Case Western Reserve University - 2016

Institution Information

Contact Information

Institution's Mailing Address

Institution Name: Case Western Reserve University
Mailing Address: 10900 Euclid Avenue
City: Cleveland
State: OH
Postal Code: 441067220
Country: United States
Phone 216-368-4436
Fax: 216-368-6939
Website: http://www.engineering.case.edu

Undergraduate Admission Inquiries

Patrick Crago
Professor
Biomedical Engineering
Case Western Reserve University
10900 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44106
Phone: 216-368-3977
Fax: 216-368-4969
pec3@case.edu

Graduate Admission Inquiries

Patrick Crago
Professor
Biomedical Engineering
Case Western Reserve University
10900 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44106
Phone: 216-368-3977
Fax: 216-368-4969
pec3@case.edu

Gary Wnek
Professor and Chair
Macromolecular Science and Engineering
Case Western Reserve University
10900 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 441067217
Phone: 216-368-4172
Fax: 216-368-4202
gew5@case.edu

Institution Information

General Information


Type of institution: PRIVATE
Academic Year: SEMESTERS
Setting of Main Engineering Campus URBAN

Main Campus Information

Is the main campus located in a city with a population greater than 100,000?: Yes
Name of this city, or if no, the name of the nearest city of any size?: Cleveland
This city's population (approx.): 2,000,000
Distance from Main Campus: 0

Total Enrollment

Total Undergraduate enrollment: 5,152
Total Graduate enrollment: 2,601
Total Professional and other enrollment: 3,911

Non-Engineering Degree Granting Colleges

Business, Dentistry, Law, Liberal arts, Medicine, Natural sciences, Nursing, Applied Social Sciences

Institution Information

General Admissions

Entrance Requirements and Recommendations

Requirements

All applicants are evaluated on the basis of past academic performance, recommendations, and personal accomplishments. Undergraduate admission is based on SAT or ACT tests. GRE scores required for admission to graduate programs.

Recommendations

none provided

Engineering Information

Head of Engineering

Head of Engineering

Jeffrey Duerk
Dean
Case School of Engineering
Case Western Reserve University
10900 Euclid Ave.
Cleveland, OH 44106-7220
Phone: 216-368-3227
jeffrey.duerk@case.edu

Engineering Information

Engineering Degrees Offered

Types of Engineering Degrees

Bachelor's:B.S.
Master's:M.S. with thesis, M.S. without thesis, but with project or report, M.Eng., M.S. with comprehensive exam
Doctoral:Ph.D.

Computer Science Degrees Awarded Outside the College/School of Engineering

Bachelor's

Engineering Information

Engineering Departments

Engineering Department(s) Degree Granting Level Department Chair Discipline
Academic Office of the Dean Both Marcus Buchner Other Engineering Disciplines
Biomedical Engineering Both Robert Kirsch Biomedical Engineering
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Both Daniel Lacks Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering Both Xiangwu (David) Zeng Civil Engineering
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Both Kenneth Loparo Electrical/Computer Engineering
Macromolecular Science and Engineering Both David Schiraldi Other Engineering Disciplines
Materials Science and Engineering Both Frank Ernst Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Both Robert Gao Mechanical Engineering

Engineering Information

Research Centers

  • INCOLL - Research center WITHIN the college of engineering
  • INDEPT - Research center WITHIN an engineering department
  • INUNIV - Research center WITHIN university system
  • OUTUNIV - Research center OUTSIDE the university
Center/Lab Discipline Research Class Head Chair
Advanced Manufacturing and Mechanical Reliability Center Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering INDEPT John Lewandowski
Advanced Platform Technology Center Biomedical Engineering INUNIV
Case Metal Casting Laboratory Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering INCOLL James McGuffin-Cawley
Center for Advanced Polymer Processing Other Engineering Disciplines INCOLL Joao Maia
Center for Advanced Science and Engineering of Carbon Other Engineering Disciplines INCOLL Liming Dai
Center for Applied Polymer Research Other Engineering Disciplines INCOLL Eric Baer
Center for Biomaterials Biomedical Engineering INCOLL Robert Kirsch
Center for Computational Imaging and Personalized Diagnostics Biomedical Engineering INDEPT Anant Madabhushi
Center for Evaluation of Implant Performance Mechanical Engineering INDEPT Clare Rimnac
Center for Layered Polymeric Systems Other Engineering Disciplines INCOLL Eric Baer
Cleveland Functional Electrical Stimulation Center Biomedical Engineering INDEPT Robert Kirsch
Control and Energy Systems Center Electrical Engineering INCOLL Mario Garcia-Sanz
Electro-Ceramics for Sustainable Energy Solutions Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering INCOLL
Electronics Design Center Chemical Engineering INCOLL Chung-Chiun (C.C.) Liu
Great Lakes Energy Institute Engineering (General) INCOLL Alexis Abramson
Institute for Advanced Materials Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering INCOLL Stuart Rowan
Larry Sears and Sally Zlotnick Sears think[box] Other Engineering Disciplines INCOLL Gary Wnek
Magnetic Materials Characterization Laboratory Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering INCOLL Matthew Willard
Materials for Opto/Electronics Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV
Microfabrication Laboratory Electrical Engineering INCOLL Christian Zorman
Neural Engineering Center Biomedical Engineering INDEPT Dominque Durand
Nitinol Commercialization Accelerator Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering INCOLL John Lewandowski
Rapid Solidification Laboratory Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering INCOLL Matthew Willard
SDLE Research Center Engineering (General) INCOLL Roger French
Swagelok Center for Surface Analysis of Materials Engineering (General) INCOLL Arthur Heuer
The Institute for Management and Engineering Other Engineering Disciplines INCOLL Gary Wnek
Wind Energy Research Center Engineering (General) INCOLL David Matthiesen
Yeager Center for Electrochemical Sciences Chemical Engineering INUNIV

Engineering Information

Degree Programs

Bachelor's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Academic Office of the Dean Engineering Physics (B.S.E.) Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Academic Office of the Dean Engineering-Undesignated (B.S.E) Engineering (General)
Biomedical Engineering Biomedical Engineering (B.S.E.) Biomedical Engineering
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Chemical Engineering (B.S.E.) Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (B.S.E.) Civil Engineering
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Computer Engineering (B.S.E.) Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Computer Science (B.S.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Systems and Control Engineering (B.S.E.) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Electrical Engineering (B.S.E.) Electrical Engineering
Macromolecular Science and Engineering Polymer Science and Engineering (B.S.E.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Materials Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering (B.S.E.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Mechanical Engineering (B.S.E.) Mechanical Engineering
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Aerospace Engineering (B.S.E.) Aerospace Engineering

Master's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Master's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Academic Office of the Dean Master of Engineering and Management (M.E.M.) Engineering Management
Academic Office of the Dean Engineering-Undesignated (M.S.) Engineering (General)
Academic Office of the Dean Master of Engineering (Practice-Oriented) (M.E.) Engineering (General)
Biomedical Engineering Biomedical Engineering (M.S.) Biomedical Engineering
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Chemical Engineering (M.S.) Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (M.S.) Civil Engineering
Civil Engineering Engineering Mechanics (M.S.) Civil Engineering
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Electrical Engineering (M.S.) Electrical Engineering
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Computer Engineering (M.S.) Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Computing and Information Science (M.S.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Systems and Control Engineering (M.S.) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Macromolecular Science and Engineering Macromolecular Science and Engineering (M.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Materials Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering (M.S.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) Mechanical Engineering
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Aerospace Engineering (M.S.) Aerospace Engineering

Doctoral Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Doctoral Degree Program(s) Discipline
Biomedical Engineering Biomedical Engineering (Ph.D.) Biomedical Engineering
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) Civil Engineering
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Systems and Control Engineering (Ph.D.) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.) Electrical Engineering
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Computing and Information Science (Ph.D.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Macromolecular Science and Engineering Macromolecular Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Materials Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) Mechanical Engineering
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Aerospace Engineering (Ph.D.) Aerospace Engineering

Engineering Information

Areas of Expertise

Engineering Departments Areas of Expertise
Biomedical Engineering
  1. Biomaterials and tissue engineering
  2. Biomedical imaging
  3. Neural engineering and rehabilitation
  4. Big data analytics and health informatics
  5. Metabolomics and systems biology
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  1. Energy conversion and storage
  2. Electrochemical devices
  3. Advanced materials design, synthesis and processing
  4. Advanced separation methods
  5. Biotransport and bioprocessing
Civil Engineering
  1. Engineering mechanics
  2. Environmental engineering
  3. Geotechnical engineering
  4. Structural engineering
  5. Infrastructure performance and reliability
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
  1. Informatics and systems biology
  2. Artificial intelligence and machine learning
  3. Communications/networks and software engineering
  4. Data management, visualization and augmented/virtual reality
  5. Connected devices and systems, wearables and wireless health
  6. Electronics and embedded and micro-/ nano-systems
  7. Energy systems and grid modernization
  8. Robotics, signal processing, control and decision-making
Macromolecular Science and Engineering
  1. Biomaterials and biomedical applications
  2. Polymer-based nanotechnology
  3. Polymer synthesis and molecular design
  4. Polymer processing, rheology and biomimetics
  5. Advanced composites
  6. Polymer structure and properties
Materials Science and Engineering
  1. Structural and functional materials
  2. Materials for energy conversion and storage
  3. Surface engineering
  4. Microcharacterization
  5. Additive and advanced manufacturing
  6. Reliability
  7. Materials informatics
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
  1. Biomechanics and biomaterials
  2. Fluids and thermal sciences
  3. Engineering mechanics and high-rate testing
  4. Robotics and mechatronics
  5. Energy-efficient buildings and systems
  6. Smart and sustainable manufacturing
  7. Energy storage and renewable energy

