Iowa State University - 2016

Institution Information

Contact Information

Institution's Mailing Address

Institution Name: Iowa State University
Mailing Address: 533 Morrill Road
City: Ames
State: IA
Postal Code: 50011
Country: United States
Phone 515-294-5933
Fax:
Website: http://www.engineering.iastate.edu

Head of Institution

Steven Leath
President
Office of the President
Iowa State University
1750 Beardshear
515 Morrill
Ames, IA 50011
Phone: 515-294-2042
Fax: 515-294-4565
president@iastate.edu

Undergraduate Admission Inquiries

Joel Johnson
Program Director
Engineering Student Services
Iowa State University
1300 Marston
533 Morrill Rd
Ames, IA 50011
Phone: 515-294-1570
Fax: 515-294-8993
joelj@iastate.edu

Graduate Admission Inquiries

Joel Johnson
Program Director
Engineering Student Services
Iowa State University
1300 Marston
533 Morrill Rd
Ames, IA 50011
Phone: 515-294-1570
Fax: 515-294-8993
joelj@iastate.edu

Institution Information

General Information


Type of institution: PUBLIC
Academic Year: SEMESTERS
Setting of Main Engineering Campus SMALL TOWN

Main Campus Information

Is the main campus located in a city with a population greater than 100,000?: No
Name of this city, or if no, the name of the nearest city of any size?: Des Moines
This city's population (approx.): 611,549
Distance from Main Campus: 30

Total Enrollment

Total Undergraduate enrollment: 30,671
Total Graduate enrollment: 5,096
Total Professional and other enrollment: 893

Non-Engineering Degree Granting Colleges

Business, Education, Fine arts, Liberal arts, Natural sciences, Agriculture, Human Sciences, Veterinary Medicine, Design

Institution Information

General Admissions

Entrance Requirements and Recommendations

Requirements

Students who wish to enter Iowa State University directly from high school are considered for admission based upon their Regent Admission Index (RAI) score. There are two mathematical formulas for computing student's RAI scores, the primary formula (for students whose high school provides class rank) and the Alternative RAI formula (for students whose high school does not provide class rank.)
Below is a detailed description of each formula:

Primary RAI Formula (for students whose high school provides class rank)
Percentile class rank x1
+ACT composite score x 2
+Cumulative GPA x 20
+Number of years of high school core courses x 5
=RAI score

Alternative RAI Formula (for students whose high school does NOT provide class rank)
ACT composite score x 3
+Cumulative GPA x 30
+Number of years of high school core courses x 5
=RAI score

Note: For purposes of calculating the RAI, SAT scores will be converted to ACT composite equivalents; high school rank is expressed as a percentile with 99% as the top value; high school GPA is expressed on a 4-point scale; and number of high school courses completed in the core subject areas is expressed in terms of years or fractions of years of study.

Applicants who achieve at least a 245 RAI score and who meet the minimum high school course requirements will automatically be offered admission. Applicants who achieve less than a 245 RAI score and who meet the minimum high school course requirements may also be offered admission, but their applications will be reviewed on an individual basis.

Students who wish to enter Iowa State University directly from high school must also meet the minimum high school course requirements for admission: 1) English/Language Art--4 years, emphasizing writing, speaking, and reading, as well as an understanding and appreciation of literature; 2) Mathematics--3 years, including one year each of algebra, geometry, and advanced algebra; 3) Science--3 years, including one year each of two of the following fields: biology, chemistry, and physics; 4) Social Studies--2 years.

In addition to the high school course requirements listed, students applying for admission to the College of Engineering must complete two years of a single foreign language. Students applying for admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences must complete a third year of social studies and two years of a single foreign language.

Nontraditional students are held to the same high school course requirements as all entering freshmen. However, because research has shown that traditional measures of high school performance (e.g., GPA, class rank) are not always good predictors of academic success for nontraditional students, those who achieve less than a 245 RAI score are still encouraged to apply for admission.

GED taken prior to 2014, GED applicants who have achieved an overall average score at the 50th percentile or higher with no score lower than the 45th percentile will be offered admission. GED applicants whose high school classes graduated after 1990 are also required to achieve GED subtest scores at the 75th percentile for subject areas in which they did not complete high school coursework as stated in the section titled Minimum High School Course Requirements for Admission.

GED taken in 2014 or later. Applicants who have achieved a score of 170 or higher on each of the four content areas (Reasoning Through Language Arts, Mathematical Reasoning, Science, and Social Studies) will be offered admission.

In January, 2014, the state of Iowa began using the HiSET (in place of the GED) as the assessment for persons who wish to earn their high school equivalency diploma. The HiSET is composed of five sub-tests listed below, each of which are scored from 1-20 with a score of 8 considered "passing" and a score of 15 considered "college ready". The total HiSET score ranges from 1-100. HiSET sub-tests: Language Arts-Reading, Language Arts-Writing, Mathematics, Social Studies, & Science. Freshman applicants who achieve a minimum sum score of 75 on the HiSET and a minimum score of 15 on each of the five sub-tests will automatically be offered admission. Applicants who do not meet these minimum requirements will be considered on an individual basis.

Each year, Iowa State welcomes students who have been educated at home. Because some of the factors that make up the RAI are frequently not available for these students, increased emphasis is given to standardized test scores in the admission review. Home-schooled students are asked to provide thorough documentation regarding the subject matter (i.e. subject titles, text books, and syllabus) studied. Contact the ISU Office of Admissions for additional details.

Students with documented disabilities are held to Iowa State's regular freshman admission requirements. Those who feel their academic record does not accurately reflect their ability to succeed and, therefore, wish to be considered for admission on an individual basis are asked to submit additional documentation explaining their circumstances. This documentation should include: 1) A letter from the applicant requesting special consideration. This letter should identify the disability and include a description of how the disability impacts academic performance; 2) Information pertaining to accommodations and services used in high school or the most recent educational setting; 3) A recent typed report prepared by a qualified provider that contains a specific current diagnosis, treatment history, and existing functional impact as it relates to one's participation at Iowa State University. Please refer to Student Disability Resources Web site for more details on documentation requirements. For additional information about services for students with disabilities, visit Student Disability Resources.

Some freshman applicants who are not admitted unconditionally are offered the opportunity to enroll during the summer session on a trial basis. Select freshman applicants who don't meet Iowa State's admission requirements, but whose academic records suggest a reasonable chance for achieving success, are offered the opportunity to enroll at Iowa State during the summer term on a trial basis. Those students who are successful are allowed to continue their enrollment unconditionally.

While the success rate for summer trial students varies from year to year, on average, approximately 80 percent of those students who enroll are successful. Those who aren't successful are not permitted to continue their enrollment, but may re-enter Iowa State as transfer students after they have completed at least 24 semester credits of transferable coursework from another accredited college or university with at least a 2.00 transfer GPA.

Freshman applicants who are offered summer trial enrollment must meet all of the following requirements in order to continue their enrollment at Iowa State University: 1) Enroll beginning Summer Session II, an eight-week term that begins in mid-June. 2) Complete at least six credits (typically two courses) selected in consultation with an academic adviser 3) Earn at least a 2.00 cumulative GPA for the summer term 4) Earn a grade of C- or better in each course attempted.

Students must take their courses on the Iowa State campus. In other words, students may not complete their summer trial enrollment by taking Iowa State online courses or by taking courses at any other college or university.

Recommendations

High school credits particularly important to students wishing to study engineering include 2 years of algebra, 1 year of geometry, 1/2 year of trigonometry and 1/2 year pre-calculus; 1 year each of chemistry, biology and physics; 3 years of social science and 4 years of English. Placement in mathematics, English, and chemistry will generally be based on high school preparation and test scores. Advanced placement is possible for exceptionally well-prepared students. Students who are not adequately prepared may be encouraged or required to take additional preparatory coursework and should expect to spend more than the customary time to complete the engineering program. Any coursework which is preparatory or remedial in nature cannot be used to satisfy credit requirements for graduation in any of the engineering curricula.

Engineering Information

Head of Engineering

Head of Engineering

Sarah A Rajala
Dean
College of Engineering
Iowa State University
4100S Marston Hall
533 Morrill Rd
Ames, IA 50011
Phone: 515-294-9988
Fax: 515-294-9273
rajala@iastate.edu

Engineering Information

Engineering Degrees Offered

Types of Engineering Degrees

Bachelor's:B.S.
Master's:M.S. with thesis, M.S. without thesis, but with project or report, M.Eng.
Doctoral:Ph.D.

Computer Science Degrees Awarded Outside the College/School of Engineering

Bachelor's, Master's, Doctoral

Engineering Information

Engineering Departments

Engineering Department(s) Degree Granting Level Department Chair Discipline
Aerospace Engineering Both Richard Wlezien Aerospace Engineering
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Both Steven Mickelson Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical & Biological Engineering Both Andrew Hillier Chemical Engineering
Civil, Construction, & Environmental Engineering Both Terry Wipf Civil Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Both Manimaran Govindarasu Electrical/Computer Engineering
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering Both Gul Okudan-Kremer Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Interdepartmental Graduate Other Engineering Disciplines
Materials Science and Engineering Both Kristen Constant Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Both Caroline Hayes Mechanical Engineering
Undeclared Engineering/Specials Undergraduate Other Engineering Disciplines

Engineering Information

Research Centers

  • INCOLL - Research center WITHIN the college of engineering
  • INDEPT - Research center WITHIN an engineering department
  • INUNIV - Research center WITHIN university system
  • OUTUNIV - Research center OUTSIDE the university
Center/Lab Discipline Research Class Head Chair
Ames Laboratory of the U.S. Dept. of Energy Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering OUTUNIV Adam Schwartz
Analog & Mixed-Signal VLSI Design Center Electrical/Computer Engineering INDEPT Degang Chen
Asteroid Deflection Research Center Aerospace Engineering INDEPT Bong Wie
Biobased Industry Center Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Bruce Babcock
BioCentury Research Farm Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr. INUNIV Kevin Keener
Bioeconomy Institute Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Robert Brown
Biopolymers & Biocomposites Research Team Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV David Grewell
Bridge Engineering Center Civil Engineering INUNIV Brent Phares
Center for e-Design Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering INDEPT Gul Okudan-Kremer
Center for Industrial Research & Service Other Engineering Disciplines INCOLL Ron Cox
Center for Nondestructive Evaluation Engr. Science and Engr. Physics INCOLL Leonard Bond
Center for Sustainable Environmental Technologies Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Robert Brown
Critical Materials Institute Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering OUTUNIV Alexander King
Electric Power Research Center Electrical/Computer Engineering INDEPT Anne Kimber
Industrial Assessment Center Mechanical Engineering INDEPT Gregory Maxwell
Information Assurance Center Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL Doug Jacobson
Institute for Transportation Civil Engineering INUNIV Shauna Hallmark
Iowa Space Grant Consortium Aerospace Engineering OUTUNIV Richard Wlezien
Microelectronics Research Center Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL Vikram Dalal
NSF Engineering Research Center for Biorenewable Chemicals Chemical Engineering INCOLL Brent Shanks
Power Systems Engineering Research Center Electrical Engineering INDEPT Anne Kimber
Virtual Reality Applications Center Mechanical Engineering INUNIV James Oliver

Engineering Information

Degree Programs

Bachelor's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Aerospace Engineering Aerospace Engineering (B.S.) Aerospace Engineering
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Agricultural Engineering (B.S.) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Biological Systems Engineering (B.S) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical & Biological Engineering Chemical Engineering (B.S.) Chemical Engineering
Civil, Construction, & Environmental Engineering Civil Engineering (B.S.) Civil Engineering
Civil, Construction, & Environmental Engineering Construction Engineering (B.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Electrical and Computer Engineering Computer Engineering (B.S.) Computer Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering (B.S.) Electrical Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Software Engineering (B.S.) Computer Engineering
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering Industrial Engineering (B.S.) Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Materials Science and Engineering Materials Engineering (B.S.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) Mechanical Engineering
Undeclared Engineering/Specials Multiple Curricula/Majors (B.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines

