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The University of New Mexico - 2016

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Engineering Information

Student Projects

Student Design Projects Description

1) Chemical and Biological Engineering. Senior Chemical Engineering students have a two-semester design experience. The first semester (Fall) is a textbook-based course with individual and small team problems. The second semester includes material on process safety hazards and environmental issues, but the emphasis is on the capstone design projects. The capstone projects are open-ended semester-long projects that involve integration of a broad range of chemical engineering principles to address a chemical process or product design. Projects in the recent past have included the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Student Design Contest problem (e.g. gas-to-liquid conversion, ABE fermentation), problems from the WERC Environmental Design Contest (e.g., sulfate removal from groundwater, brackish water pretreatment), other petrochemical projects such as a fuel processor for fuel cell power station, and product design such as a transdermal drug delivery system.

2) Civil Engineering students are required to participate in a capstone design course. Student project teams design a comprehensive and creative civil engineering project, including economic and cost analyses. The projects are sponsored by different local and national engineering firms and involve real world projects that the firms have previously designed or are currently designing. Projects involve design skills from a variety of civil engineering disciplines.

2A) Civil Engineering students compete in the national bridge building and concrete canoe contests sponsored by the American Institute of Steel Construction and the American Society of Civil Engineers. Students design and build a steel bridge. Bridges are judged on their ability to support a load, weight, speed of assembly, and appearance. Students also design and build a lightweight concrete canoe that can be used in a canoe race.

2-B) Construction Engineering and Management students participate in the regional construction competition for the Associated Schools of Construction and the National Home Builder Associations. Students are given design documents for a construction project and twenty-four hours to complete the plans for the project. They design a production plan for this project which includes such items as: safety plan, production plan, site plan, budget or construction estimate, and schedule. A presentation is then made to the Board of Contractors. The winner can advance to the national competition held in association with the AGC annual convention.


2C) A combined Civil Engineering and Construction Management group of students collaborate with School of Architecture students in the National Design-Build Student Competition in which the teams are provided a building requirement and are then required to develop the design along with the budget and scheduling activities.


3) Computer Science: Seniors in CS are required to do a software design project in a team of 3-5 students. The topic of the project varies from semester to semester. Recent projects were done on a Gameboy Advance emulator, a web based photo book, a remote cluster management, computer electronic mail, transaction processing, conference management, file version control and bug tracking systems, adaptive malware detection, psychologically motivated machine learning. In addition, students do team projects in large-scale programming courses.

4. Electrical and Computer Engineering

1. Smart Surgical Instruments. Students: Hamilton, Alexander William; Nery, Steven J; Carlos, Corey. Sponsor and technical mentor: Christina Salas.

2. Automated Water Disinfection System. Students: Awungayi, Desmond; Westhoff, Talbot C. Sponsor: Rodney Herrington. Technical Mentor: Tim Cushman.

3. 3-D Metal Detector-Based Visualization System for Nasogastric Feeding. Students: Chavez, Andre M; ElShafiey, Ahmed Tarief; Machado, Jordy. Sponsor: Sang M. Han. Technical Mentors: Divya Prakash, Nicholas Brechtel.

4. LED Illuminator for Diabetes Studies. Students: Chen, WeyAnn; Brooks, Ryan. Sponsor and technical mentor: Fabiano Trigueiro Amorim.

5. Telemetry System for Transmission of Load Cell Data Liddle. Students: Benjamin, James; Rhoades, Aubyn D. Sponsor and technical mentor: Ann Gibson.

6. Portable System for Residual Lung Volume Submersion Measurements. Students: Harjes, Cameron D; Smith, Justin Keith. Sponsor: Ann Gibson, EE Technical mentor: Same as above

7. Solar Splash 1: Mobile Motorized Solar Tracking System. Students: Piro-Rael, Ricardo Miguel; Jafari, Naveed D; Castro, Devon J. Sponsor: Jane Lehr. Technical Mentors: Jason Neely and Joshua Stewart.

8. Solar Splash 2: Maximum Power Point Tracking Charge Controller. Students: Amezcua, Ursula M; Benfraj, Sayfallah. Sponsor: Jane Lehr. Technical Mentors: Jason Neely and Joshua Stewart.

9. Interactive Learning Software. Students: Graham, Joey P; Vacek, Ryan D. Sponsor: Tom Lee.Technical Mentor: Peter Martin.

10. High Functionality Mobile Apps for STEM. Students: Watters, Mitchell R; Tafoya, Johnathan Steven. Sponsor: Manel Martinez-Ramon. Technical Mentor: Eric Hamke.