Engineering Information

Societies

Honor Societies

National Groups

  • Alpha Eta Mu Beta
  • Eta Kappa Nu
  • Pi Mu Epsilon
  • Sigma Xi
  • Tau Beta Pi

Local Groups

  • ACS Poly/PMSE Student Chapter
  • AIMBE College of Fellows
  • BMES Fellows
  • IEEE Fellows

Student Organizations

National Groups

  • ACM
  • Am. Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics
  • Am. Inst. of Chemical Engineers
  • Am. Soc. of Mechanical Engineers
  • American Society of Civil Engineers
  • Assoc. for Computing Machinery
  • Biomedical Engineering Society
  • Eta Kappa Nu
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
  • National Society of Black Engineers
  • Sigma Xi
  • Soc. of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Soc. of Plastics Eng.
  • Society for Biomaterials
  • Society of Women Engineers
  • Tau Beta Pi

Local Groups

  • Alpha Eta Mu Beta (National Biomedical Engineering Honor Society)
  • Baja SAE
  • Biomedical Graduate Student Organization
  • Case Amateur Radio Club
  • Case Engineers Council
  • Case Robotics Team
  • Case Rocket Team
  • Chemical Engineering Graduate Student Organization
  • Design for America
  • Design, Build, Fly
  • Global Engineering Brigade
  • Global Health Design Collaboration
  • Graduate Materials Society
  • Hacker Society
  • Humanitarian Design Corp/Engineers Without Borders
  • Intelligent Group Vehicle Competition
  • LEGO Robotics Club
  • Macromolecular Science Organization
  • Maker's Guild
  • Math Club
  • Medical Instrumentation for Nations Under Development (MIND)
  • Natural Language Processing System Club
  • Physics and Astronomy Club
  • Polymer Innovation Northeast Ohio (PINO)
  • Radio Club
  • USMGO-Macro
  • Undergraduate Materials Society
  • Women in Science & Engineering Roundtable

Engineering Information

Support Programs

College's Under-Represented Student Groups

National Groups

  • National Society of Black Engineers
  • Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Society of Women Engineers

Local Groups

  • Women in Science & Engineering Roundtable

Other Student Support Programs

None reported.

Engineering Information

Student Projects

Student Design Projects Description

Senior design projects are required of all engineering majors. These projects are of sufficient scope to include safety, environmental, economic, ethical and professional issues. They are also intended for students to develop their leadership, team, communication and presentation skills.

Senior project students must identify and formulate the problem needs and constraints and design within these constraints to meet the problem specifications. Designing to multiple, realistic constraints and engineering standards is part of the evaluation.

Information on specific projects and project sponsorship can be obtained directly from the department chair.

Engineering Information

College Description

Engineering College Description and Special Characteristics

Experiential learning, depth and rigor of knowledge, critical thinking skills, and extensive interaction with professors and practitioners are the hallmark of the Case School of Engineering education. Approximately 35 percent of students participate in our award-winning cooperative education program, while another 40 percent contribute to faculty research. All engineering students benefit from Case's SAGES (Seminar Approach to General Education and Scholarship) Program and many double major or minor in the arts and humanities. Other programs include industrial internships, Semester Year Abroad, combined BS/MS, and 3+2 Dual Degree Program with select liberal arts colleges.

Engineering Information

Engineering Faculty & Research

Teaching, Tenure-Track View Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Full Professors Assoc. Professors Assistant Professors Program Total
Academic Office of the Dean 0 0 0 0
Biomedical Engineering 13 6 2 21
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 8 2 2 12
Civil Engineering 4 1 3 8
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 17 10 5 32
Macromolecular Science and Engineering 9 2 2 13
Materials Science and Engineering 6 4 2 12
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 10 0 4 14
Totals: 67 25 20 112

Teaching, Non-Tenure-Track

Engineering Department(s) FT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel PT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Teach. Personnel
Academic Office of the Dean 0 0 0 0.00
Biomedical Engineering 1 0 1 0.00
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Civil Engineering 0 1 1 0.50
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 5 0 5 0.00
Macromolecular Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Materials Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 5 0 5 0.00
Totals: 11 1 12 0.50

Non-Teaching, Research

Engineering Department(s) Non-Teach. FT Research Personnel Non-Teach. PT Research Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Non-Teach. Research Personnel
Academic Office of the Dean 0 0 0 0.00
Biomedical Engineering 10 0 10 0.00
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 0 1 1 0.50
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 2 0 2 0.00
Macromolecular Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Materials Science and Engineering 3 0 3 0.00
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 6 0 6 0.00
Totals: 21 1 22 0.50

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

  • American Indian or Alaska Native (Am Ind): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.
  • Asian: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
  • Black or African American (B/AfrA): A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as "Haitian" or "Negro" can be used in addition to "Black or African American."
  • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (Haw): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
  • Hispanic or Latino (Hisp): A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. The term, "Spanish origin," can be used in addition to "Hispanic or Latino."
  • White: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Full Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Academic Office of the Dean 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Biomedical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 12 1
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 8 0
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 12 1 0 0 16 1
Macromolecular Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 8 1
Materials Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 6 0
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 9 1
Totals: 0 0 0 0 1 0 20 1 0 0 0 0 42 3 0 0 63 4

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Associate Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Academic Office of the Dean 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Biomedical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 5 1
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 10 0
Macromolecular Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1
Materials Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 4 0
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 1 0 0 14 2 0 0 22 3

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Assistant Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Academic Office of the Dean 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Biomedical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2
Civil Engineering 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 1
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 2
Macromolecular Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Materials Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 2
Totals: 1 1 1 0 0 0 2 3 2 0 0 0 6 4 0 0 12 8

Undergraduate

Admissions/Transfers

Undergraduate Admission to the College of Engineering

Applicants to Case Western Reserve University have the advantage of a single-door admission policy. All prospective students interested in engineering as a major should submit an application to the Office of Undergraduate Admission via the Common Application online at commonapp.org.

Case Western Reserve University prides itself on attracting the best and brightest students and faculty. Admission to Case Western Reserve University is competitive. We look for students who show leadership and a passion for learning inside and outside the classroom.

Applicants are expected to take a challenging high school curriculum to fulfill the following units: four units of English, three units of math, three units of science (two of which must be laboratory science), three units of social studies and two units of a foreign language.

Applicants interested in engineering should have an additional unit of math and laboratory science.

Prospective students must submit either their official SAT or ACT with writing scores, their official high school transcripts, school report with counselor’s recommendation and two teacher recommendations.

Undergraduate Admission to an Engineering Department

Undergraduate students interested in engineering as a major do not declare their majors until the middle of the first semester of their first year, at the earliest, and are not subject to individual departmental requirements.

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

International students who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents are required to submit proof of English language proficiency. The recommended minimum TOEFL score is 90 (iBT), 577(PBT), or 233 (CBT). Students can also meet language proficiency by scoring a 6.5 on the IELTS, a 600 on the CR section of the old SAT, a 33 or higher on the new SAT reading test, or a 26 on the English section of the ACT. This requirement may be waived for students who have been educated for two years prior to high school graduation in schools where the primary language of instruction is in English.

Residency Requirements

It is generally expected that the final two academic years will be taken in residence at Case Western Reserve University.

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

Transfer applicants are students who have enrolled in a college or university after graduation from high school. Transfers are considered for admission for both fall and spring semesters.

In order to provide adequate time for evaluation, applications should be completed as early as possible and by the appropriate deadline. The deadline for fall semester is May 1, for spring semester it is October 1.

In evaluating transfer students, we are looking for students who will reap the greatest benefits from our challenging academic environment and diverse student life opportunities. We recommend that transfer applicants carry a cumulative grade-point average of at least a 3.2 in all previous college work, especially in their intended field of study. We look for As and Bs in challenging academic courses, including English composition, mathematics, liberal arts and sciences.

If you have recently graduated from high school or have completed less than one full year of college, your high school record will play a large part in our admission decision. We expect you to have completed a minimum of 30 units of full-credit classes in high school (a GED, along with standardized testing, is also accepted) including four units of English, three units of mathematics (four units for math, science and engineering majors) and one unit of laboratory science (two units including chemistry for math and science majors; engineering majors must have one unit of chemistry and one unit of physics)

If you were dismissed from another college or university, you must be eligible to return to that institution in order to be considered for admission to Case Western Reserve University.

Transfer applicants must submit:
1. An application including Case Western Reserve University supplement. The application is available through the Common Application at http://commonapp.org
2. An official high school transcript
3. Official transcripts from each college or university attended.
4. A letter of recommendation from a college or university professor
5. Transfer College Report from the Common Application, indicating you are in good standing and eligible to return to the college you most recently attended.
6. SAT or ACT scores. The scores must be sent directly to the university from the testing service.


Transfer applicants will be notified of the admission decision on a rolling basis. (Visit http://case.edu/admission/apply/deadlines/ for a list of notification dates.) In order to enroll, students must submit a non-refundable $500 deposit as directed in their admission letter by the deadline cited. Offers of admission are contingent upon satisfactory completion of work in progress at another college or university. In order to evaluate transfer credit, the Office of Undergraduate Admission must receive a complete official transcript of all work taken, including course descriptions.

Number of Transfer Students from:

A two-year community junior college where they were full-time students: 10
A four-year college or university where they were full-time students: 38

Undergraduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): All Students

Undergraduate Group 1
Tuition & Fees: $45,592
Room & Board: $14,298
Books & Supplies: $1,200
Other Expenses: $2,839
Estimated avg. course load per term: 15
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), College Scholarship Service Financial Aid PROFILE (CCS/PROFILE), Institution's Own Application Form

Additional Financial Aid Information

A Case Western Reserve University education will grant you unlimited opportunities. You’ll graduate with the finest training in your field, experiences that enrich your understanding of the world, access to a vast network of talented alumni and the freedom to create the life you most aspire to.

