

Power & Energy Systems Lab

The Power & Energy Systems Laboratory (PESL) at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) was established in the fall of 2008. Our research aims to develop innovative technologies to provide better electric energy security and sustainability. To achieve this goal we carry out leading-edge research in the areas of clean and renewable energy systems, smart grids, microgrids, power system control and optimization, condition monitoring and fault diagnostics, energy storage systems, power electronics, electric machines and drives, and computational intelligence for electric power and energy systems.

Power Laboratory

This is the teaching laboratory for Agricultural and Biological Systems Engineering Power Systems Design (every spring semester), Mechanized Systems Management (MSYM) Hydraulic Power Systems (every fall semester), and MSYM Engine Power Systems, every spring semester. Equipment resources in this room include three hydraulic test benches; several engines; a tractor chassis with engine, transmission and hydraulic system; an electric engine dynamometer; a number of Briggs and Stratton small engines; a JD 3010 gasoline engine; and instrumentation to measure the airflow rate into the combustion chambers of an engine during a dynamometer test. Several of the exercises conducted in this laboratory include calibrating hydraulic flow meters, measuring the volumetric efficiency of a hydraulic pump, determining pressures and input and output forces from hydraulic cylinders, measuring the pressure drop across a needle valve as a function of flow rate through the valve, and engine dynamometer tests. This lab is housed in the Biological Systems Engineering Research Laboratory

Robotic and Mechatronics Lab

From creating robotic safety markers for highways and tiny surgical instruments to sophisticated mechanisms for future planetary exploration, our faculty and students are on the cutting edge of the robotics field.

Smart Building Laboratories & Field Test Beds

Low energy consumption is an important characteristic when designing buildings of the future. The Smart Building lab is dedicated to this kind of "green" research.

Soil & Water Properties Lab

This laboratory is equipped to measure saturated hydraulic conductivity, soil water release properties, bulk density, soil water content, and soil particle size. The equipment in the lab includes: falling head permeameters, a flexible wall permeameter, neutron radiation soil moisture meter, and Time Domain Reflectrometry for soil water measurement, thermocouple psychrometers, Tempe and pressure plate chambers, and fluorescent dye tracing equipment.

Structural Dynamics Lab

This lab is dedicated to the research of dynamic loads on structures. It is also home of the College of Engineering EERI team.

Structural Laboratory

Are you interested in breaking large objects? If so, this lab was made for you. When the industry is in need of sample testing, this is where they come.

Structures & Materials Research Lab

The Structures & Materials Research Laboratory, located at the University of Nebraska’s Peter Kiewit Institute, offers structural and material testing services to regional engineering firms for their design validations. The laboratory addresses the needs for infrastructure and construction engineering research and development, a focus area identified by the Nebraska Research Initiatives established by the Nebraska Legislature.

The structures lab provides capabilities for static, dynamic, and fatigue testing. The testing area of the structural floor is approximately 30 feet by 90 feet. The floor system is designed to withstand 750 kips per tie-down location and approximately 100 kips per square foot testing area. A 30-ft high reaction wall is designed to take maximum allowable load of 240 kips either pushing or pulling, 80 kips at each 10-ft anchor point. A hydraulic pump provides 4000 psi pressure line along the testing floor for hydraulic jack connection.

The capabilities of the Structures Research Laboratory are: •Max loading capacity of tie-down floor system = 750,000 pounds per 3-foot anchor spacing
•Max load capacity of steel transfer beam = 500,000 pounds
•60 feet by 90 feet testing area
•25-ton crane (50,000 pounds)
•A 30-foot Reaction Wall for prototype structural testing, including dynamic loads. Max horizontal load = 240,000 pounds
•Underground chambers with 7 feet head room for testing setup
•Removable floor panels designed for semi-truck wheel loads, where a flat bed can deliver heavy test articles directly into position
•70-foot long pre-stressing bed for casting pre-stressed or post-tensioned concrete structures
In addition to structural testing, the materials lab is equipped with: one Forney 400-kip concrete compression machine, one 55-kip MTS machine and one concrete freeze and thaw tester. A concrete curing room is available with climate control to set temperature up to 140oF and humidity to 100%. The materials lab is fully equipped for conducting concrete compressive strength, split-tension, modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture, freeze and thaw durability, permeability, alkali-silica reactivity (ASR), and creep and shrinkage evaluations. The concrete lab is Cement and Concrete Reference Laboratory certified.