11. Variable Resistor Logic Unit (VRLU)/Finite State Machine (FSM). Students: Dinh, Ryan; Swain, Derek Walter. Sponsoring organization: Honeywell. Sponsor: Kevin E. Baugh. Technical Mentor: Spencer Bell.

12. Modeling effects of ion implantation in semiconductors. Students: Tran, Coty; Wobbe, Briana Rose. Sponsor: Kevin E. Baughn. Technical Mentor: Daniel Ewing.

13. Modeling Metamaterials. Students: Cross, Aaron D; Rodgers, Casey. Sponsor: Kevin E. Baughn. Technical Mentor: Daniel Ewing.

14. Modeling of Electrodynamic Shakers. Students: Brown, Cody M; Holland, Abriel A. Sponsor: Kevin E. Baughn. Technical Mentor: Washington DeLima.

15. Augmented Reality. Students: Ngo, Duong; Lizewski, Jacob Edward; Thorpe, Adam J; Hidalgo, Alexandra Victoria. Sponsor: Kevin E. Baughn. Technical Mentor: Eric Cornwell.

16. Calibrated Voltage Pulse Box. Stuents: Beyale, Jeremiah; Collin, James Burt; Phan, Huyen. Sponsor: Kevin E. Baughn. Technical Mentor: Greg Hilgenkamp.

17. Data Acquisition (DAQ) System for Transducer-Equipped Toy. Students: Tabar, Joseph Serrano; Bolivar, Gerardo; Ma, Yanqiu. Sponsor: Kevin E. Baughn. Technical Mentor: Erik Timpson.

18: Integrated Spectrum Intelligent IoT Gateways. Students: Haway, Michael J. Noedel, Adam C; Rossetti, Leonardo S. Sponsor: Kamil Agi. Technical Mentor: Jorge Piovesan.

19: Computer-Controlled Precision Pressure Controller. Students: Post, Canon; Ronny Lanes Silviera. Sponsor: Ravi Jain. Technical Mentors: Mike Klopfer and B. Behzadi.

20. Automated Microheater for Glass Microspheres. Students: Canfield, David; Smith, Paula Colleen; Hirpo, Endeshaw. Sponsor: Mani Hossein-Zadeh. Technical Mentor: Behsan Behzadi.

21. Fast risetime pulse generating circuits for laser applications. Students: Johnson, Olivia; Pound-Espericueta, Jonathan M. Sponsor and Technical Mentor: Leanne J. Henry.

22. 3D-printed microstructured optical fiber preforms. Students: Tso, Jared E; Zapotocky, Christopher; Martin, Jacob Eli. Sponsor: Ravinder K. Jain. Technical Mentor: Behsan Behzadi.

23. Power electronics for solar-powered desalination. Students: Steimling, Edwin Clair; Trejo, Jose A; Pereira, Nestor. Sponsor and Technical Mentor: Laura Biedermann.

24. Multispectral Imaging System. Students: Rodriguez, Darren G; Trujillo, Nathaniel Anthony. Sponsor: Alonzo Vera. Technical Mentor: Jorge Piovesan.

5-A) Mechanical Engineering students participate in an international race car design competition. The Formula SAE competition involves designing a race car and includes the following elements: (a) formal design presentations, (b) construction of the design by the students, (c) safety analysis to assure the vehicles are safe for competition driving, (d) design, manufacturing and marketing presentations and dynamic competitions including noise, braking, and acceleration, skid pad and (e) an endurance race.

6. Nuclear Engineering: Design projects are required as part of a Capstone Design Class in the Senior year. Students in teams of 3 â€" 4 collaborate on different capstone design projects that have distinct design requirements, objectives, and education outcomes. Previous design projects have included Neutronic and Thermal-Hydraulic Assessment of Accident Tolerant Fuels and Cladding in Commercial Scale PWRs; Nuclear Powered 1.0 MWt Passively Operated Submersible Submarine; 30 MWt Passively Cooled, Solid Core Nuclear Power System for Commercial Seafaring Vessels; Boiling Water Modular Reactor (!00MWt); and Low Enrichment High Flux Reactor for Moly-99 Medical Isotope Production.