The Office of University Financial Aid is invested in your success. We understand that financing the college education of your dreams is an important consideration for you and your family. It is our commitment to make a Case Western Reserve education as affordable as we possibly can. Case Western Reserve employs a sophisticated program of financial aid, including scholarships, grants, work study and loan opportunities.

The first step in applying for financial aid is to fill out the CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE and the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

Undergraduate

New Applicants

New Undergraduate Applicants

A. Number of undergraduate applicants to the engineering college: 23,116
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 8,192
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 1,264
Percentage of entering students (excluding transfer students) ranked in the top quarter (25%) of their high schools: 94%

Newly Enrolled Test Scores

Scores Reflect 75th to 25th percentile

SAT 75th 25th
Math Range: 770 680
Reading Range: 720 600
Writing Range: 720 620
Combined Range: 2170 1940
ACT 75th 25th
Math Range: 34 29
Composite Range: 34 30

Undergraduate

Enrollments by Class

Undergraduate Engr. Programs Fresh
1st Year
Soph
2nd Year
Junior
3rd Year
Senior
4th/5th Year
Full Time Total Part Time Total
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.E.) 0 27 34 50 111 0
Biomedical Engineering (B.S.E.) 2 95 98 194 389 7
Chemical Engineering (B.S.E.) 0 26 57 99 182 1
Civil Engineering (B.S.E.) 0 15 25 26 66 1
Computer Engineering (B.S.E.) 0 9 20 26 55 1
Computer Science (B.S.) 2 55 81 133 271 10
Electrical Engineering (B.S.E.) 0 14 50 66 130 1
Engineering Physics (B.S.E.) 0 5 6 17 28 0
Engineering-Undesignated (B.S.E) 0 0 0 0 0 0
Materials Science and Engineering (B.S.E.) 0 7 17 27 51 1
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.E.) 2 42 109 147 300 9
Polymer Science and Engineering (B.S.E.) 0 14 16 42 72 1
Systems and Control Engineering (B.S.E.) 0 10 2 6 18 0
Totals: 6 319 515 833 1673 32

Freshmen

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Biomedical Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Civil Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Physics (B.S.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering-Undesignated (B.S.E)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Materials Science and Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Polymer Science and Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Systems and Control Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 6 0

Sophomores

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 12 0 1 0 21 0
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 6 0
Biomedical Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 5 0 1 0 3 0 1 0 12 0 2 0 0 0 26 0 1 0 51 0
Women 8 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 7 0 2 0 0 0 20 0 3 0 44 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 0 0 0 16 0
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 10 0
Civil Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 9 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 6 0
Computer Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 7 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 11 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 8 0 2 0 0 0 22 1 1 0 49 1
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 2 0 13 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Engineering Physics (B.S.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Engineering-Undesignated (B.S.E)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Materials Science and Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 6 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 2 0 0 0 16 0 1 0 29 0
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 2 0 13 0
Polymer Science and Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 8 0
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 6 0
Systems and Control Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 6 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0
Totals: 50 0 5 0 17 0 1 0 56 0 15 0 0 0 161 1 14 0 319 1

Juniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 21 0 3 0 30 0
Women 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 0
Biomedical Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 8 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 15 0 1 0 0 0 22 0 2 0 53 0
Women 5 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 11 0 2 0 0 0 22 0 1 0 45 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 4 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 0 0 21 0 1 0 34 0
Women 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 15 0 1 0 23 0
Civil Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 12 0
Women 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 13 0
Computer Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 2 0 16 0
Women 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 2 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 9 0 2 0 0 0 40 0 8 0 67 0
Women 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 14 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 9 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 0 0 18 0 1 0 37 0
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 13 0
Engineering Physics (B.S.E.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 6 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering-Undesignated (B.S.E)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Materials Science and Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 1 1 8 1
Women 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 9 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 10 0 1 0 10 0 0 0 8 0 1 0 0 0 57 0 6 0 93 0
Women 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 1 0 16 0
Polymer Science and Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 9 0
Women 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 7 0
Systems and Control Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 58 0 16 0 31 0 0 0 86 0 11 0 0 0 280 0 33 1 515 1

Seniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 2 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 26 0 3 0 39 0
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 11 0
Biomedical Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 13 0 8 0 4 0 0 0 35 3 1 0 0 0 49 2 1 0 111 5
Women 7 1 3 0 2 1 0 0 24 0 0 0 0 0 44 0 3 0 83 2
Chemical Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 3 1 2 0 4 0 0 0 11 0 1 0 0 0 32 0 3 0 56 1
Women 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 33 0 2 0 43 0
Civil Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 16 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 1 10 1
Computer Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 14 1 1 0 22 1
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 4 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 11 1 3 1 4 0 0 0 17 1 1 0 0 0 60 4 6 1 102 8
Women 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 5 0 1 0 0 0 18 1 2 0 31 1
Electrical Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 6 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 4 0 2 0 0 0 28 1 5 0 49 1
Women 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 8 0 1 0 17 0
Engineering Physics (B.S.E.)
Men 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 14 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Engineering-Undesignated (B.S.E)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Materials Science and Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 0 0 0 18 0
Women 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 9 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 8 0 5 0 7 0 0 0 9 2 4 0 0 0 76 5 4 0 113 7
Women 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 24 1 1 0 34 2
Polymer Science and Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 18 1
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 16 0 3 0 24 0
Systems and Control Engineering (B.S.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 3 0
Totals: 65 3 30 1 42 2 1 0 134 7 15 0 0 0 508 15 38 2 833 30

Undergraduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.E.) 1 2 3 0 2 0 0 28 2 38 31 7
Biomedical Engineering (B.S.E.) 5 5 8 0 29 2 0 54 3 106 65 41
Chemical Engineering (B.S.E.) 7 1 2 0 10 1 0 31 2 54 37 17
Civil Engineering (B.S.E.) 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 14 0 16 10 6
Computer Engineering (B.S.E.) 1 1 0 0 4 0 0 8 1 15 13 2
Computer Science (B.S.) 1 1 3 0 11 1 0 39 3 59 50 9
Electrical Engineering (B.S.E.) 1 2 2 0 8 0 0 16 2 31 23 8
Engineering Physics (B.S.E.) 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 4 4 0
Engineering-Undesignated (B.S.E) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Materials Science and Engineering (B.S.E.) 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 12 1 17 11 6
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.E.) 4 6 4 0 12 2 0 62 5 95 71 24
Polymer Science and Engineering (B.S.E.) 3 1 0 0 4 0 0 15 1 24 11 13
Systems and Control Engineering (B.S.E.) 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 2 0 6 4 2
Totals: 25 21 24 0 86 6 0 283 20 465 330 135

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.E.) 1 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 23 5 1 1 38
Biomedical Engineering (B.S.E.) 3 2 4 1 4 4 0 0 20 9 2 0 0 0 30 24 2 1 106
Chemical Engineering (B.S.E.) 4 3 1 0 1 1 0 0 8 2 0 1 0 0 22 9 1 1 54
Civil Engineering (B.S.E.) 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 5 0 0 16
Computer Engineering (B.S.E.) 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 7 1 1 0 15
Computer Science (B.S.) 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 8 3 1 0 0 0 35 4 2 1 59
Electrical Engineering (B.S.E.) 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 7 1 0 0 0 0 11 5 2 0 31
Engineering Physics (B.S.E.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4
Engineering-Undesignated (B.S.E) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Materials Science and Engineering (B.S.E.) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 10 2 0 1 17
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.E.) 2 2 5 1 3 1 0 0 9 3 2 0 0 0 48 14 2 3 95
Polymer Science and Engineering (B.S.E.) 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 7 8 1 0 24
Systems and Control Engineering (B.S.E.) 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 6
Totals: 16 9 16 5 15 9 0 0 61 25 5 1 0 0 205 78 12 8 465

Undergraduate

Dual Degrees

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

Students pursuing dual degrees must complete all program requirements for both degrees and must accumulate a minimum of 30 credit hours in excess of the credit hours required for one degree. The dual degree program can generally be completed in five years.

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degrees Awarded

69

Undergraduate

Program Comparisons

  • ABET - Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
  • CEAB - Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board
Degree Program ABET/CEAB Accred. Nominal Program Length
(yrs.)
Average Program Length
(yrs.)
Time: Day/Even./
Both
Co-op: None/Opt./
Required
Grads in Co-op Progs.
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.E.) yes 4.00 4.25 Day Optional
Biomedical Engineering (B.S.E.) yes 4.00 4.25 Day Optional
Chemical Engineering (B.S.E.) yes 4.00 4.25 Day Optional
Civil Engineering (B.S.E.) yes 4.00 4.25 Day Optional
Computer Engineering (B.S.E.) yes 4.00 4.25 Day Optional
Computer Science (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.25 Day Optional
Electrical Engineering (B.S.E.) yes 4.00 4.25 Day Optional
Engineering Physics (B.S.E.) yes 4.00 4.25 Day Optional
Engineering-Undesignated (B.S.E) no 0.00 4.25 Day Optional
Materials Science and Engineering (B.S.E.) yes 4.00 4.25 Day Optional
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.E.) yes 4.00 4.25 Day Optional
Polymer Science and Engineering (B.S.E.) yes 4.00 4.25 Day Optional
Systems and Control Engineering (B.S.E.) yes 4.00 4.25 Day Optional

Graduate

Admissions Information

Graduate Admission to the College of Engineering

Admission is made directly to the departments after approval by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies.

Graduate Admission to an Engineering Department

Each department sets its own entrance requirements, regarding minimum grade point averages, and requirements for some standardized tests.

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

Admissions criteria are the same as U.S. residents except for the following:1. International students whose first language is not English must be able to speak, read, write and comprehend English. English proficiency must be demonstrated by taking the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A score of at least 577 (paper-based), 90 (iBT--internet based TOEFL) is a mandatory requirement for admission. The IELTS (International English Language Testing System) is also accepted. The required minimum score is 7.0. Some departments may require higher scores.