Master's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Master's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Aerospace Engineering Aerospace Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) Aerospace Engineering
Aerospace Engineering Engineering Mechanics (M.S., M.Eng.) Aerospace Engineering
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Agricultural and Biological Systems Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical & Biological Engineering Chemical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) Chemical Engineering
Civil, Construction, & Environmental Engineering Civil Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) Civil Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) Electrical Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Computer Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) Computer Engineering
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (M.S., M. Eng.) Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Interdepartmental Environmental Science (M.S.) Environmental Engineering
Interdepartmental Engineering Management (M.Eng.) Engineering Management
Interdepartmental Biorenewable Resources and Technology (M.S.) Engineering (General)
Interdepartmental Toxicology (M.S.) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Interdepartmental Human Computer Interaction (M.S.) Engineering (General)
Interdepartmental Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (M.S.) Engineering (General)
Interdepartmental Information Assurance (M.S., M.Eng.) Computer Engineering
Interdepartmental Sustainable Agriculture (M.S.) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Interdepartmental Systems Engineering (M.Eng.) Engineering (General)
Interdepartmental Neuroscience (M.S.) Engineering (General)
Interdepartmental Transportation (M.S.) Civil Engineering
Materials Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Energy Systems Engineering (M.Eng.) Mechanical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) Mechanical Engineering

Doctoral Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Doctoral Degree Program(s) Discipline
Aerospace Engineering Aerospace Engineering (Ph.D.) Aerospace Engineering
Aerospace Engineering Engineering Mechanics (Ph.D.) Aerospace Engineering
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Agricultural and Biological Systems Engineering (Ph.D.) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical & Biological Engineering Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) Chemical Engineering
Civil, Construction, & Environmental Engineering Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) Civil Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.) Electrical Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) Computer Engineering
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (Ph.D.) Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Interdepartmental Environmental Science (Ph.D.) Environmental Engineering
Interdepartmental Biorenewable Resources and Technology (Ph.D.) Engineering (General)
Interdepartmental Human Computer Interaction (Ph.D.) Engineering (General)
Interdepartmental Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (Ph.D.) Engineering (General)
Interdepartmental Toxicology (Ph.D.) Engineering (General)
Interdepartmental Sustainable Agriculture (Ph.D.) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Interdepartmental Neuroscience (Ph.D.) Engineering (General)
Interdepartmental Wind Energy Science, Engineering and Policy (Ph.D.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Materials Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) Mechanical Engineering

Engineering Information

Areas of Expertise

Engineering Departments Areas of Expertise
Aerospace Engineering
  1. Computational and Experimental Aerodynamics and Thermal Sciences
  2. Multi-Scale Computational and Experimental Solid Mechanics
  3. Nondestructive Testing and Evaluation
  4. Autonomy, Astrodynamics, Guidance, Navigation and Control
  5. Design, Optimization, and Complex Systems
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
  1. Animal Production Systems Engineering
  2. Advanced Machinery Engineering
  3. Manufacturing Systems
  4. Biological and Process Engineering and Technology
  5. Occupational Safety Engineering
  6. Land and Water Resources Engineering
Chemical & Biological Engineering
  1. Biorenewable Chemicals
  2. Biorenewable Energy
  3. Biomedical Engineering
  4. Healthcare Technologies
  5. Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology
  6. Biochemical Engineering
  7. Catalysis and Reaction Engineering
  8. Polymeric Materials and Nanocomposites
  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics
  10. Biobased Products
  11. Electrochemistry
  12. Electrochemical Engineering
  13. Materials for Energy Conversion
  14. Photonics and Optics
  15. Corrosion
Civil, Construction, & Environmental Engineering
  1. Construction Engineering, Contract and Project Management, Design-Build and Integrated Delivery
  2. Sustainable and Green Infrastructure Design, Construction, Monitoring, and Repair
  3. Structural Design, condition and risk assessments; high-performance structures; design for extreme loads
  4. Geotechnical Engr., Intelligent Earthworks Engr., foundation engr., ground modifications, Soil-Structure Interactions, and soil dynamics
  5. Environmental Engineering, Water Quality, Water Resources and Reuse, and Bioenergy
  6. Transportation Management, Safety and Human Factors, Asset Management and Intelligent Transportation Systems; transportation air quality and energy
  7. Energy systems; computational mechanics; structural health monitoring
  8. Materials Engr., asphalt materials, portland cement concrete materials, bio-asphalt, pavement design, pavement preservation, rehabilitation
Electrical and Computer Engineering
  1. Computing/Networking Systems and Security
  2. Software Systems
  3. Energy Systems
  4. Bioengineering
  5. Electronics, Magnetics, Advanced Materials and VLSI
  6. Communications, Controls and Signals
  7. Cyber Physical Security
  8. Cyber Security
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering
  1. Advanced Manufacturing
  2. Operations Research and Analytics
  3. Human Factors and Ergonomics
  4. Systems Engineering and Engineering Management
  5. Energy Systems
  6. Sustainable Systems
  7. Engineering Statistics
  8. Production Systems and Supply Chain
  9. Information Engineering
  10. Wind Energy Manufacturing, Engineering and Policy
Interdepartmental
  1. Computational Genomics
  2. Human Computer Interaction
  3. Biorenewable Resources
  4. Computer and Network Security
  5. Engineering Systems Modeling and Design
  6. Biological Network Modeling
Materials Science and Engineering
  1. Functional Bulk and Nanomaterials
  2. Battery Materials
  3. Additive Manufacturing
  4. Nonferrous Alloys
  5. Materials Synthesis and Processing
  6. Advanced Characterization
  7. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE)
  8. Biomaterials
  9. Computational Materials Science
  10. Innovative Materials Design and Manufacturing
Mechanical Engineering
  1. Biological and Nanoscale Sciences
  2. Clean Energy Technologies
  3. Complex Fluid Systems
  4. Design and Manufacturing Innovation
  5. Simulation and Visualization
  6. Design and Optimization
  7. Dynamic Systems and Controls
  8. Materials Processing and Mechanics
  9. Thermo-Fluid Sciences
Undeclared Engineering/Specials
  1. Engineering Undeclared

Engineering Information

Societies

Honor Societies

National Groups

  • Alpha Epsilon
  • Alpha Pi Mu
  • Chi Epsilon
  • Eta Kappa Nu
  • Keramos
  • Omega Chi Epsilon
  • Phi Kappa Phi
  • Pi Tau Sigma
  • Sigma Gamma Tau
  • Sigma Lambda Chi
  • Sigma Xi
  • Tau Beta Pi

Student Organizations

National Groups

  • ACM
  • Am. Concrete Institute
  • Am. Indian Science and Eng. Soc.
  • Am. Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics
  • Am. Inst. of Chemical Engineers
  • Am. Soc. of Agricultural Eng.
  • Am. Soc. of Civil Engineers
  • Am. Soc. of Mechanical Engineers
  • Am. Soc. of Safety Eng.
  • American Society for Engineering Education
  • Associated General Contractors of America
  • Earthquake Engineering Research Institute
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
  • Institute of Industrial Engineers
  • Material Advantage
  • Mexican American Engineering Societies
  • National Society of Black Engineers
  • Natl. Assoc. of Home Builders
  • Natl. Org. of Black Chemists & Chemical Engineers
  • Soc. of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Soc. of Manufacturing Engineers
  • Society of Women Engineers
  • Women in Science and Engineering

Local Groups

  • 3D Printing and Design
  • AerE and Engr Mechanics Graduate Org.
  • Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering Graduate Organization
  • AirISU
  • AirPad
  • American Public Works Association
  • American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air-Conditioning Engineers ISU Student Chapter (ASHRAE)
  • Audio Engineering Society
  • Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Graduate Student Organization
  • Biological Systems Engineering Club
  • Biomedical Engineering Society at ISU
  • Chemical Engineering Graduate Organization
  • Civil Construction Software Club (CCSC)
  • Critical Tinkers (CT)
  • Cyclone Amateur Radio Club
  • Cyclone Business Jet
  • Cyclone Power Pullers (CPP)
  • Cyclone Space Mining
  • Design Build Institute of America
  • Emerging Leaders in Engineering
  • Engineering Student Council
  • Engineers Week (E-Week)
  • Engineers Without Borders(EWB-ISU)
  • Engineers for a Sustainable World (ESW)
  • Environmental Technologies Club (EnTech)
  • Freshman Leaders in Engineering (FLIE)
  • Gaffers Guild
  • Human Computer Interaction Student Org.
  • IMPACT (Innovators Making Positive Advances in Creative Technologies)
  • ISU BioBus
  • ISU Computer Science and Software Engineering Club
  • ISU Robotics Club
  • ISU Student Section of the American Nuclear Society
  • Information Assurance Student Group
  • International Society of Research Design and Implementation (ISRDI)
  • Iowa State Mobile Development Club (ISUMDC)
  • Iowa State Space Society
  • Keramos
  • Materials Research Society at Iowa State Univerity (MRS)
  • Mechanical Contractors Association
  • Mechanical Engineers Graduate Student Org (MEGSO)
  • Minds of Tomorrow
  • National Electrical Contractors Association
  • Rube Goldberg Club
  • Sales Engineering Club
  • Science Explorations
  • Society of Automotive Engineering
  • Society of International Engineers
  • SolidWorks and CAD Club
  • Speedbike at ISU
  • TEAM (The Engineering Ambassador Mentors)
  • Team PrISUm-Solar Car
  • The Blueprint Engineering & Technology Magazine
  • Transportation Student Association
  • Water Environment Federation Student Chapter (WEF)
  • Wind Energy Student Organization

Engineering Information

Support Programs

College's Under-Represented Student Groups

National Groups

  • African Students Association
  • National Society of Black Engineers
  • Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Society of Mexican American Engineers and Scientis
  • Society of Women Engineers

Local Groups

  • American Indian Science & Engineering Soc.
  • Civil Ladies
  • Digital Women
  • The National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE)
  • Women in Science & Engineering

Other Student Support Programs

ISU offers a wide range of support services and programs for engineering students. There is a required first-semester orientation course for freshmen and transfer students to acquaint students to engineering and the university. Many students have the opportunity to participate in learning communities with students in their discipline. Learning communities utilize upper-class students as peer mentors. Academic support is available through supplemental instruction, free and paid tutoring, and help rooms for introductory classes. There are a number of engineering student organizations that provide professional development opportunities for students. The Engineering College has a Career Services office to assist students in finding permanent employment as well as co-op and intern experiences. The college’s Engineering International Programs office assists students in obtaining international education or work experiences. The College supports students financially through a scholarship program that awards over $3 million annually. All ISU students also have access to a wide variety of university services including counseling, advocacy and legal services.

Engineering Information

Student Projects

Student Design Projects Description

Several departments offer their own first-year design courses patterned from the college course, but emphasizing design problems common to those majors. All curricula integrate design into a number of elective and required courses throughout the four years. This culminates in a senior capstone course experience, involving design projects solving problems usually submitted by local or regional industry. Students also may elect to take a 400-level multidisciplinary engineering design course to analyze industrial design problems, develop concepts, and in most cases build a working prototype or pilot model of their solution.

Engineering Information

College Description

Engineering College Description and Special Characteristics

1) The Iowa State University College of Engineering practices engineering within a social context: emphasizing fundamental knowledge, practical skills, and leadership values to produce engineers who can work across disciplines to create new approaches, solve problems, and turn ideas into reality. Such innovation will make a crucial difference as our world strives for clean water, safe food, sound infrastructure, adequate healthcare, and renewable energy. The college is taking the lead in Iowa and throughout the global community to help meet these challenges through advanced research as well as educating tomorrow’s innovators and leaders.

2) Engineering contributes substantially to Iowa State’s long history of advanced research across disciplinary boundaries. College faculty members are collaborators in research centers throughout campus. They play leadership roles in the Bioeconomy Institute, NSF Engineering Research Center for Biorenewable Chemicals, Virtual Reality Applications Center, and Wind Energy Initiative. Research funding is crucial to the college’s mission because it increases opportunities for graduate students; allows faculty to pursue important innovations and advance engineering knowledge; leads to the development of premier laboratories; and contributes to the application of technology that enhances quality of life. The college conducts $88.1 million annually in research across a broad range of topics including tissue engineering and drug delivery; advanced transportation systems; cleaner energy sources; advanced manufacturing; critical materials; disaster-immune electric power grids, hacker-proof computer networks, and other cyber-physical systems; non-destructive evaluation; asteroid deflection; sensors and robotic systems; and human-computer interaction.

