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Marquette University - 2016

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Engineering Information

Degree Requirements

Bachelor's Degree Requirements

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Biomedical, Civil, Construction, Computer, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering may be conferred on students who complete the following requirements: a minimum of 60 semesters hour at Marquette University, a minimum of 32 semester hours of upper division coursework at Marquette University, at least 15 hours must be within the major, a cumulative grade average of C or better, a cumulative grade average of C or better in the major area of study, complete the minimum number of semester credit hours per the major, completion of all required courses, including 36 semester hours of University Core of Common Studies.

Master's Degree Requirements

Biomedical Engineering Master of Science (M.S.):
A master of science student must complete 24 credit hours of course work (including three credit hours of physiology) and six credit hours of thesis work. The student also must pass a comprehensive examination and submit an approved thesis.
Biomedical Engineering Master of Engineering (M.E.):
A master of engineering student must complete a total of 30 credit hours of course work, which includes three credits of independent readings and research. The student also must pass the capstone comprehensive examination.

Civil Engineering Master of Science (M.S.):
Students may earn a master’s degree under either Plan A (thesis) or Plan B (non-thesis). Regardless of the option chosen, at least one-half of the total course work requirement must be taken at the 6000-level. In most cases, master’s students are admitted to the program under Plan B but may transfer to Plan A with permission from their adviser. Note: Recipients of teaching or research assistantships are strongly encouraged to pursue Plan A (thesis option).

Plan A requires the student to complete 30 credit hours (24 hours of course work, 6 hours of thesis work), submit an approved thesis, and pass a final oral comprehensive examination (thesis defense). The comprehensive exam for Plan A is focused mainly on the student’s thesis topic.

Under the Plan B option, students must complete 30 credit hours of course work and pass a final comprehensive examination. The comprehensive exam for Plan B is usually an oral exam, administered by the student’s three-person master’s committee. The scope of the Plan B comprehensive exam may span the student’s entire body of course work.

Both Plans A and B require that at least 18 credit hours be from the Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering course offerings.

Electrical and Computer Engineering Master of Science (M.S.):
The EECE department offers two options for earning a master's degree, a thesis option (Plan A) and a non-thesis option (Plan B). By the end of the first semester of full-time studies, all master's students must select and meet with the academic adviser and together complete a Master's Program Planning Form, including identifying whether they wish to pursue the thesis or non-thesis option as well as listing a proposed set of courses for their program of study. This program of study must be approved by the adviser and the EECE director of graduate studies, as well as the Graduate School. Courses must form a cohesive overall plan of study as determined mutually by each student and his or her adviser.

In the thesis option, 30 credit hours are required: 24 credit hours of course work plus 6 credit hours of EECE 6999 Master's Thesis. At least 18 of the 24 credits of course work must be taken in EECE. At least one half of the minimum total course program (i.e., 12 hours exclusive of thesis) and of the EECE course program (i.e., 9 hours exclusive of thesis but including the required courses EECE 6010 Advanced Engineering Mathematics and EECE 6020 Probability and Random Processes in Engineering) must be taken at the strictly graduate level (6000 or 8000-level). Students in the master's thesis option must also successfully complete and defend a research thesis under the guidance of their faculty advisers and thesis committees.

In the non-thesis option, 30 credit hours, at least 21 of which must be in EECE, are required. At least 18 credits of the total program course work and at least 12 credits of the EECE course work (including EECE 6010 Advanced Engineering Mathematics and EECE 6020 Probability and Random Processes in Engineering) must be taken at the strictly graduate level (6000 or 8000-level). In addition, independent study and research seminar credits are not permitted in this program option. Students in the master's non-thesis option must also successfully pass a written comprehensive examination prior to graduation. The exam covers material from the two required core courses EECE 6010 Advanced Engineering Mathematics and EECE 6020 Probability and Random Processes in Engineering, plus one additional focus area identified by students and their advisers.

Healthcare Technologies Management Masters of Science (M.S.):
The program consists of 37.5 credit hours.

Mechanical Engineering Master of Science (M.S.):
Upon enrolling in the master of science in mechanical engineering program, a student selects one of three areas of specialization: energy systems, manufacturing and materials systems, or mechanical systems. Upon selection of a faculty adviser, a curriculum is designed along with a research program to address the specific goals of the student. Programs will include course work in engineering, mathematics and science with the following requirements:
◾A minimum of 24 credit hours of course work.
◾A minimum of 3 credit hours of an approved math course (MEEN 6101, MEEN 6102, or MEEN 6103).
◾A minimum of one half of the total course work must be at the 6000 level.
◾A minimum of one half of the total course work must be taken from the Department of Mechanical Engineering.
◾At most, a maximum of 3 credit hours of an Independent Study course may be included in the course work total.
◾Six (6) credit hours of thesis work, completion of a comprehensive exam and submission of an approved thesis.
◾The student must attend and participate in the departmental graduate seminar series (MEEN 6960).

A maximum of 6 credit hours of graduate-level credit from other approved institutions may be accepted toward the requirement of the degree.

