The University of New Mexico - 2016

Institution Information

Contact Information

Institution's Mailing Address

Institution Name: The University of New Mexico
Mailing Address: 1 University of New Mexico
City: Albuquerque
State: NM
Postal Code: 87131
Country: United States
Phone 505-277-0111
Fax:
Website: http://www.unm.edu/

Head of Institution

Robert Frank
President
Office of the President
The University of New Mexico
MSC 05 3300
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
Phone: 505-277-2626
Fax: 505-277-5965

Engineering College Inquiries

Charles Fleddermann
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
School of Engineering
The University of New Mexico
MSC 01 1140
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
Phone: 505-277-5521
Fax: 505-277-1422
cbf@unm.edu

Undergraduate Admission Inquiries

Charles Fleddermann
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
School of Engineering
The University of New Mexico
MSC 01 1140
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
Phone: 505-277-5521
Fax: 505-277-1422
cbf@unm.edu

Graduate Admission Inquiries

Charles Fleddermann
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
School of Engineering
The University of New Mexico
MSC 01 1140
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
Phone: 505-277-5521
Fax: 505-277-1422
cbf@unm.edu

Engineering Technology College Inquiries

Charles Fleddermann
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
School of Engineering
The University of New Mexico
MSC 01 1140
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
Phone: 505-277-5521
Fax: 505-277-1422
cbf@unm.edu

Engineering Technology Admission Inquiries

Charles Fleddermann
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
School of Engineering
The University of New Mexico
MSC 01 1140
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
Phone: 505-277-5521
Fax: 505-277-1422
cbf@unm.edu

Institution Information

General Information


Type of institution: PUBLIC
Academic Year: SEMESTERS
Setting of Main Engineering Campus URBAN

Main Campus Information

Is the main campus located in a city with a population greater than 100,000?: Yes
Name of this city, or if no, the name of the nearest city of any size?: Albuquerque
This city's population (approx.): 647,601
Distance from Main Campus: 0

Total Enrollment

Total Undergraduate enrollment: 19,598
Total Graduate enrollment: 5,284
Total Professional and other enrollment: 417

Non-Engineering Degree Granting Colleges

Business, Communications, Education, Fine arts, Law, Medicine, Natural sciences, Nursing, Pharmacy, Architecture & Planning, Arts & Sciences, Public Administration, Population Health

Institution Information

General Admissions

Entrance Requirements and Recommendations

Requirements

UNDERGRADUATE:
Admission Requirements for Fall 2016

(subject to change)

Freshmen applicants may be offered admission by meeting one of the following criteria:

Criterion I: Completion of the following 16 specific high school college preparatory units (two semesters of class work equals one year-long unit) with a minimum 2.5 GPA. The Admissions Office will calculate an admission GPA for each applicant.

Four units of English with at least one unit earned in the 11th or 12th grade in composition;*
Three units of social science (one of which must be U.S. History).
Four units of mathematics from the following list: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, Trigonometry, or higher mathematics;
Three units of natural science (two of which must be a laboratory science in Biology, Chemistry or Physics); and
Two units of a single language other than English;**
* To meet the composition requirement, any English course taken during the junior or senior year of high school in which 50% or more of the curriculum emphasized correct and clear composition will be accepted. Speech courses will not satisfy the composition requirement; however, up to two semesters of speech will be accepted in the remaining requisite English courses. While considered good augmentation to classic, liberal arts English, courses such as drama, journalism and yearbook will not be counted toward the four unit English requirement.

** Exemption from the freshmen admission requirement for two years of a language other than English will be approved under these conditions:

Applicants who speak a language other than English that is offered by the University of New Mexico will have the opportunity to test out on the basis of performance on a native speakers examination administered on campus by the University of New Mexico language department. This examination will be available on an ongoing basis during early registration periods to accommodate the University’s continuous admission policy.

Applicants who speak a language other than English will be eligible for exemption on the basis of certification of fluency in their native languages by an appropriate school or tribal official. Students must request consideration on the basis of testing or exemption by arranging to have certification of proficiency sent directly to the Office of Admissions.

Criterion II: A formula based on a composite ACT or a combined score using SAT Critical Reading/Verbal and Math sub-scores in combination with a high school grade point average, calculated by the Admissions Office. In general, the higher the standardized test score, the lower the required grade point average.

The College Board implemented a new SAT effective 2016. Scores for the 2016 version will be determined at a later date and will be concordant with current scores.

Criterion III: (A limited “Special Admissions” category) Students who do not qualify for admission under Criterion I or II may request “special consideration” through an appeal. A combination of quantitative and subjective factors is used in making these admissions decisions.


GRADUATE:
1. Bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university in the United States or its equivalent in another country. (See also: International Applicants Special Admission Process.)
2. Minimum of 12 sem hrs of upper division course work (300-level courses or higher) in the proposed major field or in cognate areas. Certain departments require more extensive or more specific preparation (consult individual graduate unit requirements).
3. Cumulative GPA of 3.0 (B) in last 2 undergraduate yrs and in major.
Exceptions to the above will be considered in special cases.

Recommendations

Although some academic units at the University of New Mexico will admit students with a bachelor’s degree directly into a doctoral program, most admit only students who have earned a master’s degree within the same or a different program at the University of New Mexico or at another accredited institution. Applicants must present satisfactory evidence of adequate preparation in their major field. (Consult individual departmental sections of the catalog for specific requirements.)

Application Process " Domestic and International Applicants

Transcripts, test scores and letters of recommendation submitted to the University of New Mexico for admission become the property of the University and will not be sent elsewhere or returned to the student.

The online application can be found at the Admissions Web site. A $50 non-refundable Application Fee is charged by credit card with the online application.

In addition, students must submit one official transcript (unopened) from each non-UNM academic institution previously attended to the UNM Office of Admissions (domestic) or to the UNM Global Education Office (international) by the academic unit’s published deadline.

NOTE: Do not list study abroad programs separately on the application form, if they are included as part of a transcript program from an accredited U.S. institution.

Materials required by the academic unit (letters of intent, writing samples, etc.) should be uploaded as part of the online application.

Application fee waivers are available under certain circumstances. Please see the Graduate Studies Web site for more information.

Engineering Information

Head of Engineering

Head of Engineering

Joseph Cecchi
Dean
School of Engineering
The University of New Mexico
MSC 01 1140
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
Phone: 505-277-5522
Fax: 505-277-1422
cecchi@unm.edu

Engineering Information

Engineering Degrees Offered

Types of Engineering Degrees

Bachelor's:B.S.
Master's:M.S. with thesis, M.S. without thesis, but with project or report, M.Eng., M.C.M.
Doctoral:Ph.D.

Computer Science Degrees Awarded Outside the College/School of Engineering

Engineering Information

Engineering Departments

Engineering Department(s) Degree Granting Level Department Chair Discipline
Chemical and Biological Engineering Both Abhaya Datye Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering Both Mahmoud Taha Civil Engineering
Computer Engineering Both Mihail Devetsikiotis Computer Engineering
Computer Science Both Darko Stefonovic Computer Science (inside engineering)
Electrical Engineering Both Mihail Devetsikiotis Electrical Engineering
Interdisciplinary Graduate Charles Fleddermann Other Engineering Disciplines
Note: Interdisciplinary Graduate programs in clude Biomedical Engineering, NanoScience and MicroSystems, and Optical Science and Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Both Yu-Lin Shen Mechanical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering Both Abhaya Datye Nuclear Engineering

Engineering Information

Research Centers

  • INCOLL - Research center WITHIN the college of engineering
  • INDEPT - Research center WITHIN an engineering department
  • INUNIV - Research center WITHIN university system
  • OUTUNIV - Research center OUTSIDE the university
Center/Lab Discipline Research Class Head Chair
Center for Advanced Research Computing Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Patrick Bridges
Center for Biomedical Engineering Chemical Engineering INCOLL Andrew Shreve
Center for Emerging Energy Technology Other Engineering Disciplines INCOLL Andrea Mammoli
Center for High Technology Materials Electrical/Computer Engineering INUNIV Arash Mafi
Center for Micro-Engineered Materials Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV
Center for Water and the Environment (CWE) Civil/Environmental Engineering INCOLL Kerry Howe
Configurable Space Microsystems Innovations & Applications Center (COSMIAC) Aerospace Engineering INCOLL Edl Schamiloglu
Dean's Office Programs Other Engineering Disciplines INCOLL Charles Fleddermann
Institute for Space Nuclear Power Studies Other Engineering Disciplines INCOLL Mohamed El-Genk
Manufacturing Engineering Program Mechanical Engineering INCOLL John Wood

Engineering Information

Degree Programs

Bachelor's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Chemical and Biological Engineering Chemical Engineering (B.S.) Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (B.S.) Civil Engineering
Civil Engineering Construction Management (B.S.) Civil Engineering
Civil Engineering Construction Engineering (B.S.) Civil Engineering
Computer Science Computer Science (B.S.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Electrical Engineering Computer Engineering (B.S.) Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering Electrical Engineering (B.S.) Electrical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) Mechanical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) Nuclear Engineering

Master's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Master's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Chemical and Biological Engineering Chemical Engineering (M.S.) Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering Construction Management (M.C.M.) Civil Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (M.S.) Civil Engineering
Computer Science Computer Science (M.S.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Electrical Engineering Computer Engineering (M.S.) Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering Electrical Engineering (M.S.) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Interdisciplinary Biomedical Engineering (M.S.) Biomedical Engineering
Interdisciplinary Optical Science and Engineering (M.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Interdisciplinary Nanoscience & Microsystems (M.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) Mechanical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Manufacturing Engineering (M.E.) Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Engineering (M.S.) Nuclear Engineering

Doctoral Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Doctoral Degree Program(s) Discipline
Chemical and Biological Engineering Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) Civil Engineering
Computer Science Computer Science (Ph.D.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Electrical Engineering Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) Computer Engineering
Electrical Engineering Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Interdisciplinary Biomedical Engineering (Ph.D.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Interdisciplinary Optical Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Interdisciplinary Nanoscience & Microsystems (Ph.D.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) Mechanical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Engineering (Ph.D.) Nuclear Engineering

Engineering Information

Areas of Expertise

Engineering Departments Areas of Expertise
Chemical and Biological Engineering
  1. Materials Science and Nanoscience
  2. New Energy Technologies
  3. Biomedical Engineering
Civil Engineering
  1. Highway and Transportation Engineering
  2. Structural Engineering and Mechanics
  3. Construction Engineering & Management
  4. Environmental Engineering
  5. Hydraulics and Water Resources Engineering
  6. Geotechnical Engineering and Pavement Management
Computer Engineering
  1. BioEngineering
  2. Computer Architecture & VLSI Design
  3. Computer Systems and Networks
  4. Computer Graphics, Vision, and Image Processing
  5. Information Systems
Computer Science
  1. Scalable Systems, Networks, and Distributed Computing and Distributed Algorithms
  2. Scientific Data Mining
  3. Automated Reasoning and Program Verification
  4. Adaptive Computation, Computer Immunology and Artificial Life
  5. Molecular Computing
  6. Computational Biology Computational Neuroscience
  7. Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning
  8. Robotics
  9. Cybersecurity
Electrical Engineering
  1. Applied Electromagnetics
  2. Microelectronics & Optoelectronics
  3. Bioengineering
  4. Signal Processing
  5. Systems and Controls
  6. Communications
  7. Power and Energy
  8. Image Processing
Interdisciplinary
  1. Nanomaterials
  2. Nanomedicine
  3. Materials for energy conversion
  4. Optical Science
  5. Photonics
  6. Imaging Science
  7. Biomaterials
  8. Bioanalytical Microsystems
  9. Molecular and Cellular Systems Engineering
  10. Quantum Optics
Mechanical Engineering
  1. Robotics
  2. Dynamic Systems and Controls
  3. Thermosciences
  4. Fluid Mechanics
  5. Computational Mechanics
  6. Solid Mechanics & Materials Science
  7. Nanoscience and Microsystems
Nuclear Engineering
  1. Nuclear Reactor Design
  2. Nuclear Reactor Safety
  3. Nuclear Instrumentation and Detection
  4. Radiation Transport Modeling and Simulation
  5. Space Nuclear Power and Nuclear Systems
  6. Medical Physics

Engineering Information

Societies

Honor Societies

National Groups

  • Chi Epsilon
  • Eta Kappa Nu
  • Kappa Mu Epsilon
  • Phi Beta Kappa
  • Pi Tau Sigma
  • Tau Beta Pi

Student Organizations

National Groups

  • ACM
  • Am. Indian Science and Eng. Soc.
  • Am. Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics
  • Am. Inst. of Chemical Engineers
  • Am. Nuclear Society
  • Am. Soc. of Civil Engineers
  • Assoc Gen Contractors of America
  • Assoc. for Energy Engineers
  • Biomedical Engineering Society
  • Chi Epsilon
  • Engineers without Borders
  • Eta Kappa Nu
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
  • National Society of Black Engineers
  • Pi Tau Sigma
  • Soc. of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Soc. of Physics Students
  • Society for Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science
  • Society of Women Engineers
  • Tau Beta Pi

Local Groups

  • Chinese Student Friendship Association
  • Computer Science Graduate Student Association
  • Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate Student Association
  • Formula Society of Automotive Engineers
  • Hispanic Engineering and Science Organization
  • India Student Association
  • Institute of Nuclear Materials Management
  • Interdisciplinary Film & Digital Media Program Association
  • Latinos in STEM - MAES
  • Nanoscience & Microsystems Graduate Student Association
  • Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science
  • UNM Robotics Club

Engineering Information

Support Programs

College's Under-Represented Student Groups

National Groups

  • American Indian Science and Engineering Society
  • National Society of Black Engineers
  • Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Society of Women Engineers

Local Groups

  • Hispanic Engineering and Science Organization
  • Latinos in STEM - MAES

Other Student Support Programs

Engineering Student Services student programs: Native Americans in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math in the School of Engineering (NASTEM), group and individual tutoring, Recruitment of First-Year, Freshman, and Transfer Students, Career Development seminars to School of Engineering students, Cooperative and Internship programs offered through industry partners, Women in Engineering Programs, and Activities, and School of Engineering Scholarship programs for qualified students.

Engineering Information

Student Projects

Student Design Projects Description

1) Chemical and Biological Engineering. Senior Chemical Engineering students have a two-semester design experience. The first semester (Fall) is a textbook-based course with individual and small team problems. The second semester includes material on process safety hazards and environmental issues, but the emphasis is on the capstone design projects. The capstone projects are open-ended semester-long projects that involve integration of a broad range of chemical engineering principles to address a chemical process or product design. Projects in the recent past have included the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Student Design Contest problem (e.g. gas-to-liquid conversion, ABE fermentation), problems from the WERC Environmental Design Contest (e.g., sulfate removal from groundwater, brackish water pretreatment), other petrochemical projects such as a fuel processor for fuel cell power station, and product design such as a transdermal drug delivery system.

2) Civil Engineering students are required to participate in a capstone design course. Student project teams design a comprehensive and creative civil engineering project, including economic and cost analyses. The projects are sponsored by different local and national engineering firms and involve real world projects that the firms have previously designed or are currently designing. Projects involve design skills from a variety of civil engineering disciplines.

2A) Civil Engineering students compete in the national bridge building and concrete canoe contests sponsored by the American Institute of Steel Construction and the American Society of Civil Engineers. Students design and build a steel bridge. Bridges are judged on their ability to support a load, weight, speed of assembly, and appearance. Students also design and build a lightweight concrete canoe that can be used in a canoe race.

2-B) Construction Engineering and Management students participate in the regional construction competition for the Associated Schools of Construction and the National Home Builder Associations. Students are given design documents for a construction project and twenty-four hours to complete the plans for the project. They design a production plan for this project which includes such items as: safety plan, production plan, site plan, budget or construction estimate, and schedule. A presentation is then made to the Board of Contractors. The winner can advance to the national competition held in association with the AGC annual convention.


2C) A combined Civil Engineering and Construction Management group of students collaborate with School of Architecture students in the National Design-Build Student Competition in which the teams are provided a building requirement and are then required to develop the design along with the budget and scheduling activities.


3) Computer Science: Seniors in CS are required to do a software design project in a team of 3-5 students. The topic of the project varies from semester to semester. Recent projects were done on a Gameboy Advance emulator, a web based photo book, a remote cluster management, computer electronic mail, transaction processing, conference management, file version control and bug tracking systems, adaptive malware detection, psychologically motivated machine learning. In addition, students do team projects in large-scale programming courses.

4. Electrical and Computer Engineering

1. Smart Surgical Instruments. Students: Hamilton, Alexander William; Nery, Steven J; Carlos, Corey. Sponsor and technical mentor: Christina Salas.

2. Automated Water Disinfection System. Students: Awungayi, Desmond; Westhoff, Talbot C. Sponsor: Rodney Herrington. Technical Mentor: Tim Cushman.

3. 3-D Metal Detector-Based Visualization System for Nasogastric Feeding. Students: Chavez, Andre M; ElShafiey, Ahmed Tarief; Machado, Jordy. Sponsor: Sang M. Han. Technical Mentors: Divya Prakash, Nicholas Brechtel.

4. LED Illuminator for Diabetes Studies. Students: Chen, WeyAnn; Brooks, Ryan. Sponsor and technical mentor: Fabiano Trigueiro Amorim.

5. Telemetry System for Transmission of Load Cell Data Liddle. Students: Benjamin, James; Rhoades, Aubyn D. Sponsor and technical mentor: Ann Gibson.

