Mississippi State University - 2016

Institution Information

Contact Information

Institution's Mailing Address

Institution Name: Mississippi State University
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 9544
250 McCain Hall
City: Mississippi State
State: MS
Postal Code: 39762
Country: United States
Phone 662-325-2270
Fax: 662-325-8573
Website: http://www.msstate.edu

Head of Institution

Mark Keenum
President
Office of the President
Mississippi State University
PO Box J
Mississippi State, MS 39762
Phone: 662-325-3221
president@msstate.edu

Engineering College Inquiries

James Warnock
Associate Dean and Professor
James Worth Bagley College of Engineering
Mississippi State University
P.O.Box 9544, 250 McCain Hall
Mississippi State, MS 39762
Phone: 662-325-2270
Fax: 662-325-8573
jwarnock@bagley.msstate.edu

Undergraduate Admission Inquiries

Robert Green
Undergraduate Coordinator
James Worth Bagley College of Engineering
Mississippi State University
P.O. Box 9544
160 McCain Engr. Building
Mississippi State, MS 39762
Phone: 662-325-2267
Fax: 662-325-9094
green@bagley.msstate.edu

James Warnock
Associate Dean and Professor
James Worth Bagley College of Engineering
Mississippi State University
P.O.Box 9544, 250 McCain Hall
Mississippi State, MS 39762
Phone: 662-325-2270
Fax: 662-325-8573
jwarnock@bagley.msstate.edu

Graduate Admission Inquiries

Kari Babski-Reeves
Associate Professor & Associate Dean
James Bagley College of Engineering
Mississippi State University
P.O. Box 9544
250 McCain Hall
Mississippi State, MS 39762
Phone: 662-325-8430
Fax: 662-325-8573
kari@bagley.msstate.edu

Institution Information

General Information


Type of institution: PUBLIC
Academic Year: SEMESTERS
Setting of Main Engineering Campus SMALL TOWN

Main Campus Information

Is the main campus located in a city with a population greater than 100,000?: No
Name of this city, or if no, the name of the nearest city of any size?: Starkville
This city's population (approx.): 25,366
Distance from Main Campus: 1

Total Enrollment

Total Undergraduate enrollment: 18,090
Total Graduate enrollment: 3,186
Total Professional and other enrollment: 346

Non-Engineering Degree Granting Colleges

Business, Education, Agriculture & Life Sciences, Arts and Sciences, Forest Resources, Veterinary Medicine

Institution Information

General Admissions

Entrance Requirements and Recommendations

Requirements

New Freshmen Admission
For regular admission to one of the College of Engineering’s degree granting programs as a freshman, you must be admitted to Mississippi State University, complete the following high school academic core: 4 units of English, 4 units of mathematics (algebra, geometry, trigonometry), 3 units of science (chemistry and either biology or physics), 3 units of social studies and/or foreign languages and 2 units of electives, and meet any one of the following criteria:
• Have a composite score greater than or equal to 23 on the ACT or 1060 on the SAT
• Have a composite score of 20, 21, or 22 on the ACT or between 940 and 1050 on the SAT with a high school GPA of 3.00 or greater on academic core courses listed above
• Have any ACT or SAT score with a high school GPA of 3.5 or greater on academic core courses listed above

These criteria are essential for the success of a student beginning an engineering or computer science curriculum at the level shown in the following pages of the Bulletin.
Applicants with justifiable circumstances may petition the Dean of Engineering for special admission.
New freshmen applicants who do not meet these requirements, are otherwise admitted to Mississippi State University, and want to pursue an engineering degree should join the undeclared major with a pre-engineering concentration. These students will be advised for the first 30 hours by the University Advising Center. Students in the pre-engineering concentration will also be assigned a mentor from the engineering faculty.
Students with coursework deficiencies will be required to schedule preparatory coursework. This coursework will be in addition to that shown in the engineering and computer science curricula and will, in general extend the time to graduation.

Internal Transfers
Students in the pre-engineering concentration and other students at Mississippi State University may transfer into an engineering degree granting program if they satisfy any one of the following criteria:
• Meet engineering new freshmen requirements listed above
• Have completed at least 30 hours with a cumulative GPA greater than or equal to 2.00 and passed Calculus I (MA 1713), English Composition I (EN 1103), and Fundamentals of Chemistry (CH 1213) with grades of C or better.

Internal transfer students should discuss the transfer with the appropriate department head or program coordinator before completing the Change of Major form. Some departments have additional admission requirements for internal transfers.
Students admitted to one engineering or computer science degree program may transfer to another engineering or computer science program at any time so long as they meet departmental transfer requirements.

External Transfers
Students may transfer from other colleges or universities into Mississippi State University engineering degree programs if they meet all requirements to transfer to Mississippi State University and satisfy any one of the following criteria:
• Meet engineering new freshmen admission standards listed above
• Have completed at least 30 hours with a cumulative GPA greater than or equal to 2.00 and passed courses equivalent to Calculus I (MA 1713), English Composition I (EN 1103), and Fundamentals of Chemistry I (CH 1213) with grades of C or better.

Applicants with justifiable circumstances may petition the Dean of Engineering for special admission.
Coursework taken elsewhere will not be applied toward a degree in the College of Engineering until it is determined that it is equivalent to required coursework or is an acceptable substitute. Also, only coursework taken elsewhere on which a grade of C or better has been earned will be considered for application toward a degree. No more than one-half of the hours of an engineering or computer science curriculum may be transferred from a two-year community or junior college
For admission to undergraduate programs, international students must earn a minimum paper-based TOEFL score of 550 or a computer-based minimum score of 213.