3) The college offers 12 undergraduate degree programs including aerospace engineering, agricultural engineering, biological systems engineering, chemical engineering, civil and environmental engineering, computer engineering, construction engineering, electrical engineering, industrial engineering, materials engineering, mechanical engineering and software engineering.

4) The college’s undergraduate minor programs include:
• Nondestructive evaluation, a multi-disciplinary and rapidly evolving engineering discipline where students learn how to determine the condition of an engineering component or structure without affecting its usefulness
• Engineering sales, equipping students with a broad understanding of the technical sales process, primarily from the business-to-business perspective
• Nuclear engineering, providing students a basic knowledge of nuclear science to apply to a wide variety of careers, including establishing electrical energy systems needed for economic security and growth.
• Biomedical, an interdisciplinary minor exploring interactions between various engineering disciplines and biological systems with four specialized tracks
• Energy systems, providing students an understanding of broad energy perspectives; the language of energy systems; and the economic, environmental and policy issues related to energy.

The College of Engineering has also worked with other Iowa State academic units to offer several interdisciplinary minors, including an entrepreneurial studies minor, sustainability minor, and wind energy minor.

Additionally, undergraduates can participate in a university-wide Leadership Certificate and minor program, which provides students the soft skills needed to advance in the engineering profession.

5) The college offers state-of-the-art facilities to 8,296 undergraduate and 1,349 graduate students. Iowa State’s facilities include one of the world’s premier tornado simulators, one of the few atom probe microscopes at a university, robotics lab, Wind Energy Manufacturing Lab, and the Virtual Reality Applications Center (VRAC) with C6, an internationally renowned virtual reality cave. In other labs, ultrasound and lasers are being used to develop cancer treatments, and rapid prototyping technology is producing replacement bone fragments reverse-engineered from CT scans.

6) Iowa State University is the first institution in the U.S. to offer MS and PhD degrees in biorenewable resources and technology. The program offers students from a wide variety of science and engineering backgrounds advanced study in the use of plant- and crop-based resources for the production of fuels, chemicals, materials and energy.

7) As host of one of a handful of Centers of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education chartered by the National Security Agency, Iowa State offers a multidisciplinary MS in information assurance supported by faculty members from six departments. The degree prepares students to embark on careers that focus on protecting the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information.

8) Our Engineering-LAS Online Learning department offers 25 online graduate engineering programs and over 150 graduate and undergraduate engineering courses. Online Master degrees are offered in traditional engineering disciplines and in emerging fields such as human-computer interaction and information assurance. Graduate certificates are available in biorenewable resources and technology, environmental engineering, construction management, nondestructive evaluation, systems engineering and numerous other fields. Engineering faculty taught nearly 4,844 student credit hours (credits multiplied by the number of students) online in academic year 2014-2015. Our online engineering programs and courses serve practicing engineers, corporations, government agencies, students in industrial co-ops, and on-campus students.

9) There are seven departments within the College of Engineering with formal concurrent BS/MS programs. Being accepted into a concurrent program allows students to jump-start their graduate degrees. In some majors, students can complete their MS in two or three additional semesters. Application and eligibility requirements vary; other non-formalized individual programs may also be possible. The program is offered in agricultural engineering; chemical engineering; civil, construction, and environmental engineering; electrical and computer engineering; industrial engineering, materials science and engineering, and mechanical engineering. The college also offers concurrent BS/MBA programs.

10) The college honors its commitments to diversity and leadership through numerous programs, including Leadership through Engineering Academic Diversity (LEAD) learning community, which engages underrepresented engineering students. A variety of discipline-specific student societies and general engineering honor societies offer students many opportunities to improve and practice their leadership skills. The college also supports the Academic Program for Excellence (APEX) a summer bridge program to help underrpresented minorities transition from high school to college.

11) The College of Engineering encourages all students to have meaningful engineering work experience before graduation through its cooperative education and internship programs. More than 70 percent of engineering students graduate with one or more experiential education work experiences, which contributes to a high full-time placement rate.The five-year average placement rate six months after graduating is 95 percent; and the average starting salary is about $61,000. The college’s most recent career fair, held in September 2016, featured 444 companies interacting with more than 7,000 students. On the 3 days following the career fair, 2,150 student interviews were held.

12) Learning communities are a central feature of the engineering program. These small groups of students generally take 1-3 courses together and may live in the same residence hall. Benefits also include peer and faculty mentoring. 85 percent of first-year engineering students participate in learning communities; retention is greatly enhanced for participants; and the program has been cited multiple times by U.S. News & World Report in its annual rankings.

13) The College of Engineering Admissions Partnership Program (EAPP) is a jointly administered program between Iowa State Admissions and the College of Engineering. Community college students who are accepted into the program are assigned an academic adviser in their major and a transfer peer mentor. These students are invited to campus, participate in the Engineering Career Fair, establish online professional networks with their peers, and are encouraged to make meaningful connections as a part of the program. The goal of the program is to increase community college student engagement prior to transfer, resulting in decreased “transfer shock” and increased retention and graduation rates for these students.

14) Each department in the college offers a master of science and doctor of philosophy degree for graduate students; many also offer course-work only master’s programs. Students can earn interdepartmental graduate degrees in bioinformatics and computational biology; biorenewable resources and technology; environmental science; executive engineer dual master's degree; human-computer interaction; information assurance; sustainable agriculture; systems engineering; toxicology; and transportation.

15) The College of Engineering offers students the opportunity to learn from the very best. Some of the remarkable faculty members in our ranks include Nobel Laureate Dan Shechtman, Advancement of Science (AAAS) Fellows Vikram Dalal, Leonard Bond and Balaji Narasimhan, American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Fellows Larry Genalo and Diane Rover, and former astronaut Clayton Anderson, along with many others.

Engineering Information

Engineering Faculty & Research

Teaching, Tenure-Track View Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Full Professors Assoc. Professors Assistant Professors Program Total
Aerospace Engineering 14 8 9 31
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering 16 11 5 32
Chemical & Biological Engineering 10 6 5 21
Civil, Construction, & Environmental Engineering 12 11 9 32
Electrical and Computer Engineering 24 17 4 45
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering 4 10 4 18
Interdepartmental 0 0 0 0
Materials Science and Engineering 16 2 6 24
Mechanical Engineering 16 6 20 42
Undeclared Engineering/Specials 0 0 0 0
Totals: 112 71 62 245

Teaching, Non-Tenure-Track

Engineering Department(s) FT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel PT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Teach. Personnel
Aerospace Engineering 11 2 13 1.33
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering 7 1 8 0.10
Chemical & Biological Engineering 5 1 6 0.50
Civil, Construction, & Environmental Engineering 11 5 16 1.80
Electrical and Computer Engineering 8 2 10 0.30
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering 3 1 4 0.25
Interdepartmental 0 0 0 0.00
Materials Science and Engineering 8 0 8 0.00
Mechanical Engineering 12 2 14 1.33
Undeclared Engineering/Specials 0 0 0 0.00
Totals: 65 14 79 5.61

Non-Teaching, Research

Engineering Department(s) Non-Teach. FT Research Personnel Non-Teach. PT Research Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Non-Teach. Research Personnel
Aerospace Engineering 1 0 1 0.00
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering 9 0 9 0.00
Chemical & Biological Engineering 1 0 1 0.00
Civil, Construction, & Environmental Engineering 9 3 12 1.35
Electrical and Computer Engineering 13 3 16 1.66
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering 5 0 5 0.00
Interdepartmental 0 0 0 0.00
Materials Science and Engineering 6 0 6 0.00
Mechanical Engineering 3 0 3 0.00
Undeclared Engineering/Specials 0 0 0 0.00
Totals: 47 6 53 3.01

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

  • American Indian or Alaska Native (Am Ind): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.
  • Asian: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
  • Black or African American (B/AfrA): A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as "Haitian" or "Negro" can be used in addition to "Black or African American."
  • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (Haw): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
  • Hispanic or Latino (Hisp): A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. The term, "Spanish origin," can be used in addition to "Hispanic or Latino."
  • White: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Full Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Aerospace Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 9 1 0 0 13 1
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 16 0
Chemical & Biological Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 8 2
Civil, Construction, & Environmental Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 8 1 0 0 10 2
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 1 0 0 0 0 8 3 0 0 20 4
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 2 2
Interdepartmental 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Materials Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 4 0 0 12 4
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 7 2 0 0 14 2
Undeclared Engineering/Specials 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 0 0 1 0 0 0 31 3 1 0 0 0 62 14 0 0 95 17

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Associate Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Aerospace Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 8 0
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 5 2 0 0 9 2
Chemical & Biological Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 4 2
Civil, Construction, & Environmental Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 10 1
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 17 0
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 8 2
Interdepartmental 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Materials Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 6 0
Undeclared Engineering/Specials 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 0 0 0 1 0 0 27 1 2 0 0 0 35 5 0 0 64 7

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Assistant Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Aerospace Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 7 2
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 3
Chemical & Biological Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 1
Civil, Construction, & Environmental Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 4 5
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 3 1
Interdepartmental 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Materials Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 4 2
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 2 0 0 0 6 4 0 1 0 0 6 1 0 0 14 6
Undeclared Engineering/Specials 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 0 0 2 0 0 0 19 11 3 1 0 0 18 8 0 0 42 20

Undergraduate

Admissions/Transfers

Undergraduate Admission to the College of Engineering

Students applying for admission into the engineering college that have received unconditional admission to Iowa State University are automatically admitted into the college.

Undergraduate Admission to an Engineering Department

New students that have been admitted into the engineering college can also be admitted to the department of their choice. Alternatively, these students can be admitted into as undeclared engineering students until they find the major that is the right fit for them.

However, before enrolling in the professional courses (200-level and above) offered by engineering departments they must:

1. Complete the basic program with a grade point average of 2.00 or better in the basic program courses.
2. Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or better for all courses taken at Iowa State University.

The College of Engineering requires a grade of C or better for any transfer credit course that is applied to the basic program.

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

For the purpose of applying to Iowa State, English may be considered your native language if you have been raised in an environment where English is the only official language of your locality and nation, and English has been the primary language used in your home. Applicants whose native language is not English must meet an English proficiency requirement. They may do so in one of the following ways:

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL): A score of 71 on the Internet-Based Test (IBT) or 530 on the Paper-Based Test (PBT) is required. Official scores should be reported directly to Iowa State University by the testing agency. Iowa State's reporting code is 6306. (Photocopies are not accepted.)

International English Language Testing System (IELTS): An overall band score of 6.0 with no sub score below 5.5 is required. Scores should be sent directly to the Office of Admissions by the testing center where you took the IELTS. (Photocopies are not accepted.)

SAT I Critical Reading/ACT-English: A minimum score of 420 on the Verbal Section of the SAT I or an ACT English sub score of 16 (same for engineering applicants). Scores should be reported directly to Iowa State University by the testing agency. (Photocopies are not accepted.)

If a TOEFL score is too low, a student may wish to consider applying to Iowa State's full-time Intensive English and Orientation Program (IEOP) to improve their English proficiency. They may retake the TOEFL as many times as they would like. While ISU encourages students to take the TOEFL before coming to campus, they do not have to meet the minimum score to be offered admission. ISU does offer conditional admission to otherwise well-qualified applicants. Students would be invited to take our Institutional TOEFL the week before classes begin. If they achieve the required score, they would begin their academic program immediately. If they did not meet the minimum, they would be automatically admitted to the IEOP at Iowa State, and academic study delayed until the minimum requirement was met.



Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

Nonresidents of Iowa, including international students, may be held to higher academic standards, but must meet at least the same requirements as resident applicants.

Residency Requirements

In determining resident or nonresident classification, the issue is essentially one of why the person is in the state of Iowa. If the person is in the state primarily for educational purposes, that person will be considered a nonresident. For example, it may be possible that an individual could qualify as a resident of Iowa for such purposes as voting, or holding an Iowa Driver's license, and not meet the residency requirements as established by the Board of Regents for admission, tuition, and fee purposes.

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

Applicants must submit an application for admission, and the appropriate application fee (see www.admissions.iastate.edu for current application fee information). Applicants must also request that each college they have attended send an official transcript of record to the Office of Admissions. Failure to provide transcripts from all colleges or universities attended may result in denial of the application or dismissal from the university. If less than 24 semester hours of graded transferable college credit is completed prior to entry at Iowa State University, applicants must also request that their official high school transcript and ACT or SAT scores be sent to the Office of Admissions. Other transfer applicants are encouraged to provide high school academic information. Students who do not do so may be asked to take course placement examinations during orientation.