6. Portable System for Residual Lung Volume Submersion Measurements. Students: Harjes, Cameron D; Smith, Justin Keith. Sponsor: Ann Gibson, EE Technical mentor: Same as above

7. Solar Splash 1: Mobile Motorized Solar Tracking System. Students: Piro-Rael, Ricardo Miguel; Jafari, Naveed D; Castro, Devon J. Sponsor: Jane Lehr. Technical Mentors: Jason Neely and Joshua Stewart.

8. Solar Splash 2: Maximum Power Point Tracking Charge Controller. Students: Amezcua, Ursula M; Benfraj, Sayfallah. Sponsor: Jane Lehr. Technical Mentors: Jason Neely and Joshua Stewart.

9. Interactive Learning Software. Students: Graham, Joey P; Vacek, Ryan D. Sponsor: Tom Lee.Technical Mentor: Peter Martin.

10. High Functionality Mobile Apps for STEM. Students: Watters, Mitchell R; Tafoya, Johnathan Steven. Sponsor: Manel Martinez-Ramon. Technical Mentor: Eric Hamke.

11. Variable Resistor Logic Unit (VRLU)/Finite State Machine (FSM). Students: Dinh, Ryan; Swain, Derek Walter. Sponsoring organization: Honeywell. Sponsor: Kevin E. Baugh. Technical Mentor: Spencer Bell.

12. Modeling effects of ion implantation in semiconductors. Students: Tran, Coty; Wobbe, Briana Rose. Sponsor: Kevin E. Baughn. Technical Mentor: Daniel Ewing.

13. Modeling Metamaterials. Students: Cross, Aaron D; Rodgers, Casey. Sponsor: Kevin E. Baughn. Technical Mentor: Daniel Ewing.

14. Modeling of Electrodynamic Shakers. Students: Brown, Cody M; Holland, Abriel A. Sponsor: Kevin E. Baughn. Technical Mentor: Washington DeLima.

15. Augmented Reality. Students: Ngo, Duong; Lizewski, Jacob Edward; Thorpe, Adam J; Hidalgo, Alexandra Victoria. Sponsor: Kevin E. Baughn. Technical Mentor: Eric Cornwell.

16. Calibrated Voltage Pulse Box. Stuents: Beyale, Jeremiah; Collin, James Burt; Phan, Huyen. Sponsor: Kevin E. Baughn. Technical Mentor: Greg Hilgenkamp.

17. Data Acquisition (DAQ) System for Transducer-Equipped Toy. Students: Tabar, Joseph Serrano; Bolivar, Gerardo; Ma, Yanqiu. Sponsor: Kevin E. Baughn. Technical Mentor: Erik Timpson.

18: Integrated Spectrum Intelligent IoT Gateways. Students: Haway, Michael J. Noedel, Adam C; Rossetti, Leonardo S. Sponsor: Kamil Agi. Technical Mentor: Jorge Piovesan.

19: Computer-Controlled Precision Pressure Controller. Students: Post, Canon; Ronny Lanes Silviera. Sponsor: Ravi Jain. Technical Mentors: Mike Klopfer and B. Behzadi.

20. Automated Microheater for Glass Microspheres. Students: Canfield, David; Smith, Paula Colleen; Hirpo, Endeshaw. Sponsor: Mani Hossein-Zadeh. Technical Mentor: Behsan Behzadi.

21. Fast risetime pulse generating circuits for laser applications. Students: Johnson, Olivia; Pound-Espericueta, Jonathan M. Sponsor and Technical Mentor: Leanne J. Henry.

22. 3D-printed microstructured optical fiber preforms. Students: Tso, Jared E; Zapotocky, Christopher; Martin, Jacob Eli. Sponsor: Ravinder K. Jain. Technical Mentor: Behsan Behzadi.

23. Power electronics for solar-powered desalination. Students: Steimling, Edwin Clair; Trejo, Jose A; Pereira, Nestor. Sponsor and Technical Mentor: Laura Biedermann.

24. Multispectral Imaging System. Students: Rodriguez, Darren G; Trujillo, Nathaniel Anthony. Sponsor: Alonzo Vera. Technical Mentor: Jorge Piovesan.

5-A) Mechanical Engineering students participate in an international race car design competition. The Formula SAE competition involves designing a race car and includes the following elements: (a) formal design presentations, (b) construction of the design by the students, (c) safety analysis to assure the vehicles are safe for competition driving, (d) design, manufacturing and marketing presentations and dynamic competitions including noise, braking, and acceleration, skid pad and (e) an endurance race.

6. Nuclear Engineering: Design projects are required as part of a Capstone Design Class in the Senior year. Students in teams of 3 " 4 collaborate on different capstone design projects that have distinct design requirements, objectives, and education outcomes. Previous design projects have included Neutronic and Thermal-Hydraulic Assessment of Accident Tolerant Fuels and Cladding in Commercial Scale PWRs; Nuclear Powered 1.0 MWt Passively Operated Submersible Submarine; 30 MWt Passively Cooled, Solid Core Nuclear Power System for Commercial Seafaring Vessels; Boiling Water Modular Reactor (!00MWt); and Low Enrichment High Flux Reactor for Moly-99 Medical Isotope Production.

7. Optical Science and Engineering
A) Optical Science & Engineering (OSE) MS students following the “Thesis Option” are required to write a thesis, based on a project, and publicly defend it. The goal is to help students in developing the ability to actively engage in research in commercial, government and academic settings. The evaluation process by the thesis committee includes assessing the student’s level of comprehension in the core topics of electromagnetism, general optics, and a specialized topic related to optical science and engineering, as well as evaluating their ability to apply their knowledge to tackle real and practical challenges in optics/ photonics research and engineering. Below is a recent example of a thesis degree project.

a. Thesis title "Linear mode CMOS compatible p-n junction avalanche photodiode for smart-lighting applications"
Thesis advisor: Professor Majeed M. Hayat

Committee members:
Dr. Majeed M. Hayat
Dr. Steven R. J. Brueck
Dr. Payman Zarkesh-Ha
Dr. Mansoor Sheik-Bahae,


B) OSE MS students with “Internship Option” are required to work on a project outside the university (at industry or a national lab). The MS Internship option in OSE allows for private companies, national/federal laboratories, and their contractors to partner with UNM in OSE areas in mutually beneficial ways by means of either a first look at potential recruits or a more interactive career advancement of their current employees. A faculty member with whom the student takes a three research hour internship course (PHYC 559) oversees this project. The student is required to give an oral presentation on his/her internship project. The presentation is evaluated by the faculty member in charge. Below is an example of recent MS Internship Project degrees.

a. Thesis title: "Assessing Linear Regression for Predicting Coronal Holes"
Thesis Advisor: Sanjay Krishna

Committee members:
Sanjay Krishna
Marios Pattichis
Sudhakar Prasad
Charles Arge (AFRL)

8. Nano Science and Micro Systems

Course Objective. To provide the student direct experience in the process of innovating medical technologies.
Learning Outcome. Students will be conversant in all core elements of biodesign as practiced by a team com¬prised of a UNM Hospital physician, a UNM School of Engineering faculty member, and engineering students.
Course Description. "Biodesign" is a phrase widely used to describe a process by which an important clinical problem is identified, solved and translated to a ready-to-market product or process. As practiced in this course, biodesign begins with pairing a practicing physician with an engineering faculty member and several students. The initial task of each team is to learn from the medical doctor some area of their clinical practice plus various key problems in that area. The next task of the team is to generate an array of possible solutions to the problems posed. Under the guidance of the faculty leader or designated team facilitator, the resulting list of problems and potential solutions is winnowed to a single prime candidate for translation from idea, to lab prototype, to clinical product. The final product of each team is a presentation and a written proposal for subsequent research, development and prototyping work.
Competition. On the last day of class, each of the teams will present their results before a panel of judges. Also at this time, a 2-page funding pre-proposal will be submitted whose editor-in-chief is the SOE faculty team co-leader, and/or the HSC physician team co-leader. Students will be expected to participate in writing and/or editing some or all portions of the pre-proposal. The pre-proposal will be for up to $50,000 of bench-level research to be conducted the following semester Spring 2016. At the conclusion of the meeting, the panel of judges may elect to announce one or more winning teams. Winning teams, if any, will be invited to submit a full proposal to the CTSC Pilot Funding Program. It is expected there will be one winning team.

Prerequisites. Permission of the instructor. Graduate students in engineering or health sciences are preferred. Also considered for admission are exceptional undergraduate students in the shared credit program with prior bench-level research experience.

9. Biomedical Engineering
Course Objective. To provide the student direct experience in the process of innovating medical technologies.
Learning Outcome. Students will be conversant in all core elements of biodesign as practiced by a team com¬prised of a UNM Hospital physician, a UNM School of Engineering faculty member, and engineering students.
Course Description. "Biodesign" is a phrase widely used to describe a process by which an important clinical problem is identified, solved and translated to a ready-to-market product or process. As practiced in this course, biodesign begins with pairing a practicing physician with an engineering faculty member and several students. The initial task of each team is to learn from the medical doctor some area of their clinical practice plus various key problems in that area. The next task of the team is to generate an array of possible solutions to the problems posed. Under the guidance of the faculty leader or designated team facilitator, the resulting list of problems and potential solutions is winnowed to a single prime candidate for translation from idea, to lab prototype, to clinical product. The final product of each team is a presentation and a written proposal for subsequent research, development and prototyping work.
Competition. On the last day of class, each of the teams will present their results before a panel of judges. Also at this time, a 2-page funding pre-proposal will be submitted whose editor-in-chief is the SOE faculty team co-leader, and/or the HSC physician team co-leader. Students will be expected to participate in writing and/or editing some or all portions of the pre-proposal. The pre-proposal will be for up to $50,000 of bench-level research to be conducted the following semester Spring 2016. At the conclusion of the meeting, the panel of judges may elect to announce one or more winning teams. Winning teams, if any, will be invited to submit a full proposal to the CTSC Pilot Funding Program. It is expected there will be one winning team.

Prerequisites. Permission of the instructor. Graduate students in engineering or health sciences are preferred. Also considered for admission are exceptional undergraduate students in the shared credit program with prior bench-level research experience.

Engineering Information

College Description

Engineering College Description and Special Characteristics

The School of Engineering at the University of New Mexico advances, interprets, and disseminates knowledge through teaching, research, and service. The School performs these activities in ways which attract high quality students and faculty to produce the highest quality graduates. Our graduates are prepared for employment because of our programs and opportunities (such as co-op education, internships, and industry relations) which facilitate the school-to-work transition. The School enjoys three distinct advantages: 1) New Mexico's cultural and ethnic diversity, 2) location in the commercial, industrial, and population center of the state, and 3) proximity to national laboratories. The School conducts basic and applied research in engineering and scientific disciplines to advance the knowledge base and to strengthen the teaching program. Through its research activities, the School also seeks to improve and protect the natural and built environments. The School recognizes the importance of multi-disciplinary approaches to research and teaching
and seeks to enhance research and instructional programs through collaboration with other disciplines both within and outside the University. The School takes pride in its track record of entrepreneurship and views itself as an engine of economic development.

Engineering Information

Engineering Faculty & Research

Teaching, Tenure-Track View Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Full Professors Assoc. Professors Assistant Professors Program Total
Chemical and Biological Engineering 10 3 2 15
Civil Engineering 8 2 5 15
Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0
Computer Science 5 8 3 16
Electrical Engineering 18 7 4 29
Interdisciplinary 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering 9 1 3 13
Nuclear Engineering 3 2 3 8
Totals: 53 23 20 96

Teaching, Non-Tenure-Track

Engineering Department(s) FT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel PT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Teach. Personnel
Chemical and Biological Engineering 1 2 3 0.50
Civil Engineering 1 3 4 0.75
Computer Engineering 0 1 1 0.25
Computer Science 2 6 8 1.75
Electrical Engineering 4 6 10 1.50
Interdisciplinary 0 0 0 0.00
Mechanical Engineering 2 9 11 2.38
Nuclear Engineering 1 1 2 0.25
Totals: 11 28 39 7.38

Non-Teaching, Research

Engineering Department(s) Non-Teach. FT Research Personnel Non-Teach. PT Research Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Non-Teach. Research Personnel
Chemical and Biological Engineering 11 2 13 0.75
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Computer Engineering 0 1 1 0.50
Computer Science 0 0 0 0.00
Electrical Engineering 8 15 23 6.67
Interdisciplinary 2 0 2 0.00
Note: Two listed are both Biomedical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering 0 4 4 1.31
Nuclear Engineering 2 1 3 0.30
Totals: 23 23 46 9.52

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

  • American Indian or Alaska Native (Am Ind): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.
  • Asian: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
  • Black or African American (B/AfrA): A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as "Haitian" or "Negro" can be used in addition to "Black or African American."
  • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (Haw): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
  • Hispanic or Latino (Hisp): A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. The term, "Spanish origin," can be used in addition to "Hispanic or Latino."
  • White: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Full Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Chemical and Biological Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 10 0
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 8 0
Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Note: Computer Engineering reported with Electrical Engineering
Computer Science 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 4 1
Electrical Engineering 1 1 2 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 16 2
Interdisciplinary 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Note: All Interdisciplinary Department faculty are in reported in their Departmental home.
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 9 0
Nuclear Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Totals: 1 1 3 0 1 0 10 1 0 0 0 0 35 1 0 0 50 3

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Associate Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Chemical and Biological Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1
Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Note: Computer Engineering reported with Electrical Engineering
Computer Science 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 4 0 0 0 7 1
Electrical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 1 6 1
Interdisciplinary 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Note: All Interdisciplinary Department faculty are in reported in their Departmental home.
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Nuclear Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Totals: 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 1 1 0 0 12 3 0 1 17 6

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Assistant Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Chemical and Biological Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Civil Engineering 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 1
Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Note: Computer Engineering reported with Electrical Engineering
Computer Science 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2
Electrical Engineering 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 1
Interdisciplinary 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Note: All Interdisciplinary Department faculty are in reported in their Departmental home.
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Nuclear Engineering 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0
Totals: 6 1 2 3 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 16 4

Undergraduate

Admissions/Transfers

Undergraduate Admission to the College of Engineering

Admission to the School of Engineering

Students who meet certain criteria may be admitted to the School of Engineering in one of three ways: as freshmen in pre-major status; as internal or external transfers or as readmits in a pre-major status; or as internal or external transfers or readmits in department major status.

Freshman students admitted to the University of New Mexico who declare engineering or computer science as a major and meet the criteria listed below are eligible for enrollment in the School of Engineering in a pre-major status. Their academic records are maintained by the Engineering Student Programs Office. To be admitted in pre-major status, a student must have:

ACT math score of 25 or higher;
ACT English and Science scores of 19 or higher; and
ACT Reading score of 18 or higher.

Freshmen who do not initially meet the above criteria or any student wishing to transfer from University College, from other degree-granting colleges, from non-degree status or from other accredited institutions to the School of Engineering in the pre-major status must meet the following requirements. Their academic records are maintained by the Engineering Student Programs Office.

MATH 150 and MATH 123 or equivalent with a grade of "C" or better;
Minimum 2.20 cumulative grade point average for all courses presented;
Minimum 2.50 grade point average in classes required in the curricula, including prerequisite classes;
Completion of no more than 24 credit hours that count toward a major in the School of Engineering, exclusive of credit hours in communications skills, humanities, social and behavioral sciences, fine arts and foreign languages; and
Accumulation of no more than 9 attempted credit hours with grades of D+, D, D-, F, WF or NC other than those subject to removal by academic renewal or use of the repeat policy.
Any courses required for a School of Engineering curriculum cannot have been attempted more than three times. An attempt includes receiving any letter grade (A through F), WP, WF, W, WNC, CR, NC, I or AUDIT. For the purposes of this requirement, course work taken at other institutions is treated the same as course work taken at the University of New Mexico.

Undergraduate Admission to an Engineering Department

To be eligible for admission to one of the five departments in the School of Engineering in a department major status, students must, as a minimum, meet the following requirements. Some departments have stricter admission requirements. Academic records are maintained by the respective departments.

Completion of 26 credit hours of acceptable credit for a degree in the School of Engineering. Of these 26 hours of credit, at least 18 must be from the courses required in the first year curricula, excluding English, humanities, social and behavioral sciences, fine arts and foreign languages.
In addition to requiring a 2.20 grade point average for all courses presented, it is required that the 18 credit hours also yield at least a 2.50 grade point average and a grade of "C-" or better in each course.
Any courses required for a School of Engineering curriculum cannot have been attempted more than three times. An attempt includes receiving any letter grade (A through F), WP, WF, W, WNC, CR, NC, I or AUDIT. For the purposes of this requirement, course work taken at other institutions is treated the same as course work taken at the University of New Mexico.
Any specific program requirements, as noted in the departmental sections of this Catalog.

For additional information about pre-major status or other aspects of admission, contact Engineering Student Services, Centennial Engineering Center, Room 2080, (505) 277-4354.

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

International Undergraduate Admission Requirements

1. Secondary Education. Completion of the equivalent of an American upper-secondary school education (approximately 12 years of formal education beginning at age six) as well as the appropriate diplomas or satisfactory results on leaving examinations.

2. Academic Preparation. Strong academic preparation or a U.S. equivalent grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale (for freshman applicants) or 2.0 on a 4.0 scale (for transfer students).

3. English Proficiency. If English is not the first language of the student or not the official language of the country, the student must submit results of either the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) - minimum score 6.0; the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) - minimum score 520 paper-based, 190 computer-based or 68 Internet-based; the University of Cambridge Examinations Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) or Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) - minimum score C. Students who are academically admissible, but whose scores are less than the required minimum, may enroll in the intensive English program offered through UNM’s Center for English Language and Culture (CELAC). Contact CELAC (celac@unm.edu) for additional information.