7. Optical Science and Engineering
A) Optical Science & Engineering (OSE) MS students following the “Thesis Option” are required to write a thesis, based on a project, and publicly defend it. The goal is to help students in developing the ability to actively engage in research in commercial, government and academic settings. The evaluation process by the thesis committee includes assessing the student’s level of comprehension in the core topics of electromagnetism, general optics, and a specialized topic related to optical science and engineering, as well as evaluating their ability to apply their knowledge to tackle real and practical challenges in optics/ photonics research and engineering. Below is a recent example of a thesis degree project.

a. Thesis title "Linear mode CMOS compatible p-n junction avalanche photodiode for smart-lighting applications"
Thesis advisor: Professor Majeed M. Hayat

Committee members:
Dr. Majeed M. Hayat
Dr. Steven R. J. Brueck
Dr. Payman Zarkesh-Ha
Dr. Mansoor Sheik-Bahae,


B) OSE MS students with “Internship Option” are required to work on a project outside the university (at industry or a national lab). The MS Internship option in OSE allows for private companies, national/federal laboratories, and their contractors to partner with UNM in OSE areas in mutually beneficial ways by means of either a first look at potential recruits or a more interactive career advancement of their current employees. A faculty member with whom the student takes a three research hour internship course (PHYC 559) oversees this project. The student is required to give an oral presentation on his/her internship project. The presentation is evaluated by the faculty member in charge. Below is an example of recent MS Internship Project degrees.

a. Thesis title: "Assessing Linear Regression for Predicting Coronal Holes"
Thesis Advisor: Sanjay Krishna

Committee members:
Sanjay Krishna
Marios Pattichis
Sudhakar Prasad
Charles Arge (AFRL)

8. Nano Science and Micro Systems

Course Objective. To provide the student direct experience in the process of innovating medical technologies.
Learning Outcome. Students will be conversant in all core elements of biodesign as practiced by a team com¬prised of a UNM Hospital physician, a UNM School of Engineering faculty member, and engineering students.
Course Description. "Biodesign" is a phrase widely used to describe a process by which an important clinical problem is identified, solved and translated to a ready-to-market product or process. As practiced in this course, biodesign begins with pairing a practicing physician with an engineering faculty member and several students. The initial task of each team is to learn from the medical doctor some area of their clinical practice plus various key problems in that area. The next task of the team is to generate an array of possible solutions to the problems posed. Under the guidance of the faculty leader or designated team facilitator, the resulting list of problems and potential solutions is winnowed to a single prime candidate for translation from idea, to lab prototype, to clinical product. The final product of each team is a presentation and a written proposal for subsequent research, development and prototyping work.
Competition. On the last day of class, each of the teams will present their results before a panel of judges. Also at this time, a 2-page funding pre-proposal will be submitted whose editor-in-chief is the SOE faculty team co-leader, and/or the HSC physician team co-leader. Students will be expected to participate in writing and/or editing some or all portions of the pre-proposal. The pre-proposal will be for up to $50,000 of bench-level research to be conducted the following semester Spring 2016. At the conclusion of the meeting, the panel of judges may elect to announce one or more winning teams. Winning teams, if any, will be invited to submit a full proposal to the CTSC Pilot Funding Program. It is expected there will be one winning team.

Prerequisites. Permission of the instructor. Graduate students in engineering or health sciences are preferred. Also considered for admission are exceptional undergraduate students in the shared credit program with prior bench-level research experience.

9. Biomedical Engineering
Course Objective. To provide the student direct experience in the process of innovating medical technologies.
Learning Outcome. Students will be conversant in all core elements of biodesign as practiced by a team com¬prised of a UNM Hospital physician, a UNM School of Engineering faculty member, and engineering students.
Course Description. "Biodesign" is a phrase widely used to describe a process by which an important clinical problem is identified, solved and translated to a ready-to-market product or process. As practiced in this course, biodesign begins with pairing a practicing physician with an engineering faculty member and several students. The initial task of each team is to learn from the medical doctor some area of their clinical practice plus various key problems in that area. The next task of the team is to generate an array of possible solutions to the problems posed. Under the guidance of the faculty leader or designated team facilitator, the resulting list of problems and potential solutions is winnowed to a single prime candidate for translation from idea, to lab prototype, to clinical product. The final product of each team is a presentation and a written proposal for subsequent research, development and prototyping work.
Competition. On the last day of class, each of the teams will present their results before a panel of judges. Also at this time, a 2-page funding pre-proposal will be submitted whose editor-in-chief is the SOE faculty team co-leader, and/or the HSC physician team co-leader. Students will be expected to participate in writing and/or editing some or all portions of the pre-proposal. The pre-proposal will be for up to $50,000 of bench-level research to be conducted the following semester Spring 2016. At the conclusion of the meeting, the panel of judges may elect to announce one or more winning teams. Winning teams, if any, will be invited to submit a full proposal to the CTSC Pilot Funding Program. It is expected there will be one winning team.

Prerequisites. Permission of the instructor. Graduate students in engineering or health sciences are preferred. Also considered for admission are exceptional undergraduate students in the shared credit program with prior bench-level research experience.