U.S. citizen and immigrant applicants who have not graduated from an approved U.S. high school and whose primary language is not English must meet the university's English communication requirement. This can be accomplished by achieving satisfactory scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or the SAT. Contact the Office of Admissions for minimum score requirements for each examination.

A. Transfer applicants with a minimum of 24 semester hours of graded transferable credit from regionally accredited colleges or universities, who have achieved for all college work previously attempted the grade point average required by Iowa State for specific programs, will be admitted. A 2.00 grade point average (on a 4.00 grading scale) is the minimum transfer grade point average requirement. Some programs may require a transfer grade point average higher than this minimum. Higher academic standards may be required of students who are not residents of Iowa, including international students.

Applicants who have not maintained the grade point average required by Iowa State University for specific programs or who are under academic suspension from the last college attended generally will be denied admission.

B. In addition to meeting the minimum transfer grade point average requirement described above, applicants who have completed fewer than 24 semester hours of graded transferable college credit prior to their enrollment at Iowa State must also meet the admission requirements for students entering directly from high school.

C. Transfer applicants under disciplinary suspension will not be considered for admission until information concerning the reason for the suspension has been received from the college assigning the suspension. Applicants granted admission under these circumstances will be admitted on probation.

D. Transfer applicants from colleges and universities not regionally accredited will be considered for admission on an individual basis, taking into account all available academic information.

Number of Transfer Students from:

A two-year community junior college where they were full-time students: 261
A four-year college or university where they were full-time students: 87

Undergraduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): In-State / Out-of-State

Undergraduate Group 1 Undergraduate Group 2
Tuition & Fees: $8,435 $21,799
Room & Board: $8,356 $8,356
Books & Supplies: $995 $1,040
Other Expenses:
Estimated avg. course load per term: 12 9
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Special Programs or Fee Structures

Other expenses included in Tuition & Fees columns include an Activity, Services, Building, & Recreation Fee ($659.40/yr), Health Facility Fee ($16.00/yr), Health Fee ($216.00/yr); and Technology Fee- $446.00/yr for Engineering students (most students incur a Technology fee of $230.00/yr). Undergraduate and Graduate international students incur the same fee schedule as Out-of-State students plus an additional $500/yr in Tuition.

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

Additional Financial Aid Information

Eligibility for financial aid is determined by the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Students can apply online at www.fafsa.ed.gov beginning October 1 for the coming academic year. Students should submit the FAFSA before December 1 to receive consideration for most grants and scholarships. A new application must be completed each academic year.

The priority deadline for financial aid is December 1. Priority financial aid is awarded to eligible students who complete the FAFSA prior to December 1 each year. Students who apply after this date will be considered for the Federal Pell Grant and student loans. New students enrolling spring semester or summer session should complete the current year’s aid application to apply for any available financial aid. To be eligible for most financial aid programs, a student must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, enrolled at least half-time, and making satisfactory academic progress toward a degree.

Students may use their financial aid for study in other countries if they have clearance for the transfer of credit to their degree programs and have made financial aid arrangements prior to departure. For further information, contact the Study Abroad Center, 3224 Memorial Union, or the Office of Student Financial Aid, 0210 Beardshear Hall.

There are three general types of financial aid programs: gift aid(scholarships and grants), loans, and part-time employment. Laws, regulations, and policies governing these programs are subject to change.

Undergraduate

New Applicants

New Undergraduate Applicants

A. Number of undergraduate applicants to the engineering college: 5,458
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 5,113
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 2,189
Percentage of entering students (excluding transfer students) ranked in the top quarter (25%) of their high schools: 64%

Newly Enrolled Test Scores

Scores Reflect 75th to 25th percentile

SAT 75th 25th
Math Range: 690 580
Reading Range: 630 490
Writing Range:
Combined Range: 1360 1160
ACT 75th 25th
Math Range: 30 26
Composite Range: 30 25

Undergraduate

Enrollments by Class

Undergraduate Engr. Programs Fresh
1st Year
Soph
2nd Year
Junior
3rd Year
Senior
4th/5th Year
Full Time Total Part Time Total
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.) 271 178 157 251 857 26
Agricultural Engineering (B.S.) 52 70 41 47 210 17
Biological Systems Engineering (B.S) 17 31 21 36 105 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 195 167 151 251 764 43
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 137 167 162 230 696 57
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 267 153 126 215 761 45
Construction Engineering (B.S.) 49 72 73 99 293 22
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 135 128 124 204 591 37
Industrial Engineering (B.S.) 76 132 125 181 514 29
Materials Engineering (B.S.) 33 68 65 97 263 14
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 480 495 445 641 2061 124
Multiple Curricula/Majors (B.S.) 359 69 10 0 438 9
Software Engineering (B.S.) 129 141 138 128 536 29
Totals: 2200 1871 1638 2380 8089 452

Freshmen

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.)
Men 14 0 9 0 10 0 0 0 12 0 7 1 1 0 185 1 5 0 243 2
Women 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 3 1 0 0 19 0 1 0 28 1
Agricultural Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 6 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 34 1 1 0 45 1
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 7 0
Biological Systems Engineering (B.S)
Men 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 7 0
Women 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 10 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 19 0 4 0 7 0 0 0 5 0 4 0 0 0 102 1 2 0 143 1
Women 4 0 5 0 4 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 35 0 2 0 52 1
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 9 0 3 0 5 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 88 2 4 0 111 4
Women 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 20 1 0 0 26 1
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 24 0 19 0 12 0 0 0 21 1 4 1 0 0 164 4 5 0 249 6
Women 6 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 0 0 5 0 1 0 18 1
Construction Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 1 1 0 43 1
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 1 0 6 1
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 28 0 3 0 9 1 0 0 5 0 3 1 0 0 76 3 0 0 124 5
Women 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 11 0
Industrial Engineering (B.S.)
Men 11 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 4 0 0 0 31 1 2 0 54 1
Women 5 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 22 0
Materials Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 1 0 27 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 6 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 59 0 16 0 26 1 1 0 20 0 8 1 0 0 297 6 9 0 436 8
Women 4 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 31 1 1 0 44 1
Multiple Curricula/Majors (B.S.)
Men 8 0 18 0 11 0 1 0 10 0 3 1 0 0 230 3 7 1 288 5
Women 3 0 4 0 4 1 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 52 0 4 1 71 2
Software Engineering (B.S.)
Men 13 0 3 0 9 0 0 0 8 0 2 0 0 0 70 2 3 0 108 2
Women 2 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 10 0 1 0 21 0
Totals: 223 0 109 0 114 6 3 0 102 1 47 9 1 0 1548 27 53 2 2200 45

Sophomores

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.)
Men 6 0 7 0 9 0 0 0 9 0 10 0 0 0 116 1 2 0 159 1
Women 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 14 0 1 0 19 1
Agricultural Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 59 4 0 0 62 4
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 8 1
Biological Systems Engineering (B.S)
Men 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 11 0 1 0 15 0
Women 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 1 0 16 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 19 0 10 0 6 0 0 0 9 0 3 0 1 0 75 1 3 0 126 1
Women 5 0 2 0 6 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 0 0 22 0 0 0 41 0
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 18 0 7 1 3 1 0 0 4 0 3 0 1 0 90 3 4 1 130 6
Women 5 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 24 0 1 0 37 0
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 16 0 9 0 6 2 0 0 12 0 1 0 0 0 94 7 4 0 142 9
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 5 0 0 0 11 0
Construction Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 4 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 52 4 1 0 62 5
Women 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 10 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 27 0 6 0 2 0 0 0 4 0 3 0 0 0 67 3 2 0 111 3
Women 6 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 17 1
Industrial Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 4 0 5 0 0 0 3 0 4 0 0 0 72 0 3 0 93 0
Women 6 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 30 0 1 0 39 0
Materials Engineering (B.S.)
Men 6 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 39 0 1 0 51 0
Women 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 17 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 57 0 33 1 14 1 2 0 9 0 5 0 1 0 321 5 4 0 446 7
Women 2 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 37 1 2 0 49 1
Multiple Curricula/Majors (B.S.)
Men 0 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 49 1 2 0 56 2
Women 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 13 0
Software Engineering (B.S.)
Men 10 0 7 0 7 0 1 0 9 0 2 0 0 0 85 2 3 1 124 3
Women 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 9 1 2 1 17 2
Totals: 196 0 111 4 75 4 5 0 80 0 37 1 5 0 1324 34 38 4 1871 47

Juniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.)
Men 11 0 8 1 5 1 0 0 6 0 1 0 0 0 111 0 1 0 143 2
Women 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 1 0 0 14 1
Agricultural Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 29 6 0 0 29 6
Women 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 12 0
Biological Systems Engineering (B.S)
Men 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 12 0
Women 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 9 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 20 0 6 0 1 0 1 0 4 0 6 0 0 0 60 2 2 0 100 2
Women 11 1 2 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 31 2 2 0 51 5
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 21 0 9 0 7 0 0 0 2 0 2 2 0 0 93 7 2 0 136 9
Women 6 0 2 0 4 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 10 2 1 0 26 2
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 8 0 8 0 2 0 0 0 8 0 2 0 0 0 83 3 2 0 113 3
Women 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 1 0 13 0
Construction Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 5 0 5 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 49 4 1 0 64 5
Women 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 9 1
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 36 0 7 1 6 0 0 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 56 6 1 0 112 7
Women 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 12 0
Industrial Engineering (B.S.)
Men 7 0 10 0 5 1 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 63 6 0 0 88 7
Women 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 29 2 2 1 37 3
Materials Engineering (B.S.)
Men 7 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 0 0 0 53 0
Women 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 1 0 12 1
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 41 1 23 1 13 0 0 0 8 1 6 1 0 0 308 19 6 1 405 24
Women 3 0 1 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 30 1 2 0 40 2
Multiple Curricula/Majors (B.S.)
Men 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 8 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Software Engineering (B.S.)
Men 10 0 5 1 5 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 97 8 5 0 126 9
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 8 0 1 0 12 1
Totals: 200 2 98 4 63 6 3 0 47 2 28 3 0 0 1168 71 31 2 1638 90

Seniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.)
Men 10 0 14 1 6 2 1 0 6 1 7 0 0 0 172 8 5 1 221 13
Women 5 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 1 0 17 1 2 0 30 5
Agricultural Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 5 0 0 39 5
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 8 0
Biological Systems Engineering (B.S)
Men 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 17 0
Women 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 0 0 0 19 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 22 3 7 0 4 1 0 0 13 1 8 0 0 0 121 16 1 3 176 24
Women 13 1 1 1 4 0 0 0 5 1 3 0 0 0 45 6 4 0 75 9
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 28 5 7 2 8 1 0 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 135 14 1 0 185 22
Women 6 2 1 0 2 0 0 0 4 0 1 1 0 0 30 10 1 0 45 13
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 13 6 11 0 7 1 0 0 8 1 6 3 0 0 149 12 4 1 198 24
Women 6 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 8 1 0 0 17 2
Construction Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 4 0 4 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 69 7 1 0 84 8
Women 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 0 0 0 15 1
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 37 5 13 0 14 2 0 0 8 0 5 0 1 0 104 12 2 0 184 19
Women 11 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 20 2
Industrial Engineering (B.S.)
Men 7 1 5 0 3 2 0 0 7 0 1 0 0 0 93 10 4 0 120 13
Women 6 3 2 0 7 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 40 2 3 0 61 5
Materials Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 4 3 2 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 61 5 2 1 74 9
Women 1 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 19 0 0 0 23 3
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 68 10 29 3 25 3 1 0 11 2 7 1 1 1 421 52 10 1 573 73
Women 3 0 6 0 3 0 1 0 3 0 3 1 0 0 47 7 2 0 68 8
Multiple Curricula/Majors (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Software Engineering (B.S.)
Men 6 1 6 0 3 1 1 0 7 0 4 0 1 0 87 8 3 0 118 10
Women 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 5 2 0 0 10 2
Totals: 258 41 121 12 99 15 4 0 86 9 55 7 6 1 1706 178 45 7 2380 270

Undergraduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.) 5 2 9 0 7 1 0 92 1 117 106 11
Agricultural Engineering (B.S.) 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 36 0 41 36 5
Biological Systems Engineering (B.S) 0 3 3 0 1 1 0 8 0 16 6 10
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 31 12 0 0 7 2 0 105 2 159 105 54
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 27 7 7 1 1 0 2 110 2 157 129 28
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 9 4 4 0 0 0 0 76 1 94 84 10
Construction Engineering (B.S.) 2 3 2 0 0 0 0 50 1 58 48 10
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 34 2 4 0 0 6 0 60 2 108 98 10
Industrial Engineering (B.S.) 9 4 5 0 3 2 0 86 0 109 82 27
Materials Engineering (B.S.) 10 2 3 0 2 0 1 29 3 50 46 4
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 41 11 11 1 9 5 0 272 8 358 323 35
Multiple Curricula/Majors (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Software Engineering (B.S.) 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 44 2 48 44 4
Totals: 169 52 51 2 30 18 3 968 22 1315 1107 208

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.) 5 0 1 1 7 2 0 0 6 1 1 0 0 0 86 6 0 1 117
Agricultural Engineering (B.S.) 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 32 4 0 0 41
Biological Systems Engineering (B.S) 0 0 3 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 7 0 0 16
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 18 13 6 6 0 0 0 0 4 3 0 2 0 0 75 30 2 0 159
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 22 5 6 1 5 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 93 17 0 2 157
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 8 1 4 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 68 8 1 0 94
Construction Engineering (B.S.) 0 2 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 42 8 1 0 58
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 31 3 2 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 55 5 1 1 108
Industrial Engineering (B.S.) 9 0 4 0 4 1 0 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 61 25 0 0 109
Materials Engineering (B.S.) 10 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 25 4 3 0 50
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 38 3 11 0 9 2 1 0 9 0 4 1 0 0 244 28 7 1 358
Multiple Curricula/Majors (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Software Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 40 4 2 0 48
Totals: 142 27 44 8 40 11 2 0 23 7 14 4 3 0 822 146 17 5 1315

Undergraduate

Dual Degrees

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

Several engineering programs offer the opportunity for well-qualified undergraduate juniors and seniors to pursue a graduate degree in their program while finishing the undergraduate requirements. The programs offering concurrent undergraduate/graduate degrees are: aerospace engineering, agricultural engineering, biological systems engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computer engineering, construction engineering, electrical engineering, industrial engineering, materials engineering, and mechanical engineering.

Programs offering concurrent bachelor of science/master of business administration degrees are: agricultural engineering, civil engineering, computer engineering, electrical engineering, industrial engineering and mechanical engineering. For more information, refer to the graduate study sections for each engineering program. Advanced work in engineering is offered in the post-graduate programs.

For more information on all concurrent programs, please visit http://www.engineering.iastate.edu/prospective/engineering-degree-programs/.

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degrees Awarded

20

Undergraduate

Program Comparisons

  • ABET - Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
  • CEAB - Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board
Degree Program ABET/CEAB Accred. Nominal Program Length
(yrs.)
Average Program Length
(yrs.)
Time: Day/Even./
Both
Co-op: None/Opt./
Required
Grads in Co-op Progs.
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.50 Both Optional
Agricultural Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.50 Both Optional
Biological Systems Engineering (B.S) yes 4.00 4.50 Both Optional
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.30 Both Optional
Civil Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.30 Both Optional
Computer Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.50 Both Optional
Construction Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.60 Both Optional
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.20 Both Optional
Industrial Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.60 Both Optional
Materials Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.40 Both Optional
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.50 Both Optional
Multiple Curricula/Majors (B.S.) no 4.00 4.60 Both Optional
Software Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.60 Both Optional

Graduate

Admissions Information

Graduate Admission to the College of Engineering

All degree-seeking graduate students must have graduated with a bachelor’s or master’s degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution or from a recognized foreign institution where the requirements for the bachelor’s degree or its equivalent are similar to those at ISU. Additionally, each applicant must be accepted at ISU by the major program, the Office of Admissions, and the Graduate College. For information concerning graduate study in a particular academic discipline, prospective students should correspond with the chair of the major program in which they wish to study.

In the College of Engineering, there are 8 graduate engineering departments as well as 14 interdepartmental programs with engineering participation and admission recommendations are made by the individual departments. See ISU Graduate College web site for more information (www.grad-college.iastate.edu).

Graduate Admission to an Engineering Department

Varies by department. To receive information related to your research interest, please visit http://www.engineering.iastate.edu/grad/ and complete the Graduate Information Request form. At this site, also find links to each of the 8 college engineering departments and 14 interdepartmental programs with engineering participation.

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

Applicants whose native language is not English and who have not earned a bachelor's or master's in a country where the only official language is English are required to submit Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores as part of their application for admission. A minimum score of at least 550 on the Paper Based Test (PBT) or 79 on the internet Based Test (iBT) test is required for admission to the Graduate College. International students may also submit IELTS (International English Language Testing System) scores in lieu of the TOEFL. The ISU Graduate College minimum is 6.5. Because some programs require higher scores, applicants should check directly with the program to which they desire admission. Graduate students whose native language is not English and who do not have an undergraduate degree from Iowa State University or another US institution must also take the English Placement Test at the beginning of their first semester of enrollment. Students who do not pass this examination are assigned to one or more courses in the English 101 series. This coursework must be completed during the first year of study. Admission requirements/forms can be accessed at the following website: http://www.admissions.iastate.edu/apply/index.php?type=intl_grad.

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

For degree-seeking students, if a bachelor's degree was received from other than ISU, the applicant will need to 1) submit official transcripts of grades and credits earned from each institution attended and 2) have the institution that granted the undergraduate baccalaureate degree provide a statement of the degree received.

Residency Requirements

State of Iowa students with graduate assistantships: 1) 1/4 time or more for three months (six weeks in the summer) or more are assessed Iowa resident tuition and may earn a tuition scholarship; 2) 1/4 time or more for more than five class days but less than three months (six weeks in the summer) are assessed tuition by the credit hour and are not eligible for a tuition scholarship. Nonresident students (non-Iowa students and nonresident aliens) with graduate assistantships 1/4 time or more for three months (six weeks in the summer) 1) retain their nonresidency classification, 2) are assessed resident tuition as long as the graduate assistantship is continued, and 3) may earn a tuition scholarship. Nonresident students 1/4 time or more for more than five class days but less than three months (six weeks in the summer) 1) retain their nonresidency classification, 2) are assessed tuition by the credit hour, and 3) are not eligible for a tuition scholarship. The nonresident spouse of a graduate assistant (on appointment for three months or more) is eligible for resident tuition during the period of the assistantship appointment. State of Iowa residency is not granted, but a waiver of nonresident tuition is permitted each semester the appointment is in effect and ends when the appointment is finished. Graduate students receiving fellowships that provide for payment of tuition and/or fees are assessed the full-time rate in accordance with their residency status. Assistantship support provided to such students is considered to be supplemental income, so fee reduction and the tuition scholarship normally associated with assistantship support do not apply. Graduate students appointed as instructors, research associates, postdoctoral research associates, or assistant professors are approved by the Office of the Registrar for state of Iowa residency and pay full-time resident tuition according to the number of credit hours taken. Spouses of students holding any of these appointments are also approved for state of Iowa residency and pay the same full-time resident tuition. Nonresident students (non-Iowa and nonresident aliens) with the above appointments and their spouses have the nonresident portion of their tuition waived only while the appointment is in effect. State of Iowa residency is not granted as a result of the graduate appointment. State of Iowa residency is not granted as a result of a graduate assistantship appointment. The official determination of the student’s state of residency is made only in the Office of the Registrar.

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

At the discretion of the Program of Study (POS) committee, and with the approval of the program and the Graduate College, graduate credits earned as a graduate student at another institution or through a distance education program offered by another institution may be transferred if the grade was B or better. Such courses must have been acceptable toward an advanced degree at that institution and must have been taught by individuals having graduate faculty status at that institution. If a student wishes to transfer credits from graduate courses taken at or through another university as an undergraduate student, it is that student's responsibility to provide verification by letter from that institution that those graduate courses were not taken to satisfy undergraduate requirements for a degree. A transcript must accompany the POS in order to transfer credits. The POS committee may ask for other materials, such as a course outline or accreditation of the institution, to evaluate the course. Transfer courses not completed when the POS is submitted must be completed before the term in which the student graduates. A transcript must then be submitted for review and final approval. Research credits earned at another institution are generally not transferred. In rare circumstances, the transfer of S or P marks may be accepted for research credits only. It is the responsibility of the POS committee to obtain a letter from the responsible faculty member at the other institution stating that research credits recommended for transfer with S or P marks are considered to be worthy of a B grade or better. Audits may be listed on the program of study, but do not carry credit. Undergraduate-level courses are sometimes required of graduate students to make up deficiencies in undergraduate background. They appear on the POS form as Z courses. Such courses appear on transcripts and are included in the determination of the grade point average. These courses may not be taken on a P/NP basis.

Graduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): In-State / Out-of-State

Graduate Group 1 Graduate Group 2
Tuition & Fees: $11,107 $24,361
Room & Board: $8,607 $8,607
Books & Supplies: $994 $992
Other Expenses:
Estimated avg. course load per term: 12 9
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Special Programs or Fee Structures

Other expenses included in Tuition & Fees columns include an Activity, Services, Building, & Recreation Fee ($659.40/yr), Health Facility Fee ($16.00/yr), Health Fee ($216.00/yr); and Technology Fee- $446.00/yr for Engineering students (most students incur a Technology fee of $230.00/yr). Undergraduate and Graduate international students incur the same fee schedule as Out-of-State students plus an additional $500/yr in Tuition.

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

Additional Financial Aid Information

International students are required to complete the "ISU Financial Statement for Graduate Applicants" form. This form is located on this web page http://www.admissions.iastate.edu/apply/pdf/intl_finstate.pdf.

Graduate

New Applicants

New Graduate Applicants

A. Number of graduate applicants to the engineering college: 2,327
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 420
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 261

Graduate

Enrollments by Class

Master's

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.)
Men 19 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 21 0 0 0 45 0
Women 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 5 0
Agricultural and Biological Systems Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.)
Men 5 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 14 0
Women 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 9 0
Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Biorenewable Resources and Technology (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chemical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.)
Men 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 6 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Civil Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.)
Men 53 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 26 0 0 0 85 0
Women 17 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 23 0
Computer Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.)
Men 24 0 4 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 27 0 0 0 58 0
Women 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 16 0
Electrical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.)
Men 37 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 18 0 2 0 63 0
Women 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 15 0
Energy Systems Engineering (M.Eng.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Management (M.Eng.)
Men 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 24 0 0 0 26 0
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 0
Engineering Mechanics (M.S., M.Eng.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Environmental Science (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0
Human Computer Interaction (M.S.)
Men 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 16 0 0 0 22 0
Women 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 14 0
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (M.S., M. Eng.)
Men 25 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 30 0
Women 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 1 0 14 0
Information Assurance (M.S., M.Eng.)
Men 2 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 0 1 0 31 0 1 0 44 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 0
Materials Science and Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.)
Men 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 18 0
Women 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Mechanical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.)
Men 24 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 43 0 0 0 78 0
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 6 0
Neuroscience (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sustainable Agriculture (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Systems Engineering (M.Eng.)
Men 2 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 26 0 0 0 35 0
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 9 0
Toxicology (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Transportation (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 266 0 25 0 19 0 1 0 13 0 17 0 1 0 307 0 6 0 655 0

Doctoral

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 36 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 42 0
Women 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0
Agricultural and Biological Systems Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 15 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 24 0
Women 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 10 0
Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (Ph.D.)
Men 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Biorenewable Resources and Technology (Ph.D.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 23 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 35 0
Women 20 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 24 0
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 60 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 70 0
Women 21 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 23 0
Computer Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 31 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 40 0
Women 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 11 0
Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 96 0
Women 26 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 27 0
Engineering Mechanics (Ph.D.)
Men 12 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 17 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Environmental Science (Ph.D.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Human Computer Interaction (Ph.D.)
Men 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 6 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 18 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 22 0
Women 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 11 0
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 15 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 0 0 0 36 0
Women 7 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 16 0
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 82 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 30 0 0 0 118 0
Women 22 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 26 0
Neuroscience (Ph.D.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sustainable Agriculture (Ph.D.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Toxicology (Ph.D.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Wind Energy Science, Engineering and Policy (Ph.D.)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 7 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Totals: 513 0 5 0 9 0 2 0 8 0 14 0 0 0 130 0 1 0 682 0

Graduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Aerospace Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 4 0 0 0 1 1 0 5 0 11 10 1
Agricultural and Biological Systems Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 20 12 8
Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Biorenewable Resources and Technology (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0
Chemical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 7 4 3
Civil Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 35 0 1 0 2 0 1 23 1 63 46 17
Computer Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 1 26 22 4
Electrical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 24 2 0 0 2 1 0 4 0 33 27 6
Energy Systems Engineering (M.Eng.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Management (M.Eng.) 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 7 3 4
Engineering Mechanics (M.S., M.Eng.) 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 2 2
Environmental Science (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1
Human Computer Interaction (M.S.) 2 3 0 0 5 2 0 22 1 35 18 17
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (M.S., M. Eng.) 22 0 1 0 1 2 0 8 1 35 26 9
Information Assurance (M.S., M.Eng.) 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 10 0 14 13 1
Materials Science and Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 5 4 1
Mechanical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 16 1 1 0 1 1 0 19 0 39 34 5
Neuroscience (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sustainable Agriculture (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Systems Engineering (M.Eng.) 5 2 1 0 1 1 0 12 0 22 18 4
Toxicology (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Transportation (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 146 8 6 0 14 10 1 134 4 323 240 83

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Aerospace Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 11
Agricultural and Biological Systems Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 8 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 5 0 0 20
Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Biorenewable Resources and Technology (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Chemical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 7
Civil Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 24 11 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 18 5 1 0 63
Computer Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 12 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 1 26
Electrical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 18 6 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 33
Energy Systems Engineering (M.Eng.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Management (M.Eng.) 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 7
Engineering Mechanics (M.S., M.Eng.) 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4
Environmental Science (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
Human Computer Interaction (M.S.) 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 2 0 0 0 12 10 1 0 35
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (M.S., M. Eng.) 18 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 3 5 1 0 35
Information Assurance (M.S., M.Eng.) 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 10 0 0 0 14
Materials Science and Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 5
Mechanical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 16 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 16 3 0 0 39
Neuroscience (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sustainable Agriculture (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Systems Engineering (M.Eng.) 3 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 10 2 0 0 22
Toxicology (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Transportation (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 109 37 6 2 5 1 0 0 9 5 7 3 1 0 100 34 3 1 323

Master's Degree Programs

Master's Degree Program Degree Type
Master's w/ Thesis Master's w/o Thesis or with Proj./Report Program Totals
Aerospace Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 8 3 11
Agricultural and Biological Systems Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 20 0 20
Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (M.S.) 0 0 0
Biorenewable Resources and Technology (M.S.) 1 0 1
Chemical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 5 2 7
Civil Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 30 33 63
Computer Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 8 18 26
Electrical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 14 19 33
Energy Systems Engineering (M.Eng.) 0 0 0
Engineering Management (M.Eng.) 0 7 7
Engineering Mechanics (M.S., M.Eng.) 2 2 4
Environmental Science (M.S.) 1 0 1
Human Computer Interaction (M.S.) 1 34 35
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (M.S., M. Eng.) 25 10 35
Information Assurance (M.S., M.Eng.) 2 12 14
Materials Science and Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 4 1 5
Mechanical Engineering (M.S., M.Eng.) 20 19 39
Neuroscience (M.S.) 0 0 0
Sustainable Agriculture (M.S.) 0 0 0
Systems Engineering (M.Eng.) 0 22 22
Toxicology (M.S.) 0 0 0
Transportation (M.S.) 0 0 0
Totals: 141 182 323

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Aerospace Engineering (Ph.D.) 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 8 6 2
Agricultural and Biological Systems Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 5 2 3
Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0
Biorenewable Resources and Technology (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 4 2
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) 9 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 0 14 10 4
Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) 10 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 16 14 2
Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.) 15 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 13 4
Engineering Mechanics (Ph.D.) 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 0
Environmental Science (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Human Computer Interaction (Ph.D.) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 4 4 0
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 1
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 12 10 2
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) 10 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 12 7 5
Neuroscience (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sustainable Agriculture (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Toxicology (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Wind Energy Science, Engineering and Policy (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
Totals: 74 6 0 0 3 0 0 21 0 104 78 26

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Aerospace Engineering (Ph.D.) 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 8
Agricultural and Biological Systems Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 5
Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Biorenewable Resources and Technology (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) 7 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 14
Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) 9 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 16
Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.) 11 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17
Engineering Mechanics (Ph.D.) 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5
Environmental Science (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Human Computer Interaction (Ph.D.) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (Ph.D.) 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) 8 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 12
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) 6 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 12
Neuroscience (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sustainable Agriculture (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Toxicology (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Wind Energy Science, Engineering and Policy (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Totals: 56 18 5 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 16 5 0 0 104

Graduate

Research Expenditures

Expenditures by Research Department

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Engineering Department External Funding Source
Aerospace Engineering
Total#: 149 Foreign: $314,644 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $7,530,969 Industry: $1,516,817 Priv/Non: $149,681
State: $189,303 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $9,701,414
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
Total#: 249 Foreign: $15,365 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $6,317,494 Industry: $4,163,416 Priv/Non: $1,151,195
State: $1,161,411 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $12,808,881
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Chemical & Biological Engineering
Total#: 137 Foreign: $104,743 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $7,025,968 Industry: $1,814,582 Priv/Non: $206,411
State: $199,307 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $9,351,011
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Civil, Construction, & Environmental Engineering
Total#: 378 Foreign: $30,072 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $8,262,224 Industry: $1,286,282 Priv/Non: $848,736
State: $3,792,707 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $14,220,021
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Total#: 255 Foreign: $94,972 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $10,220,919 Industry: $1,778,302 Priv/Non: $879,204
State: $303,020 Local: $15,663 Total Expn.: $13,292,080
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering
Total#: 62 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $1,276,510 Industry: $273,981 Priv/Non: $365,074
State: $61,348 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $1,976,913
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Interdepartmental
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Materials Science and Engineering
Total#: 78 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $19,202,001 Industry: $866,162 Priv/Non: $72,960
State: $268,067 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $20,409,190
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Mechanical Engineering
Total#: 194 Foreign: $127,118 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $8,903,594 Industry: $2,741,772 Priv/Non: $37,879
State: $950,698 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $12,761,061
Totals:
Total#: 1502 Foreign: $686,914 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $68,739,679 Industry: $14,441,314 Priv/Non: $3,711,140
State: $6,925,861 Local: $15,663 Total Expn.: $94,520,571

Expenditures by Research Center

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Center/Lab External Funding Source
Ames Laboratory of the U.S. Dept. of Energy
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Analog & Mixed-Signal VLSI Design Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Asteroid Deflection Research Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Biobased Industry Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
BioCentury Research Farm
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Bioeconomy Institute
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Biopolymers & Biocomposites Research Team
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Bridge Engineering Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for e-Design
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Industrial Research & Service
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Nondestructive Evaluation
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Sustainable Environmental Technologies
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Critical Materials Institute
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Electric Power Research Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Industrial Assessment Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Information Assurance Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Institute for Transportation
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Iowa Space Grant Consortium
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Microelectronics Research Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
NSF Engineering Research Center for Biorenewable Chemicals
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Power Systems Engineering Research Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Virtual Reality Applications Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0


Grand Totals:
Total#: 1502 Foreign: $686,914 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $68,739,679 Industry: $14,441,314 Priv/Non: $3,711,140
State: $6,925,861 Local: $15,663 Total Expn.: $94,520,571

The following text was offered to each school as a guideline for the calculation of externally-funded research expenditures:

Include all expenditures associated with grants and contracts specifically budgeted for externally sponsored research and associated programs and expenditures associated with all gifts auditably used for research. Include expended funds provided by the following external sources:

  1. Federal Government
  2. State Government
  3. Foreign Governments
  4. Industry
  5. Non-Profit Organizations (e.g. foundations)
  6. Individuals
  7. Local Government

The expenditures reported should be only those funds provided by organizations, agencies, and individuals external to the institution. Cost sharing/matching funds should be included only if provided from sources external to the institution.

Only State government funds that were obtained competitively or as matching funds associated with other externally funded programs should be included. State funds that are part of the normal operating budget should not be included regardless of purpose.

For all joint or contracted projects or sub-projects, only the portion of the center research performed by faculty, staff, and students of the affiliated engineering school should be credited to that school. Expenditures for capital costs of research laboratory building construction should not be included.

Expenditures for research laboratory renovations should not be included unless the renovation funds expended came from grants and contracts expressly intended for the direct support of engineering research.

Any portion of academic year and/or summer salary for any researcher that is not derived from external research grants or contracts should not be counted.

Total #: Report total number of individual grants, not the total dollar amount of the expenditures.

Expenditures: Report actual expenditures (as opposed to authorization amounts) in U.S. dollars.

Time frame for expenditures: Report expenditures for your current fiscal year.

Research centers listed as "WITHIN an engineering department" on the Research Centers page (screen 7) of the College of Engineering Profile, will not have their expenditures added to the school's total research expenditures. Such expenditures can be included in the department total, while still being listed for the appropriate center. This allows users to list the expenditures in two areas without double-counting.

Graduate

Research Description

Research Description By Graduate Engineering Department

Aerospace Engineering

Department research is proceeding in nondestructive evaluation including structure health monitoring, ultrasonics, x-ray, eddy current, terahertz and infrared imaging, thermography, life cycle and damage evolution, and NDE of composite structures; aviation biofuels including biofuel storage and structural degradation and biofuel combustion; complex systems and optimization including multidisciplinary design optimization, control optimization, and complex systems; advanced materials systems including composite materials and layered structures, multi-scale multi-physics computational and experimental mechanics, micro- and nano-mechanics and manufacturing, morphing structures, and soft and flexible materials; aerodynamics and aero-structural interaction including wind engineering and wind energy, aircraft icing, aerodynamic efficiency, turbomachinery and rotorcraft, and computational and experimental fluid dynamics, turbulence simulation on high performance computing platforms, turbulence modeling, laminar-to-turbulent transition, large eddy simulation/detached eddy simulation; and guidance, navigation, controls, and astrodynamics including asteroid deflection, trajectory optimization, and aerospace guidance, controls, and navigation.

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

The department's research efforts are focused on the current and near future sustainability issues facing our nation and rest of the world in the 21st century related to natural resources (air, soil, and water), food supply (both safety and security), and energy security (biorenewables, biofuels, bioplastic, and bioproducts). Engineering science and technological solutions are being developed to manage crop and animal production systems that include areas such as water quality and air quality management, controlled environments for animals, animal manure/nutrient management, bioconversion of agricultural and industrial waste materials, grain quality and food processing, advanced agricultural machinery and manufacturing systems, machine automation and intelligence for precision agriculture, agricultural and food safety, and modeling of hydrologic systems. New research efforts are being directed increasingly towards biosystems engineering through invention and/or application of biosensors, biofuels and bioenergy, biomass harvest, storage, conversion, and bioplastics. Our mission-oriented research is driven by the ever expanding need for a safe food supply and for long-term sustainability of water, energy, and food systems in the world today.

Chemical & Biological Engineering

Research is proceeding in diverse areas and across multiple scales ranging in size from chemical plants down to the nanoscale. Topics include nanostructured advanced materials for fuel cells; new biomaterials for tissue engineering, drug/gene delivery systems, vaccines and biomedical imaging; development of new catalysts for value added products and fuels from biorenewable resources; improved separation techniques for biological products; analysis of plant metabolism; new enzymes for food processing; engineering of new polymeric materials and sensors; process control strategies; analysis and design of novel chemical reactors and energy conversion systems; fluid dynamics investigations of flow in chemical reactors; and analysis of microscopic-scale corrosion, etching and crystallization phenomena with the goal of improved control over these processes.