Limited Special Admission category: Students classified by the University as Beginning Freshman who do not qualify for the above criteria may appeal for special consideration. A combination of quantitative and subjective factors is used in making these admission decisions.

Prospective undergraduate students who meet one of the exceptions below are exempted from submitting English proficiency exam results:

Completion of four years of U.S. high school with a 2.5 GPA or higher.
ACT English score of 19 or higher (Test NOT required for admission).
SAT Critical Reading Score of 470 or higher (Test NOT required for admission).
One year of full-time study (minimum of 24 credit hours) at a regionally-accredited U.S. college or university with a 3.0 GPA or higher completed within the last two years.
Completion of two semesters of freshman English composition (English 110 and 120 equivalents) with a GPA of 2.0 or higher at a regionally-accredited U.S. college or university.
Bachelor's degree from a regionally-accredited U.S. college or university or recognized university in English-speaking Canada, the United Kingdom, South Africa, Australia or New Zealand.
Attendance in the Center for English Language and American Culture (CELAC) program at UNM with a TOEFL score of 520 and a recommendation from the CELAC program director.

4. Financial Resources. All international applicants are required to submit documentation verifying adequate funding to meet study and living expenses for themselves and any accompanying dependents, if applicable, while in the United States. A minimum amount of approximately $36,443 U.S. dollars is required (based on 2015"2016 rates). Proof of support includes a Certification of Financial Responsibility Form completed for all years of study, and proof of funds available for the first year of study.

5. Health Insurance. International students who attend the University of New Mexico and any dependents who may accompany them are required to have medical insurance as offered through the University of New Mexico. Students who demonstrate that they have equivalent health insurance policies may be granted waivers.

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

Requirements for out-of-state U.S. residents are the same as for in-state students.

Residency Requirements

Residency
Summary of Regulations for New Mexico Residency for Tuition Purposes

A student who enters and remains in this State principally to obtain an education is presumed to continue to reside outside this state, and such presumption continues in effect until rebutted by clear and convincing evidence of bona fide residence. A student determined to be financially dependent on an out-of-state parent or guardian also assumes the residency of that parent or guardian. The burden of proof is on the student. The student must secure and file the residency petition with the appropriate documents of evidence in the manner described herein. All documents submitted for this purpose are kept confidential. Residency petitions are accepted until the second Friday of each Fall and Spring semester (and Summer term for Nursing students) in the Mesa Vista Hall North One-Stop.

To become a legal resident for tuition purposes of the State of New Mexico, the student must meet four basic requirements. Each person must individually meet the requirements.

The 12-Month Consecutive Presence Requirement
A student must physically reside in the state for 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the term for which the student submits a petition.

The Financial Independence Requirement
A student who is financially dependent on parents or legal guardians who are not residents of New Mexico cannot be approved for residency. At the time the student petitions for residency (if under 23 years of age), a copy of the parents’ or guardians’ 1040 or 1040A U.S. income tax form for the previous year must be submitted with the petition. If shown to be a dependent on that tax form, the student is not eligible to establish residency apart from the parents or guardians.

The Written Declaration of Intent Requirement
The student must sign a written declaration of intent to relinquish residency in another state and to establish it in New Mexico (included in residency petition).

The Overt Acts Requirement
Overt acts are required to evidence support of the written declaration of intent to establish permanent residency in New Mexico. Documentation of two of the following is required:

If the applicant is financially dependent, a copy of the parents’ or guardians’ previous year income tax form showing the applicant as a dependent and the parents’ address as New Mexico;
A New Mexico high school transcript issued in the past year confirming attendance at a New Mexico public or private high school within the past 12 months;
A transcript from an online high school showing a New Mexico address confirming attendance within the past 12 months;
A New Mexico driver’s license or ID card with an original date of issue or a renewal date issued prior to the first day of the term or semester;
Proof of payment of New Mexico state income tax for the previous year;
Evidence of employment within the state of New Mexico;
New Mexico vehicle registration;
Voter registration in New Mexico;
Proof of residential property ownership in New Mexico;
A rental agreement within New Mexico;
Utility bills showing the applicant's name and a New Mexico address;
Other evidence which would reasonably support the individual’s intent to establish and maintain New Mexico residency.

Any act considered inconsistent with being a New Mexico resident will cause the request for resident classification to be denied. As such, other relevant factors may be considered in addition to the items listed above.

NOTES:

A person who has moved to New Mexico and has obtained permanent full-time employment (sufficient documentation is required) and his/her spouse and dependent children shall not be required to complete the 12-month durational requirement. However, all other requirements must be satisfied.
Active duty military members stationed in New Mexico, their spouses and dependents are eligible for waivers of non-resident tuition. Members of the National Guard, their spouses and dependents are also eligible for waivers of non-resident tuition. A form must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar by the second Friday of the term to obtain these waivers.

According to the University of New Mexico’s tuition policy:

Non-resident, degree-seeking graduate students enrolled for six or fewer credit hours in their first two semesters are charged resident tuition rates.

Students enrolling for the summer session are charged resident tuition rates regardless of residency classification (except those in the College of Nursing).

The residency petition and a brochure that explains requirements for establishing New Mexico residency for tuition purposes and special tuition status waivers are available from the Mesa Vista Hall North One-Stop. For more information, visit the Registrar's Office Web site.

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

Admission Requirements

The minimum requirement for admission as a transfer student to the University of New Mexico is a grade point average of “C” (2.00) in all transferable college work attempted. However, most degree granting colleges at the University require a higher grade point average for the acceptance of transfer students (see the appropriate sections of this Catalog for specific requirements).

The University of New Mexico operates on a semester credit calendar. Therefore, classes from quarter system institutions will be recalculated to semester hours (one quarter hour equals .666 semester hour).

Applicants with fewer than 24 acceptable transferable hours are considered transfer freshmen and must therefore submit high school credentials and also meet freshmen admission requirements (see Beginning Freshmen above).
Previous Suspension

A student under academic suspension from another college or university may not enter the University of New Mexico during the term of suspension. In cases of unspecified suspension periods, the University of New Mexico’s suspension term will apply. Upon termination of the suspension, the student is eligible to request special consideration for admission to the University of New Mexico.

In general, students under disciplinary suspension are not admitted to the University of New Mexico. However, because the reasons for disciplinary suspension vary among institutions, a student may be suspended from one school for infractions that would not be actionable at another. Therefore, the University of New Mexico reviews such cases individually and, when justified, makes exceptions and allows the student to be considered for admission.
Transfer of Credits

The University of New Mexico evaluates without prejudice courses from post-secondary institutions that are regionally accredited or are candidates for regional accreditation. Course work completed with a minimum grade of “C-,” provided the classes are similar or equivalent to courses offered at the University, may be accepted as transfer credit. (Transferable courses with grades of “D” from New Mexico state institutions are accepted.)

The University of New Mexico does not accept technical/vocational, remedial, personal development or dogmatic religion courses. Credit is not awarded for work or life experience, cooperative education or for courses from out-of-state in which the grade received was lower than “C-” except by petition to the Director of Admissions.

Transferable credits from an accredited junior college will be accepted up to a maximum determined by the University of New Mexico college in which the student enrolls.

Grades earned in courses taken at other institutions are not included in calculation of the University of New Mexico grade point average. This grade point average will reflect only classes taken at the University of New Mexico.
University College

Admissible students with fewer than 24 semester hours or undecided about their major will ordinarily enroll in University College. See the Undergraduate Academic Advisement section of this Catalog.

Students with more than 24 semester hours, with an area of interest or a definite major in mind should refer to the appropriate college or program section of this Catalog.
Transfer Student Advisement

The Office of University Advisement is responsible for establishing and administering policies and procedures related to transfer student advisement. Once transfer students have been admitted to UNM, they should schedule an appointment with their assigned advisor through LoboAchieve. Prospective transfer students are able to locate their appropriate advisor by visiting the UNM Advisement Web site. Advisors are available to assist transfer students with navigating their way through UNM, answering questions or concerns regarding course equivalencies, and helping students interpret the transfer course evaluations through general academic advisement to ensure a seamless transition into UNM. For more information regarding transfer advisement, please visit the UNM Advisement Web site, or email ucac@unm.edu.

Transfer Among New Mexico Higher Education Institutions

To facilitate transfer of students and course credits among New Mexico’s colleges and universities, the state’s public institutions of higher education are required to accept any transfer courses taken within approved modules of lower-division course work and apply them toward degree requirements. Several transfer guides have been developed through collaboration of New Mexico’s public post-secondary institutions, consistent with requirements of state law (21-1B, NMSA 1978). Students enrolling for first-year or second-year study at a New Mexico institution and wishing to prepare for possible transfer into a degree program at another institution are advised to take these courses during their freshman and sophomore years.

Undergraduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): All Students

Undergraduate Group 1
Tuition & Fees: $6,944
Room & Board: $9,472
Books & Supplies: $1,080
Other Expenses: $5,154
Estimated avg. course load per term: 15
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Special Programs or Fee Structures

NM Residents have $832.20 of additional mandatory fees. Non-residents have $693.36 in fees. Both rates are based on 12-18 credit hours, or full-time attendance.
Engineering undergraduate students have an additional $15/credit hour tuition differential.

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

Additional Financial Aid Information

UNM's FAFSA school code is: 002663

Undergraduate

New Applicants

New Undergraduate Applicants

A. Number of undergraduate applicants to the engineering college: 515
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 497
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 491
Percentage of entering students (excluding transfer students) ranked in the top quarter (25%) of their high schools: 0%

Newly Enrolled Test Scores

Scores Reflect 75th to 25th percentile

SAT 75th 25th
Math Range: 105 18
Reading Range: 90 15
Writing Range: 92 14
Combined Range: 102 17
ACT 75th 25th
Math Range: 382 61
Composite Range: 423 61

Undergraduate

Enrollments by Class

Undergraduate Engr. Programs Fresh
1st Year
Soph
2nd Year
Junior
3rd Year
Senior
4th/5th Year
Full Time Total Part Time Total
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 57 73 55 116 301 23
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 42 53 36 57 188 33
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 59 32 38 47 176 20
Computer Science (B.S.) 113 97 77 102 389 98
Construction Engineering (B.S.) 1 1 0 5 7 3
Construction Management (B.S.) 1 4 11 25 41 13
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 44 39 44 81 208 52
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 142 133 111 186 572 99
Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) 15 21 15 27 78 12
Totals: 474 453 387 646 1960 353

Freshmen

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 0 0 19 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 6 1 2 0 31 2
Women 0 0 0 0 16 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 1 0 26 1
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 0 0 13 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 27 0
Women 0 0 0 0 10 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 15 0
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 2 0 26 1 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 13 0 2 0 52 1
Women 0 0 1 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 10 0 0 0 42 0 3 1 7 0 2 1 0 0 26 1 4 0 94 3
Women 1 1 0 0 10 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 19 1
Construction Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Construction Management (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 0 0 18 1 1 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 9 1 2 0 38 2
Women 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 6 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 9 0 3 0 58 3 8 0 5 0 4 0 1 0 30 1 3 0 121 4
Women 0 0 1 0 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 2 0 0 21 2
Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 14 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Totals: 35 1 7 0 236 6 20 1 20 1 11 1 1 0 128 7 16 0 474 17

Sophomores

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 7 0 0 0 18 1 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 0 1 0 42 2
Women 4 0 0 0 17 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 5 2 2 0 31 2
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 0 0 19 2 3 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 12 0 0 0 40 3
Women 0 0 1 0 7 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5 0 0 0 13 2
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 15 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 26 2
Women 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 6 1
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 7 0 0 0 35 3 5 1 0 1 2 0 1 0 25 8 4 1 79 14
Women 1 0 0 0 6 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 7 2 2 0 18 4
Construction Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Construction Management (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 0 1 12 1 2 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 11 3 1 0 32 5
Women 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 7 0 2 0 52 4 3 0 5 1 1 1 0 0 38 2 3 0 111 8
Women 0 0 0 0 9 0 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 22 0
Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 7 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 1 0 17 1
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0
Totals: 33 0 3 2 207 17 23 2 19 3 5 2 3 0 144 18 16 1 453 45

Juniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 6 0 0 0 14 3 3 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 9 1 0 1 35 5
Women 2 0 1 0 9 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 2 0 20 0
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 10 4 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 1 1 21 8
Women 1 0 0 0 4 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 15 2
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 1 0 13 2 2 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 8 0 1 0 33 2
Women 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 1
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 1 20 7 2 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 42 6 3 0 71 16
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 6 2
Construction Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Construction Management (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 8 6 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 10 8
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 0 0 10 3 2 0 2 1 3 0 0 0 14 4 3 0 38 8
Women 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 5 0 1 0 43 15 6 0 3 0 1 1 1 0 34 4 3 0 97 20
Women 1 0 0 0 6 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 2 0 14 3
Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 1 4 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 12 2
Women 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 1
Totals: 27 0 3 2 151 46 21 6 18 2 8 2 1 0 141 18 17 2 387 78

Seniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 7 0 2 0 28 1 2 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 29 3 4 0 74 6
Women 1 0 0 0 14 3 2 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 17 1 4 0 42 5
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 1 0 14 8 4 4 2 1 0 0 0 0 16 1 2 1 41 15
Women 1 0 0 0 8 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 5 1 0 0 16 3
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 1 0 16 6 0 2 6 1 0 0 0 0 14 2 2 0 41 11
Women 0 0 0 0 5 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6 2
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 3 1 3 2 26 18 0 1 3 2 2 0 0 0 45 25 3 1 85 50
Women 3 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 4 2 1 0 0 0 8 3 0 0 17 8
Construction Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 2
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Construction Management (B.S.)
Men 0 0 1 0 13 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 0 1 23 4
Women 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 5 1 6 0 20 8 4 2 2 2 2 1 0 0 28 17 2 0 69 31
Women 1 0 0 0 2 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 7 2 1 0 12 6
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 4 1 60 24 7 1 3 3 4 0 0 0 66 26 4 0 152 55
Women 1 0 1 0 15 2 2 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 11 3 2 0 34 7
Nuclear Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 1 0 0 3 3 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 9 3 0 0 15 7
Women 0 0 0 0 6 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 12 1
Totals: 30 3 19 3 235 83 27 16 27 14 13 2 1 0 270 89 24 3 646 213

Undergraduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 0 1 15 0 4 0 0 18 2 40 24 16
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 3 0 14 2 1 0 0 14 0 34 25 9
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 1 1 5 0 1 1 0 18 1 28 23 5
Computer Science (B.S.) 1 0 11 1 4 1 0 20 1 39 35 4
Construction Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1
Construction Management (B.S.) 0 0 5 2 0 0 0 7 0 14 11 3
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 2 0 18 2 1 1 0 20 1 45 39 6
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 3 0 32 3 3 0 0 45 1 87 74 13
Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 8 3 16 13 3
Totals: 10 2 104 11 15 4 0 150 9 305 245 60

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 1 10 5 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 12 6 0 2 40
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 3 0 0 0 9 5 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 4 0 0 34
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 1 0 1 0 2 3 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 17 1 1 0 28
Computer Science (B.S.) 1 0 0 0 11 0 1 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 18 2 0 1 39
Construction Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Construction Management (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 4 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 14
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 1 1 0 0 16 2 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 19 1 1 0 45
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 3 0 0 0 26 6 2 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 39 6 1 0 87
Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 8 0 3 0 16
Totals: 9 1 1 1 80 24 6 5 10 5 4 0 0 0 129 21 6 3 305

Undergraduate

Dual Degrees

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

Shared-Credit Undergraduate/Graduate Degrees Program. The School of Engineering offers Shared-Credit Undergraduate/Graduate Degrees Programs designed to allow students to complete a B.S. and M.S., or a B.S. and M.Eng. degree in five years (depending upon the student’s mathematics preparation upon entering UNM as a first-year student). To accomplish this, some courses are counted towards both the Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees.

Curriculum

School of Engineering courses that can be shared between B.S. and M.S. degrees fall into two categories: 1) Courses that are designated variously as technical electives, track electives, engineering electives, management electives, or advanced science electives; in the shared-credit degrees program, these courses are be replaced by 500-level graduate courses that count towards both degrees, and 2) courses that are double-numbers at both the 400- and 500-levels; students in the shared-credit degrees program take some of these courses at the 500-level with the course counting towards both the B.S. and M.S. degrees.

This program is intended to facilitate both disciplinary and interdisciplinary B.S. and M.S. degree programs. The exact curriculum for each student is determined by the director of undergraduate studies for the student’s B.S. degree and the director of graduate studies for the student’s M.S. degree, and is approved by the School of Engineering Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

Students pursuing an interdisciplinary Shared-Credit Undergraduate/Graduate Degrees program may be required to take prerequisite courses for the graduate level courses in the M.S. program. Thus, an interdisciplinary Shared-Credit Undergraduate/Graduate Degrees program may require more than the nominal five years to complete. Because the mathematics requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Construction Management (B.S.C.M.) do not match those for engineering or computer science degrees, no interdisciplinary shared-credit degrees programs are available to those students who are pursuing the B.S.C.M.

Admission

The B.S./M.S. Shared-Credit Undergraduate/Graduate Degrees Program is a special program for which a student applies during the junior year of the B.S. program. Students may apply after completing 75 credit hours applicable to the B.S. degree. In order to be eligible for the Shared-Credit Undergraduate/Graduate Degrees Program, students must have already been admitted to a B.S. degree program in the School. Admission to the graduate portion of this program is provisional, and is not finalized until the student satisfactorily completes the requirements for the B.S. degree.