Scores must be on file before registration will be permitted. For more information about the TOEFL go to: http://www.ets.org/toefl. Information about the IELTS can be found at: http://www.ielts.org/.

Residency Requirements

Transfer credit is limited to six credit hours for the M.S. degree and courses taken in excess of previous degree requirements for doctoral students. No transfer credit is allowed for thesis or dissertation. All other requirements must be completed at Case Western Reserve University.

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

Varies according to department.

Graduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): All Students

Graduate Group 1
Tuition & Fees: $42,576
Room & Board: $12,700
Books & Supplies: $1,200
Other Expenses: $3,624
Estimated avg. course load per term: 9
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), Institution's Own Application Form

Additional Financial Aid Information

Competitive Fellowships and assistantships and also awarded directly through the departments.
Applicants will need a Memo of Assistance from the department chair. The Case Financial Aid Form will also be needed to fill out.

Graduate

New Applicants

New Graduate Applicants

A. Number of graduate applicants to the engineering college: 1,310
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 447
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 184

Graduate

Enrollments by Class

Master's

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (M.S.)
Men 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1
Biomedical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 13 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 22 5
Women 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 11 1
Chemical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 5
Women 5 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 4
Civil Engineering (M.S.)
Men 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Computer Engineering (M.S.)
Men 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 9 1
Women 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0
Computing and Information Science (M.S.)
Men 16 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 18 4
Women 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1
Electrical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 24 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 0 0 35 1
Women 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0
Engineering Mechanics (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering-Undesignated (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Macromolecular Science and Engineering (M.S.)
Men 13 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 15 3
Women 9 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 1
Master of Engineering (Practice-Oriented) (M.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 4
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Master of Engineering and Management (M.E.M.)
Men 25 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 2 1 0 0 19 1 1 0 55 2
Women 8 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 15 0
Materials Science and Engineering (M.S.)
Men 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 3 0 1 9 4
Women 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 2
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 27 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 0 0 33 4
Women 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 9 1
Systems and Control Engineering (M.S.)
Men 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 1
Women 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 1
Totals: 195 17 7 2 5 0 0 0 16 4 3 1 0 0 60 22 1 1 287 47

Doctoral

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Biomedical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 19 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 11 0 1 0 0 0 18 4 1 0 54 5
Women 10 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 10 1 1 0 30 2
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 19 0
Women 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 10 0
Women 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
Computer Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 9 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 12 1
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 5 0
Computing and Information Science (Ph.D.)
Men 16 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 19 0
Women 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0
Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 33 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 39 1
Women 6 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 1
Macromolecular Science and Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 24 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 31 4
Women 12 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 7 1 1 0 23 4
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 16 0
Women 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 24 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 34 1
Women 5 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 2
Systems and Control Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 7 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 10 2
Women 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0
Totals: 210 11 11 1 5 1 0 0 27 1 6 1 0 0 83 8 3 0 345 23

Graduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Aerospace Engineering (M.S.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 1
Biomedical Engineering (M.S.) 5 1 0 0 3 0 0 11 0 20 8 12
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 2 0
Civil Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 4 3 1
Computer Engineering (M.S.) 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0
Computing and Information Science (M.S.) 6 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 11 8 3
Electrical Engineering (M.S.) 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 9 6 3
Engineering Mechanics (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering-Undesignated (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Macromolecular Science and Engineering (M.S.) 13 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 16 9 7
Master of Engineering (Practice-Oriented) (M.E.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 5 4 1
Master of Engineering and Management (M.E.M.) 37 1 2 0 3 0 1 14 1 59 43 16
Materials Science and Engineering (M.S.) 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 1 3
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 11 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 16 12 4
Systems and Control Engineering (M.S.) 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0
Totals: 84 8 3 0 8 1 1 47 1 153 102 51

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Aerospace Engineering (M.S.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2
Biomedical Engineering (M.S.) 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 3 8 0 0 20
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2
Civil Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 4
Computer Engineering (M.S.) 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Computing and Information Science (M.S.) 3 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 11
Electrical Engineering (M.S.) 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 9
Engineering Mechanics (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering-Undesignated (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Macromolecular Science and Engineering (M.S.) 8 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 16
Master of Engineering (Practice-Oriented) (M.E.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 5
Master of Engineering and Management (M.E.M.) 29 8 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 7 7 1 0 59
Materials Science and Engineering (M.S.) 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 7 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 16
Systems and Control Engineering (M.S.) 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Totals: 58 26 8 0 2 1 0 0 5 3 1 0 1 0 26 21 1 0 153

Master's Degree Programs

Master's Degree Program Degree Type
Master's w/ Thesis Master's w/o Thesis or with Proj./Report Program Totals
Aerospace Engineering (M.S.) 2 0 2
Biomedical Engineering (M.S.) 9 11 20
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 2 0 2
Civil Engineering (M.S.) 1 3 4
Computer Engineering (M.S.) 2 0 2
Computing and Information Science (M.S.) 7 4 11
Electrical Engineering (M.S.) 5 4 9
Engineering Mechanics (M.S.) 0 0 0
Engineering-Undesignated (M.S.) 0 0 0
Macromolecular Science and Engineering (M.S.) 4 12 16
Master of Engineering (Practice-Oriented) (M.E.) 0 5 5
Master of Engineering and Management (M.E.M.) 0 59 59
Materials Science and Engineering (M.S.) 3 1 4
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 9 7 16
Systems and Control Engineering (M.S.) 2 1 3
Totals: 46 107 153

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Aerospace Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
Biomedical Engineering (Ph.D.) 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 6 0 11 5 6
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 2 0
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 1
Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 3 1
Computing and Information Science (Ph.D.) 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 8 8 0
Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.) 5 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 0 10 8 2
Macromolecular Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 13 13 0
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 4 1
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 2 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 9 9 0
Systems and Control Engineering (Ph.D.) 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 3 1
Totals: 40 2 0 0 6 0 0 22 0 70 57 13

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Aerospace Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Biomedical Engineering (Ph.D.) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 4 0 0 11
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4
Computing and Information Science (Ph.D.) 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 8
Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.) 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 10
Macromolecular Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 13
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 9
Systems and Control Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
Totals: 36 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 0 0 0 0 17 5 0 0 70

Graduate

Research Expenditures

Expenditures by Research Department

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Engineering Department External Funding Source
Academic Office of the Dean
Total#: 18 Foreign: $3,000 Indiv: $29,000
Fed/Nat: $2,000 Industry: $669,000 Priv/Non: $157,000
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $860,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Biomedical Engineering
Total#: 232 Foreign: $3,000 Indiv: $34,000
Fed/Nat: $14,119,000 Industry: $531,000 Priv/Non: $897,000
State: $288,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $15,872,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Total#: 61 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $2,232,000 Industry: $549,000 Priv/Non: $43,000
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $2,824,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Civil Engineering
Total#: 33 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $384,000 Industry: $130,000 Priv/Non: $183,000
State: $146,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $843,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Total#: 122 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $3,618,000 Industry: $738,000 Priv/Non: $459,000
State: $115,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $4,930,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Macromolecular Science and Engineering
Total#: 99 Foreign: $72,000 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $2,630,000 Industry: $1,253,000 Priv/Non: $47,000
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $4,002,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Materials Science and Engineering
Total#: 90 Foreign: $4,000 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $2,454,000 Industry: $1,116,000 Priv/Non: $31,000
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $3,605,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Total#: 119 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $4,172,000 Industry: $825,000 Priv/Non: $304,000
State: $7,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $5,308,000
Totals:
Total#: 774 Foreign: $82,000 Indiv: $63,000
Fed/Nat: $29,611,000 Industry: $5,811,000 Priv/Non: $2,121,000
State: $556,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $38,244,000

Expenditures by Research Center

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Center/Lab External Funding Source
Advanced Manufacturing and Mechanical Reliability Center
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Advanced Platform Technology Center
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Case Metal Casting Laboratory
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Advanced Polymer Processing
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Advanced Science and Engineering of Carbon
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Applied Polymer Research
Total#: 2 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $112,000 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $112,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Biomaterials
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Computational Imaging and Personalized Diagnostics
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Evaluation of Implant Performance
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Layered Polymeric Systems
Total#: 8 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $2,189,000 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $1,000
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $2,190,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Cleveland Functional Electrical Stimulation Center
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Control and Energy Systems Center
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Electro-Ceramics for Sustainable Energy Solutions
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Electronics Design Center
Total#: 1 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $47,000
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $47,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Great Lakes Energy Institute
Total#: 13 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $11,000
Fed/Nat: $26,000 Industry: $255,000 Priv/Non: $127,000
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $419,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Institute for Advanced Materials
Total#: 6 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $87,000 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $87,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Larry Sears and Sally Zlotnick Sears think[box]
Total#: 11 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $3,000
Fed/Nat: $7,000 Industry: $258,000 Priv/Non: $355,000
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $623,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Magnetic Materials Characterization Laboratory
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Materials for Opto/Electronics
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Microfabrication Laboratory
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Neural Engineering Center
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Nitinol Commercialization Accelerator
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Rapid Solidification Laboratory
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
SDLE Research Center
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Swagelok Center for Surface Analysis of Materials
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
The Institute for Management and Engineering
Total#: 23 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $302,000 Priv/Non: $121,000
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $423,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Wind Energy Research Center
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Yeager Center for Electrochemical Sciences
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Totals:
Total#: 64 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $14,000
Fed/Nat: $2,222,000 Industry: $1,014,000 Priv/Non: $651,000
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $3,901,000


Grand Totals:
Total#: 838 Foreign: $82,000 Indiv: $77,000
Fed/Nat: $31,833,000 Industry: $6,825,000 Priv/Non: $2,772,000
State: $556,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $42,145,000

The following text was offered to each school as a guideline for the calculation of externally-funded research expenditures:

Include all expenditures associated with grants and contracts specifically budgeted for externally sponsored research and associated programs and expenditures associated with all gifts auditably used for research. Include expended funds provided by the following external sources:

  1. Federal Government
  2. State Government
  3. Foreign Governments
  4. Industry
  5. Non-Profit Organizations (e.g. foundations)
  6. Individuals
  7. Local Government

The expenditures reported should be only those funds provided by organizations, agencies, and individuals external to the institution. Cost sharing/matching funds should be included only if provided from sources external to the institution.