Civil, Construction, & Environmental Engineering

Research conducted within the CCEE department focuses on an overarching theme of sustainable infrastructure design, construction, monitoring, and rehabilitation. Transportation research addresses safety, efficiency and management of various transportation modes, with emphasis on remote sensing and GIS applications. Structures research has a long tradition of emphasis on bridge engineering issues, including applied health-monitoring technologies and strategies. Seismic and soil-structure interactions are also emphasized. New processes and systems for construction design-build and integrated delivery are also under investigation, covering enhanced scheduling for highway renewal, accelerated construction/reconstruction, as well as exploring high-performance, extended-durability innovations. Advanced foundation systems are being studied in the geotechnical/materials area for bridges, pavements, and buildings, coupling cutting-edge geo-construction systems with intelligent construction methods. Portland cement and asphalt concrete research areas include methods to improve the quality, performance, durability, and environmental suitability of pavements and runways. Environmental research focuses on water, waste, and residuals management, recovery of beneficial byproducts, anaerobic biological process, optimized nutrient removal methods, and watershed modeling.

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Department research is broadly categorized into five areas.

Cyber Infrastructure research interests include multi-core architectures; embedded systems; high-speed processors and memory systems; optical networking; wireless, sensor, and ad-hoc networks; and reconfigurable computing. Additionally, this area involves research on intrusion detection, denial of service attacks, network forensics, reliable networking, attack-tolerant networks, and fault-tolerant systems, parallel and distributed computing, real-time and embedded systems, scientific computing, software engineering, and software security. Iowa State is a nationally recognized “Center of Excellence” in information assurance.

Energy Infrastructure research focuses on power system dynamics and control, voltage security, distribution systems, power economics, power electronics, and emerging “smart grid” and renewable energy applications, including wind energy and solar energy.
Bioengineering involves research in optical nanostructures for bioengineering, bioMEMS, biophotonics, biological image processing, bioinformatics, microfluidics, lab on a chip, and ultrasound technologies.

Materials, Devices and Circuits includes more specific research groups in the areas of microelectronics and photonics; electromagnetics, microwave, and nondestructive evaluation; and VLSI (both analog and digital). Researchers in these areas focus on biosensing, microwave remote sensing, optical communications, thin-film semiconductor and photonic bandgap devices, solar energy conversion, mixed signal VLSI design, and circuit testing.

Distributed Sensing and Decision Making research encompasses biomedical imaging, computer vision, control of complex dynamic systems, information and control theory, nanotechnology, wireless communications, and statistical signal processing.

The department plays an active role in various research centers and institutes including the Ames Laboratory, Analog and Mixed-Signal VLSI Design Center, Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, CyberInnovation Institute, Electric Power Research Center, Information Assurance Center, Information Infrastructure Institute, Power Systems Engineering Research Center, Microelectronics Research Center, and Virtual Reality Applications Center.

Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

The Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering has four major areas of concentration: operations research, information engineering, advanced manufacturing systems and ergonomics. Operations research is concerned with the development of quantitative models that can provide new insights into the behavior of complex systems, identify areas where significant improvements can be made in system performance, and provide a basis for effective decision making. Quantitative models include mathematical and computer models based on principles of simulation, optimization, probability, and statistics. Information engineering research is focused on enhancing the decision making process through knowledge discovery methods and information modeling that helps us understand how information is used within an enterprise. Faculty working in this area conduct research related to data mining, experimental design, decision theory, and statistical analysis. Advanced manufacturing systems research includes the investigation of new production methods for advanced products, studying process parameters of new processes, and understanding the interaction of processes in advanced manufacturing systems. Current IMSE efforts in this area include rapid manufacturing systems, advanced metrology and inspection, control and automation systems, and industrial energy efficiency. Ergonomics is the application of our understanding of the capabilities and limitations of human beings in the design of the workplace and consumer items. Current emphasis areas in IMSE include 1) physical ergonomics with a particular focus on spine biomechanics, prevention of low back injury and hand/wrist disorders such as tendinitis and carpal tunnel syndrome and 2) cognitive engineering with a focus on augmented human performance and human computer interaction. Systems Engineering as well as Engineering Management are interdisciplinary programs that are led and managed by IMSE. Systems Engineering enables engineers, regardless of undergraduate discipline, to develop the analytical abilities needed to design, evaluate, and build complex systems involving many components and demanding specifications, work across disciplinary boundaries as needed, and develops the management capabilities needed into today’s working environment. Engineering Management offers engineering perspectives to management in areas such as project management, production systems management, and technology management.

Interdepartmental

Interdisciplinary research and graduate study programs include bioinformatics and computational biology, biorenewable resources and technology, environmental science, human-computer interaction, information assurance, sustainable agriculture, systems engineering, toxicology, transportation, and wind energy. Bioinformatics and computational biology includes research in all major areas of computational molecular biology including genomics, structural genomics, functional genomics, and computational systems biology. Research in biorenewable resources and technology focuses on developing methods for converting renewable resources like corn, soybeans, switchgrass and poplars into biobased products of value. Environmental science includes research in the biological, chemical, and physical aspects of environmental systems and integrated analysis of these systems. Human computer interaction includes a variety of topics on how computers and their users are becoming better connected as a combined resource. In information assurance research projects are focused on intrusion detection, forensic analysis, applied cryptography, innovative methodologies for building secure systems, and policy and privacy issues in an electronic democracy. Sustainable agriculture is focused on the agroecological principles and social relations underlying sustainable farming and food systems. In systems engineering, some example research projects are decision-based system design via life-cycle modeling and simulation and risk reduction in complex system development. Toxicology includes a wide range of research areas including analytical chemistry, animal and avian protection, bioremediation, biotransformation of toxicants, cancer research, groundwater and aquatic risk, parasitology, and plant pathology. Research in transportation emphasizes the complex questions facing transportation systems today and interdisciplinary approaches to planning, operating, managing, and maintaining the next generation of transportation systems. Research in wind energy is focused on advances to make wind energy competitive with other energy sources by reducing capital costs, minimizing operation and maintenance costs, increasing output through efficiency and system design, and improving grid operation for wind energy.

Materials Science and Engineering

Current research in the department emphasizes a range of topics in processing-structure-property-performance relationships in materials for a variety of applications. Topics include ceramic powder synthesis and processing, glass synthesis and processing, metal powder production and consolidation, mechanical behavior of metals, ceramics and composites, magnetic materials, electronic materials, photonic materials, biomaterials, superconductors, nondestructive techniques for evaluating structure and properties of materials as well as corrosion, computational modeling of materials, solidification processing of metals, nanoscale characterization of polymers and hybrid materials, and rare earth metallurgy. Many of these projects are administered through various research centers on campus such as the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Ames Laboratory, the Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, and the Microelectronics Research Center.

Mechanical Engineering

The research and graduate programs of the mechanical engineering department produce graduates who are technical leaders and innovators. They make lasting and important discoveries that improve lives and livelihoods. Our programs are built on strong foundations in the fundamentals of thermal-fluid sciences, design and manufacturing, materials and mechanics, dynamic systems, and control. Our students, researchers and educators focus on important societal needs " energy, environment, national security, health care, and cyber infrastructure " in an interdisciplinary research climate. We collaborate with two dozen departments situated in all colleges on campus, 20 interdisciplinary research institutes and centers, and more than 150 organizations outside of Iowa State. Mechanical engineering faculty members lead major research enterprises such as the Bioeconomy Institute and the Virtual Reality Applications Center. With research supported by industry and governmental agencies, the department boasts internationally acclaimed programs in biological and nanoscale sciences, clean energy technologies, complex fluid systems, design and manufacturing innovation, and simulation and visualization. By any measure"patents, textbooks, awards, start-up companies, publications"the excellence of the department’s faculty and students is widely recognized throughout the national and international mechanical engineering community. Our programs are an important resource for the state and the nation. They are critical for the economic health, vitality and wellbeing of the State, the people of Iowa and beyond.

Research Description By Engineering Research Center

Ames Laboratory of the U.S. Dept. of Energy

The Ames Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science national laboratory devoted to "creating materials and energy solutions". Established in the 1940s with the successful development of the most efficient process to produce high-purity uranium metal for atomic energy, the Ames Lab now pursues a much broader portfolio that has given it international credibility and stature, notably in the area of rare earth science and technology. Responding to issues of national concern, the Lab’s scientists bring together expertise in chemistry, engineering, materials, mathematics and physics to solve large, challenging and complex problems. They are actively involved in innovative research, science education programs, the development of applied technologies, and the quick transfer of those technologies to industry. Uniquely integrated within a university environment, this national lab stimulates creative thought and encourages scientific discovery, providing solutions to critical problems and helping to inspire tomorrow’s scientific talent.

Analog & Mixed-Signal VLSI Design Center

Faculty members in the center focus on analog and mixed-signal VLSI design for biomedical, RF, microwave, fiber-optics, data conversion, testing layout, and other applications. The center's faculty bring extensive academic experience, broad industrial experience, and continued professional interactions into a center that relies heavily on industrial direction, interaction, and support.

Asteroid Deflection Research Center

The ADRC was established at Iowa State University in the Spring 2008 to coordinate and lead a research effort to address the complex engineering and science issues for mitigating the impact threats from hazardous asteroids or comets. It's specific mission goal is to develop the science, engineering, and technology needed to reliably deflect or disrupt those large asteroids or comets that could collide with Earth and cause a global climate change or the end of civilization.

Biobased Industry Center

Launched in 2008, the Biobased Industry Center (BIC) leverages the intellectual resources of interdisciplinary research and education programs to address critical business, infrastructure, supply chain, and policy issues facing the growing biobased economy.

To facilitate expansion of the biobased products industry, new investment, training, and analytical effort is needed. With the committed partnership of industry leaders, BIC has the depth and breadth of academic scholarship as well as the resources necessary to address these efforts thoroughly and successfully.

BioCentury Research Farm

The BioCentury Research Farm is the first-in-the-nation integrated research and demonstration facility dedicated to biomass production and processing. Biomass includes both lignocellulosic crops and grain. This facility presents a unique opportunity for industry collaboration. It will accelerate innovation and production capacity associated with biobased fuels, chemicals, and products. Collaborations for developing sustainable technologies will provide solutions that pave the way to meet national energy, economic, and environmental directives.

Bioeconomy Institute

The Bioeconomy Institute (BEI) is an outgrowth of the Bioeconomy Initiative -- a campuswide effort, launched in 2002, to investigate the use of biorenewable resources as sustainable feedstocks for producing chemicals, fuels, materials, and energy. Today, the BEI has over 160 faculty affiliated members who contribute to the Bioeconomy Initiative with over $60 million in cumulative sponsored research funding from industry and federal agencies ranging from the Department of Agriculture to the National Science Foundation.

Biopolymers & Biocomposites Research Team

The Biopolymers & Biocomposites Research Team (BBRT), established in 1995, promotes research in the development of biorenewable polymers from Midwest crops, encourages bioplastics in industry, and works towards new formulations and processing techniques. We work with plant-based oils, proteins, adhesives, and composites.

Our team is focused on four major research areas: biobased polymers, protein-based plastics, cellulosic-based composites, and design, characterization, and use of biopolymers and biocomposites. The team consists of world leaders in research and teaching in these areas.

Bridge Engineering Center

The Bridge Engineering Center at Iowa State University was established in 1988. The center’s mission is to conduct research on bridge technologies to help bridge designers/owners, particularly the Iowa Department of Transportation Office of Bridges and Structures, design, build, and maintain long-lasting bridges.

Center for e-Design

The Center for e-Design is a cooperative research center combining industry needs with academic resources to produce more efficient, effective, and collaborative electronic design processes and tools. Many high-tech companies and agencies face engineering challenges that limit the evolution of systems and products. The Center is committed to resolving these challenges through creative and innovative research. Center activities focus on fundamental research, research test beds, engineering education, and technology transfer. The Center for e-Design is a National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center.

Center for Industrial Research & Service

The Center for Industrial Research and Service (CIRAS) is a part of Iowa State University Extension and the College of Engineering. Outreach activities include university-industry educational seminars, industrial research, and one-on-one technical assistance for Iowa's businesses. CIRAS staff provide assistance in the areas of engineering, biobased products, management practices, government contracting, productivity, and quality systems.