Graduate Admission:
The following admission criteria apply to all graduate applicants:
1. Applicants seeking degree status must have a 2.75 GPA on the last two full years of undergraduate academic work or a 3.0 GPA on all graduate work already completed. Individual departments or programs may require a higher GPA for admission.
2. While the Graduate School does not require scores from standardized examinations such as the GRE or GMAT, each department or program may require the submission of standardized tests scores by applicants for consideration of admission.
3. Applicants not satisfying the GPA may be admitted (if recommended by the department) to a degree program as a provisional student. Provisional students must earn a 3.0 GPA on the first nine (9) hours of regular graduate-level courses on their program of study taken at Mississippi State University (transfer hours will not apply) in order to achieve regular admission status. If a 3.0 is not attained in the first nine (9) hours, the provisional student will be dismissed from the Graduate School.
4. Applicants seeking non-degree or unclassified status must provide verification of receipt of the baccalaureate degree. Applicants in the unclassified category will be admitted by the Graduate School. Only nine (9) hours of graduate work received as an unclassified student may be transferred to a degree program. Individual departments or programs may place restrictions on unclassified students taking courses in their areas. This policy took effect for students admitted for the Fall Semester of 1990.

The following requirements satisfy the English language proficiency for international graduate students. A student admitted to the University with a national TOEFL or IELTS score less than the proficient-level equivalencies must enroll in the specified English as a Second Language (ESL) course requirement(s) beginning with the initial enrollment period.
I. An international applicant whose English-language test score falls within the following ranges is eligible for admission and award of a graduate assistantship.
• An applicant who attains a national TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 550 PBT or 79 iBT or an IELTS (International English Language Testing System) score of 6.5 is considered proficient in English. If the academic department requires a higher test score, the applicant must attain the higher score or be admitted contingent on satisfying this University requirement. The applicant can be considered for admission for Spring, Summer or Fall terms.
• An applicant with either a TOEFL score between 547-523 PBT or 78-69 iBT or an IELTS of 6.0 will be required to enroll in ESL 5323 Academic Research and Writing. This course is designed for international graduate students whose test score indicates a need for assistance in English writing, research, and editing skills. The course is graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. The student required to take ESL 5323 can also enroll in up to 6 credit hours in his/her graduate program. The applicant can be considered for admission for Spring, Summer or Fall terms.

II. An international applicant whose English-language test score falls within the following ranges is eligible for admission but is not eligible for award of a graduate assistantship until the English-language requirements of ESL 5110 and/or ESL 5120 are satisfied.
• An applicant with either a TOEFL score between 520-500 PBT or 68-61 iBT or an IELTS score of 5.5 is required to enroll in ESL 5120, a 9-hour intensive English course designed by the English as a Second Language Center. This course is graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. The student cannot register for courses in his/her graduate program while completing this required course. A student enrolled in ESL 5120 will complete the course when he/she passes the English Proficiency Exam consisting of grammar, reading, writing, oral, and aural skills; has attended the English immersion class regularly for at least one semester; and has done satisfactory work. The student is then eligible to enroll in ESL 5323 Academic Research and Writing.
• A qualified student with either a TOEFL score between 497-477 PBT or 59-53 iBT or an IELTS score of 5-4.5 is required to enroll in ESL 5110 , an intensive English language course especially designed by the English as a Second Language Center. This course is graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. The student cannot register for courses in his/her graduate program while completing this requirements. A student enrolled in ESL 5110 will complete the course when he/she passes the English Proficiency Exam consisting of grammar, reading, writing, oral, and aural skills, has attended the English immersion class regularly for at least one semester, and has done satisfactory work. Such student must then complete ESL 5120 (a 9-hour immersion course) and, subsequently, ESL 5323. The applicant can be considered for admission for Fall term only.

III. An applicant whose TOEFL score is below 477 PBT or 53 iBT or whose IELTS score is 4.5 is not eligible for admission to the Graduate School.

Recommendations

none provided

Engineering Information

Head of Engineering

Head of Engineering

Jason Keith
Dean, Professor & Endowed Chair
James Worth Bagley College of Engineering
Mississippi State University
P.O.Box 9544, 250 McCain Hall
Mississippi State , MS 39762
Phone: 662-325-2270
Fax: 662-325-8573
keith@bagley.msstate.edu

Engineering Information

Engineering Degrees Offered

Types of Engineering Degrees

Bachelor's:B.S.
Master's:M.S. with thesis, M.S. without thesis, but with project or report, M.Eng.
Doctoral:Ph.D.

Computer Science Degrees Awarded Outside the College/School of Engineering

Engineering Information

Engineering Departments

Engineering Department(s) Degree Granting Level Department Chair Discipline
Undergraduate Aerospace Engineering
Aerospace Engineering Both Thomas Lacy Aerospace Engineering
Agricultural and Biological Engineering Both Jonathan Pote Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical Engineering Both Bill Elmore Chemical Engineering
Civil and Environmental Engineering Both Dennis Truax Civil Engineering
Computer Science and Engineering Both Donna Reese Computer Science (inside engineering)
Dean of Engineering Both Kari Babski-Reeves Other Engineering Disciplines
Electrical and Computer Engineering Both Nicholas Younan Electrical/Computer Engineering
Industrial and Systems Engineering Both John Usher Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Both Pedro Mago Mechanical Engineering