Only State government funds that were obtained competitively or as matching funds associated with other externally funded programs should be included. State funds that are part of the normal operating budget should not be included regardless of purpose.

For all joint or contracted projects or sub-projects, only the portion of the center research performed by faculty, staff, and students of the affiliated engineering school should be credited to that school. Expenditures for capital costs of research laboratory building construction should not be included.

Expenditures for research laboratory renovations should not be included unless the renovation funds expended came from grants and contracts expressly intended for the direct support of engineering research.

Any portion of academic year and/or summer salary for any researcher that is not derived from external research grants or contracts should not be counted.

Total #: Report total number of individual grants, not the total dollar amount of the expenditures.

Expenditures: Report actual expenditures (as opposed to authorization amounts) in U.S. dollars.

Time frame for expenditures: Report expenditures for your current fiscal year.

Research centers listed as "WITHIN an engineering department" on the Research Centers page (screen 7) of the College of Engineering Profile, will not have their expenditures added to the school's total research expenditures. Such expenditures can be included in the department total, while still being listed for the appropriate center. This allows users to list the expenditures in two areas without double-counting.

Graduate

Research Description

Research Description By Graduate Engineering Department

Biomedical Engineering

Several research thrusts are available to accommodate various student backgrounds and interests. Strong research collaborations with clinical and basic science departments of the university and collaborating medical centers bring a broad range of opportunities, expertise, and perspective to student research projects.

Biomaterials/Tissue Engineering/Drug and Gene Delivery
Fabrication and analysis of materials for implantation, including neural, orthopaedic, and cardiovascular tissue engineering, biomimetic materials, liposomal and other structures for controlled, targeted drug delivery, and biocompatible polymer surface modifications. Analysis of synthetic and biologic polymers by AFM, nanoscale structure-function relationships of biomaterials. Applications in the nervous system, the cardiovascular system, the musculoskeletal system, and cancer.

Biomedical Imaging
MRI, PET, SPECT, CT, ultrasound, acoustic elastography, optical coherence tomography, cardiac electrical potential mapping, human visual perception, image-guided intervention, contrast agents. In vivo microscopic and molecular imaging, and small animal imaging.

Biomedical Sensing
Optical sensing, electrochemical and chemical fiber-optic sensors, chemical measurements in cells and tissues, endoscopy.

Big Data Analytics and Health Informatics
Radiomics, Radiogenomics, computer assisted diagnosis, digital pathology, co-registration, cancer detection, decision making, precision medicine, bioinformatics, image informatics, machine learning, pattern recognition, artificial intelligence, deep learning.

Neural Engineering and Neural Prostheses
Neuronal mechanisms; neural interfacing for electric and magnetic stimulation and recording; neural dynamics, ion channels, second messengers; neural prostheses for control of limb movement, bladder, bowel, and respiratory function; neuromodulation systems for movement disorders, epilepsy, pain mitigation, visceral functions; computational modeling and simulation of neural structures.

Transport and Metabolic Systems Engineering
Modeling and analysis of tissue responses to heating (e.g., tumor ablation) and of cellular metabolism related to organ and whole-body function in health (exercise) and disease (cardiac).

Biomechanical Systems
Computational musculoskeletal modeling, bone biomechanics, soft tissue mechanics, control of neuroprostheses for motor function, neuromuscular control systems, human locomotion, cardiac mechanics.

Cardiovascular Systems
Normal cardiac physiology, pathogenesis of cardiac diseases, cardiac development, therapeutic technologies, including cardiac regeneration; electrophysiological techniques, imaging technologies, mathematical modeling, gene regulation, molecular biology techniques; cardiac bioelectricity and cardiac biomechanics.

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Research in the department is sponsored by a variety of state and federal agencies, by private industry, and by foundations. Current active research topics include:

Energy
• Novel energy storage systems for transportation, grid storage applications, and portable devices
• Energy efficient extraction and processing of materials
• Fuel cells and batteries
• Novel catalysts, electrocatalysts and plasmas for conversion of gases to fuels
• Simulation, modeling, and fundamental characterization of transport and interfacial processes in electrochemical energy storage and conversion systems
Materials
• Advanced materials for electronic and electrochemical device applications
• Novel synthesis and deposition methods and reactor designs, including electrochemical and plasma reactors
• Novel characterization of materials and in situ reactor diagnostics
• Simulation and theory of materials properties
• Surface properties and interfacial phenomena
• Materials processing and engineering at molecular through macro scales
• Novel separations processes
Biomolecular Engineering
• Biosensors
• Cell and tissue engineering
• Biocatalysis and protein engineering

Civil Engineering

Research under way in civil engineering includes work in analytical, design and experimental areas and is sponsored by industry, state, and federal government sources. Major areas of research interest are:

• Behavior of reinforced and prestressed concrete
• Wind engineering
• Earthquake analysis and design of structures
• Finite element methods
• Nondestructive Testing of Structures
• Passive control of the vibration of structures
• Transient response of nonlinear structures
• Blast loading of structures
• Fracture mechanics
• Multiscale simulation of nonlinear dynamic structural behavior
• Modeling of structural materials and structural systems
• High and low-cycle fatigue
• Geotechnical/Pavement Materials
• Static behavior of anisotropic clays and sands
• Soil liquefaction
• Centrifuge modeling of static and dynamic soil behavior
• Dynamic soil structure interaction
• Non-destructive testing evaluation of soils and pavement materials
• Measurement of dynamic soil properties
• Design of Structures for High-Speed Vehicles
• Stability of tailings dams
• Environmentally conscious manufacturing
• Brownfields/structural remediation
• Environmental modeling and software development
• Geoenvironmental engineering
• Sediment remediation
• Environmental chemistry
• Bioremediation
• Structural health monitoring
• Transportation safety
• Infrastructure engineering
• Non-destructive Testing
• Sensor technology
• Smart materials
• Energy structures and geotechnology
• Biofuel development
• Urban hydraulics
• Soil contamination standards
• Intelligent infrastructure and transportation system
• Driver safety
• Building materials
• Environmental hazard and risk engineering
• Extreme dynamic load resistant design
• Multi-hazard and structural risk assessment

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

The research thrusts of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department include:

• Micro/Nano Systems
• Electronics and Instrumentation
• Robotics and Haptics
• Embedded Systems, including VLSI, FPGA
• Hardware Algorithms, Hardware Security, Testing/Verification
• Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
• Machine Learning and Data Mining
• Computer Networks and Distributed Systems
• Secure and Reliable Software
• Energy Systems, including Wind and Power Grid Management/Control
• Gaming, Simulation, Optimization
• Medical Informatics and Wireless Health

EECS participates in a number of groundbreaking collaborative research and educational programs, including the Microelectromechanical Systems Research Program, the Center for Computational Genomics, graduate program in Systems Biology and Bioinformatics, the Clinical & Translational Science Collaborative, the Great Lakes Energy Institute, and the VA Center for Advanced Platform Technology.

Macromolecular Science and Engineering

The research activities of the department span the entire scope of macromolecular science and polymer technology.

Synthesis
New types of macromolecules are being made in the department’s synthesis laboratories. The emphasis is on creating polymers with novel functional properties such as photoconductivity, selective permeation, and biocompatibility, and in producing new materials which behave like classical polymers without being linked together by covalent bonds.

Physical Characterization
This is the broad area of polymer analysis, which seeks to relate the structure of the polymer at the molecular level to the bulk properties that determine its actual or potential applications. This includes characterization of polymers by infrared, Raman, and NMR and mass spectroscopy, thermal and rheological analysis, determination of structure and morphology by x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy, permeability and free volume, and investigation of molecular weights and conformation by light scattering.

Mechanical Behavior and Analysis
Polymeric materials are known for their unusual mechanical capabilities, usually exploited as components of structural systems. Analysis includes the study of viscoelastic behavior, yielding and fracture phenomena and a variety of novel irreversible deformation processes.

Processing
A major concern of industry is the efficient and large scale production of polymer materials for commercial applications. Research in this area is focusing on reactive processing, multi-layer processing and polymer mixing, i.e., compounding and blends. The integration of sensors and processing equipment, and methods for examining changes in structure and composition during processing steps are growing areas of inquiry. Both laboratory and simulation research are brought to bear on these critical issues.

Materials Development and Design
Often, newly conceived products require the development of polymeric materials with certain specific properties or design characteristics. Materials can be tailor-made by designing synthesis and processing conditions to yield the best performance under specified conditions. Examples might be the design of photoluminescent and semi-conducting polymers for use in optoelectronic devices, polymers that are stable at high temperatures for fire-retardant construction materials, high temperature polymer electrolytes for use in advanced fuel cells, low density thermal insulating polymer composite materials, advanced polymeric optical devices, and biocompatible polymers for use in prosthetic implants, reconstructive medicine and drug-delivery vehicles.

Biopolymers
Living systems are composed primarily of macromolecules, and research is in progress on several projects of medical relevance. The department has a long-standing interest in the hierarchical structure and properties of the components of connective tissues (e.g., skin, cartilage, and bone). The department is also engaged in the development of new biocompatible polymers for applications in human health.

Materials Science and Engineering

Department research areas include:

Deformation and Fracture
Relationships between structure and mechanical behavior of traditional and advanced materials: metals, ceramics, intermetallics, composites, and biological materials. State-of-the art facilities are available for deformation processing as well as mechanical testing over a range of strain rates, test temperatures, stress states, and size scales for both monotonic and cyclic conditions.