Mechanical Engineering master of Engineering (M.E.)
Upon enrolling in the master of engineering program in mechanical engineering, a student selects one of three areas of specialization: energy systems, manufacturing and materials systems, or mechanical systems. A curriculum is designed along with an academic adviser which is specific to the goals of the individual student. The program includes course work in engineering, mathematics and science with the following requirements:
◾30 credit hours of course work.
◾A minimum of 3 credit hours of an approved math course (MEEN 6101 Advanced Engineering Analysis 1, MEEN 6102 Advanced Engineering Analysis 2 or MEEN 6103 Approximate Methods in Engineering Analysis).
◾A minimum of one half of the total course work must be at the 6000 level.
◾A minimum of one half of the total course work must be taken from the Department of Mechanical Engineering.
◾At most, a maximum of 3 credit hours of an Independent Study course may be included in the course work total.
◾Completion of a capstone comprehensive examination consisting of two parts:
1.A mathematics portion drawn from material presented in MEEN 6101 Advanced Engineering Analysis 1.
2.An area of specialization portion drawn from material presented from the area of specialization selected:
Energy Systems: MEEN 5350 Transport Phenomena and MEEN 5360 Intermediate Thermodynamics
Manufacturing and Materials Systems: MEEN 5410 Experimental Design and MEEN 5440 Processing and Forming of Materials
Mechanical Systems: MEEN 5220 Intermediate Dynamics and MEEN 5230 Intermediate Mechanics of Materials
◾A maximum of 6 credit hours of graduate-level credit from other approved institutions may be accepted toward the requirement of the degree.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

Biomedical Engineering:
A doctoral student must complete a program of study prepared in consultation with his or her dissertation adviser and outlined on an approved Doctoral Program Planning Form. The program normally requires 36 credit hours of course work beyond the baccalaureate degree (a minimum of 18 credit hours beyond the master’s degree) plus 12 credit hours of dissertation work. Doctoral course work must include a minimum of three credit hours of graduate-level physiology. The student also must pass a doctoral qualifying examination (DQE) and submit and successfully defend a dissertation.


Civil Engineering:
A doctoral student must complete a program of study prepared in consultation with his or her doctoral adviser and outlined on an approved Doctoral Program Planning Form. This form must be submitted within the first year of the student’s doctoral studies. The program normally requires a minimum of 45 credit hours of course work beyond the baccalaureate degree plus 12 credit hours of dissertation work. In cases in which the student enters the program with a master’s degree in civil engineering or a closely related field, the student may request that the department and the Graduate School allow credits from the master’s degree to satisfy up to 21 credit hours of the required course work. Thus, a minimum of 24 credit hours of course work exclusive of the dissertation must be taken at Marquette University while the student is in the doctoral program. The student must also pass a doctoral qualifying examination (DQE) and submit and successfully defend a dissertation.

Electrical and Computer Engineering:
The doctoral program requires a total of 24 post-master's credit hours of course work, plus an additional 12 dissertation credits. (A master's degree is considered to be the equivalent of 24 course work credits, so that this course work requirement is the equivalent of 48 credits beyond the bachelor's degree, exclusive of dissertation credits.)

The only required courses for the doctoral program are EECE 6010 Advanced Engineering Mathematics and EECE 6020 Probability and Random Processes in Engineering typically taken in the first year of study. Courses must form a cohesive overall plan of study as determined mutually by each student and their adviser.

Doctoral students are required to take the doctoral written qualifying examination by the beginning of their fourth semester of study. The WQE is a written exam, administered twice a year. Following successful completion of the WQE, students become doctoral candidates and move forward with pursuing their dissertation research. This process includes formation of a faculty dissertation committee, presentation of an oral proposal and dissertation outline and finally a public dissertation defense of their work.

Mechanical Engineering:
A doctoral student must complete a program of study prepared in collaboration with their permanent adviser and outlined on an approved Doctoral Program Planning Form. This form must be submitted within the first year of the student’s doctoral studies. The program normally requires 48 credit hours of course work beyond the baccalaureate degree, plus 12 credit hours of dissertation work. In cases in which the student enters the program with a master’s degree in mechanical engineering or a closely related field, the student may request that the department and the Graduate School allow credits from the master’s degree to satisfy up to 24 credit hours of the required course work. At least one-half of the total course work requirement must be from designated graduate-level courses. Students are required to take at least one-half of their total course work from the Department of Mechanical Engineering course offerings. A maximum of 6 credit hours of graduate-level credit from other accredited institutions may be accepted toward the requirements of the degree. Independent study course work can account for a maximum of 3 credit hours. All doctoral students are required to participate in the department graduate seminar activities and complete all university Graduate School requirements.

A doctoral student must complete a departmental written proficiency exam prior to completion of the Marquette University doctoral residency requirement. This exam will be comprised of two components, one component being engineering mathematics and the other representing the student’s declared area of specialization: energy systems, manufacturing and materials systems, or mechanical systems. This examination is based upon material presented in the advanced undergraduate and master’s degree level course work (approved math courses are MEEN 6101 Advanced Engineering Analysis 1, MEEN 6102 Advanced Engineering Analysis 2 and MEEN 6103 Approximate Methods in Engineering Analysis).

A student must pass a doctoral qualifying examination (DQE) administered by their doctoral committee within one academic year after completing course work requirements. This exam must be passed at least one year prior to the submission and successful public defense of the dissertation. The dissertation must represent an original research contribution and demonstrate both high scholarly achievement and the ability to conduct independent research.