Engineering Information

Research Centers

  • INCOLL - Research center WITHIN the college of engineering
  • INDEPT - Research center WITHIN an engineering department
  • INUNIV - Research center WITHIN university system
  • OUTUNIV - Research center OUTSIDE the university
Center/Lab Discipline Research Class Head Chair
Alliance for Systems Safety of UAS through Research Excellence (ASSURE) Aerospace Engineering INUNIV Dallas Brooks
Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems (CAVS) Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Roger King
Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems Extension (CAVS-E) Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Clayton Walden
Center for Battlefield Innovation (CBI) Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV John Hamilton
Center for Biomedical Research Excellence Biomedical Engineering INUNIV Stephen Puryear
Center for Computational Sciences Computer Science (outside engineering) INUNIV
Center for Computer Security Research (CCSR) Computer Science (inside engineering) INCOLL David Dampier
Center for Cyber Innovation Aerospace Engineering INUNIV
Distributed Analytics and Security Institute (DASI) Computer Engineering INUNIV David Dampier
Energy Institute (EI) Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Jonathan Pote
Geosystems Research Institute (GRI) Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Robert Moorhead
High Performance Computing Collaboratory (HPC2) Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV William Breckenridge
High Voltage Laboratory Electrical Engineering INCOLL Joni Kluess
Institute for Clean Energy Techolology (ICET) Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Charles Waggoner
Institute for Computational Research for Engineering and Science (ICRES) Computer Science (inside engineering) INUNIV Roger King
Institute for Imaging and Analytical Technologies Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV
Institute for Systems Engineering Research Other Engineering Disciplines INCOLL Roger King
Institute of Genomics, Biocomputing & Biotechnology (IGBB) Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Daniel Peterson
Mississippi Transportation Research Center (MTRC) Civil Engineering INDEPT Dennis Truax
National Center for Intermodal Transportation for Economic Competitiveness (NCITEC) Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering INCOLL John Usher
National Forensic Training Center (NFTC) Computer Engineering INCOLL David Dampier
Northern Gulf Institute (NGI) Other Engineering Disciplines INUNIV Robert Moorhead
Raspet Flight Research Laboratory (RFRL) Aerospace Engineering INCOLL Ratneshwar Jha
Sustainable Energy Research Center (SERC) Mechanical Engineering INCOLL Jonathan Pote
The Critical Infrastructure Protection Center (CIPC) Electrical/Computer Engineering INDEPT David Dampier

Engineering Information

Degree Programs

Bachelor's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Aerospace Engineering
Aerospace Engineering Aerospace Engineering (B.S.) Aerospace Engineering
Agricultural and Biological Engineering Biological Engineering (B.S.) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical Engineering Chemical Engineering (B.S.) Chemical Engineering
Chemical Engineering Petroleum Engineering (B.S.) Petroleum Engineering
Chemical Engineering Petroleum Engineering (B.S.) Petroleum Engineering
Civil and Environmental Engineering Civil Engineering (B.S.) Civil Engineering
Computer Science and Engineering Software Engineering (B.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Computer Science and Engineering Computer Science (B.S.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Dean of Engineering Undeclared - Freshman Engineering Engineering (General)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering (B.S.) Electrical Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Computer Engineering (B.S.) Computer Engineering
Industrial and Systems Engineering Industrial Engineering (B.S.) Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) Mechanical Engineering

Master's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Master's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Aerospace Engineering Aerospace Engineering (M.S.) Aerospace Engineering
Agricultural and Biological Engineering Biological Engineering (M.S.) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Agricultural and Biological Engineering Biomedical Engineering (M.S.) Biomedical Engineering
Chemical Engineering Chemical Engineering (M.S.) Chemical Engineering
Civil and Environmental Engineering Civil Engineering (M.S.) Civil Engineering
Computer Science and Engineering Computer Science (M.S.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Dean of Engineering Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Dean of Engineering Computational Engineering (M.S.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical and Computer Engineering (M.S.) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Industrial and Systems Engineering Industrial Engineering (M.S.) Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) Mechanical Engineering

Doctoral Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Doctoral Degree Program(s) Discipline
Aerospace Engineering Aerospace Engineering (Ph.D.) Aerospace Engineering
Agricultural and Biological Engineering Biological Engineering (Ph.D.) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Agricultural and Biological Engineering Biomedical Engineering (P.h.D.) Biomedical Engineering
Chemical Engineering Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) Chemical Engineering
Civil and Environmental Engineering Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) Civil Engineering
Computer Science and Engineering Computer Science (Ph.D.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Dean of Engineering Computational Engineering (Ph.D.) Other Engineering Disciplines
Dean of Engineering Applied Physics (Ph.D.) Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical and Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Industrial and Systems Engineering Industrial and Systems Engineering (Ph.D.) Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) Mechanical Engineering