Surface Mechanics and Tribology Laboratory

This laboratory is mainly for statistical studies of the topographical features of material surfaces and the influences of surface topography on the micromechanical mechanisms governing the tribological response of these surfaces. The laboratory is equipped with a Proscan 1000 measuring system, which is an optical profilometer capable of non-contact three-dimensional surface profiling over large areas and at a 2-mm depth of field and a submicron resolution. The use of a chromatic sensor allows examinations of dark and rough surfaces such as those of fractured silicon carbide. The scanning process is fully computerized and the computer software enables two- and three-dimensional surface visualizations as well as complete statistical analysis of surface topography.

An ongoing research project in the laboratory is to study the friction and wear mechanisms of as-fractured rough surfaces by comparing the surface features of such a tribo-pair before and after tribometric experiment and by correlating the evolution of frictional response with that of surface topography. •Optical non-contact surface profiling
•Sub-micron scanning at large depth of field (2 mm) and large areas
•Chromatic sensor for dark surfaces
•3-D surface visualization
•Complete computerized statistical analysis

The Holland Computing Center

The Holland Computing Center provides campus-wide services to researchers who need high performance computing resources. PrairieFire, a powerful supercomputer located in the facilty, is used by scientists and engineers to study topics such as nanoscale chemistry, subatomic physics, meteorology, crashworthiness, and artificial intelligence.

Trauma Mechanics Research Iniative

Blast induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is signature injury in recent combat scenarios involving improvised explosive devices (IEDs). In 2005, the U.S. military reported 10,953 IED attacks, at an average of 30 per day[2].TBI and concussion rates among service members returning from Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) have been reported at 22%. However, the rate of persistent symptoms has been reported as significantly lower (8%).

Ultrasonic Materials Characterization Laboratory

This laboratory is used for characterizing materials including metals, concrete, piezoelectrics, and ceramics. Of particular interest are diffuse ultrasonic methods for studying heterogeneous materials. Equipment in this laboratory includes two 200 MHz digital oscilloscopes, an ultrasonic pulser receiver, a 15 MHz arbitrary waveform generator, a large water tank with three-dimensional scanning control for ultrasonic measurements, preamplifiers, a large optical table with laser interferometer equipment (shown), and a variety of ultrasonic transducers (longitudinal and shear) covering frequencies from 500 kHz to 20 MHz. Computers with GPIB boards and Labview software are used for control of experiments and data acquisition.