Further rules regarding shared-credit degrees programs can be found on the School of Engineering Web site and in the advising manuals for each department.

UNM Global and National Engineering Scholars Programs. The School of Engineering offers two shared-credit programs for students earning their B.S. degree from other universities. The Global Engineering Scholars Program and the National Engineering Scholars Program offer selected students the ability to count up to 9 credit hours from their B.S. degrees in engineering or computer science towards a UNM Master’s degree in engineering or computer science. The Global Engineering Scholars Program seeks to educate students with rich and meaningful experiences across nations to become competitive in a globalized market. The National Engineering Scholars Program seeks to provide students from accredited institutions in the United States with a streamlined pathway to a Master’s degree in engineering or computer science.

In order to participate in these programs, students must have completed at least 120 credit hours of the requirements for a B.S. degree. For many students, admission to these programs takes place upon completion of the B.S. degree from their home institution. For students from institutions outside the United States that offer engineering or computer science programs leading to the B.S. degree that require five years to complete, students finish at least 120 credit hours of course work at their home institution, and complete a fifth year at UNM; upon completion of the course work at UNM the student is awarded an M.S. from UNM and a B.S. from their home institution.

Since these programs are intended to provide an expedited pathway from the B.S. to an M.S. degree, only students who have completed the requirements for a B.S. degree within one year of application to the program are considered.

UNM School of Engineering has identified a list of domestic and international partner universities for these programs. Each School of Engineering department admits students to the National or Global Scholars program according to their normal admission rules and procedures. There is no GRE requirement for students applying to this program. Each School of Engineering department evaluates and approves up to 9 credit hours of appropriate undergraduate technical electives to be double-counted towards the M.S. requirements. The regular M.S. program requirements defined in the UNM Catalog apply.

Students from institutions that have not been identified as partners for this program may also apply, and are individually evaluated and considered.

3 + 2 B.S./M.B.A. Program. The School of Engineering recognizes that many engineers become managers of engineering programs and projects and thus require training in business methods beyond their engineering training. In cooperation with the Anderson School of Management (ASM) at the University of New Mexico, the School of Engineering offers a “3 + 2” program of studies leading to the B.S. and M.B.A. degrees in five years. This program involves selecting core and technical electives that are compatible with both degree programs and applying to the M.B.A. program at the end of the junior year of engineering studies. Consult your departmental advisor in engineering and the advisors for the M.B.A. program in ASM for details of this program.

Degree in Combination with Other Colleges. If a student wishes to secure a degree in another college together with a School of Engineering degree, he or she is urged to seek advice early in the college program from the academic advisors of the colleges concerned. With care in selection of the program of studies, it is possible for students to secure a second degree in one additional year.

Military Studies. Students enrolled in Air Force, Naval or Army ROTC may need an extra semester to complete the requirements for both a degree and a commission. Students should consult an advisor or the department chair in planning their programs.

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degrees Awarded

6

Undergraduate

Program Comparisons

  • ABET - Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
  • CEAB - Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board
Degree Program ABET/CEAB Accred. Nominal Program Length
(yrs.)
Average Program Length
(yrs.)
Time: Day/Even./
Both
Co-op: None/Opt./
Required
Grads in Co-op Progs.
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 0.00 Day Optional
Civil Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 0.00 Day Optional 1
Computer Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 0.00 Day Optional 2
Computer Science (B.S.) yes 4.00 0.00 Day Optional
Construction Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 0.00 Day Optional
Construction Management (B.S.) no 4.00 0.00 Day Optional
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 0.00 Day Optional
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 0.00 Day Optional 4
Nuclear Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 0.00 Day Optional

Graduate

Admissions Information

Graduate Admission to the College of Engineering

Graduate Programs

Students wishing to pursue graduate programs in engineering or computer science must meet both the requirements for admission to graduate study and the particular prerequisites established by the School of Engineering department through which the desired program is offered.

Applicants are normally expected to hold bachelor’s degrees in the same field as their proposed graduate study. Departments also consider applicants holding bachelor’s degrees in mathematics, the physical and biological sciences or other fields of engineering. In such cases, applicants are required to satisfy specified prerequisites, listings of which can be obtained from the Departmental Graduate Advisor. As conditional admissions are not granted, prospective students lacking the required background are advised to satisfy prerequisites on a non-degree basis before admission is sought. In some cases, students with a small prerequisite requirement may be admitted to graduate studies. Outstanding prerequisites are added to the degree requirement. All applicants must submit the results of the Graduate Record Exam General Test to the appropriate department prior to admission.

Interdisciplinary Concentration. In addition to the programs offered by the individual departments, concentrations involving disciplines from more than one department may be undertaken. These concentrations are tailored to accomplish specific goals. These interdisciplinary concentrations do not result in separately titled degrees. Rather, at the M.S. level, students receive their degrees from their resident engineering department. At the Ph.D. level, all students receive the Ph.D. in Engineering or Computer Science with a concentration in a specific discipline. For further information contact the departments involved.

Financial Assistance. Most full-time graduate students in the School of Engineering are supported through research assistantships and/or teaching assistantships. Applications for and appointments to these assistantships are made by the individual departments. In addition, there are a limited number of fellowships available: contact the graduate advisor in the appropriate department for information on fellowships.

Graduate Admission to an Engineering Department

As above, except:
1. Submit verbal, quantitative and analytical GRE scores.

2. For Computer Science: Admission

In addition to the University-wide requirements for admission to graduate study, the prospective Master of Science (M.S.) or Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) candidate must submit verbal, quantitative and analytical GRE scores (general test) as well as satisfy the following criteria for admission to graduate study:

Knowledge of computer science equivalent to CS 152L, 251L, 261, 341L, 351L, 357L, 361L, 362, **460 and **481.
Knowledge of mathematics essential to computer science equivalent to MATH 162, 163, **314 and STAT **345.

Students lacking adequate undergraduate training may be admitted, at the discretion of the admissions committee, with the understanding that course work required to remove the deficiencies in undergraduate background is not applicable to the graduate degree.

Each student is assigned a graduate advisor. The student should see his or her graduate advisor before registering for the first time. The student and the advisor together work out a course of studies which meets the student’s career objectives and which constitutes a coherent program satisfying the graduation requirements. No course shall be counted toward the required credit hours which has not been agreed on by the student and the advisor as a part of this coherent program. It is the responsibility of the student to meet the requirements and to keep the department office informed of compliance with them; in particular, the student should meet with his or her graduate advisor at least once a semester to review progress toward the degree.

3. For graduate study in ME: Application Information
We welcome applications from students who have earned distinguished academic records. Results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test must be submitted to the Department prior to admission.
The Director of Graduate Programs makes admission decisions. Applicants must hold (or will have completed by the time they arrive) an accredited Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (B.S.M.E.) degree and at least a B average in their final two years (or their final, earned 60 credit hours) of their last degree.

Applications from individuals with a B.S. degree in other Engineering disciplines, Math, Computer Science, and Physical Sciences (such as Physics and Chemistry) are also considered. To qualify for a graduate degree, applicants are expected to have at least an undergraduate-level exposure to most of the core ME disciplines. Those who are deemed deficient may be asked to take additional (leveling) courses.

4. Biomedical Engineering: Ph.D. and M.S. Admission Requirements

Prospective candidates may apply directly for admission to the Ph.D. program. Successful applicants to the program usually have a bachelor's degree in the physical sciences or engineering. The Admissions Committee makes admissions decisions on a case-by-case basis, with special consideration of scholastic proficiency in one or more of the following subject areas:

Molecular and Cellular Biology
Chemistry and Organic Chemistry
Calculus and Ordinary Differential Equations
Thermodynamics
Physics
Biochemistry or Biomolecular Engineering

Students who have not passed courses in one or more of these subject areas may be admitted to the program, but required to take undergraduate courses to address deficiencies in their background. General admission requirements described in the Graduate Program section of this Catalog also apply.
Ph.D. and M.S. Application Process

Details of applying to the Ph.D. and M.S. programs are found at the Biomedical Engineering program Web site. Applications to the degree program are submitted online.

5. The Department of Nuclear Engineering offers programs in nuclear engineering leading to the Master of Science (M.S.) and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees. A GPA of 3.0 in the last two years of undergraduate study, and/or in previous engineering graduate study, is normally required for admission. In addition, the GRE is required of all Nuclear Engineering applicants.

6. For Chemical and Biological Engineering:

Master of Science in Chemical Engineering (M.S.)
Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering (Ph.D.)
Concentration: Chemical Engineering

The Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering offers programs in chemical engineering leading to the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. A GPA of 3.0 in the last two years of undergraduate study, and/or in previous engineering graduate study, is normally required for admission. In addition, the GRE is required of all Chemical Engineering applicants.

Students with an undergraduate degree in chemical engineering may directly enter the graduate chemical engineering program. Students from other engineering/science fields are also encouraged to apply. However, certain undergraduate background courses, as determined by the graduate advisor on an individual basis, must be completed as prerequisites to graduate study.

7. Civil Engineering: The Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is required of all applicants for graduate study in civil engineering. The Master of Construction Management requires either the GRE or the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). The Master of Engineering in Civil Engineering requires either the GRE or evidence of passage of the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam. See the Civil Engineering department Web site for more information about applying to the CE graduate program.

Persons with a bachelor’s degree in a field other than civil engineering may be admitted to the graduate program, but they may be required to take undergraduate civil engineering courses to eliminate deficiencies in their background. Each case is considered individually.

8. NanoScience and MicroSystems:
M.S. Admission Prerequisites. The general admission requirements described in the Graduate Program section of this Catalog apply to the Nanoscience and Microsystems Engineering program. Applicants who plan to apply to the program must have a bachelor’s degree in a natural science or engineering field. All incoming students should meet a minimum level of competency indicated by passing grade in a math class of MATH **316 or higher. If needed, incoming students who are otherwise qualified may take MATH **316 during their first semester and pass with a B or better or by taking and passing an equivalency exam that certifies their mathematical ability.

M.S. Application Process. The general application process for domestic and international students is described in the Graduate Program section of this Catalog. In addition to meeting those requirements, applicants must submit the following directly to the Nanoscience and Microsystems Engineering program office for the Admissions Subcommittee review and selection process:

Letter of Intent from the applicant about why this program is of interest. (Approximately 250 words stating the rationale and motivation for entering the program.)
Three sealed letters of recommendation (sent directly to the Nanoscience and Microsystems office).
GRE entrance examination scores.
Any other materials that are relevant to this application, such as experiential credit.
Departmental application available online or at program office.

Ph.D. Application and Admission Process. For prospective doctoral students, the process of applying and being selected is the same as for applicants to the Master’s program, with the Admissions Subcommittee assuming responsibility for reviewing applications and selecting candidates. Applicants who plan to apply to the program must have a bachelor’s degree in a natural science or engineering field. All incoming students should meet a minimum level of competency indicated by passing grade in a math class of MATH **316 or higher. If needed, incoming students who are otherwise qualified may take MATH **316 during their first semester and pass with a B or better or by taking and passing an equivalency exam that certifies their mathematical ability.

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

International Applicants " Admission Process

The University of New Mexico welcomes applications from international students who have distinguished academic records and have demonstrated English proficiency.
Graduate Admission Requirements for International Students
Undergraduate Education Requirement

Graduate applicants must have an earned degree that is equivalent to the U.S. bachelor’s degree. Some non-U.S. bachelor’s degrees are based on three-year programs that may or may not be equivalent to the U.S. bachelor’s degree. In these cases, the applicant must submit an independent credential evaluation report from a credential evaluation service that is a member of the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services.

If the credential evaluation report confirms that the applicant does have the equivalent of a US bachelor’s degree, the applicant is considered for graduate study.

If the report states that the applicant may be considered for graduate study but does not confirm the equivalent degree, the applicant may petition the Dean of Graduate Studies for consideration of equivalency. The petition must include the support of the graduate unit and College Graduate Committee, along with a complete application packet, a copy of the credential evaluation report, and an explanation of the suitability of the applicant’s undergraduate preparation. This documentation must be submitted to the International Admissions Office.

If the Dean approves the petition, the graduate unit may proceed with an offer of admission. A student admitted under this policy is classified as a regular graduate student with the same rights and responsibilities as any other student in graduate status.
Academic Preparation

A minimum grade point average of 3.0 (on a U.S. 4.0 scale) or comparable grade point average in upper-division (junior and senior level) work and in any graduate work already completed.

A satisfactory score on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) as required by the major academic department or college.

Adequate subject preparation for proposed graduate major. Meeting minimum requirements does not guarantee admission since some graduate programs have higher standards and may have limited space. Therefore, it is very important that students contact the departments to which they wish to be admitted.
Demonstrated Proficiency in English

If English is not the official language spoken in a student’s country, the student must submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The minimum acceptable score is 550 on the paper test or 213 on the computerized test. Individual departments may require a higher score but not less than 550/213. International students whose native language is not English and are seeking graduate teaching assistantships may also be required to submit acceptable scores on the Test of Spoken English (TSE). Applicants who have received a bachelor’s or graduate degree from an accredited institution in the United States, English-speaking Canada, the United Kingdom, South Africa, Australia, or New Zealand are exempt from submitting TOEFL scores. Contact the International Admissions Office for additional information.
Financial Resources

All international applicants are required to submit documentation verifying adequate funding to meet study and living expenses while in the United States. A minimum amount of approximately $26,909 U.S. dollars is required. Proof of support includes a Certification of Financial Responsibility Form completed for all years of study and proof of funds available for the first year of study.
Health Insurance

International students who attend the University of New Mexico and any dependents who may accompany them are required to have medical insurance as offered through the University of New Mexico Student Health Center. Students who demonstrate that they have equivalent health insurance policies may be granted waivers.
Application Deadlines for International Admissions
Fall Semester March 1
Spring Semester August 1
Summer Session January 1

Note: Most graduate units have earlier application deadlines than those listed by the International Admissions office. It is important that students consult with individual graduate units and meet their specific academic program deadline requirements. Applications and all supporting credentials must be submitted by the International Admissions deadline (see above) or the graduate unit deadline"whichever comes first. Only complete applications are reviewed for admission.
International Applicants " Required Documents

International students should submit the following required documentation to the University of New Mexico International Admissions office. Note: A student who wants any information concerning the applicant file released to any third party must submit a letter of authorization directly to the International Admissions Office. This release must include the student’s name and signature.

Evidence of English language proficiency: (TOEFL results must be sent directly to the University of New Mexico [code 4845] by Educational Testing Services, PO Box 6151, Princeton, NJ 08541-6151, USA. Phone 609/771-7100.)
Academic Records: In order to facilitate the admission decision, the University of New Mexico strongly recommends that students initially submit academic records to any member of the National Credential Evaluation Services. Students must still submit official transcripts to the University, but the English translations are then not required. Students who do not utilize a credential evaluation service must have official grade reports (transcripts) and diplomas or certificates from each institution attended sent to the University of New Mexico. Students must submit original or officially certified copies. Notarized, faxed copies or photocopies of these documents are not acceptable. All documents must be submitted in the original language and accompanied by an official certified English translation. Certified copies must contain the original signature(s), stamp(s) or seal(s) of the issuing institution’s designated official.
Financial Documents: Students must submit the University of New Mexico Certification of Financial Responsibility form along with required supporting documentation.

I-20 Statement: The Immigration Form I-20 is valid up to the first day of class for the semester or summer session to which a student is admitted. Students who are not able to attend must immediately return the I-20 form to the UNM Global Education Office. A $50 non-refundable deposit is required before the I-20 is issued. It is later applied to tuition. If a student does not enroll or changes semesters, the deposit is forfeited.

Submit all documents to:

Mailing Address:
International Admissions
Office of Admissions
MSC06 3850
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001

Shipping/Delivery Address:
International Admissions
Office of Admissions
The University of New Mexico
Student Support and Services Center
1155 University Blvd., SE
Albuquerque, NM 87106
International Students " Reapplication Process

International students who previously applied to, but never attended the University of New Mexico in graduate status, may reapply for admission through the International Admissions Office, as described above.

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

Application Process " Domestic and International Applicants

Transcripts, test scores and letters of recommendation submitted to the University of New Mexico for admission become the property of the University and will not be sent elsewhere or returned to the student.

The online application can be found at the Admissions Web site. A $50 non-refundable Application Fee is charged by credit card with the online application.

In addition, students must submit one official transcript (unopened) from each non-UNM academic institution previously attended to the UNM Office of Admissions (domestic) or to the UNM Global Education Office (international) by the academic unit’s published deadline.

NOTE: Do not list study abroad programs separately on the application form, if they are included as part of a transcript program from an accredited U.S. institution.

Materials required by the academic unit (letters of intent, writing samples, etc.) should be uploaded as part of the online application.

Application fee waivers are available under certain circumstances. Please see the Graduate Studies Web site for more information.
Application Fee Waiver Policy

The University’s graduate application fee may be waived for domestic applicants who are affiliated with the following programs: the Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC), McNair Scholars, Project 1000, Post Baccalaureate Research and Education Programs (PREP), GEM Fellowship Program, and Initiatives for Maximizing Student Diversity (IMSD). In order to receive the waiver, applicants must submit a signed letter of support from the program director along with a completed “Application Fee Waiver Request” form.

The graduate application fee may also be waived in limited cases of financial hardship. In order to apply for the fee waiver, students must submit an “Application Fee Waiver Request” form and at least one­ of the following:

A copy of the waiver granted by the testing service for the GRE fee within the past year.
An official statement of need signed by a financial aid officer at the college or university the student is now attending, including the most recent year’s Estimated Student or Family Contribution.
Official verification of current participation in a government aid program based on low income.