Engineering Information

Areas of Expertise

Engineering Departments Areas of Expertise
Aerospace Engineering
  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics
  2. Computational Structural Mechanics
  3. Experimental Fluid Mechanics
  4. Experimental Structural Analysis
  5. Guidance, Navigation, and Control
  6. Multdisciplinary Design and Optimization
  7. Unmanned Aircraft Systems
  8. Composite Materials and Structures
  9. Structural Health Management
  10. Uncertainty Analysis
  11. Surrogate Modeling
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
  1. Remote Sensing
  2. Bioenergy
  3. Biomaterials
  4. Artificial Wetlands to Treat Waste
  5. Optimization of Agricultural Chemicals Application
  6. Land Application of Animal Waste
  7. Tissue Engineering
  8. Biomechanics and Mechanobiology
  9. Bioinstrumentation
  10. Cell and Gene Therapy
Chemical Engineering
  1. Petrochemical/Refining Processes, Supercritical Processes, Thermodynamics, Separation and Energy Engineering
  2. Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Catalysis, Reactor Design
  3. Bioprocessing of Renewable Resources to make High-Value-Added Chemicals/Fuels, Gas Hydrate Sci & Eng
  4. Materials, Biomaterials, Surface Science, Polymers, Plastics, Soft Materials, and Composite Materials
  5. Envir. Remediation, RCRA Waste, Hazardous Waste Mgt, Pollution Prevention, Solid Waste Recycling
  6. Characterization: Rheology
  7. Microfluidics, Microreactor
  8. Advanced computational tools to model advanced nuclear fuel cycles, and biomass transformation
  9. Development of fundamental algorithms and force fields for interaction potentials
Civil and Environmental Engineering
  1. Water Resources Engineering
  2. Construction Materials Engineering
  3. Environmental Engineering
  4. Structural Engineering
  5. Transportation Engineering
  6. Geotechnical Engineering
  7. Construction Engineering and Management
  8. Urban Planning
Computer Science and Engineering
  1. Artificial Intelligence
  2. Bioinformatics
  3. High Performance Computing
  4. Autonomous Computing
  5. Computer Security
  6. Computer Forensics
  7. Information Visualization
  8. Computer Graphics
  9. Software Engineering
  10. Human Centered Computing
  11. Computer Systems
Dean of Engineering
  1. Diversity in Engineering Education
  2. Engineering Education
  3. Engineering Outreach
  4. Distance Education
  5. Student Exchange Programs
  6. Study Abroad
Electrical and Computer Engineering
  1. High Voltage Engineering, Power Systems and Power Electronics
  2. Signal/Image Processing, Pattern Recognition, and Visualization
  3. Remote Sensing, Feature Extraction, Image Fusion, and Image Information Mining
  4. Computational Electromagnetics, Antenna Design, and Electromagnetic Compatibility
  5. Robotic and Control Systems
  6. Semiconductor Materials and Devices
  7. Microelectronics, VLSI and CAD Tool Development, and Embedded Systems
  8. Cyber Security and Industrial Control Systems
  9. Autonomic Computing
Industrial and Systems Engineering
  1. Supply Chain/Logistics Modeling, Optimization, and Management
  2. Multi-criteria/disciplinary design optimization
  3. Operations Research
  4. Management Systems Engineering
  5. Human Factors and Ergonomics
  6. Occupational Safety and Health
  7. Logistics & Transportation Systems Engineering
  8. Supply Chain Management
  9. Quality Management
  10. Enterprise Systems Engineering
  11. System Informatics and Control
  12. Disaster Preparedness and Response
Mechanical Engineering
  1. Materials Science
  2. Uncertainty Analysis
  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics
  4. Energy Systems
  5. Constitutive Modeling
  6. Fatigue and Fracture
  7. Welding and Solidification
  8. Internal Combustion Engines
  9. Additive Manufacturing

Engineering Information

Societies

Honor Societies

National Groups

  • Alpha Beta Kappa
  • Alpha Epsilon
  • Alpha Pi Mu
  • Chi Epsilon
  • Eta Kappa Nu
  • Mortar Board
  • Omega Chi Epsilon
  • Phi Kappa Phi
  • Pi Tau Sigma
  • Sigma Gamma Tau
  • Tau Beta Pi
  • Theta Tau
  • Upsilon Pi Epsilon

Local Groups

  • CHE Honor Society
  • Engineering Student Hall of Fame

Student Organizations

National Groups

  • ACM
  • Air and Waste Management Association
  • Am. Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics
  • Am. Inst. of Chemical Engineers
  • Am. Soc. for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing
  • Am. Soc. of Civil Engineers
  • Am. Soc. of Heating, Refrig. and Air Condit. Eng.
  • Am. Soc. of Mechanical Engineers
  • Assoc. for Computing Machinery
  • Associated General Contractors of America
  • Biomedical Engineering Society
  • Engineering Student Council
  • Engineers without Borders
  • Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
  • Inst. for Operations Research & Management Science
  • Inst. of Transportation Engineers
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
  • National Society of Black Engineers
  • Natl Society of Professional Eng
  • Soc. for Automotive Engineering
  • Soc. for the Adv. of Material and Process Eng.
  • Soc. of Petroleum Engineers
  • Soc. of Women Engineers
  • Society of Asian Scientists and Engineers
  • Society of Automotive Engineers
  • Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Society of Plastics Engineers

Local Groups

  • American Society of Agricultural & Biological Engineers
  • Chemical Engineering Graduate Association
  • Entrepreneurship Network
  • Increasing Minority Access to Graduate Education (IMAGE)
  • Institute of Biological Engineering
  • Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineers
  • Mechanical Engineering Ladies Organization
  • Mechanical Engineering Ladies Organization
  • Mechanical Engineering Minority Organization
  • Order of the Engineer
  • Soil and Water Conservation Society
  • Toastmasters

Engineering Information

Support Programs

College's Under-Represented Student Groups

National Groups

  • African Students Association
  • Diversity Programs
  • Minority Engineering Program
  • National Society of Black Engineers
  • Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Society of Women Engineers

Local Groups

  • Graduate Women in Science and Engineering (GWISE)
  • Louis Stokes Mississippi Alliances for Minority Participation (LSMAMP)
  • Mechanical Engineering Ladies Organization
  • Mechanical Engineering Minority Organization
  • Society of Asian-American Scientists & Engineers
  • Women of Aerospace Engineering

Other Student Support Programs

The MSU Increasing Minority Access to Graduate Education (IMAGE) Program is part of the Mississippi Alliance for Minority Participation (MAMP), an NSF initiative. The objective of MAMP (and other state's AMP programs) is to prepare more under-represented minorities for graduate education in engineering, math, and science. The summer bridge recruitment and retention program for freshman minority students is a foundational component of this program. The participants in this program enroll at MSU during the second summer session prior to their fall admission. These students complete the pre-calculus course during this session. In addition to the class, the students have study halls, life skills programs and visit with the different departments to learn more about the various engineering majors. Some expenses (except personal expenses) for the summer bridge participants are paid for by the program. The retention rates for students who participate in this program is significantly higher than the overall retention rate for minority students in engineering who do not participate.