Materials Processing
Alloy surface engineering, crystal growth, thin- film deposition, casting of metal alloys, metallic glasses by rapid solidification, powder synthesis, crystallization of amorphous alloys, consolidation processing, layered materials, plated metals and alloys, solution- and/or precipitation heat-treatments, thermo-mechanical processing, diffusion-bonding, brazing and welding of metals, glasses and ceramics, electro-chemical and thermo-chemical oxidation/reduction conversion processing of metal/oxide surface layers.

Environmental Effects
Durability and lifetime extension of structural, energy-conversion and energy-storage materials including materials for solar energy. Corrosion, oxidation, stress-corrosion, low-and high-cycle fatigue, adhesion, decohesion, friction and wear. Surface modification and coatings, adhesion, bonding, and dis-bonding of dissimilar materials, reliability of electronics, photonics and sensors.

Surfaces and Interfaces
Material surfaces in vacuum, ambient and chemical environments, grain-and phase boundaries, hetero-interfaces between different metals, ceramics, carbon (graphite) and polymers.

Electronic, Magnetic, and Optical Materials
Materials for energy technologies, such as photovoltaics, organic and inorganic light emitting diodes and displays, fuel cells, electrolytic capacitors, building-envelope materials, and wind turbines. Processing, properties, and characterization of magnetic materials and ferroelectric and piezoelectric ceramics.

Microcharacterization of Materials
Facilities for high-resolution imaging, spatially resolved chemical analysis, and diffractometry. Conventional, analytical, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, focused ion beam techniques, scanning probe microscopy, light-optical microscopy, optical spectroscopies, surface analysis, and X-ray diffractometry.

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Research areas include:

Aerospace Technology and Space Exploration
Flow in turbomachinery, molecular dynamics simulation of rarefied gas flow, two phase flow, supersonic combustion and propulsion, thermoacoustic refrigeration, in-situ resource utilization from space. Gravitational effects on transport phenomena, fluids and thermal processes in advance life support systems for long duration space travel, interfacial processes, g-jitter effects on microgravity flows, two phase flow in zero and reduced gravity.

Combustion and Energy
Hydrogen ignition and safety, catalytic combustion, flame spread, fire research and protection, combustion in micro- and partial gravity.

Data Analytics
Multi-domain signal decomposition and analysis, wavelet transform and other transformation methods, data fusion, statistical methods for defect detection, root cause diagnosis, and remaining service life prognosis, multi-scale analysis.

Dynamics of Rotating Machinery
Forced and instability vibration of rotor/bearing/seal systems, nonlinear rotor dynamics, torsional rotor vibration, rotor dynamic characteristics of bearings and seals (computational and experimental approach), control of rotor system dynamics, rub-impact studies on bearings and compressor/turbine blading systems. Advanced rotating machinery monitoring and diagnostics.

Engineering Design
Optimization and computer-aided design, feasibility studies of kinematic mechanisms, kinematics of rolling element-bearing geometries, mechanical control systems, experimental stress analysis, failure analysis, development of biologically inspired methodologies.

Heat Transfer
Analysis of heat transfer in complex systems such as biological organisms, multi-functional materials and building enclosures.

Manufacturing
Agile manufacturing work cells developed to facilitate quick change over from assembly of one object to assembly of other objects contains multiple robots, a conveyor system and flexible parts feeders. Additive manufacturing, in-process sensing and control.

Materials
Development of novel experimental techniques to investigate material response at elevated temperatures and high rates of deformation. Constitutive modeling of damage evolution, shear localization and failure of advanced engineering materials. Fabrication of mechanical properties of composite materials; creep, rupture, and fatigue properties of engineering materials at elevated temperatures.

Multiphase Flow
Application of non-intrusive laser based diagnostic techniques and ultrasound techniques including pulsed ultrasound Doppler velocimetry to study solid-liquid, solid-gas, liquid-gas and solid-liquid-gas, multiphase flows encountered in slurry transport and bio-fluid mechanics.

Nanotechnology
Research related to various nanotechnology applications with particular emphasis on energy conversion, generation and storage in nanostructured materials including the synthesis of polymer-based nanocomposites. Current research projects include investigation of nanocomposites for thermoelectric devices, molecular simulation of thermal transport across interfacial regions, and biomimetic research on protein-based shark gel.

Musculoskeletal Mechanics and Materials
Design, modeling, and failure analysis of orthopaedic prostheses and material selection; mechanical properties of, and transport processes in, bone and soft tissue; tribology of native and tissue engineered cartilage; nondestructive mechanical evaluation of tissue engineered cartilage.

Robotics
Biologically inspired and biologically based design and control of legged robots. Dynamics, control and simulation of animals and robots. Distributed intelligence, swarm robotics, social robots, wearable telesensors, tangible game interface,

Sensing and Metrology
Signal transduction mechanisms, design, modeling, behavior characterization, and performance evaluation of mechanical, thermal, optical, and magnetic-field sensors, multi-physics sensing, and precision instrumentation.

Tribology and Seals
Time-resolved friction on nano- and microsecond time scale with applications to high speed machining and mechanics of armor penetration. Study of gas lubricated foil bearing systems with application to oil-free turbomachinery. Evaluation of advanced seal concepts and configurations for high temperature applications in gas turbine engines.

Turbomachinery
Vibration characteristics of seals and bearings and measurement of chaotic motion. Rub impact studies of blade tip/casing interactions, particle-blade/casing interactions in centrifugal pumps.

Research Description By Engineering Research Center

Advanced Manufacturing and Mechanical Reliability Center

The Advanced Manufacturing and Mechanical Reliability Center (AMMRC) was originally established as the Center for Mechanical Characterization of Materials (CMCM) in 1987. This has been expanded to provide advanced manufacturing (e.g. deformation processing, extrusion, forging, forming, etc.) and mechanical characterization (e.g. mechanical testing, reliability testing, fatigue, etc.) expertise to the Case Western Reserve University campus, medical, industrial, legal, outside university and government laboratory communities. The center, housed in the Charles M. White Metallurgy building, currently maintains equipment valued in excess of $4.5M and has been accessed by the local, national and international communities. In general, the center is capable of deformation processing and/or mechanically evaluating materials that range in size scale from the micrometer range up through bulk quantities. Materials systems that have been investigated span the range of organic and inorganic materials, including metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, electronic materials and biomedical materials systems.

Advanced Platform Technology Center

The Advanced Platform Technology (APT) Center at the Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center (LSCVAMC) is one of 15 designated Centers in the Rehabilitation Research and Development (RR&D) Service. Established in 2005 as a collaboration between the LSCVAMC and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), the APT Center focuses on addressing the pressing medical needs of veterans with sensorimotor dysfunction, cognitive impairment or limb-loss through the application of cutting edge technologies or rehabilitation techniques and translating them from proof of concept to viable clinical options. The APT Center captures advances in material science, microfabrication and microsystem design, neural engineering, mechanics and communications, and integrates them for applications in prosthetics/orthotics, neural interfacing, wireless health monitoring and maintenance and all forms of enabling and emerging technologies. Approximately 55 Engineers and Clinician Scientists at the LSCVAMC, CWRU, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland State University, Kent State University, University of Michigan and Cornell University are affiliated with the APT Center and contribute to its mission. The APT Center is able to provide or facilitate access to the following resources:

• Neural modeling and analysis of interface designs 
• Polymer and bioactive material development
• Microelectromechanical (MEMS) systems design and fabrication
• 3-D and laser printing/prototyping, mechanical testing and dynamic simulation 
• Pre-clinical in vitro and in vivo verification of device performance
• Circuit, sensor and software design and fabrication 
• System validation and design control documentation
• Professional engineering support and project management
• Administrative support for intellectual property protection, regulatory affairs, and quality systems.

Case Metal Casting Laboratory

The Case Metal Processing Laboratory (CMPL) collaborates with federal agencies, industry, professional societies and associations, national laboratories and other universities to promote and advance metal processing technologies by conducting cutting edge research and development. As a Case Western Reserve University operated unit, the CMPL has an educational orientation, providing undergraduate and graduate-level training in metal processing. CWRU is both a Foundry Educational Foundation Affiliated School and a Forging Industry Association Magnet School.

Center for Advanced Polymer Processing

CAPP, the Center for Advanced Polymer Processing, stems from a partnership between Case Western Reserve University, Thermo Scientific and leading plastics and rubber companies. It is a state-of-the-art center for advanced polymer blending and compounding and reactive extrusion able to perform basic non-competitive research and development in the area of materials development and manufacturing by intent in support of the polymer, pharmaceutical and food industries.

Center for Advanced Science and Engineering of Carbon

The Center of Advanced Science and Engineering for Carbon (Case4Carbon) is a world-renowned research center at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, dedicated to advances in all aspects of science and engineering for carbon.
Our mission is to pursue an integrated science and engineering program by utilizing emerging carbon nanotechnology to develop new materials, devices and systems.
One of our unique strengths is applying advanced synthetic methods to the development of advanced carbon nanomaterials with well-defined, multidimensional structures for multifunctional applications, including electrochemical energy conversion and storage.

Center for Applied Polymer Research

The Center for Applied Polymer Research (CAPRI) is a state-of-the-art center for advanced polymer blending and compounding and reactive extrusion able to perform basic research and applied research and development in support of the polymer, pharmaceutical and food industries. The main tools of CAPRI are:

**state-of-the-art sensors that allow multiple rheological, physical, chemical and morphological quantities to be measured along the screw axis of twin-screw extruders;
**advanced multi-scale computational simulation capabilities to build physical-chemical-structural models of polymer systems under flow in realistic polymer transformation processes;
**integration of on-line sensors and multi-scale softwares to develop new advanced and functional multiphase complex materials or optimize the performance of existing ones.