Fee waiver requests must be submitted at least four weeks prior to the program’s application deadline date, in order to provide sufficient time to evaluate the application and determine eligibility. The program to which the student is applying may require additional fees, which are not covered by this policy. Waivers are not available to international applicants.
Application to More Than One Graduate Program

Students may apply to more than one graduate degree program but must submit an application and fee for each program. If admitted to more than one program, students may accept admission from only one, with the exception of admission to dual degree programs.

Residency Requirements

Residency
Summary of Regulations for New Mexico Residency for Tuition Purposes

A student who enters and remains in this State principally to obtain an education is presumed to continue to reside outside this state, and such presumption continues in effect until rebutted by clear and convincing evidence of bona fide residence. A student determined to be financially dependent on an out-of-state parent or guardian also assumes the residency of that parent or guardian. The burden of proof is on the student. The student must secure and file the residency petition with the appropriate documents of evidence in the manner described herein. All documents submitted for this purpose are kept confidential. Residency petitions are accepted until the second Friday of each Fall and Spring semester (and Summer term for Nursing students) in the Mesa Vista Hall North One-Stop.

To become a legal resident for tuition purposes of the State of New Mexico, the student must meet four basic requirements. Each person must individually meet the requirements.

The 12-Month Consecutive Presence Requirement
A student must physically reside in the state for 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the term for which the student submits a petition.

The Financial Independence Requirement
A student who is financially dependent on parents or legal guardians who are not residents of New Mexico cannot be approved for residency. At the time the student petitions for residency (if under 23 years of age), a copy of the parents’ or guardians’ 1040 or 1040A U.S. income tax form for the previous year must be submitted with the petition. If shown to be a dependent on that tax form, the student is not eligible to establish residency apart from the parents or guardians.

The Written Declaration of Intent Requirement
The student must sign a written declaration of intent to relinquish residency in another state and to establish it in New Mexico (included in residency petition).

The Overt Acts Requirement
Overt acts are required to evidence support of the written declaration of intent to establish permanent residency in New Mexico. Documentation of two of the following is required:

If the applicant is financially dependent, a copy of the parents’ or guardians’ previous year income tax form showing the applicant as a dependent and the parents’ address as New Mexico;
A New Mexico high school transcript issued in the past year confirming attendance at a New Mexico public or private high school within the past 12 months;
A transcript from an online high school showing a New Mexico address confirming attendance within the past 12 months;
A New Mexico driver’s license or ID card with an original date of issue or a renewal date issued prior to the first day of the term or semester;
Proof of payment of New Mexico state income tax for the previous year;
Evidence of employment within the state of New Mexico;
New Mexico vehicle registration;
Voter registration in New Mexico;
Proof of residential property ownership in New Mexico;
A rental agreement within New Mexico;
Utility bills showing the applicant's name and a New Mexico address;
Other evidence which would reasonably support the individual’s intent to establish and maintain New Mexico residency.

Any act considered inconsistent with being a New Mexico resident will cause the request for resident classification to be denied. As such, other relevant factors may be considered in addition to the items listed above.

NOTES:

A person who has moved to New Mexico and has obtained permanent full-time employment (sufficient documentation is required) and his/her spouse and dependent children shall not be required to complete the 12-month durational requirement. However, all other requirements must be satisfied.
Active duty military members stationed in New Mexico, their spouses and dependents are eligible for waivers of non-resident tuition. Members of the National Guard, their spouses and dependents are also eligible for waivers of non-resident tuition. A form must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar by the second Friday of the term to obtain these waivers.

According to the University of New Mexico’s tuition policy:

Non-resident, degree-seeking graduate students enrolled for six or fewer credit hours in their first two semesters are charged resident tuition rates.

Students enrolling for the summer session are charged resident tuition rates regardless of residency classification (except those in the College of Nursing).

The residency petition and a brochure that explains requirements for establishing New Mexico residency for tuition purposes and special tuition status waivers are available from the Mesa Vista Hall North One-Stop. For more information, visit the Registrar's Office Web site.

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

Same admissions criteria apply for transfer as well as non-transfer students. Contact individual department for specifics on course credit transfer.

Graduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): All Students

Graduate Group 1
Tuition & Fees: $5,835
Room & Board: $9,472
Books & Supplies: $1,168
Other Expenses: $5,154
Estimated avg. course load per term: 9
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Special Programs or Fee Structures

NM Residents have $832.20 of additional mandatory fees. Non-residents have $693.36 in fees. Both rates are based on 12-18 credit hours, or full-time attendance.
Engineering undergraduate students have an additional $15/credit hour tuition differential.

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

Additional Financial Aid Information

Teaching and research assistantships are awarded by academic departments and by research centers and institutes. See catalog for eligibility requirements. (catalog.unm.edu)

Scholarships, fellowships, loans and work-study opportunities are also available.

Student Financial Aid

The following information explains the application process and answers questions about financial aid at the University of New Mexico. To maximize the opportunity for funding, the application for aid must be received by March 1. Students must also respond to any request for additional information in a timely fashion (and by March 20 to maximize the opportunity for funding). Pell Grants and Federal Direct Loans remain available to eligible students who submit applications after the March 1 priority date.

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is used to apply for all types of federal and state need-based aid. Students can apply for financial aid on the Web or by completing the paper application. Students are encouraged to apply at the Federal Student Aid Web site. The University of New Mexico’s Federal School Code is 002663. All prospective students must be admitted to the University of New Mexico to receive an offer of financial aid.

The costs of attending the University of New Mexico include:

tuition and fees
room and board
books and supplies
transportation
personal expenses
child care costs, if applicable

To be considered for financial aid, students must apply every year.

For additional information regarding costs and financial aid at the University of New Mexico, access the Student Financial Aid Office Web site.

Graduate

New Applicants

New Graduate Applicants

A. Number of graduate applicants to the engineering college: 782
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 345
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 195

Graduate

Enrollments by Class

Master's

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Biomedical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chemical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 11 0
Women 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 6 0
Civil Engineering (M.S.)
Men 13 0 2 0 9 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 1 0 39 0
Women 4 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 2 0 19 0
Computer Engineering (M.S.)
Men 17 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 11 0 1 0 33 0
Women 5 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 9 0
Computer Science (M.S.)
Men 23 0 3 0 9 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 20 0 1 0 60 0
Women 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 13 0
Construction Management (M.C.M.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 21 0 0 0 16 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 41 0 2 0 81 0
Women 6 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 8 0
Manufacturing Engineering (M.E.)
Men 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 3 0 1 0 20 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 31 0 0 0 56 0
Women 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 10 0
Nanoscience & Microsystems (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0
Nuclear Engineering (M.S.)
Men 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 9 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Optical Science and Engineering (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 110 0 8 0 71 0 2 0 7 0 4 0 0 0 158 0 7 0 367 0

Doctoral

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Biomedical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 10 0
Women 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 9 0
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 9 0 2 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 13 0 1 0 31 0
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 2 0 9 0
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 26 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 31 0
Women 8 0 1 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 18 0
Computer Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 9 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 20 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Computer Science (Ph.D.)
Men 22 0 4 0 4 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 26 0 2 0 61 0
Women 4 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 10 0
Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 53 0 4 0 10 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 24 0 2 0 95 0
Women 10 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 18 0
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 10 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 25 0
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0
Nanoscience & Microsystems (Ph.D.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 12 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Nuclear Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 18 0 0 0 27 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0
Optical Science and Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 19 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 31 0
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Totals: 185 0 17 0 43 0 1 0 13 0 4 0 0 0 148 0 9 0 420 0

Graduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Biomedical Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 3 0 7 2 5
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 5 4 1
Civil Engineering (M.S.) 7 0 3 0 0 0 0 6 0 16 11 5
Computer Engineering (M.S.) 8 0 1 1 0 1 0 3 0 14 11 3
Computer Science (M.S.) 55 0 5 0 0 0 0 14 2 76 57 19
Construction Management (M.C.M.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (M.S.) 19 2 4 0 1 0 0 12 0 38 29 9
Manufacturing Engineering (M.E.) 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 4 1 4 0 0 0 0 15 1 25 24 1
Nanoscience & Microsystems (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nuclear Engineering (M.S.) 0 2 3 0 0 0 0 5 0 10 8 2
Optical Science and Engineering (M.S.) 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 6 1
Totals: 102 6 25 1 2 1 0 61 3 201 155 46

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Biomedical Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 7
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 5
Civil Engineering (M.S.) 6 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 0 0 16
Computer Engineering (M.S.) 6 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 14
Computer Science (M.S.) 41 14 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 4 1 1 76
Construction Management (M.C.M.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (M.S.) 13 6 1 1 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 2 0 0 38
Manufacturing Engineering (M.E.) 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 4 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 1 1 0 25
Nanoscience & Microsystems (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nuclear Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 10
Optical Science and Engineering (M.S.) 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7
Totals: 78 24 5 1 22 3 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 45 16 2 1 201

Master's Degree Programs

Master's Degree Program Degree Type
Master's w/ Thesis Master's w/o Thesis or with Proj./Report Program Totals
Biomedical Engineering (M.S.) 4 3 7
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 2 1 3
Civil Engineering (M.S.) 11 4 15
Computer Engineering (M.S.) 7 7 14
Computer Science (M.S.) 7 68 75
Construction Management (M.C.M.) 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (M.S.) 7 21 28
Manufacturing Engineering (M.E.) 0 3 3
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 9 16 25
Nanoscience & Microsystems (M.S.) 3 1 4
Nuclear Engineering (M.S.) 6 4 10
Optical Science and Engineering (M.S.) 1 15 16
Totals: 57 143 200

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Biomedical Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 4 2 2
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 4 1
Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 4 0
Computer Science (Ph.D.) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 9 8 1
Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.) 7 0 2 0 1 0 0 4 0 14 12 2
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 4 0 7 7 0
Nanoscience & Microsystems (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1
Nuclear Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0
Optical Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 3 1
Totals: 19 2 5 0 1 0 0 23 0 50 41 9

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Biomedical Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 4
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5
Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4
Computer Science (Ph.D.) 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 9
Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.) 6 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 14
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 7
Nanoscience & Microsystems (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
Nuclear Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Optical Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
Totals: 16 3 1 1 5 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 18 5 0 0 50

Graduate

Research Expenditures

Expenditures by Research Department

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Engineering Department External Funding Source
Chemical and Biological Engineering
Total#: Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $24,000 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $24,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Civil Engineering
Total#: 0 Foreign: $10,000 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $3,100,000 Industry: $11,000 Priv/Non: $101,000
State: $85,000 Local: $137,000 Total Expn.: $3,444,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Computer Engineering
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Computer Science
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $3,327,000 Industry: $269,000 Priv/Non: $66,000
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $3,662,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Electrical Engineering
Total#: 0 Foreign: $77,000 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $5,849,000 Industry: $19,000 Priv/Non: $36,000
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $5,981,000
Note: Includes Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering.
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Interdisciplinary
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Mechanical Engineering
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $770,000 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $6,000
State: $38,000 Local: $2,000 Total Expn.: $816,000
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Nuclear Engineering
Total#: 0 Foreign: $38,000 Indiv: $39,000
Fed/Nat: $1,576,000 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $1,653,000
Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $125,000 Indiv: $39,000
Fed/Nat: $14,646,000 Industry: $299,000 Priv/Non: $209,000
State: $123,000 Local: $139,000 Total Expn.: $15,580,000

Expenditures by Research Center

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Advanced Research Computing
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Biomedical Engineering
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $1,411,000 Industry: $9,000 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $1,420,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Emerging Energy Technology
Total#: 0 Foreign: $137,000 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $327,000 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $130,000
State: $15,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $609,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for High Technology Materials
Total#: 0 Foreign: $121,000 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $5,578,000 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $45,000
State: $95,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $5,839,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Micro-Engineered Materials
Total#: 0 Foreign: $141,000 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $2,979,000 Industry: $313,000 Priv/Non: $158,000
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $3,591,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Water and the Environment (CWE)
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $1,452,000 Industry: $27,000 Priv/Non: $108,000
State: $460,000 Local: $26,000 Total Expn.: $2,073,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Configurable Space Microsystems Innovations & Applications Center (COSMIAC)
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $2,059,000 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $29,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $2,088,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Dean's Office Programs
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $662,000 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $35,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $697,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Institute for Space Nuclear Power Studies
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $18,000 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $18,000
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Manufacturing Engineering Program
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $1,042,000 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $1,042,000
Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $399,000 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $15,528,000 Industry: $349,000 Priv/Non: $441,000
State: $634,000 Local: $26,000 Total Expn.: $17,377,000


Grand Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $524,000 Indiv: $39,000
Fed/Nat: $30,174,000 Industry: $648,000 Priv/Non: $650,000
State: $757,000 Local: $165,000 Total Expn.: $32,957,000

The following text was offered to each school as a guideline for the calculation of externally-funded research expenditures:

Include all expenditures associated with grants and contracts specifically budgeted for externally sponsored research and associated programs and expenditures associated with all gifts auditably used for research. Include expended funds provided by the following external sources:

  1. Federal Government
  2. State Government
  3. Foreign Governments
  4. Industry
  5. Non-Profit Organizations (e.g. foundations)
  6. Individuals
  7. Local Government

The expenditures reported should be only those funds provided by organizations, agencies, and individuals external to the institution. Cost sharing/matching funds should be included only if provided from sources external to the institution.

Only State government funds that were obtained competitively or as matching funds associated with other externally funded programs should be included. State funds that are part of the normal operating budget should not be included regardless of purpose.

For all joint or contracted projects or sub-projects, only the portion of the center research performed by faculty, staff, and students of the affiliated engineering school should be credited to that school. Expenditures for capital costs of research laboratory building construction should not be included.

Expenditures for research laboratory renovations should not be included unless the renovation funds expended came from grants and contracts expressly intended for the direct support of engineering research.

Any portion of academic year and/or summer salary for any researcher that is not derived from external research grants or contracts should not be counted.

Total #: Report total number of individual grants, not the total dollar amount of the expenditures.

Expenditures: Report actual expenditures (as opposed to authorization amounts) in U.S. dollars.

Time frame for expenditures: Report expenditures for your current fiscal year.

Research centers listed as "WITHIN an engineering department" on the Research Centers page (screen 7) of the College of Engineering Profile, will not have their expenditures added to the school's total research expenditures. Such expenditures can be included in the department total, while still being listed for the appropriate center. This allows users to list the expenditures in two areas without double-counting.

Graduate

Research Description

Research Description By Graduate Engineering Department

Chemical and Biological Engineering

Chemical Engineering: Synthesis, processing & characterization of nano- and biomaterials (catalysis & interfaces, porous materials, thin film deposition, sol-gel synthesis, aerosol materials synthesis, optoelectronic materials), inorganic membranes, etching and thin film deposition for microelectronics, fuel cell technology, bioanalytical micro- and nanosystems, tissue engineering, and biomedical sensors and separation processes.

Civil Engineering

Current research topics include: finite element analysis, structural reliability, smart structures, blast-effects analysis and testing, structural health monitoring, infrastructure resilience, nanocomposites, composite materials and structures, ultra-high performance concrete, uncertainty quantification, railroad engineering, geomechanics, pavement and materials testing, deep boreholes and CO2 sequestration, wellbore integrity, transportation systems safety and design, regional transportation planning, mobile source air quality, active transportation, environmental remediation, radioactive and hazardous waste management, waste water treatment, environmental microbiology, impact of climate change on water and the environment, water-reuse, decision support systems, groundwater remediation, open-channel hydraulics, arid regions hydrology, construction project management, construction risk analysis, wild fire modeling, building information management (BIM), design-build methods, and sustainability.

Computer Engineering

Biomedical imaging, hardware security, reconfigurable systems, computer graphics, virtual reality, image processing information systems, machine learning, neural networks, cognitive radios, cloud computing, data analytics, and cyber security.

Computer Science

Active research programs include: adaptive computation, computational biology, computer immunology, computational neuroscience, artificial intelligence, machine learning, automated reasoning, formal methods, symbolic and algebraic computation, data mining, run-time systems, memory management, scientific data mining, security, scalable systems, high performance networks, molecular computing, networks, network scaling theory, verification.

Electrical Engineering

Electrical Engineering: Adaptive and optimal control, nonlinear systems, robotics, distributed networks, control systems, hybrid systems, optical switching networks, optical communication systems, digital signal processing, photonics, nano technology, microelectronics fabrication, high speed semiconductor lasers, antennas, RF MEMS, wireless and multiuser communications systems design, pulsed power, high power microwaves, plasma science, power and renewable energy.

Interdisciplinary

Biomedical Engineering
Current research projects include: Fundamentals and bioengineering of enzymatic fuel cells; Stimuli responsive surfaces; Smart mesoporous silica beads for biomedical applications; Nanofluidics for advanced biomolecular separations; Multi-analyte biosensors in packed microcolumns; Microchip countercurrent electroseparation

Nanoscience and Microsystems Engineering (NSMS)
The University of New Mexico graduate program in Nanoscience and Microsystems Engineering bridges the distinct properties of the nanoscale and microsystem functionality. The integrated academic and research activities highlight our capabilities and unique breadth in materials synthesis and self-assembly, nanolithography, interrogative platforms, and functional micro/macrosystems. The program has the following technical thrusts:

• Information Nanotechnology
• Nanoscience of Biosystems
• Nanomaterials for Energy Conversion

To illustrate as an example, Nanoscience of Biosystems places a special emphasis on translating these technologies to radical changes in the way we diagnose, treat and ultimately prevent cancer. UNM's interdisciplinary Nanoscience and Microsystems Engineering degree program is offered jointly by the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Engineering, evolving from the traditional disciplines of solid state physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and engineering. More than 70 faculty in nine academic departments participate in this program, providing an example of how our faculty's leading-edge research benefits graduate as well as undergraduate students in a formal curriculum. The program requires that graduate students complete a curriculum of integrated courses. Students also specialize in one of the technical thrusts or obtain a minor in a traditional department.