Graduate

Subject Areas of Research

Subject Areas

  • Acoustics
  • Advanced Telecommunications
  • Agricultural Engineering, Animal Housing Systems
  • Agricultural Machinery Management
  • Agricultural Soils
  • Air Management Systems
  • Air Management Systems in Buildings
  • Algorithms
  • Applications of Digital Signal Processing to Sensor Array Problems
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Atmospherics & Gasses
  • Automated Systems
  • Biochemical Engineering in Healthcare
  • Bioenergy
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Bogor
  • Bridge Design and Construction
  • Building System Commissioning
  • CAD of VLSI Systems
  • Change, Engineering Management, Teams and Technology, and Systems Engineering
  • Channel Coding
  • Computational Chemistry
  • Computational Complexity Theory
  • Computer Architecture and Systems
  • Computer Modeling
  • Computer Networks
  • Computer Vision
  • Construction Management
  • Control Systems
  • Data Compression/Scientific Image Compression
  • Database Systems
  • Design and Analysis of Network Protocols and Architectures
  • Detection of Food Irradiation
  • Digital Image Processing
  • Digital Signal Processing
  • Dynamic and Nonlinear Systems
  • Efficient Water Use in Irrigation
  • Electrical Codes and Standards for Agriculture
  • Electromagnetic Interactions and Theoretical Calculations
  • Electromagnetic Theory
  • Engineering Design
  • Environmental Design of Buildings
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Infrastructure Engineering
  • Failure Analysis and Corrosion
  • Fluid Mechanics
  • Fluid Power Hydraulics
  • Food and Process Engineering
  • Functional Proteomics
  • Geotechnical Engineering
  • Graphic databases
  • Groundwater Engineering and Management
  • High Assurance Systems
  • High Performance and Low-Power I/O Architectures and Storage Systems
  • High Voltage Semiconductor Devices
  • Historic Architecture
  • Imaging Systems
  • Industrial Product and Fuel Production
  • Industrial Utilization of Agricultural Commodities
  • Instrumentation, Controls and Sensors
  • Interactive Computer Problem Solving
  • Irrigation
  • Irrigation Water Management
  • Irrigation Water Management/Qualtiy
  • Irrigation and Drainage Systems
  • Lighting Design
  • Lighting and Illumination in Buildings
  • Livestock Environment
  • Livestock Environment Management
  • Livestock Environment Management
  • Machine Design
  • Machine Design
  • Machine Learning / Computational Learning Theory
  • Material Science/Composite Materials
  • Materials Processing
  • Mechanized Systems Management
  • Microstructural/Nanoscale Mechanics
  • Modeling and Simulation of Digital Systems
  • Numerical Analysis
  • Object-Oriented Systems
  • Optical, Electrical and Microstructural Studies of Solids
  • Organizational Learning Approaches to Software Development
  • Pharmaceutical Products
  • Polymer/Fiber/ Physical/Chemical Treatment Processes
  • Power & Machinery
  • Power Semiconductors
  • Predictive Microbiology
  • Project Management
  • Project Management
  • Protein Absorption at Material Surfaces
  • Recombinant Protein Production
  • Remote Sensing
  • Robotic Systems
  • Scientific Computing
  • Simulation and Reliability Evaluation of Power Systems
  • Software Testing
  • Software Testing Techniques
  • Soil & Water Conservation Engineering
  • Soil and Water Conservation
  • Soil and Water Resources Engineering
  • Solid Phase Reactions
  • Sound and Vibration Studies
  • Spectral Composition of Light and Human Vision, Optics
  • Stability and Automation Control
  • Starch/Protein Processing
  • Structural Determination of Surfaces
  • Structural Engineering
  • Surface Materials Interactions
  • Surface Water Quality
  • Systems Modeling & Design
  • Thermodynamics
  • Thin Film Deposition
  • Thin Film Deposition and Surface Engineering
  • Thin Film Semiconductor Alloys
  • Transportation Engineering
  • Transportation Systems
  • VSLI Testing
  • Value-Added Process Enginering
  • Water Management Systems
  • Water Resources
  • Water Resources Engineering
  • Water Science and Mechanized Systems Management
  • Whole Farm Nutrient Management
  • Wireless Communications Channels
  • Work Teams, Quality Control and Management, Organizational Management and

Graduate

Dual Degrees

Graduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

The EMME program is a simultaneous double master's degree program that provides the student with a master in Engineering Mechanics from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL), USA, and a master of Engineering Materials (CEMPI) from the University of Rouen (UR), France. The program provides students with a unique educational opportunity at the interface of Mechanics and Materials, yet enables them to complete two master's degrees in approximately two years.

Students entering this program at UNL spend the first year taking courses in Engineering Mechanics, completing materials prerequisites, and studying French. They then continue their studies in the second year at UR in Materials Engineering.

Students entering this program at UR spend the first year taking courses in Materials Engineering, completing mechanics prerequisites, and studying English. They then continue their studies in the second year at UNL in Engineering Mechanics.


The MEME program is a simultaneous double master program that provides the student with a master in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL), USA, and a master of Engineering Materials (CEMPI) from the University of Rouen (UR), France. The program provides students with a unique educational opportunity at the interface of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Engineering, yet enables them to complete two master's degrees in approximately two years.

Students entering this program at UNL spend the first year taking courses in Mechanical Engineering, completing materials prerequisites, and studying French. They then continue their studies in the second year at UR in Materials Engineering. Students entering this program at UR spend the first year taking courses in Materials Engineering, completing mechanics prerequisites, and studying English. They then continue their studies in the second year at UNL in Mechanical Engineering.