Center for Biomaterials

The Center for Biomaterials carries out research and development projects to investigate new biomaterials, tissue-engineered materials, and targeted drug-delivery systems for use in cardiovascular applications and implants.

The Center for Biomaterials also provides researchers access to shared-use facilities, which includes high-resolution microscopy such as AFM, molecular spectroscopies, surface analysis, and polymer and peptide synthesis capabilities. The chemical and mechanical interface between the biomaterial and the host tissue are the focus of major study, with the goals being to improve biologic function and biocompatibility in the response of the human body to implants.

Current projects include investigation of thrombosis (blood clotting) and infection mechanisms due to cardiovascular prosthesis, biomimetic design of novel biomaterials for cardiovascular and neural implants; and cardiovascular and neural tissue engineering based on biomimetic designs. Studies at the cell and molecular level assist our understanding of the underlying mechanisms so that novel biomedical materials may be designed, prepared and characterized.

Center for Computational Imaging and Personalized Diagnostics

The Center of Computational Imaging and Personalized Diagnostics at Case Western Reserve University is involved in various different aspects of developing, evaluating and applying novel quantitative image analysis, computer vision, pattern recognition and machine learning tools for disease diagnosis, prognosis and theragnosis in the context of several oncologic (e.g. breast, prostate, brain, lung, rectal, head&neck) as non-oncologic diseases (e.g. plaque, epilepsy, inflammatory bowel disease). Our group is also exploring the utility of these methods in studying correlations of disease markers across multiple length scales, modalities, and functionalities"from gene and protein expression to spectroscopy to digital pathology and to multi-parametric MRI and CAT scans. We also work closely with industry to move a number of the technologies towards translation and commercialization.

Center for Evaluation of Implant Performance

The mission of the Center for the Evaluation of Implant Performance is to pursue engineering and scientific analysis of retrieved joint reconstruction devices and to evaluate the performance of implants during patient use. This mission is achieved through IRB-approved collection, maintenance, and protection of clinical and radiographic information and total joint replacement components obtained at revision or removal surgery. The goal is to advance the science of joint replacement durability and improved performance for better patient outcomes through improvements in implant materials and design. To this end, the Center for the Evaluation of Implant Performance works in partnership with the Center for Joint Replacement and Restoration at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center.

Center for Layered Polymeric Systems

The Center for Layered Polymeric Systems (CLiPS) is an NSF Science & Technology Center and focuses its intensive research on microlayering and nanolayering process technology and draws strength from Case Western Reserve's extensive history in polymer science.

Technology refined within CLiPS allows the production of films and membranes composed of hundreds or thousands of layers. These extremely thin layers promote interactions approaching the molecular level between the materials used in the process.

CLiPS research activities are organized into five platforms to exploit the microlayer and nanolayer structures:
(1) Rheology and New Processing focuses on integrating rheology into the multilayering process, and explores combinations of rheologically dissimilar materials to create new polymer-based structures;
(2) advanced Membranes and Transport Phenomena that exploit the layered hierarchy to achieve unique transport properties;
(3) novel Optic and Electronic Systems based on the advanced layered materials;
(4) Science and Technology Initiatives that probe a fundamental understanding and explore new opportunities for the layered structures, and
(5) new Templated Interfaces and Reactions that explores chemistry using templates, interfaces, and patterning to discover new phenomena and introduce new or responsive properties in multilayer films.

Cleveland Functional Electrical Stimulation Center

The Cleveland Functional Electrical Stimulation Center builds upon the neural engineering accomplishments of the Department of Biomedical Engineering and several clinical partners to develop electrode stimulation systems that restore movement, relieve pain, enhance neurological rehabilitation, treat autonomic disorders, and mitigate psychiatric conditions. These systems apply electrical currents to either generate or suppress activity in the nervous system to compensate for disease or injury.

The center focuses its activities in four major areas:
**Fundamental studies to discover new knowledge
**Enabling technologies for clinical application or the discovery of knowledge
**Clinical research that applies this knowledge and technology to individuals with neurological dysfunction
**Transfer of knowledge and technology to the clinical community and to industry.

Control and Energy Systems Center

With an interdisciplinary and concurrent engineering approach, the Control and Energy Systems Center (CESC) focuses on bridging the gap between fundamental research and applied industrial projects in Advanced Control and Systems Engineering, with special emphasis in energy innovation, wind energy, power systems, water treatment plants, sustainability, spacecraft, environmental and industrial applications. Fundamental research is conducted to gain knowledge and understanding on multi-input-multi-output systems, distributed parameter systems and nonlinear plants with uncertainty, and to develop new methodologies to design quantitative robust controllers to improve the efficiency and reliability of such systems.

The CESC’s expertise has been applied to real-world problems with industrial partners and space agencies in the following main areas:

Multi-Megawatt Onshore and Offshore Wind Turbines
Airborne Wind Energy Systems
Renewable Energy Plants, Advanced Energy Systems
Power System Dynamics and Control, Grid Integration, Energy Storage
Large Radio Telescope Control, Optical Telescope Control
Formation Flying Spacecraft, Satellites with Flexible Appendages
Wastewater Treatment Plants, Desalination Systems
Heating Systems, Fluid Dynamics
Robotics, Parallel Kinematics

The CESC's capabilities and equipment include:

Fully instrumented wind tunnel to test prototypes at wind speeds up to 20 m/s
Lab-scale wind turbine blade manufacturing units
State-of-the-art computer programs for commercial wind turbine design
Aerodynamics, Solid modeling and Electrical design CAD/CAE software
Advanced software to design robust QFT control systems
Software for analysis and simulation of dynamic systems
Multiple laboratory scale wind turbines with a variety of collinear and orthogonal rotors, electrical generators, gearboxes, sensors, actuators and hierarchical real-time torque/pitch/yaw control systems
Lab-scale wind farms with flexible configurations
Fully-controlled 6-DOF Stewart platform for lab-scale Floating Wind Turbine experimentation
Laboratory helicopter to test advanced control systems

Electro-Ceramics for Sustainable Energy Solutions

Our research interests are on functional materials that actively contribute to the application (i.e. thermoelectrics and piezoelectrics), rather than passive materials that are generally structural in nature. We concentrate on two paths of research: (i) applying materials technology to real life applications and (ii) developing new materials for extreme environmental conditions. Our objective is to investigate fundamental sciences and develop next generation materials and devices that will integrate physics and materials with other engineering fields such as mechanical and electrical engineering.

Electronics Design Center

With roots dating to the 1950s, the Electronics Design Center is a multi-disciplinary educational and research center focusing on the applications of microfabrication processing to the advancement of chemical and biological micro-systems specializing in application-oriented electrochemical based biosensors.

Great Lakes Energy Institute

The Great Lakes Energy Institute at Case Western Reserve University connects faculty across the university to transition breakthrough research into worldwide impact. Since 2008, GLEI has helped catalyze a five-fold increase in energy research, won awards from many major federal (NSF, DOE, ARPA-E) and state (Ohio Third Frontier) awards, attracted over $80 million in gifts, worked with over 100 different industry partners, and encouraged multidisciplinary proposals from throughout the university. At the heart of these proposals and effort are over 90 engaged faculty, hailing from engineering, arts & sciences, management, and law.

Institute for Advanced Materials

The Institute for Advanced Materials (IAM) at Case Western Reserve University provides a hub for collaborations among the university’s researchers, private industry and government partners that drive innovation of new materials from ideas to proven models to marketable technology. Focusing in the areas of advanced fundamentals, energy, sustainability and materials for human health, IAM's nearly 100 faculty leverage their expertise in specialties ranging from ceramics and metals, semiconductors, composites, polymers, and biomedical materials including regenerative tissue engineering.

Larry Sears and Sally Zlotnick Sears think[box]

Sears think[box], the university’s seven-story, 50,000-square-foot innovation center gives the campus community the room and tools it needs to test and tinker, to collaborate and fabricate, and to bring ideas to life. Students, faculty, staff and community members have access to a variety of equipment"from rapid prototyping tools like 3-D printers to CNC machining equipment like PCB routers and laser cutters"as well as to collaborative design space, and entrepreneurial resources.

Magnetic Materials Characterization Laboratory

This laboratory has world class magnetometry facilities and unique measurement capabilities to aid in materials discovery and general magnetic material investigations. A Lakeshore Model 7410 Vibrating Sample Magnetometer with high temperature furnace capability enables the measurement of quasi-static hysteresis loops, thermomagnetic measurements, and various other magnetic materials analyses. We can measure powders, thin films, and bulk samples in fields up to 3.1 Tesla at room temperature or 2.3 Tesla with the oven inserted. A magnetostriction characterization facility using strain gauges provides accurate shape change better than 1 ppm sensitivity at room temperature and fixed field (~0.2 T). Other measurement capabilities are in progress, including measurement of AC core losses.

Materials for Opto/Electronics

The MORE Center advances science and innovation with facilities enabling the fabrication and characterization of materials and devices for solar energy and emerging electronic and optoelectronic technologies.

Microfabrication Laboratory

The Microfabrication Laboratory (MFL) is a state-of-the-art, Class 100 cleanroom configured for the fabrication of micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems. Capabilities include thin film deposition, photolithographic patterning, reactive ion etching, and wafer bonding. Materials processed in the MFL include semiconductors, ceramics, metals and polymers. The laboratory is known for its support of world class research in silicon carbide MEMS. Laboratories affiliated with the MFL support design, packaging and testing of the devices fabricated in the facility.

Neural Engineering Center

The Neural Engineering Center (NEC) is a coordinated group of scientists and engineers dedicated to research and education in an area at the interface between neuroscience and engineering. They share the common goal of analyzing the function of the nervous system, developing methods to restore damaged neurological function, and interfacing with the nervous system to obtain information and to modulate neural activity. This is achieved by integrating physical, chemical, mathematical, biological and engineering tools.