Optical science and Engineering
Active research areas in OSE include, advanced materials, biomedical optics, fiber optics, laser cooling, laser physics, semiconductor lasers, ultrafast lasers and phenomena, optical communication, microscopy, nano lithography, nanophotonics, nonlinear optics, optical imaging, photodetectors and IR/spectral focal "plane arrays, microresonators, quantum optics and quantum information, 2D materials, flexible electronics, inorganic nanomembranes, quantum and nonlinear behavior of optical waveguides, magnetomery, nano-scale magnetometry, molecular imaging with optically-pumped fluorophores, self-assembly, biological assembly and photophysical behavior of electronic and optical materials, plasmonics and metamaterials for sensing, and spectroscopy.

Mechanical Engineering

Active research programs are offered in the areas of thermal science, fluid mechanics, solid mechanics, materials science, dynamic systems and controls, robotics, space systems, material characterization, nanomechanics, nanomaterials synthesis and processing, nanoindentation, micro-fabrication, building energy systems and control, energy conversion, energy grid system and control, manufacturing, and computational mechanics. The department houses laboratories in the areas of controls, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, materials science, materials test, robotics, vibrations and multiphase flows. The department collaborates with the UNM School of Medicine, Los Alamos and Sandia Laboratories, and the Air Force Research Laboratory.

Nuclear Engineering

Nuclear Engineering: nuclear reactor engineering (reactor thermal-hydraulics, reactor safety, reactor physics), criticality, fusion and plasma technology, space nuclear power systems and advanced static energy conversion, theoretical and computational methods in radiation transport, Monte Carlo methods, finite element methods, uncertainty quantification, medical physics, nuclear nonproliferation, radiation detection.

Research Description By Engineering Research Center

Center for Advanced Research Computing

The Center for Advanced Research Computing (CARC) is the UNM campus supercomputing Center and is currently the largest academic computing center in the State of New Mexico. Following the deployment this year of several new NSF-funded systems, and supported by a $.3M infrastructure upgrade, the Center has more than 3500 CPU cores and 92k NVIDA Tesla K40M CUDA cores available for production research use, as well as 1 PB managed nearline and mass storage. CARC's resources are available without charge to all faculty, student, and staff researchers at the University, through support from the UNM Office of the Vice President for Research. The Center serves more than 150 faculty and student researchers, spanning 20 departments and seven Colleges, and representing diverse programs and Centers, including the Nanoscience and Microsystems graduate program, UNM Cancer Center, Center for Emerging Energy Technologies, Center for High Technology Materials, DataONE, Long Term Ecological Research Network, Earth Data Analysis Center, and Center for Spatiotemporal Modeling. CARC also serves as the academic unit in charge of the Computational Science and Engineering (CSE) Certificate Program, a graduate degree certificate, and provides computational science training workshops throughout the year.

Center for Biomedical Engineering

The UNM Center for Biomedical Engineering is an interdisciplinary center that coordinates research activities in biomedical engineering among engineers, biologists and clinicians. Research foci include biomaterials, nanobiotechnology, bioanalytical microsystems and molecular and cellular systems engineering.
The center has been instrumental in fostering research among disciplines and with the high-tech industry, hiring key biomedical engineering-engaged faculty, and launching a highly successful outreach program for K-12 students. It has also been heavily involved with outreach to university-level females and under-represented minorities.

Center for Emerging Energy Technology

University of New Mexico has formed the Center for Emerging Energy Technologies (CEET) in 2008 as a research organization with a mission to foster interdisciplinary research in this strategic area of science and engineering. It is a goal of this center to provide for the economic growth of the State in the area of energy technology and to participate in the training and preparation of the labor force through providing an environment of research excellence as a component of the college and advance degree pursuit. This center is also charted to provide services to the state of New Mexico as place to foster and grow multi-institutional initiatives.
CEET has its headquarters at the Aperture Center, a commercial complex located in Mesa del Sol, which is a master-plan community designed using new urbanism principles adapted to the desert Southwest. The infrastructure installed close to the Aperture Center includes the NEDO microgrid demonstration project, a small-scale grid with generation resources and loads. It is designed to experiment with solar generation and storage , demand response and smart HVAC and building control. The equipment includes an OPAL real time simulator that allows researchers to fully test advanced control schemes before they are deployed in real-life situations.

CEET is also an organization that brings together the faculty across New Mexico and nationwide to collaborate under the framework of joint research programs after the award. The Center enjoys the support of EPRI, NSF, Mitsubishi Research Institute and DTRA.

Center for High Technology Materials

CHTM is an international leader in the development of materials, devices, and systems for photonics, optoelectronics , microelectronics, nanoscience, nanotechnology and their application. Research areas include light matter interaction at extremely small length scales and ultrafast time intervals. Specific research topics include the epitaxial growth of compound semiconductor materials and devices, self-assembled quantum dots, quantum wells, nanowires, superlattices and lithographically-defined nanostructures, nanophotonics, doped and poled optical fibers, microring resonators and ultrafast optics, 2D materials and their structural, mechanical and electronic properties, application of 2D materials to flexible electronics, optoelectronics and photonics, rolled-up nanotech, bio-devices integration, materials for THz radiation, nano-scale magnetometry and MRI with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond, and nanoscale thermal energy conversion. Device studies include near infrared, detectors and sources for datacomm and telecomm, avalanche photodiodes, semiconductor lasers, longer wavelength infrared sources and detectors, photovoltaics, nanofluidics, GaN-based visible and UV sources, solid-state lighting and high-efficiency LEDs, visible edge-emitting and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, applications of group III-nitrides to energy efficiency and renewable energy, and novel readout-circuit concepts for smart-pixel imagers. Systems related research includes advanced optical lithography, interferometric lithography, spectral sensing and imaging, molecular imaging with optically-pumped fluorophores, vibrometry using synthetic-aperture radar, ultrafast optical receivers, and microsopy. Emerging areas of research include, Anderson localization and wave propagation in random media, plasmonics, metamaterials and metasystems in the broader context of classical, quantum and computational imaging. Approximately 18 faculty, 19 research faculty, 25 staff and 100 students work at CHTM.

Center for Micro-Engineered Materials

CMEM Goals: The CMEM serves as the focal point for materials research on campus. The Center's current research program focuses on the following areas: Catalysts and Porous Materials; Powder Synthesis and Processing: Sol-gel synthesis; Self assembly of materials; Nano-bio interfaces; Materials for Energy Conversion; Nanomaterials Particulate Synthesis and Processing, Cancer Nanotechnology. CMEM serves the needs of researchers at UNM, as well as external users and collaborators. by acquiring and maintaining key materials characterization facilities. CMEM helps to enhance networking among faculty to build major centers of excellence in the area of nanomaterials. CMEM enhances the education of undergraduate students, graduate students and K-12 teachers by exposing them to research problems of significance to industry, and through the graduate interdisciplinary degree program in Nanoscience and Microsystems Engineering. The NSME degree program involves 9 participating departments from the School of Engineering, College of Arts and Sciences and the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program in the School of Medicine.

Center for Water and the Environment (CWE)

The Center for Water and the Environment was created in the School of Engineering at UNM in 2013 to foster interdisciplinary research in the areas of environmental and water resources engineering. The mission of the Center is to conduct cutting-edge research into technological and engineering-based solutions to problems with water, energy, and the environment, in a framework that considers the social, economic, policy, and legal implications. Practical solutions to problems related to water availability in arid environments and in times of drought, and problems associated with energy development and consumption are particularly relevant to the Center’s mission, in light of the criticality of these issues to the state of New Mexico, the southwestern United States, and their global importance. Solutions to water issues developed by the Center will permit economic development and protect human health, our water resources, and the environment. Major funding for the Center’s activities is being provided by the Environment Protection Agency and by the National Science Foundation, Centers for Research Excellence in Science and Technology (CREST) program.

Configurable Space Microsystems Innovations & Applications Center (COSMIAC)

COSMIAC proudly serves as a Tier-2 Research Center under the School of Engineering at the University of New Mexico. COSMIAC’s role is to promote aerospace innovation through the use of configurable and other technologies in aerospace systems and through its support of directed energy science and technology. Its current research facility of nearly 14,000 square feet includes four dedicated laboratories: a Satellite Design Lab, an Embedded Systems Lab, a Chip Design Lab, and a 3D Printing Lab. COSMIAC is active in the following research areas: Space Plug-and-Play Architecture (SPA) design, radiation testing and analysis, satellite design and development, cyber security and information/mission assurance, space weather modeling, millimeter-wave propagation, software-defined and cognitive radio, satellite antenna research and design, and direct energy science and technology. COSMIAC was responsible for the design and delivery to NASA of UNM’s first satellite, known as Trailblazer, which was launched in November of 2013. COSMIAC’s (UNM’s) second 6U Satellite is SORTIE (Scintillation Observations and Response of The Ionosphere to Electrodynamics) and the team comprises ASTRA, COSMIAC, AFRL, University of Texas at Dallas, and Boston College. Its mission is to construct an atlas of ionospheric variability and is funded by NASA for its Heliophysics Technology and Instrument Development or H-TIDeS program.

COSMIAC has a close relationship with Air Force Research Laboratory and is expanding its customer base to build partnerships with other Department of Defense Service Laboratories, National Laboratories, NASA, and Federal activities based on Kirtland Air Force Base. COSMIAC is also building a Space and Innovative Technology Consortium to unite industry, government, and academia on a common path to establish New Mexico as a high technology hub.

Dean's Office Programs

Undergraduate and graduate minority engineering, mathematics and science student support programs; Native American student support programs; women's engineering and science support programs; undergraduate research programs.

Institute for Space Nuclear Power Studies

Ongoing research on the Generation "IV Very High Temperature gas cooled nuclear Reactors (VHTRs) being considered both for electricity generation and the production of hydrogen fuel. For safety considerations, the VHTR needs to be located 100 m " 150 m away from the chemical plant for the thermo-chemical production of hydrogen. This presents a thermal coupling challenge, which is currently being addressed at the UNM-ISNPS using a hybrid coupling of liquid metals heat pipes and gravity-assisted thermosyphons. This hybrid device operates fully passive, offers high redundancy, has no single-point failures, and experiences low heat losses. The following two patents have already been issued, one in 2009 and the other in 2011:
1. Patent No. US 2009/0323886 A1, Methods and apparatuses for Removal and Transport of Thermal Energy El-Genk, M. S., and Tournier, J.-M. , December 31, 2009.
2. Patent No. US 8073096 B2, Methods and apparatuses for Removal and Transport of Thermal Energy El-Genk, M. S., and Tournier, J.-M. , December 6, 2011.

Research on VHTR UNM-ISNPS includes two additional focus areas:
(a) The development and validation of a chemical oxidation kinetics model of nuclear graphite in the unlikely event of a massive air ingress, following a break in the piping to the energy conversion subsystem. The values of the chemical kinetics parameters for different grades of nuclear graphite, including the Gaussian-like distributions for the specific energies of adsorption of oxygen and desorption of the CO and CO2 reaction products, are determined from the reported experimental measurements of the total gasification rate and the weight loss at different temperatures. This determination accomplished using a multi-parameters optimization methodology. The model calculations are in good agreement with reported experimental measurements by various research group around the world (South Korea, Japan, China, US, and Germany)

(b) Perform multi-physics simulation of VHTR core, during normal operation and in the unlikely event of massive air ingress accident. This effort develops a detailed 3-D thermal-hydraulics model of the whole VHTR core. It will be coupled to the developed oxidation kinetics model of nuclear graphite for performing safety analysis of VHTRs. This computational intensive research is optimized for shorter computational time and modest hardware requirements


IMMERSION COOLING OF ELECTRONICS AND HIGH-POWER COMPUTER CHIPS USING NUCLEATE BOILING OF DIELECTRIC LIQUID ON MICRO-POROUS, ROUGH AND DIMPLED COPPER SURFACES

On the topic of immersion cooling of high power computer chips using nucleate boiling of dielectric liquids on porous micro-porous surfaces, we have developed micro-porous cooper surfaces using electrochemical deposition on Copper substrates. We are performing extensive material synthesis of the deposited micro-porous surfaces and pool boiling experiments to assess the cooling potential of the different surfaces. The results are very encouraging with demonstrated performance that surpasses any other surfaces reported in the literature to date. These surfaces has potential application in the various areas of renewable energy, including solar thermal power systems, and advanced steam/vapor generators for both nuclear and fossil fuel electrical plants, chemical plants, oil refineries, etc.
A patent application on the development of the micro-porous surfaces for enhancing nucleate boiling has submitted with a decision pending.

Research further the performance of deposited micro-porous Cu surface with emphasis on the mitigation of hot spots, typically develop at the surface of high power computer chips, and on the effect of surface inclination of the heat removal capability with nucleate boiling. The results of this research is being used to engineer, design and evaluate the performance of composite spreaders for cooling high power computer chips with hot spots having a local heat flux 3- 5 times that of the surface average heat flux. The composite spreaders are comprised of a Cu substrate of different thicknesses and Cu micro-porous surfaces of different thicknesses. This effort is based on advanced, 3-D thermal analysis using a number of commercial software packages.

This research has been expanded to include testing rough Cu surface and Cu surfaces with micro-dimples for enhancing nucleate boiling and the Critical Heat Flux of dielectric liquids and other planned in the near future. These surfaces lend themselves to large scale industrial applications.

SIMULATION AND MODELING OF SOLAR ENERGETIC RADIATION

Another research effort at the UNM-ISNPS is modeling and simulation of space and solar energetic radiation with energies in excess of 1 GEV and investigating the interaction with different potential shielding materials and human body. This research uses state-of-the art computational codes for calculating the energy deposition and effective radiation dose on board the international Space Station. The results are being compared with reported measurement on board the International space Station using Phantoms to simulate human body. This effort also includes the development and design of a shelter on the lunar surface for protection of inhabitant of an outpost from the solar energetic particles during the periods of solar flares or high solar activities. The design of the lunar shelter relies on using lunar regolith for shielding, thus minimizing the need for launching structures and materials from Earth to the moon, thus reducing the total cost of a mission.


SMALL MODULAR NUCLEAR REACTORS AND POWER PLANTS
A recent research on the development, design and analysis of small modular nuclear reactors for future uses by nuclear utilities and in remote regions of the world, where access to alternative fuel and an electrical grid is limited. The reactor concept being developed is fully passive, as it relies on natural convection for cooling the nuclear reactor during nominal operation and for the removal of decay heat after reactor shutdown. The liquid sodium cooled reactor operates slightly below atmospheric pressures and is designed with relatively long operation life of 5 " 60 years, depending on the reactor thermal power. This power varies from 50 " 150 MW.

A patent has been filled for the “SLIMM” small modular reactor design. Natural circulation of liquid sodium cools this reactor during nominal operation at 10 " 100 MWth and after shutdown with the aid of in-vessel helically coiled tubes sodium/sodium heat exchanger. The SLIMM reactor is to be fabricated at the factory, shipped to the construction site on trucks or barges or by rail and brought on line in short period of < 24 months. The SLIMM plant has total energy utilization in excess of 60%, including electricity generations, co-production of high temperature process heat for a multitude of industrial uses, and heat for space heating and seawater desalination.

The SLIMM plant is most suited for utilities with limited financial resources or operating in regions with low to medium growth in electricity demand, small countries or island nations with no or small electrical grid capacity and remote communities with limited access to fossil fuel or renewable energy generation. With the same basic reactor core design, the nominal power of “SLIMM” reactor increases simply by increasing the height of in-vessel chimney for enhancing the natural circulation of liquid sodium cooling the core.

The SLIMM reactor with two independent shutdown systems and a negative temperature reactivity feedback is cooled after shutdown by natural circulation of ambient air that is capable of removing the decay heat safely in the unlikely event of a malfunction of the in-vessel Na/Na heat exchanger. Variable conductance heat pipes laid a long the reactor vessel wall cools the vessel wall and transport heat to a multitude of passive and redundant modules of thermoelectric units for generating electricity as an auxiliary power source. This auxiliary electrical power, generated both during reactor operation and after shutdown maintains vital function of the plant operating in case of a loss of off-site and onsite power for an extended periods.

MICRO-EMULSIONS MODELING AND SIMULATION
A recent research at UNM-ISNPS focuses on fluid flow and heat transfer in micro-channels and the simulation and modeling of emulsions of micro-droplets of disperse liquid in a co-flowing immiscible liquid, for energy and medical applications. This computation intensive effort focuses on the dripping flow regime for generating mono-disperse droplets and the development of predictive correlations of the average diameter and formation frequency of the disperse micro-droplets as functions of the prevailing dimensionless parameters such are Reynolds numbers, capillary numbers and Weber numbers of the disperse and /or the continuous liquid. Modeling and simulation results are in good agreement with published experimental measurements.

Manufacturing Engineering Program

The Manufacturing Engineering Program (MEP) supports the Master of Engineering in Manufacturing Engineering (MEME) and MEME/MBA degree plans. The MEP is housed in the 57,000 square-foot Manufacturing Training and Technology Center (MTTC), which supports training, research, academic and business functions.
The MTTC has a class 100/1000 cleanroom for semiconductor and microsystems training, research and commercialization functions. The MEP develops training materials, including hands-on kits, to facilitate training of technicians and high-school students for the semiconductor and MEMS manufacturing sectors. The MEP, utilizing the MTTC Cleanroom, hosts hands-on MEMS workshops and courses for college students and faculty members. The MEP also supports robotics research that covers vision systems, adaptive grasp algorithms, learning algorithms, system integration, haptic and coordinated control of a dual-arm workcell, and swarms of aerial and ground robots for imaging and mapping.