Center for Nondestructive Evaluation

The Center for Nondestructive Evaluation (CNDE) develops noninvasive methods and instruments for assessing the integrity of structures and materials. The Center's mission is to pursue research that defines underlying principles of nondestructive evaluation technologies and to transfer those technologies to industry, promoting the integration of nondestructive evaluation with other disciplines so that a product's lifetime reliability is enhanced. Research areas include ultrasonic techniques, electromagnetic techniques (including microwave and terahertz), thermal techniques (including vibrothermography), radiographic techniques, magnetic techniques, dye penetrant techniques, signal processing, embedded sensors, probability of detection, and integration with structural health monitoring. NDE techniques are developed for flaw detection and characterization as well as material property characterization. Applications to all materials systems, metals, ceramics and composites are under investigation. This work is performed in collaboration with a large number of industrial and academic partners in the U.S. and, increasingly, abroad. CNDE's outputs include improved understanding of inspection physics, new inspection concepts, prototype instrumentation, simulation software and a variety of educational offerings. Among the latter are an emerging program in NDE distance education and the development of a web-based focal point for technical education in NDE under the support of NSF. The Center seeks other areas that can benefit from NDE applications, such as agricultural, animal science, and biomedical areas. CNDE is the site of one of NSF’S Industry/University Cooperative Research Centers, which conducts generic, pre-competitive research for about 20 industrial and government sponsors. The work of CNDE also includes major programs sponsored by AFRL (Quantitative Inspection Technology), and ARL (NDE of Multi-Utility Materials) and is closely coupled to that of the FAA sponsored Airworthiness Assurance Center of Excellence. CNDE is a center of the Institute for Physical Research and Technology, a network of research and technology-transfer centers and industrial-outreach programs at Iowa State University.

Center for Sustainable Environmental Technologies

Through its research, education and outreach programs, the Center for Sustainable Environmental Technologies (CSET) seeks to promote, develop, and demonstrate sustainable energy and environmental technologies, particularly those that address environmentally driven problems in energy utilization. The center especially concentrates on thermochemical technologies that convert carbonaceous solid fuels into heat, power, and liquid fuels. CSET organizes multidisciplinary teams of ISU faculty, staff, and students, as well as researchers from industry, national laboratories, and other universities to address problems in sustainable energy development. CSET is a center of the Institute for Physical Research and Technology, a network of research and technology transfer centers and industrial outreach programs at Iowa State University.

Critical Materials Institute

What is the Energy Innovation Hub for Critical Materials?
Created by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Energy Innovation Hub will operate under the name, the Critical Materials Institute (CMI). The CMI will be led by the DOE’s Ames Laboratory and bring together the expertise of four DOE national laboratories, seven universities and seven industry partners to eliminate materials criticality as an impediment to the commercialization of clean energy technologies for today and tomorrow.

What are “critical” and “near critical” materials?
Certain substances provide essential capabilities, such as light emission, magnetism or others, and when the supply of one of these substances is at risk, it becomes a “critical” material. The Department of Energy has identified five rare-earth materials " neodymium, europium, terbium, dysprosium and yttrium"as critical materials, materials essential for America’s transition to clean-energy technologies. The DOE has identified two additional elements, lithium and tellurium, as “near-critical” materials. These non-rare-earth materials play an indispensable role in emerging energy storage and battery technologies, such as hybrid and electric vehicles, wind turbines, and photovoltaic thin films.

Electric Power Research Center

This center promotes and expands research in electric power and energy-related fields of particular interest to faculty and to the twelve electric utilities who support EPRC through their membership fees. Primary goals include the maintenance of a strong electric power and energy program and the education of students at the BS, MS and Ph.D. levels to prepare them for employment in many different engineering roles in electric utilities and in supporting industries. Faculty must be aware of current issues of concern and identify topics for research that their students can pursue for their advanced degrees. The results influence the quality of teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels. They also provide a stronger link between basic theory and its application to engineering challenges in industry.

Industrial Assessment Center

This center provides energy audits to small and medium-sized manufacturing companies and recommends ways to reduce their energy consumption and become more profitable. ISU teams that include faculty, graduate students and undergraduate students visit the site, collect data, conduct analyses, and write reports for each company.

Information Assurance Center

In response to the growing concern about computer security, faculty from several departments created the Information Assurance Center (IAC) as a structure to provide a focal point for research and teaching in computer security. Through the leadership of the faculty, the IAC has grown into a national leader in computer security education and has one of the largest programs in the country. These achievements led to the designation of the IAC as a charter Center of Excellence in Information Assurance (COE) by the National Security Agency. The goal of the NSA COE initiative is "to reduce vulnerability in our National Information Infrastructure by promoting higher education in information assurance, and producing a growing number of professionals with IA expertise in various disciplines." The IAC is also home to the NSF I/U CRC Center for Information Protection, which has 2 other universities and over a dozen companies as members.
The center is an interdisciplinary activity, drawing faculty from both technology-based disciplines and from the liberal arts and sciences. Many of the security problems and solutions have social implications that require experience from political science, sociology, history, law, and business and rhetoric and professional communication. By bringing faculty members from these disciplines together, ISU will be able to respond to the needs of students and the priorities of funding agencies.

Institute for Transportation

This Institute is a focal point at ISU for efforts to promote transportation education, research and extension activities. It includes 8 centers and 4 programs that address various aspects of transportation infrastructure . Programs and activities at In Trans address policy, planning, design, construction, operations and maintenance aspects of transportation systems with a focus on surface transportation elements. Topic areas include earthworks, materials, pavements, bridges, traffic engineering, safety, applications of information systems, asset management, weather implications for transportation, remote sensing, knowledge transfer, and outreach. Efforts by researchers at In Trans and their partners relate to developing innovative methods, materials, strategies and technologies as well as codes, specifications, and standards, for improving transportation system durability, efficiency, reliability, safety and sustainability. In addition, a key focus is to enhance the educational experience and training of students in transportation-related fields. As a dedicated, independent, and multidisciplinary home for about 200 students, professional staff, and faculty, all interested in the study of transportation, In Trans serves a transportation learning community. In Trans is also home to the interdisciplinary Master’s degree in Transportation, an interdisciplinary degree with supporting academic programs in the Colleges of Engineering, Design, and Business.

Iowa Space Grant Consortium

The ISGC is part of the NASA National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program, authorized by Congress in 1987. The ISGC was formed in 1990 by the three Regents’ universities (Iowa State University, the University of Iowa, and the University of Northern Iowa) and now includes Drake University, as well as affiliates from government, industry and nonprofit organizations. The mission of the ISGC is to coordinate and improve Iowa’s future in aerospace science and technology and to stimulate aerospace research, education and outreach activities throughout the state. These goals are carried out through partnerships with the Consortium’s affiliates. The ISGC’s work is organized into the program categories of precollege, higher education, fellowships/scholarships, research infrastructure and informal education.

Microelectronics Research Center

The Microelectronics Research Center develops and characterizes advanced semiconductor materials devices and processing technology. The Center researches and develops new semiconducting materials and technology for the next generation of electronic and photonic devices, interacts with industry in the commercialization of these new technologies, and provides a state-of-the-art learning laboratory. The primary goal is to accomplish world-class research in a few carefully selected niche areas, including thin film electronic and optical devices. The primary emphasis is on electronic and optical materials and devices for photovoltaic conversion, photonic bandgap devices and sensors. These include fundamental studies of high-efficiency photovoltaic solar energy conversion materials, research on nanostructured electronic devices, intelligent plasma processing for advanced semiconductor manufacturing, and organic semiconductors and sensors. MRC is a center of the Institute for Physical Research and Technology, a network of research and technology-transfer centers and industrial-outreach programs at Iowa State University.

NSF Engineering Research Center for Biorenewable Chemicals

The NSF Engineering Research Center for Biorenewable Chemicals (CBiRC) will develop the fundamental knowledge and technology and the academic and industrial partnerships needed to provide a foundation for U.S. industrial chemical production to be transformed from a petroleum-based industry to a renewable resource-based industry. It will educate a workforce capable of enabling this transformation.

Power Systems Engineering Research Center

The Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC) draws on university capabilities to creatively address challenges related to the production, transportation, delivery, and end-use of electric energy. Under the banner of PSERC, multiple U.S. universities, including Iowa State University, are working collaboratively to investigate these topics. PSERC, originally an NSF sponsored Industry University Cooperative Research Center, has now "graduated" and is self-supporting through the membership fees of almost 40 companies. Key to the PSERC�s success is its collaborative nature, reflecting collaboration between and among researchers of different disciplines, researchers of different universities, and researchers and practitioners within industry. A number of faculty members at Iowa State University are involved in several research projects sponsored by PSERC.

Virtual Reality Applications Center

The Virtual Reality Application Center (VRAC) is an interdisciplinary research center focused on the rapidly expanding interface between humans and computers. The VRAC is administered by the Institute for Physical Research and Technology at Iowa State University. Our research centers around computer interfaces that integrate virtual environments, wireless networking, pervasive computing, and emerging user interface technologies to amplify the creativity and productivity of people. The VRAC is home of the C6, the world's highest resolution, completely immersive six-sided virtual reality room.

Graduate

Subject Areas of Research

Subject Areas

  • Advanced Machinery Engineering, Manufacturing Systems, and Operations Research
  • Advanced manufacturing
  • Advanced/Novel Materials Science and Engineering
  • Aerodynamics
  • Animal Production systems Engineering
  • Animal-Microbe Interactions
  • Autonomous systems and controls
  • Aviation Safety
  • Big Data Optimization
  • Bioenergy and Biomass Production, Processing, and Use
  • Bioinformatics and Computational Biology
  • Biorenewables and Biobased Products
  • Catalysis and Reaction Engineering
  • Combinatorial Experimentation
  • Computational Methods
  • Construction Engineering and Management
  • Cyber/Cyber-Physical Infrastructure and Security
  • Electric Power and Power Systems-related Fields
  • Energy Sciences and Sustainability
  • Environmental Resources
  • Environmental Sciences
  • Fluid Dynamics
  • Food Technologies and Food Safety
  • Genomics
  • Geographic Information System Technology
  • Guidance, Navigation, and Control
  • Health Care Technology and Biomedical Engineering
  • Human Computer Interaction
  • Human Factors Engineering
  • Information Engineering
  • Materials Design and Modeling
  • Mechanics
  • Mitigating Impact Threats from Hazardous Asteroids or Comets
  • Nanoscale Sciences
  • Nondestructive Evaluation
  • Operations research
  • Plant Biotechnology
  • Renewable Energy Technologies
  • Semiconductor Devices, Circuits, and Processing Technologies
  • Signal Processing
  • Simulation, Modeling, and Decision Science
  • Structural Engineering
  • Systems Theory
  • Transportation Infrastructure and Engineering
  • Virtual Reality Technology and Applications
  • Wind Energy and Wind Engineering

Graduate

Dual Degrees

Graduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

The Executive Engineer dual Master's Degree Program was developed in response to the needs of Iowa industry. This initiative combines the Master of Systems Engineering program of Iowa State University and the Executive Master of Business Administration program of the Henry B. Tippie School of Management of the University of Iowa. The program is 28 months long with one residency week each year, 10 eight-week long semesters, and a 10-day international travel experience. Students meet as a cohort group for two full days (Friday and Saturday) on alternate weekends during semesters." Sixty semester credits total are required for completion of the program.

Graduate

Student Appointments

Appointments by Department

Appointments - Number of Appointments
Stipend - Average Monthly Stipend

Department Fellowships TA RA Other Total Appts.
Aerospace Engineering
Appointments: 1 37 67 1 106
Stipends: $2,500 $1,950 $1,950 $1,950
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
Appointments: 1 11 52 0 64
Stipends: $2,500 $1,950 $1,950 $0
Chemical & Biological Engineering
Appointments: 1 11 45 0 57
Stipends: $2,500 $1,950 $1,950 $0
Civil, Construction, & Environmental Engineering
Appointments: 1 19 103 0 123
Stipends: $2,500 $1,950 $1,950 $0
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Appointments: 1 73 143 2 219
Stipends: $2,500 $1,950 $1,950 $1,950
Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering
Appointments: 1 27 31 1 60
Stipends: $2,500 $1,950 $1,950 $1,950
Interdepartmental
Appointments: 1 3 17 0 21
Stipends: $2,500 $1,950 $1,950 $0
Materials Science and Engineering
Appointments: 1 8 52 0 61
Stipends: $2,500 $1,950 $1,950 $0
Mechanical Engineering
Appointments: 1 71 109 1 182
Stipends: $2,500 $1,950 $1,950 $1,950
All Total Appointments 9 260 619 5 893