Nitinol Commercialization Accelerator

The Ohio Third Frontier Wright Projects Program has funded a collaborative effort between the Cleveland Clinic, CWRU, University of Toledo, NASA Glenn Research Center, and Norman Noble, Inc. in order to develop a better understanding of the metallurgical processing and mechanical characterization of nitinol for use in biomedical and aerospace applications. Biomedical applications range from orthodontia to implantable devices while higher temperature shape memory alloys are of interest for aerospace. The collaboration is designed to create synergy amongst collaborators in the research and development of nitinol products. CWRU has developed a facility wherein the effects of composition changes on mechanical performance can be determined. The laboratory housed at CWRU’s Materials Science and Engineering Department contains processing and characterization (thermal and mechanical) equipment that allows for the manufacture and analysis of nitinol products. The CWRU campus community can access the facility via the use of a valid CWRU university account number that will be charged at an internal rate for machine time, including set up and any technician time involved. Long term testing can be provided at pro-rated charges in consultation with the laboratory director(s). Arrangements can be made to train users on the equipment and reserve time for equipment use. Outside (i.e. non-CWRU) users can access the facility via a number of different mechanisms by contacting the laboratory director(s).

Rapid Solidification Laboratory

The Rapid Solidification Laboratory has a single wheel melt spinner capable of producing alloy in a clean manufacturing environment. Alloys produced at the maximum quench rate by this process consist of 20 micron thick ribbons which can be made amorphous depending on quench rate and compositions are suitably chosen.

SDLE Research Center

The SDLE Research Center at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) is a world-class research center dedicated to data science and analytics applied to materials and energy science.

Established in 2011 by Professor Roger H French, the SDLE Center focuses on
- Lifetime and degradation science of solar photovoltaic (PV) materials, and other environmentally exposed, long lived (>25 years) technologies.
- Accelerated laboratory and outdoor real-world exposures and evaluations of outdoor exposed technologies such as solar, led lighting and building envelope materials
- Energy efficiency and virtual energy auditing of buildings, using engineering epidemiology and data analytics
- Data-mining and statistical- and machine-learning applied to materials
- Petabyte/Petaflop big data analytics applied to time-series, spectral and image datasets
- Non-relational data warehousing and analytics environment for complex systems.

Swagelok Center for Surface Analysis of Materials

The Swagelok Center for Surface Analysis of Materials (SCSAM) is a multi-user facility providing major instrumentation for materials microcharacterization, including high-resolution imaging, spatially resolved chemical analysis, and diffractometry.

The Institute for Management and Engineering

The Institute for Management and Engineering, or TIME, is a unique joint program between the schools of engineering and management. Upon completion of this highly selective one-year program, students who hold an undergraduate degree in engineering receive a master's in engineering and management. Students aspire to be business-minded engineers through studies that integrate the best engineering and management practices.

Wind Energy Research Center

The Wind Energy Research and Commercialization (WERC) Center is a multidisciplinary center for use by students, faculty, and industry providing instrumentation for wind resource characterization and research platforms in operating wind turbines. The WERC Center was established in 2010 with funding from the Ohio Department of Development Third Frontier Wright Project and the Department of Energy.

The instruments in the WERC Center include:

**A NorthWind 100 wind turbine manufactured by Northern Power Systems. This 100kW community-scale wind turbine has a direct drive generator with full power inverters, stall control blades with a 21 m rotor diameter, and a 37 m hub height. It is located on campus just east of Van Horn field and began operation in November, 2010.
**A Vestas V-27 wind turbine originally manufactured by Vestas. This 225kW medium-scale wind turbine has a gearbox drive generator, pitch controlled blades with a 27 m rotor diameter, and a 30 m hub height. In addition it has a 50kW generator for low wind generation. It is located at an industrial site in Euclid, OH about 15 minutes from campus.
**A Nordex N-54 wind turbine originally manufactured by Nordex. This 1.0MW utility-scale wind turbine has a gearbox drive generator, stall control blades with a 54 m rotor diameter, and a 70 m hub height. In addition it has a 200kW generator for low wind generation. This wind turbine is located at an industrial site in Euclid, OH about 15 minutes from campus.
**A continuous scan ZephIR LiDAR, manufactured by Natural Power. This instrument measures horizontal and vertical wind velocity along with wind direction at 1 Hz frequency at five user set heights up to 200 m.
**Five meteorological measurement systems: 3 on campus; 1 with the off-campus wind turbines; and one at the City of Cleveland’s water intake crib located 3.5 miles offshore in Lake Erie.

Yeager Center for Electrochemical Sciences

The Yeager Center for Electrochemical Sciences (YCES) is an internationally recognized research center dedicated to advances in all aspects of electrochemical sciences and electrochemical systems and devices. YCES fosters education and research among many disciplines at Case Western Reserve.

Graduate

Subject Areas of Research

Subject Areas

  • Advanced Composites
  • Advanced Materials
  • Applied Neural Control and Rehabilitation Engineering
  • Artificial Intelligence and machine learning
  • Automation
  • Big Data and Digital Solutions
  • Bioinformatics
  • Biological Macromolecules
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomechanics
  • Biomedical Image Processing and Analysis
  • Biomedical Optical Sensors
  • Biomedical Sensors and Systems Modeling
  • Biomimetic Systems
  • Biorobotics
  • Chemical Thermodynamics of Materials
  • Chemistry and Structure of Surfaces
  • Colloids and Dispersions
  • Combustion
  • Computational Biology
  • Computational Mechanics
  • Computational Methods for Transport Phenomena
  • Computer Architecture and Organization
  • Computer-aided Design and Testing of Digital Systems
  • Conducting Polymers and Polymer Microdevices
  • Control of Industrial Systems
  • Databases, Data Mining and Visualization
  • Decision Support Systems
  • Diagnosis and Prognosis of Manufacturing Equipment and Processes
  • Digital Signal Processing, Control and Filtering Theory
  • Dispersive Mixing and Blending
  • Distributed Systems and Computer Networks
  • Drug Delivery
  • Electrochemical Engineering
  • Electronic Materials
  • Energy Efficient Buildings
  • Energy and Production Manufacturing Systems
  • Energy and Sustainability
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Estimation and Control Theory
  • Fire Safety, flammability and Fire Suppression
  • Fluid Mechanics
  • Geotechnical Engineering
  • Global Change Modeling
  • Health Informatics
  • High-Performance Manufacturing
  • Human Health
  • Infrastructure Reliability and Performance
  • Light Scattering
  • Materials Characterization
  • Materials Engineering
  • Materials for Energy Applications
  • Measurement Systems
  • Mechanics Process Control
  • Micro Air Vehicles
  • Micro-/Nano-electronics and sensors
  • Microbiology
  • Microgravity Behavior of Combustion and Fluid Processes
  • Microstructural and Mechanical Property Characterization
  • Multiphase flow
  • Nanofluidics
  • Near-net Shape and Rapid Prototyping
  • Neural Engineering
  • Neural Prostheses
  • Neurotrauma Mechanics
  • Nonlinear and Adaptive Control
  • Optical Communications
  • Orthopaedic Engineering
  • Performance and Reliability of Materials
  • Plastic Deformation and Fracture
  • Polymer Composites and Blends
  • Polymer Synthesis and Molecular Design
  • Polymer-based nanotechnology
  • Processing, Modeling and Simulation
  • Reaction Engineering
  • Reactive Polymer Processing
  • Responsive Polymers
  • Robotics and Motion Control
  • Sensor Systems and Networks, including MEMS
  • Separations
  • Smart Systems and Cities
  • Software Design Environments
  • Software Engineering
  • Solid-state Electronics
  • Space Exploration Systems Tchnology
  • Space Power and Propulsion
  • Space Structures
  • Space-life Support Systems Technology
  • Spacecraft Fire Safety
  • Structural Dynamics and Control
  • Structural Engineering
  • Structure-property Relationships of Polymers
  • Surface Hardening of Steels and Other Alloys
  • Surface and Colloidal Phenomena
  • Systems Biology
  • Systems Optimization, Planning, and Decision Making
  • Systems Theory
  • Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Nanomaterials
  • Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials
  • Tissue Engineering
  • Transport Properties in Macromolecular Systems
  • Transport and Metabolic Systems Engineering
  • Transport in Biological Systems

Graduate

Dual Degrees

Graduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

Students who pursue multiple degrees generally complete these as independent programs. There is one dual degree program in mechanical and aerospace engineering: MD/PhD, and there are two dual degree programs in biomedical engineering: the MD/PhD and MD/MS. Students apply to the MD/PhD program through the School of Medicine when they apply for medical school. This intensive program requires approximately 7 years of study after the BS. Students apply to the MD/MS program through the Department of Biomedical Engineering after they are enrolled as medical students in the Case School of Medicine or the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine.

Graduate

Student Appointments

Appointments by Department

Appointments - Number of Appointments
Stipend - Average Monthly Stipend

Department Fellowships TA RA Other Total Appts.
Academic Office of the Dean
Appointments: 0 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0 $0
Biomedical Engineering
Appointments: 24 0 65 0 89
Stipends: $2,278 $0 $2,144 $0
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Appointments: 0 0 22 0 22
Stipends: $0 $0 $2,097 $0
Civil Engineering
Appointments: 1 4 6 2 13
Stipends: $2,200 $1,227 $2,000 $1,800
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Appointments: 1 10 63 1 75
Stipends: $1,916 $1,900 $1,914 $300
Macromolecular Science and Engineering
Appointments: 3 0 48 0 51
Stipends: $1,890 $0 $2,241 $0
Materials Science and Engineering
Appointments: 1 0 29 0 30
Stipends: $2,667 $0 $2,178 $0
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Appointments: 5 18 25 6 54
Stipends: $2,500 $1,700 $2,000 $2,000
All Total Appointments 35 32 258 9 334