Graduate

Subject Areas of Research

Subject Areas

  • Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle
  • Algorithms and Data Structures
  • Alternate Energy Systems
  • Alzheimer's Disease
  • Antennas and rf
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Automated Reasoning
  • Autonomous Vehicles and Control
  • Bio-engineering
  • Bioanalytical Systems
  • Biofuel Cells
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomechanics
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomedical Imaging
  • Biosensors
  • Boiling heat transfer of dielectric liquids from porous, microporous and nano-de
  • Carbon Based Materials
  • Cellular Analysis Systems
  • Circuits and Control Systems
  • Compilers and Garbage Collection
  • Computational Algebra
  • Computational Biology
  • Computational Materials Science
  • Computational Mechanics (Fluid and Solid)
  • Computational Neuroscience
  • Computer Architecture
  • Computer Graphics
  • Computer Immunology and Security
  • Computer Music
  • Computer Vision
  • Computer and Information Security
  • Construction Management
  • Construction Materials
  • Cooperative Robotics
  • Data Communications
  • Data Mining
  • Design & Analysis of Compact Reactors & High Energy Utilization Nuclear Power Plants
  • Design & Transient Analysis of Heat Pipes including Startup from a frozen State
  • Design, Transient Modeling, and Autonomous Operation of Space Nuclear Reactor Power System
  • Diagnostics
  • Electro separation
  • Electrochemistry
  • Electrophoresis and Electrochomatograpy
  • Energy
  • Energy Grid Modeling
  • Energy Physics
  • Engineering Mechanics
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Monitoring
  • Environmental Training
  • Error Correction
  • Failure Analysis
  • Fiber Optics
  • Flow Cytometry
  • Flow and heat transfer in microchannels and Microtubes
  • Fluid Mechanics
  • Formal Methods
  • Fuel Cell Materials
  • Fuel Cells
  • Fuzzy Logic
  • Generation IV nuclear reactors
  • Genome Sequencing
  • Genome-level Analysis of Gene Expression
  • Geosynthetic Monitoring Systems
  • Ground Water Engineering
  • Haptics
  • Heat Transfer and Microfluidics
  • High Performance Computing
  • High Performance VLSI
  • High Power Microwaves
  • High Temperature Devices for Space Applications
  • Human Cognition: Modeling and Assessment
  • Hydrodynamic and Electrical Instabilities
  • Hydrology
  • Image Analysis
  • Image Processing
  • Imaging Science
  • Information theory
  • Infrared Detectors and Arrays
  • Infrared Laser Sources
  • Integrated Optics
  • Integrated Transportation Design
  • Intelligent Control
  • Interaction of high energy particles with materials
  • Intermodal Transportation
  • Lossy and Lossless data Compression
  • Machine Learning
  • Manufacturing Engineering
  • Materials for Energy Conversion
  • Mechanical Behavior of Materials
  • Mechanical Characterization of Materials
  • Mechatronics
  • Medical Image Enhancement
  • Metamaterials
  • Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS)
  • Micro Fluidics
  • Micro Reactors
  • Micro fabrication
  • Microelectronics Fabrication and Processing
  • Microscale Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer
  • Microscale Heat Transfer
  • Microscopy
  • Microwaves
  • Mode-Locked Lasers
  • Modeling & Simulation of Networks
  • Modeling and thermal management of space systems
  • Molecular Computing and Modeling
  • Monte Carlos Methods
  • Multi-scale modeling of terrestrial nuclear power plants and space nuclear power
  • Multiscale, Multiphysics Computations for Advanced Nuclear Reactor Modeling
  • Multivariate Statistics
  • Nanobiomaterials
  • Nanocomposites
  • Nanofluidics
  • Nanolithography
  • Nanophotonics
  • Nanoscale Epitaxial Growth
  • Nanotechnology
  • Negative Index Materials
  • Network scaling theory
  • Networks
  • Neural Networks
  • Neurotincs design and analysis of space nuclear reactors and radiation shield
  • Neurtronic & thermal-hydraulic design & analyses of terrestrial & space nuclear reactors & power systems
  • Neutronics design and analysis of space nuclear reactors and radiation shield
  • Nonlinear Optics
  • Nuclear Criticality Safety
  • Nuclear Detection and Instrumentation
  • Nuclear Fuel and Materials
  • Nuclear Reactor Design, Thermal-hydraulics, Safety and Nuclear Fuels
  • Nuclear Reactor Physics
  • Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation
  • Optical Microscopy
  • Optoelectronics
  • Parallel and Randomized Algorithms
  • Photodetectors
  • Photonic Crystal Fibers
  • Photonic Crystals
  • Photonic Integrated Circuits
  • Photonics
  • Photovoltaics
  • Physics of Computation
  • Plasma Physics and Science
  • Plasma Science
  • Plasma Synthesis and Modification of Materials
  • Plasmonics
  • Porous Materials
  • Process Modeling and Control
  • Pulsed Power
  • Quantum Dot Radiation Sensors
  • Quantum Optics
  • Radiation Tolerant Electronics
  • Radiation Transport Modeling, Analysis and Simulation
  • Remote sensing
  • Robotics, Automation, and Machine Vision
  • Safety and end of life storage of space reactors in earth orbits
  • Safety of Space Nuclear Reactors During a Water Submersion and Flooding Accident
  • Satellite Array Technology (Formation Flying)
  • Scalable Systems
  • Scientific Data Mining
  • Scientific Visualization
  • Self-Assembled Quantum Dots
  • Semiconductor Circuit Design
  • Semiconductor Lasers
  • Semiconductor Materials
  • Semiconductor Nanowires
  • Sensors: Bio and Inorganic
  • Signal Processing and Communications
  • Smart Materials and Structures
  • Soft Computing (Fuzzy logic, neural networks, evolutionary computations)
  • Space Nuclear Power and Propulsion Systems for Space and Planetary Exploration
  • Spatial-Temporal Modeling of Signaling Networks
  • Specification and Verification
  • Spectroscopy
  • Structural Systems
  • Student Retention and Success
  • Supersonic Flows
  • Supramolecular Assemblies
  • Surface Analysis
  • Sustainability
  • Symbolic Computation
  • Synthetic Aperture Radar
  • Synthetic Modification of Semiconductor Surfaces
  • Synthetic Polymers
  • Systems Biology
  • Theory of Computation
  • Thermal management and design and analyses of heat pipe radiators for space syst
  • Thermoelectric energy conversion
  • Thermosyphones and applications to industrial and waste heat recovery
  • Thermosyphons design, operation, and industrial applications
  • Tissue Engineering
  • Traffic Analysis
  • Transit Management Software
  • Transportation Public Policy
  • Ultrafast Lasers
  • Uncertainty Visualization
  • Verification
  • Visible Light Emitting Diodes
  • Visualization & Virtual Environments
  • Water Resources Engineering

Graduate

Dual Degrees

Graduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

Master of Engineering Degrees

The School of Engineering offers programs leading to Master of Engineering (M.E.) degree in Manufacturing Engineering. The School of Engineering and the Anderson Schools of Management offer a dual degree program leading to the degrees of Master of Engineering in Manufacturing Engineering (M.E.M.E.) and the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) For details, see the Graduate Program section of this Catalog. There is also a Shared Credit Program, that begins in the Mechanical Engineering department B.S. curriculum, and eventuates in a M.E.M.E degree.

Dual Degree Programs " Graduate and/or Professional

The University of New Mexico offers both formal and individualized dual programs. Students must adhere to the general degree requirements as described earlier in this Catalog. A brief description of the formal dual programs follows, however students interested in them should review the departmental sections of this Catalog and consult with each program for detailed information. With the exception of those programs that involve the J.D. degree, students in dual degree programs must complete both degrees in the same semester.
Adding Graduate Certificates

Current graduate students may apply to a graduate certificate program by submitting an application and required materials through the UNM Application Web site. If the certificate program admits the student, Graduate Studies is informed and adds the graduate certificate program to the student’s official record. The student is responsible for listing the certificate on the Program of Study (Master's students) or Application for Candidacy form (Doctoral students) form.
The J.D. and M.A. in Latin American Studies

The Juris Doctor/Master of Latin American Studies dual degree is jointly administered by the Dean of the School of Law and the Director of Academic Programs for Latin American Studies. The purpose of this program is to prepare legal professionals for work in Latin America or with Hispanic people in the U.S. By combining legal training with Latin American language and area studies, the program enables students to develop professional skills directly applicable to Latin American nations and populations. In addition, the student earns two degrees in less time and at less expense than would be required if each were pursued separately. The program requires 80 credit hours of law course work, 9 credit hours of international law, 24 credit hours of Latin American Studies, and a 3-credit hour elective course covering subject matter linking Law and Latin American Studies. Competency in Spanish or Portuguese is required. Entrance requirements must be met for both programs; applications should be submitted simultaneously. Students interested in the program should consult the advisors in the School of Law and in Latin American Studies.
The J.D. and M.B.A. Degree Program

The School of Law and the Anderson Graduate School of Management offer a dual program leading to the degrees of Juris Doctor and Master of Business Administration. Under this program, the School of Law accepts 6 credit hours of graduate credit from the Business and Administrative Sciences degree toward the J.D. degree, and the Anderson Graduate School of Management accepts 6 credit hours of credit in the School of Law toward the 15 credit hours of elective credit in the second year of the M.B.A. program. Students pursuing this program must satisfy the admission and other academic requirements of both schools. Those planning to enter the dual program should consult with the admission officers of both schools as early as possible.
The J.D. and M.Acct. Degree Program

The School of Law and the Anderson Graduate School of Management offer a dual program leading to the degrees of Juris Doctor and Master of Accounting. Under this program, the School of Law accepts 6 credit hours of graduate credit from the Master of Accounting Degree toward the J.D. degree and the Anderson Schools of Management accepts 6 credit hours of graduate credit from the School of Law toward the M.Acct. degree, course work subject to pre-approval from the faculty advisor. Students pursuing this program must satisfy the admission and other academic requirements of both schools. Anderson School of Management accepts the LSAT in lieu of the GMAT if the student has already been accepted into the law school and has earned a “B” or better in the two prerequisites for admission into the M.Acct., MGMT 502 and 503 or equivalent.

Those planning to enter the dual program should consult with the admission officers of both schools as early as possible.

Students who are interested in obtaining a J.D./M.Acct. dual degree must meet with their graduate program advisor to discuss course selection.
The J.D. and M.P.A. Degree Program

Under this program a student is able to earn the J.D. degree and the Master of Public Administration in approximately three and one half to four years. To enroll in the program the student must have completed the first year in the School of Law; in addition, permission of both the Dean of the School of Law and the Director of Public Administration and formal admission to graduate study are required. Students must satisfy the admission and other academic requirements of both schools.

A student pursues the normal Law School program. During each semester and summer the student works toward the fulfillment of the course requirements for the M.P.A. The School of Law accepts up to 6 credit hours of public administration courses toward its degree requirements, and the School of Public Administration accepts up to 6 credit hours of law courses toward the M.P.A. degree requirements. In addition, the student may count up to 6 additional credit hours of law courses toward the M.P.A. electives requirement: these credit hours, however, do not count toward J.D. requirements. If the student is in a thesis program, the thesis requirement may be completed during the summer or fall following graduation from the School of Law. In choosing courses for any semester, the student must have the advice and consent of the Dean of the School of Law and the Director of Public Administration.
The J.D. and M.A., M.S. or Ph.D. Program

A student in this program is able to earn the J.D. degree and an M.A., M.S. or Ph.D. in an academic field. To enroll, a student must receive permission from the Dean of the School of Law, the Graduate Dean and the chairperson of the graduate unit offering the other degree. Students must satisfy the admission and other academic requirements of both schools.

In choosing courses for any semester, the student must have the advice and consent of the Dean of the School of Law, the major advisor and the chairperson of the department in which a graduate degree is being sought; in the case of a student pursuing the doctorate, the Dean of the School of Law shall appoint one member of the Committee on Studies. The School of Law accepts up to 6 credit hours of appropriate graduate courses toward its degree requirement, and the graduate unit concerned accepts up to 6 credit hours of law courses toward its degree requirements.
The M.A. in Latin American Studies and M.P.H.

The Master of Arts in Latin American Studies and Masters of Public Health dual degree program is intended to prepare graduates to improve the health of Latin American populations and Latino populations in the United States, with a primary focus on New Mexico, the Southwest, the United States/Mexico border region, and regions south of the border. It supplements the M.P.H. program with in-depth study of languages, cultures, and societies that help prepare graduates to work effectively either in Latin America, or with Latin American immigrant populations within the United States.
The M.C.R.P. and M.A. in Latin American Studies

This program is designed particularly for students interested in careers related to Latin America that deal with community and regional planning, and require expertise in various academic disciplines. The program enables students to develop the skills and background necessary to assess public needs, determine and develop regional planning strategies and programs, and become familiar with land use planning concepts. Students may earn the dual degree in approximately two-thirds of the time it would normally take to earn both degrees separately. A minimum of 53 hours of course work is required for the dual degree.
The M.C.R.P. and M.W.R.

A dual degree between the M.W.R. and M.C.R.P. prepares students to make important contributions in both water resources and planning through a familiarity with the scientific discourse of water resources and the language and methodologies from community-based planning. Diverse groups are brought together to collaborate in the mediation of water disputes, especially in the Southwest where demands on limited water resources are increasing exponentially. Students are exposed to the pedagogy of instructors in diverse fields of expertise, such as resource planning and management, dispute resolution and negotiation, hydrology, economic development, and collaborative planning. The M.C.R.P./M.W.R. curriculum is:
Credit
Hours
CRP 500 Planning Theory and Process 4
CRP 510 Planning Communication Workshop 2
CRP 511 Analytical Methods for Planning 4
CRP 527 Watershed Management 3
CRP 532 Foundations of Natural Resources 3
CRP 580 Community Growth and Land Use Planning 3
CRP 588 Professional Project/Thesis Preparation Seminar 2
CRP 589
-or-
CRP 599 Professional Project II

Master's Thesis 6
WR 571 Water Resources I - Contemporary Issues 4
WR 572 Water Resources II - Models 4
WR 573 Water Resources III - Field Problems 4
electives from M.W.R. groups 1, 2 and 3 18
3 credit hours from Policy Management Concentration
6 credit hours from Hydroscience
3 credit hours from Water Resources Utilities
6 credit hours from electives approved by advisor
Total 57

The M.B.A. and M.A. in Latin American Studies

Building upon the University’s unique cultural-environmental setting and its distinctive Latin American role, an integrated interdisciplinary dual degree program leading to the degrees of Master of Business Administration and Master of Arts in Latin American Studies is offered cooperatively by the Robert O. Anderson Graduate School of Management and the Latin American Studies program. This program is designed to prepare outstanding individuals for a diversity of dynamic and productive careers throughout the world in businesses, governments, private and governmental foundations, consulting firms, and other institutions with emphases on Latin America. The dual degree can be completed in a minimum of 54 and a maximum of 72 credit hours, depending on the number of core curriculum waivers granted by the Anderson School. Students must come into the program with two years of undergraduate course work, or its equivalent, in Spanish and Portuguese. Applicants must satisfy the requirements of both graduate programs. Those planning to enter this dual degree program are urged to consult with the M.B.A. program office at the Anderson Schools of Management and with the Latin American Studies program office, 801 Yale N.E.
The M.C.R.P. and M.P.A.

The dual degree in Community and Regional Planning (M.C.R.P.) and Public Administration (M.P.A.) is available to students who desire a public sector career in leadership positions requiring the skills of both a trained planner and administrator. The program of studies enables students to acquire skills and background necessary to assess public needs, develop community plans and programs, and in general to become effective administrators of planning organizations in urban, regional or rural settings. Students with undergraduate degrees in any discipline may be admitted provided they meet the entrance requirements of both degree programs. Each student selects either Community and Regional Planning or Public Administration as the home unit and is assigned an advisor accordingly. Together, the advisor and student organize an individualized program of studies that incorporates the core courses in both degree programs, an internship or extra course, a special interdisciplinary seminar on the practice of policy development, and 6 to 9 credit hours of electives. At the end of the M.C.R.P./M.P.A. course work, students elect to complete either a thesis supervised by a joint faculty committee or a public administration professional paper plus a community and regional planning independent project.

This dual degree program requires a minimum of 60 credit hours of course work, however the number of credit hours needed to complete the joint degree program varies according to the core requirements in effect for each degree program. Interested students should consult the M.C.R.P./M.P.A. Dual Degree Program Guidelines for details. In most instances, the M.C.R.P./M.P.A. degrees can be completed in two-thirds the time it would normally take to earn both degrees separately.
The M.S.N. and M.P.H.

The dual degree plan in Nursing and Public Health prepares nurses interested in leadership careers for professional Community Health Nursing and Public Health positions. Nurses are prepared to perform the core functions of assessment, assurance, surveillance and health policy in the public health arena.