In addition to the IMAGE program, MSU also sponsors outreach activities for underrepresented minoriy students such as "I Am Girl" and "STEM on the Move". Through these programs and summer camp experiences, students gain knowledge via hands-on class work, laboratory investigations, and engineering presentations. The goal of these programs is to increase underrepresented student exposure to engineering role models, resulting in highly motivated secondary students and leading to future successful college students with an interest in STEM fields.

The College of Engineering operates an Engineering Living Learning Community for freshmen engineering students. In addition to a common living area, the community includes engineering mentors who help students adjust to college life and provide advice and guidance. This program also includes a week of design competitions the week prior to classes beginning in order allow entering students to make friends, learn their way around campus, and prepare for the start of classes.

Tutors are also provided in Calculus, Physics, Chemistry, and Computer Programming through the Engineering First-Year Experience (EFX). These tutors attend classes with the students and work in concert with the class professors. They then provide tutoring assistance to the students in those specific classes.

Engineering Information

Student Projects

Student Design Projects Description

AEROSPACE ENGINEERING:
AUVSI Student Unmanned Aircraft Systems - Students from several disciplines including aerospace engineering, mechanical engineering, electrical and computer engineering, and computer science have competed and placed within the top ten nationally for the last seven years, including 1st in 2008 and 2nd in 2010. The students design and build an autonomous air vehicle to fly a prescribed flight path and determine the location and characteristics of ground targets. The vehicle must be capable of real time modification to the flight profile and provide the data either in real time format or shortly after landing.

NASA University Student Launch Initiative - Students in the department compete with interdisciplinary teams from across the nation. They must design, build, and launch a rocket to obtain an altitude as close to 5,280 feet above ground level. The rocket must carry a scientific payload and be recovered. The competition also requires a significant K-12 outreach activity. As part of this requirement the MSU Space Cowboys has created and conducted a rocket launch competition for middle school students. Middle schools from three states have participated in this competition. The Space Cowboys placed 2nd nationally in the 2007, 2010, and 2012 competitions.

High-Altitude Balloons - Students in the two-semester sequence senior capstone Spacecraft Design collaborate with students in the Electrical and Computer Engineering senior design sequence to design, build, and fly heavily instrumented high altitude balloons. The payloads of these balloons, which can reach altitudes of 100,000 feet, serve as fully functional satellite simulators.

Design, Analysis, Optimization, Fabrication, and Testing of Stiffened Panels (ASE 4623): Working in teams of two or three, students apply the topics covered in the course to design, either based on weight or a combined figure of merit, an optimum set of stringers to stiffen an 18 x 24 x 0.032 in. or a 9 x 12 x 0.032 in. 2024-T3 aluminum sheet that can support a specified design ultimate load (range: 16,000-22,000 lb) in axial compression. As part of this project, students evaluate different stringer design concepts; develop an algorithm for analysis of different failure modes; write an analysis program in Fortran and combine it with a commercial optimization code (DOT); determine the optimum size, quantity, and arrangement of stringers; find the minimum number of fasteners; fabricate one panel per student; and then test each panel to failure in a laboratory setting. Teams submit detailed written reports and give oral presentations to complete the project.

BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING:
Students in the 2-semester sequence senior design course work in teams to complete, construct, and test the design of a device for biological or biomedical applications. This course includes an innovative entrepreneurial aspect. Along with all completing a systematic approach to engineering design, teams provide a detailed budget and marketing plan for all devices developed. The MSU Entrepreneurship office hosts a biomedical business plan competition for students within the senior design course. Interested teams are invited to the competition and the top three teams are provided cash prizes. Entrepreneurs from around Mississippi judge the student teams. Design projects change on an annual basis. Although the problems are biological/biomedical in nature, the students rely heavily on mechanical and electrical engineering principles for their design solutions. Sample bioengineering problem statements are as follows:
• A better infant heart monitor: Infants under the age of one year are at risk for an ALTE (Apparent Life-Threatening Event). ALTE can be revealed as an episode of respiratory arrest lasting longer than 20 seconds which exhibits changes in cardiac rhythm. The conventional monitors currently available do not provide a contact-free method to monitor infant heart rate. Design a low cost, aesthetically pleasing, contact-free, user friendly infant heart monitor that will automatically track the heart rate of an infant and will alert parents if an issue arises.
• Ambulatory Infusion Pump: Cancer accounts for 13% of all deaths worldwide. Infusion pumps are an efficient way to deliver chemotherapy; however, the high cost of these devices limits accessibility to low income cancer patients. Develop a more cost efficient ambulatory infusion pump while maintaining the durability and performance of existing models, therefore making these devices more accessible to persons of low-income regions.
• Alternative Powered Autoclave: Rural clinics in under developed countries do not have access to autoclaves for sterilization of medical tools. Current models available to large hospitals, they are expensive and need constant maintenance. Design a simple and effective autoclave that can be run off of alternative power.