Graduate

Student Appointments

Appointments by Department

Appointments - Number of Appointments
Stipend - Average Monthly Stipend

Department Fellowships TA RA Other Total Appts.
Biological Systems Engineering
Appointments: 0 0 39 0 39
Stipends: $0 $0 $1,800 $0
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Appointments: 0 9 11 0 20
Stipends: $0 $1,800 $1,800 $0
Civil Engineering
Appointments: 1 17 40 0 58
Stipends: $3,375 $1,800 $1,800 $0
Computer Science and Engineering
Appointments: 1 33 50 0 84
Stipends: $2,833 $1,800 $1,800 $0
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction
Appointments: 0 20 16 0 36
Stipends: $0 $1,800 $1,800 $0
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Appointments: 0 29 58 0 87
Stipends: $0 $1,800 $1,800 $0
Engineering - Dean's Office
Appointments: 1 1 3 0 5
Stipends: $1,800 $1,800 $1,800 $0
Mechanical & Materials Engineering
Appointments: 1 24 69 0 94
Stipends: $1,800 $1,800 $1,800 $0
All Total Appointments 4 133 286 0 423

Appointments by Research Center

Appointments - Number of Appointments
Stipend - Average Monthly Stipend

Graduate Research Center Fellowships RA Other Total Appts.
Abacus Distributed Storage Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Acoustic Listening Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Acoustic Sound Booth
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Advanced Composites Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Advanced Electronics Engineering Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Advanced Nanomaterials & Nanomanufacturing Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Advanced Telecommunications Engineering Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Applied Electromagnetics Research Facility
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Atmospheric Trace Gas Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Atomic Force Microscopy Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Biological Process Development Facility
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Biomaterials & Mechanotransduction Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Biomechanics and Materials Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Biomechanics, Biomaterials and Biomedicine Core Facility
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Biomedical Imaging and Biosignal Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Bioseperations and Biomaterials Group
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Building Systems Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Catalytic and Sorbent Materials Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Center for Communications and Information Science
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Center for Electro-Optics
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Center for Ergonomics and Safety Research
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Center for Laser Analytical Studies of Trace Gas Dynamics
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Center for Microelectronic & Optical Materials Research
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Center for Nontraditional Marco, Micro and Nano Machining Research
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Communications and Signal-Processing Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Complex Materials Optics Network
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Computational Thermal-Fluid Sciences Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Constraint Systems Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Cyber-Physical Networking Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Digital and Computer Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
DSP/ Controls Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Dynamics and Vibrations Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Educational Robotics Programs
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Empirically-based Software Quality Research & Development Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Energy Systems Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Engineering Biomaterials and Gene Delivery Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Engineering Properties & Processing Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Environemtal Engineering & Bioremediation Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
FOCuS Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
General Electrical Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Geotechnical Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Hydraulics Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Innovative Design & Ergonomic Analysis Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Intelligent Ubiquitous Computing Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Laboratory for Dynamic Materials Characterization
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Land Measure & Surveying Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Laser Assisted Nano Engineering Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Lighting & Electrical Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Lightwave Communication Research Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Materials Testing Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Mesoscale Engineering Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Micro/Nanoscale Thermal Science Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Microstructures and Magnetic Materials Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Mid-America Transportation Center
Appointments: 0 13 0 13
Stipends: $0 $1,800 $0
Midwest Roadside Safety Facility
Appointments: 0 5 0 5
Stipends: $0 $1,800 $0
Nanostructures Research Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Nebraska Intelligent MoBile Unmanned Systems Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Nebraska Tractor Test Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Nebraska Transportation Center
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Organic Electronics and Nanoelectronics Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Passive Solar Research Group
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Plant Biophysics Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Polymer Composites Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Polymer Mechanics Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Portland Cement & Bituminous Material Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Power & Energy Systems Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Power Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Robotic and Mechatronics Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Smart Building Laboratories & Field Test Beds
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Soil & Water Properties Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Solid State Laboratories
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Structural Dynamics Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Structural Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Structures & Materials Research Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Surface Mechanics and Tribology Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Systems Biology and Biomedical Informatics Lab1
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Terry Research Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
The Holland Computing Center
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Translational aand Regenerative Medicine Imaging Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Trauma Mechanics Research Iniative
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Ultrasonic Materials Characterization Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Value-Added Processing & Food Engineering Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Wireless Communications Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
All Total Appointments 0 18 0 18

1The department is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.