The program of studies in the two disciplines enables nurses with baccalaureate preparation to further develop skills necessary to assess and plan health care delivery systems within the public health system. The detailed plan of studies satisfies the core curriculum in both areas. The thesis option (Plan I) is minimally 54 credit hours, or non-thesis option (Plan II) is minimally 56 credit hours, if the designated course plans are followed. Applicants must satisfy admission and other academic requirements of each program.
M.E.M.E. and M.B.A. Program

The School of Engineering (SOE) and the Anderson Schools of Management (ASM) offer a dual degree program leading to the degrees of Master of Engineering in Manufacturing Engineering (M.E.M.E.) and the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.). Under this program, seven courses are shared: ASM accepts 9 credit hours of graduate credit from the Manufacturing Engineering Program (MEP) core and 6 credit hours of engineering technical electives; the SOE accepts 6 credit hours of graduate credit from ASM, to be applied to the MEP core. Engineering Track Electives may come from either the Mechanical and Equipment Manufacturing area of focus or the Computers in Manufacturing area of focus (as defined for the M.E.M.E. degree).

Students pursuing this program must satisfy the admission and other academic requirements of both schools. Students are required to complete a three-month industrial internship in a manufacturing setting (or demonstrate previous equivalent experience). Students are also required to complete a 3 credit hour project in conjunction with a manufacturing enterprise. The 60 credit hour M.E.M.E./M.B.A. curriculum is:
Credit
Hours
Choose from:
CS 529, 531, 585; ECE 536, 574L, 595; ME 581
3
ME 585 Modern Manufacturing Methods 3
ME/ECE 586 Design for Manufacturability 3
MGMT 502 Financial Accounting and Analysis 3
MGMT 504 Managerial Economics 3
MGMT 506 Managing People in Organizations 3
MGMT 508 Business and Society 3
MGMT 511 Technology Commercialization and the Global Environment 3
MGMT 521 Manufacturing Systems Management 3
MGMT 522 Managerial Marketing 3
MGMT 526 Financial Decision Making 3
MGMT 598 The Strategic Management Process 3
MGMT 5XX MOT Elective (MGMT 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, 519) 6
STAT 570
-or-
MGMT 501 Industrial Statistics

Data Driven Decision Making* 3
Elective Engineering Area of Focus Elective 3
Elective Engineering Area of Focus Elective 3
Elective Engineering Area of Focus Elective 3
Elective Engineering Area of Focus Elective (for Plan II) 3
CS/ECE/ME Project (or 6 credit hours Thesis, Plan I) 3
Total 60


* Students may substitute MGMT 501 if STAT 570 is not available.
Pharm.D. and M.B.A. Program

The College of Pharmacy and the Anderson School of Management offer a dual degree program leading to the Doctor of Pharmacy and Master of Business Administration. The dual degree program is designed to prepare students for leadership positions that demand knowledge of both health sciences and management concepts. The goal is to provide graduates with skills, knowledge, and experience needed for management positions in the pharmaceutical industry, with health care organizations, or retail/independent pharmacies. Under this program, the College of Pharmacy accepts 6 credit hours of M.B.A. core courses as professional electives and the Anderson Graduate School of Management accepts 6 credit hours (PHRM 707 and 760) of credit in the College of Pharmacy toward the 18 credit hours of elective credit in the M.B.A. program. Students pursuing this program must satisfy the admission and other academic requirements of both schools. Those planning to enter the dual program should consult with the admission officers of both schools as early as possible. Students that do not have a Bachelor's degree must meet the admission requirements of Anderson's "Three-Two" program.
M.B.A. and M.S. in Electrical Engineering or in Computer Engineering

This dual degree program leading to a Master of Business Administration and a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering or Master of Science in Computer Engineering is aimed at electrical or computer engineering graduate students who have interest in a career that requires graduate level training in both business and electrical or computer engineering. The main advantage of a dual degree program is that it minimizes the time, expense and course work for earning both graduate degrees, one from the School of Engineering (SOE) and the other from the Anderson Schools of Management (ASM). The advantage is realized by “sharing” courses between the two degrees as stipulated in the program.
The M.A. in Language, Literacy and Sociocultural Studies and the M.A. in Latin American Studies

The College of Education and Latin American Studies offer a dual degree program leading to master’s degrees in Language, Literacy and Sociocultural Studies and Latin American Studies. This program is intended to allow education professionals to enhance their secondary school teaching with Latin American topics in the humanities and social sciences. The program combines advanced professional development in education with advanced interdisciplinary study of Latin America and is designed to help students integrate the two fields through coordinated advisement and bridge courses.

The program requires 51 credit hours of course work for students who hold teaching certificates. It includes three components: 21 credit hours of Language, Literacy and Sociocultural Studies courses with a concentration in social studies education; 21 credit hours of Latin American Studies course work divided between two of the following concentrations: Anthropology, Art History, Brazilian Literature and Culture, Economics, Gender Studies, History, Human Rights, International Management, Political Science, Religion and Philosophy, Sociology, Spanish American Literature, and Spanish Linguistics; and 9 credit hours of bridge courses: two core courses and one elective.

Completed separately, the two degrees would require 69"72 credit hours. Under the dual degree program, full-time students would be able to finish in approximately three years.

Students pursuing this program must meet admissions requirements of both the College of Education and Latin American Studies. Separate applications should be made simultaneously to the Department of Language, Literacy and Sociocultural Studies and Latin American Studies. It is expected that applicants to this program already have completed the licensure requirements for secondary teaching.

Students who are not licensed upon admission may pursue licensure through the Post-Baccalaureate program in the Department of Teacher Education. This program requires 18 credit hours of course work (at the undergraduate and/or graduate level). Students should contact the College of Education Advisement Center (505) 277-3190 for individual advisement. Latin American Studies students should be prepared for additional course work for licensure.
M.D./Ph.D.

The M.D./Ph.D. program is designed to provide comprehensive training in both clinical sciences and a basic biomedical science discipline. The intent of the program is to provide students with an integrated and cohesive training experience while obtaining the M.D./Ph.D. degree. Students participate in activities common to both programs while involved in the M.D. curriculum or engaged in Ph.D. dissertation research.

Currently, the program consists of 18 months of the medical school (M.D.) curriculum followed by 3-4 years of Ph.D. dissertation research and the graduate school curriculum. Students conclude with the remaining two years of the medical school curriculum. The joint M.D./Ph.D. program is designed to be completed in 7-8 years. The Ph.D. and M.D. degrees are awarded simultaneously at the end of the entire training period. Students take three one-month long rotations in research laboratories during the initial 20 months of the program. These experiences are meant to broaden the research experience of the students as they decide in what research area they wish to specialize. Students can pursue many lines of research activity performed by investigators in biomedical research in the School of Medicine. A total of 48 credit hours plus 18 dissertation credit hours plus good standing throughout the SOM curriculum is required for the M.D./Ph.D. degree.

For more information:
BREP Program
MSC08 4560
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
(505) 272-1887
Web site: Biomedical Research Education Program
email: brep@salud.unm.edu
M.D./M.P.H.

The dual status M.D./M.P.H. requires five years of integrated learning. This integrated learning enhances opportunities for medical students to acquire public health knowledge and skills with the goals of 1) reducing disparities in health status within New Mexican populations 2) strengthening physician advocacy and leadership skills in health policy development 3) fostering evidence-based interventions and 4) using assessment skills to better determine population needs and interventions. Each M.D./M.P.H. student would be able to successfully complete both degrees in an integrated fashion.

Student applies simultaneously to both the M.D. and the M.P.H. programs and indicates on the two applications that they are applying for dual status. Students must meet the requirements of both programs and be accepted into both programs in order to be considered dual status.

Students are admitted to each program separately, yet once they are admitted to both programs, they qualify as dual status students. For more information on the M.D./M.P.H. dual status, contact the M.P.H. program.
Dual Degree Programs " Individual

To pursue an integrated course of study combining two master’s degree programs, graduate students may, with prior approval of the two department chairpersons, embark upon their own individualized dual degree program culminating in two master’s degrees, under the following conditions:

The student must prepare a written rationale for the particular dual degree program, including a description of the objectives to be achieved. The student’s rationale and proposed Program of Study must be approved and signed by each graduate unit chairperson (or graduate unit advisor). The completed materials must be submitted to the Graduate Dean for final approval.
The student must meet all requirements for both master’s degrees, with the exception that a maximum of 6 credit hours from each major may be counted toward degree requirements in the other major.
Application process.
a. A new applicant wishing to pursue a dual degree program must submit an application, including application fee, to the second unit with his/her rationale for an individualized dual degree, and must identify each graduate unit to the other on both applications. The two departments may review the application together or sequentially. If accepted by both graduate units, the student is admitted to graduate study with two majors.
b. A student who is enrolled in one master’s degree program and wishes to add a second master’s must submit an application, including application fee to the second unit, together with his/her rationale statement (approved by both graduate units) to Graduate Studies (see #1 above) for an individualized dual degree. Submission of these materials must take place within three semesters of the student’s acceptance to the first graduate program. Acceptance by the second graduate unit establishes the student’s status in a dual degree program.
The student must work throughout the program with academic advisors from both graduate units, and the entire dual degree program should be constructed to fit the agreed-upon rationale.
Both degrees must be completed in the same semester.

M.F.A./M.A. Dual Status (Concurrent Enrollment):
M.F.A. and First or Second Master’s (Different field/major code)

While pursuing a M.F.A. degree, a M.F.A. student may choose to pursue a master’s degree in a field or discipline (major code) outside the M.F.A. field. Students wishing to pursue dual status must adhere to the following:

The M.F.A. student must prepare a written rationale for adding the particular master’s degree program, including a description of the objectives to be achieved. The student’s proposal must be approved and signed by the M.F.A. graduate unit chairperson (or graduate unit advisor). The completed proposal must be submitted to the Graduate Dean for final approval.
The student must be formally admitted to the added master’s program and must submit an application packet indicating the addition of the master’s program, together with his/her rationale statement (see #1 above) to Graduate Studies. Acceptance by the second graduate unit establishes the student’s dual status.
The student must meet all requirements for both the M.F.A. and the master’s degree, with the exception that a maximum of 6 approved credit hours from each degree program may be counted toward requirements in the other degree program.
The student must work throughout the program with academic advisors from both graduate units regarding requirements for each degree as well as shared units. The student should obtain from both graduate units written approval of the 6 credit hours from each program that may be counted toward required credit hours in the other degree program.
Time limits for completion of the two degrees:
a. Students must adhere to the seven-year rule for completion of all requirements for the master’s degree (see “Time Limit for Completion of Degree” under Master’s Degrees).
b. Students must adhere to their M.F.A. program’s rules regarding time limits for completion of the M.F.A. (see “Time Limit for Completion of Degree” of the M.F.A.). No exception are made to the University time limit for the M.F.A. degree to accommodate completion of the master’s degree.
c. If the time needed for completion of the master’s degree extends beyond the completion of the M.F.A., the student must have a Program of Studies for the master’s degree approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies before the M.F.A. degree is awarded. If this is not done, the student is allowed to count any of the credit used for the M.F.A. toward the master’s degree.

Obtaining a First Master’s Degree while in a Doctoral Program (same field/major code)

Students admitted directly to a doctoral program may obtain a master’s degree in the doctoral field of study while pursuing the doctorate. Specific information regarding the master’s degree follows:

Students must adhere to departmental and university policies regarding the master’s degree.
Credit hours taken to complete the master’s degree may be applied to the doctoral degree, within the limits specified in this Catalog under Doctoral Degrees.
Students must complete departmental and university requirements for the master’s degree prior to the submission of the Application for Candidacy for the doctoral degree.

Dual Status (Concurrent Enrollment): Ph.D. and First or Second Master’s (different field/major code)

While pursuing a doctoral degree, a doctoral student may choose to pursue a master’s degree in a field or discipline (major code) outside the doctoral field. Students wishing to pursue a doctoral degree and a master’s degree in different fields concurrently must adhere to the following:

Students must have written permission from their doctoral program to pursue the master’s degree.
Students must complete application materials and be formally admitted to the new master’s program.
Students must adhere to the seven-year rule for completion of all requirements for the master’s degree (see “Time Limit for Completion of Degree” under Master’s Degrees).
Students must adhere to the five-year rule for completion of the doctorate (see “Time Limit for Completion of Degree” under Doctoral Degrees). No exception are made to the five-year limit for the doctoral degree to accommodate completion of the master’s degree.
If the time needed for completion of the master’s degree extends beyond the completion of the doctoral degree, the student must have a Program of Studies for the master’s degree approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies before the doctoral degree is awarded.
A minimum of 18 credit hours of course work for the doctoral degree (exclusive of dissertation credit hours) must be taken in post-master’s (i.e., doctoral) status and cannot be used for any master’s degree. Graduate units may impose additional requirements.

International Articulation Agreements

Collaborative agreements with international institutions are encouraged. These International Articulation Agreements are expected to capitalize on the strengths of each of the participating institutions and facilitate transfer articulation such that students earn a degree from both institutions. In order to receive a degree from UNM, all degree requirements must be satisfied.

Specific program agreements, involving transfer credits from the international institution amounting to less than 25% of the total UNM degree requirements, must be approved by the relevant College Dean, and notification must be provided to the Provost Office. Agreements involving transfer credits that amount to 25%-50% of the total degree requirements must receive prior approval from the Provost Office. Unless resubmitted for approval, agreements become void after seven years.
Shared-Credit Undergraduate/Graduate Degree Programs

A Shared-Credit Undergraduate/Graduate Degree Program (such as 3+2, 4+1, etc.) provides an accelerated path to earning both a baccalaureate and a master’s degree. Both the baccalaureate and master’s degree requirements are completed in a program-defined number years by means of shared course work. Such programs help recruit high-achieving UNM undergraduate students into UNM graduate programs.

This policy provides guidelines for programs that wish to participate in a Shared-Credit Undergraduate/Graduate Degree Program.

Shared-Credit Programs must be approved through the Faculty Senate curriculum process, and are not available for individual student design. Requesting departments, undergraduate and graduate, are responsible for ensuring that accrediting bodies do not object to sharing courses for the two degrees.

Shared-Credit Undergraduate/Graduate Degree requirements:

All undergraduate degree requirements, including college requirements, must be met.
The graduate portion of the program must meet at least Plan I, Plan II, or Plan III University minimums, including the approved graduate courses taken at the undergraduate level.
A maximum of 18 credit hours of approved graduate-credit-eligible courses may be taken in undergraduate status and applied again (shared) to the graduate degree. Shared courses are transcripted as graduate.
Shared courses must be from a prescribed set that meet an undergraduate requirement, such as that of a minor, concentration, emphasis, second major, distributed minor. A grade of "B" or better must be obtained in the courses in order for them to be shared toward the graduate degree.
The undergraduate degree is awarded when it is completed.
Time-to-degree for the graduate portion of the program begins in the senior year of the undergraduate degree. Standard Graduate Studies Leave of Absence policy and re-admission procedure apply to students in Shared-Credit Programs. However, upon re-admission the student is no longer eligible for the Shared-Credit Program and courses taken while an undergraduate are not applicable to a graduate degree.

Shared-Credit Programs must identify in their curriculum proposals and published materials:

Admission Requirements. These must be, at the least, the minimum requirements in place for UNM graduate admission. Other considerations may also include the minimum number of credit hours that must be completed in the undergraduate portion, completion of a minimum number of credit hours or specific courses in the undergraduate major, class standing, minimum GPA, etc.

Students follow the usual graduate admission process to the participating graduate program.

Admission to the graduate portion of the program is provisional until the undergraduate degree is awarded.

Escape Clause. Program requirements should define the steps to be taken by students who choose not to complete both degrees, and by departments that choose not to advance a student to the graduate portion of the program. Students who choose not to complete the graduate portion of the program are still awarded the undergraduate degree when all undergraduate requirements are met.

Graduate

Student Appointments

Appointments by Department

Appointments - Number of Appointments
Stipend - Average Monthly Stipend

Department Fellowships TA RA Other Total Appts.
Chemical and Biological Engineering
Appointments: 0 0 1 0 1
Stipends: $0 $0 $2,000 $0
Civil Engineering
Appointments: 0 8 39 3 50
Stipends: $0 $2,000 $1,888 $1,875
Computer Engineering
Appointments: 0 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0 $0
Computer Science
Appointments: 0 6 33 16 55
Stipends: $0 $1,783 $2,357 $1,837
Electrical Engineering
Appointments: 0 1 63 36 100
Stipends: $0 $1,531 $1,500 $866
Note: Combined for Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering.
Interdisciplinary
Appointments: 4 4 46 4 58
Stipends: $1,830 $1,550 $1,750 $1,350
Mechanical Engineering
Appointments: 0 8 10 0 18
Stipends: $0 $1,496 $1,624 $0
Nuclear Engineering
Appointments: 1 1 17 1 20
Stipends: $2,750 $1,000 $2,000 $2,000
All Total Appointments 5 28 209 60 302

Appointments by Research Center

Appointments - Number of Appointments
Stipend - Average Monthly Stipend

Graduate Research Center Fellowships RA Other Total Appts.
Center for Advanced Research Computing
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Center for Biomedical Engineering
Appointments: 0 12 0 12
Stipends: $0 $1,826 $0
Center for Emerging Energy Technology
Appointments: 0 6 0 6
Stipends: $0 $1,939 $0
Center for High Technology Materials
Appointments: 0 47 0 47
Stipends: $0 $1,524 $0
Center for Micro-Engineered Materials
Appointments: 0 21 0 21
Stipends: $0 $1,883 $0
Center for Water and the Environment (CWE)
Appointments: 0 17 0 17
Stipends: $0 $1,888 $0
Configurable Space Microsystems Innovations & Applications Center (COSMIAC)
Appointments: 0 7 3 10
Stipends: $0 $1,500 $1,500
Dean's Office Programs
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Institute for Space Nuclear Power Studies
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Manufacturing Engineering Program
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
All Total Appointments 0 110 3 113