CIVIL ENGINEERING:
Concrete Canoe - The project is to design and build a four-person racing canoe using concrete as the primary construction material. The overall geometry and basic materials criteria are specified by the American Society of Civil Engineers' National Concrete Canoe Committee. A suitable construction jig and form must be designed. A concrete reinforcing system and mix must be developed. The material must have a sustainable component. Once completed, the canoe is raced in five races: men's slalom, men's sprint, women's slalom, women's sprint, and co-ed slalom. The competition also involves the construction of a display, preparation and submission of a written design report, and the presentation of the design report to a panel of judges. These components are evaluated by a panel of professionals. This is an annual project. This year the students finished second in the regional competition and tied Texas A&M and NJIT for 19th at the national competition.

Steel Bridge - This project involves design, fabrication and competitive erection of bridge structure using steel in accordance with the rules developed by the American Institute for Steel Construction (AISC). The structure must span a pre-defined distance between four to six meters and carry eccentrically-placed vertical loads of 1,500 pounds and horizontal loads of 150 pounds. The bridge is evaluated by a team of professionals on vertical and lateral deflection under load, cost, constructability, construction time and aesthetics. This is an annual project. The team finished fourth at the regional competition. This was due, in part, to a deviation in loading made by the site judges which contradicted the national rules and competition policies.

Timber Bridge " This project involves the design, fabrication and testing of a prototype bridge in which the primary building material is wood. Only fasteners made of metal are allowed. This is sponsored by the Southwest Mississippi Resource Conservation and Development (RC&D), Inc., a rural development program focusing on natural resources development. The corporate sponsor is Bell Structural Solutions in Minnesota and the competition is also endorsed by ASCE's Structural Engineering Institute (SEI). The wood used in this project must be from a commercially available species and treated to AWPA standards. Bridge members cannot contact with the ground. Design span was 3.8 meters with a maximum individual piece length of 2.1 meters and maximum width of supporting base plates at 60 mm. The structure is loaded at 5-kN increments up to 20kN and held at this peak load for one hour. Deflection is measured for each load increment and over the sustained peak load. Evaluation is based on bridge performance, a design report, design drawings, and constructability. In 2015 MSU ASCE Chapter finished first in deflection and esthetics, had the highest percent wood in the structure, and finished third overall in the National Timber Bridge Design Competition.

Environmental and Water Resources Laboratory - The environmental and water resources laboratory is conducted with undergraduate students serving as experimental designer. Students select topics of interest and design research experiments, under the supervision of the instructor, to investigate the topic. The students design and construct the test apparatus, develop the data collection protocol, prepare the necessary materials, and supervise the experiments.

Construction Materials Laboratory " The undergraduate laboratory on construction materials provides students with a background in codes, building materials, pavement materials, aggregates, testing methods defined by ASTM and ACI. To provide synthesis of this knowledge, the students work in teams to design a material to meet a specific hypothetical project need, test their design, and give an oral and written presentation which is judged by a group of professionals, graduate students, and upper-level undergraduates.

Civil Engineering Comprehensive - This is a class project offered to expose students to the team design approach on a diverse set of multidisciplinary projects. Students, working as pseudo consulting firms, develop a comprehensive design for a civil engineering system. The design includes environmental and water resources site assessments, engineering of structural, hydraulic, environmental, geotechnical, and materials systems which are required for the complete project functionality. Preliminary plans and specifications are developed. Presentations and project posters are presented in a competitive format to a jury. The projects have included a high school athletic complex, a regional airport, a light rail connecting two cities with an airport, a camp for kids undergoing cancer treatment, a five-story boutique hotel with activity complex and shopping mall, a wastewater treatment facility, and a grey-water treatment and storage facility.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING:
The AIChE Car Competition - Comprising student members from all ranks, the objective of this competition is: (1) To provide chemical engineering students with the opportunity to participate in a team-oriented hands-on design and construction of a small chemical powered model car. (2) To design and construct a car that is powered with a chemical energy source that will carry a specified load over a given distance and stop. (3) To encourage students to become actively involved in their professional society. (4) To increase awareness of the chemical engineering discipline among the general public, industry leaders, educators and other students. The team works on planning and design throughout the fall semester and constructing and testing in the early spring semester. The competition is first held at the regional level (for us, the Southern Region of the United States and Puerto Rico). The top five teams from the Southern Region are allowed to compete in the national contest. Our AICHE chapter has an active team planning for the spring 2016 competition.

The Chemical Engineering capstone plant design course requires groups of students to design a chemical plant to include technically- and economically-viable solutions. The open-ended projects are intended to test the ability of the students in the teams to synthesize a "best" solution from among the myriad of possible solutions. Each year the topic of the design problem changes and can include the AIChE design problem which is sponsored by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. One best solution to this problem can be entered into this contest for consideration by the national committee. The top design solution is announced each year at the annual meeting of the AIChE held in November. In 2011, MSU student teams placed first and third in the national competition. Each year, our program submits top performing team designs submitted during the plant design course to the national competition.

Separation Processes: A design project is given (spanning the last month of the semester) where students are given a multicomponent stream that they must design a separation process for that satisfies multiple constraints. For example, in a three component stream, they must produce two streams of given purities, while minimizing costs. The chemical system/composition chosen is always one where the constraints/purities cannot be met by simple manipulation of a single tower. This is typically a real world problem, with reflux ratios and production capacities typical of those seen in a petrochemical complex. Students must not only sequence the separations, meeting the constraints, but must also size the column(s) (determine column diameter, height), choose the type of column internals (tray or packed), size condenser and reboiler (determine heat transfer area) given available utilities; and cost these items. They are required to produce a design report where they discuss their design, providing the rationale and supporting evidence for their design decisions. Two examples are given below.
• Styrene from Ethylbenzene: This project involved separating styrene and ethylbenzene from a stream of seven components. A key constraint was that the styrene temperature had to remain lower than 125 oC to avoid spontaneous polymerization.
• Cumene from Propylene and Benzene: This project involved separating cumene and benzene from a 4 component mixture. The purity of the cumene stream was specified, and the benzene stream had to contain less than 0.01 mole fraction of cumene.

Reactor Design: A design project is given where students are given a feed stock, and a reaction scheme (always multiple reactions, at least one desirable product; at least one undesirable product; in some cases, desirable product may undergo secondary reaction). Students are only given a temperature and pressure at which feedstock is stored. They must decide what type of reactor to use (CSTR, PFR), what feed conditions should be used (T0, P0, feed volumetric flowrate), how the reactor should operate (isothermal, adiabatic, nonisothermal/nonadiabatic), whether inert material should be co-fed. They are given information about available utilities for heating and cooling. They are required to produce a design report where they discuss their design, providing rationale and supporting evidence for their design decisions. A grading rubric is provided to the students at the start of each project, so they are very aware of what elements must be included in the report, and at what level information must be provided and presented to achieve a satisfactory grade.

Process Design: Typically, three projects are given over the course of the semester. The first project usually focuses on a comparison of two design alternatives (which is most economically/technically better). The second project focuses on an existing process, which must be altered to either increase or decrease production capacity (a Debottlenecking/troubleshooting problem). The third project typically involves considering the inclusion of novel technologies for process improvement - for example, including gas permeation units to recover hydrogen and thereby, reduce hydrogen feedstock requirements; also, looking at heat integration for energy savings. Each project is completed in approximately three weeks; design reporting requirements differ from first to last project, so that students develop expertise in producing the different required elements in a design report.

Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer: Working in teams of people with different motivations, attitudes, and personalities is an integral part of the engineering profession and it is also commonplace that chemical engineers thrust into leadership positions. Therefore, group design projects were assigned for the Fluid Flow Operations (CHE 3203) and Heat Transfer Operations (CHE 3213) classes. Each individual member of the team could contribute their own creative ideas to the overall work and should also be accountable to each other in order to ensure team success and productivity. The projects are open-ended equipment design problems involving a specific engineering problem or equipment requirement needing application of chemical engineering principles and fundamentals, as well as engineering design heuristics and data on reference materials such as Perry’s Chemical Engineering Handbook. Students in the Fluid Flow Operations class were tasked with designing a fluid flow system consisting of a pump, pipeline, storage tank, and delivery system that would harvest a liquid with a given set of chemical properties from an underground reservoir and deliver it to consumers in a nearby building at a reasonable throughput rate. The students were given the geological data on the depth and volume of the underground liquid reservoir and they were required to design the said flow system that will use the least amount of pumping power possible. This design project problem was revisited during the Heat Transfer class during a following semester in which the students were required to design heat exchange equipment that will cool or heat the harvested liquid to a specified temperature. It was found that the liquid harvested from the underground reservoir was available at a high temperature, at which the liquid is lethal to consumers. The students were required to design a shell and tube heat exchanger based on the required cooled temperature of the liquid by applying the heat transfer concepts learned in class as well as design heuristics for heat exchanger design that were discussed. All projects were constructed as a proposal type document with the aim of selling the design concept to a prospective client. Students were graded individually based on their contributions and as a team for the overall quality of the finished product. This type of projects allows the students to apply the fundamental concepts and engineering principles that they have learned in class; exercise creativity and innovation while keeping in mind the constraints based on economics, sustainability, and ethical considerations; and train themselves in working in teams efficiently and effectively.

CHE 2213 Chemical Engineering Analysis is a three-credit-hour course required in the second semester of the freshman year. Through the use of LEGO®NXT robotics and supporting equipment (pumps, valves, tanks, piping, etc.), CHE 2213 provides students with a highly visual, project-based approach to learning engineering fundamentals. Employing an engineering “design cycle”, student teams collaboratively design, build, test and optimize a chemical process to accomplish a specific task (e.g. liquid level control in a chemical process tank, processing a set of reactants to produce a valuable product, or modifying a process stream to meet certain design specifications). Through the introduction of increasingly complex “team challenges” students are engaged in an integration of communication skills, engineering topics and engineering design principles. Introduction of the design cycle provides teams a guide for solving the problem at hand over successive refinement of their designed solution. The importance of material balances and controlling processes in chemical engineering is emphasized in a series of team challenges integrating the LEGO® NXT system with a bench-scale fluids handling system. A submersible pump delivers a fluid (e.g. water, acid/base, or salt solution) to a tank through a small needle valve controlled by the NXT robotics “Intelligent Brick” (i.e. a 32-bit microprocessor). In the latest iterations of the course, we have strengthened emphasis on process variables/measures (e.g. concentration, pH, temperature, pressure) and material balances. Student teams conduct team challenges using these measures as indicators of “product quality”. For example, one challenge requires feeding de-ionized water and a salt solution from two separate reservoirs to a mixing tank"maintaining a prescribed salt concentration in the outlet stream (as indicated by a conductivity sensor). Another challenge allows students to feed dilute acid and base solutions (typically vinegar/sodium bicarbonate) to a mixing tank, maintaining a particular pH.

Process Instrumentation and Automatic Control: In CHE 4223, Process Instrumentation and Automatic Control, a design project is given where the students are required to develop a numerical model to simulate the dynamic response of a chemical process to examine various control strategies. The students also utilize Loop-Pro software to control several chemical processes.

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING:
Each BS curriculum includes a capstone design course, except for Computer Science.


COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING:
Software Engineering Senior Design Project - The software engineering capstone design experience consists of a two-semester sequence in which students from the software engineering (SE) program in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering team with students from other disciplines on campus to work as an industrial team on a software engineering product for a real customer. Each year, the students in the Software Engineering Senior Design class are charged with developing a system and exercising the entire software engineering lifecycle - from requirements to delivery. During the 2016-17 academic year, the Software Engineering Senior Design course involves four teams working on four different projects.
This year's projects include the following systems:
EcoCAR3 ADAS - Mississippi State University's EcoCAR3 team is currently in the 3rd year of the 4-year competition with 15 other universities throughout the US and Canada. The CSE Senior Design team is working to develop and enhance the vehicle's vision-based Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS). The team is developing vision processing algorithms to assess real-world traffic and surroundings (e.g., stop signs, speed limit) to enhance driver experience and safety.
Future Grower Technology - College of Ag and Life Sciences - The goal of the Future Grower program is to develop training systems to teach the next generation of greenhouse and grower house operators how to successfully manage agricultural resources in a safe, non-threatening environment. The team is developing a server-based simulation game to use as a training tool and incorporating actual commercial control interfaces, 3D models of selected plant species, and trainee remote interfaces on iOS and Android mobile platforms. This application will reduce the operator training time by simulating shortened virtual growth cycles.
The FSB Companies Cattle Management System - The FSB Companies is a boutique investment firm that invests in and manages a diverse portfolio of companies at all stages of growth. The FSB portfolio contains agricultural holdings focused on livestock management. The senior design team is developing a full-stack web application with iOS and Android mobile app interfaces to track the status, location and health of managed cattle, straw inventory, and breeding cycles. This system will replace a manual, paper process and allow access to available metrics to enable process improvement.
Camgian Microsystems - Camgian develops advanced sensing and information processing platforms that deliver real-time, actionable intelligence. The CSE Senior design team is supporting development of Camgian's Egburt fog computing software platform providing sensor analytics to its clients. The team is developing algorithms to detect and report correlations between streams of sensor data to alert operators to data anomalies prior to actual disruptions in operations. The system will produce an interactive network map upon anomaly detection that the operator can use to pinpoint the source of any problems.
CSE 4713 Programming Languages - This class has a semester-long project that involves the design and implementation of a language translation system. This project is required for computer science students and serves to bring together the knowledge from the pre-requisite classes into a semester-long project involving the analysis, parsing and implementation of a model computer language.


ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING:
Both electrical engineering and computer engineering students participate in a two-semester senior design sequence. Student teams are composed of three to five students and are free to choose their own projects. In the first semester, student teams complete a working prototype, with the second semester dedicated to fine-tuning, packaging, and testing of the final design.

Senior design teams compete each year at the IEEE SoutheastCon Hardware Design Competition that has teams from 30+ regional universities, building autonomous robots to perform various tasks. Our ECE student team has placed in the top three positions seven times and secured first place four times (1st in 2003, 1st in 2005, 3rd in 2006, 1st in 2007, 2nd in 2008, 3rd in 2010, and 1st in 2014). Our students have also participated in the software and ethics competitions at SoutheastCon. Senior design teams can also be sponsored by external sources such as private companies (e.g., Nissan) and state/federal agencies (e.g., Mississippi Department of Transportation and Army Material Systems Analysis Activity, Proving Ground, Maryland).

Outside of the framework of the senior design sequence, other ECE students are teaming with aerospace and other engineering students to compete in the annual Student Unmanned Aerial System (SUAS) design competition, sponsored by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International. This is an international competition where the MSU team placed second overall out of twenty-five teams in 2010 and placed first out of sixteen teams in 2008. In addition, Mississippi State University is one of 16 universities in North America participating in EcoCAR 3: An Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition. Sponsored by General Motors and the U.S. Department of Energy, the goal of this 4 year-competition is to redesign a Chevrolet Camaro into a hybrid-electric car that will reduce environmental impact, while maintaining the muscle and performance expected from this iconic American car.

INDUSTRIAL AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING:
Manufacturing Processes Design Project " Industrial engineering students in IE 3323 work in teams to define the sequence of processes, along with specific machines and tooling required to efficiently and economically manufacture a selected commercially available product.
Systems Simulation I Project - Industrial engineering students in IE 4773 work in teams (undergraduate) or individually (graduate students) to complete a project involving either the solution of an actual manufacturing system problem from industry, or the design of a production or service facility defined in cooperation with the instructor. Each project must involve a detailed analysis of all aspects of the project including problem definition, identification of key performance measures, development of an operational description of the problem, simulation implementation, and model verification and validation. In addition to the intermediate reports submitted during the semester, each project must submit a final report along with their model.
Senior Design Project - Industrial engineering senior design students work in teams to design a production facility for a product they choose or a service facility for a service they choose. Each team must conduct detailed analyses of all aspects of the proposed venture, including the market for the product, the selection of a site for the facility, fabrication and assembly process design, material handling systems design, facility layout, facility and product safety, and financial analysis. Each senior design team collaborates with teams from another industrial and systems engineering class, Manufacturing Processes. In addition to intermediate reports submitted during the semester, at the end of the semester students submit a final report and make a presentation to practicing industrial and systems engineers who critique their designs.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING:
All mechanical engineering students are required to take a series of design courses. Among these are machine design, energy system design (ESD) and mechanical system design (MSD). The last two are considered the capstone courses in the curriculum. In MSD, students work in teams of 4 to 7 students. Each team is assigned an industry project, and a proposal and final report are required. In addition, the students are required to deliver a design review/update presentation as well as a final presentation. Use of computer aided engineering tools like finite element analysis (FEA) is an integral part of the project. Other activities include peer evaluations and team building exercises.

SAE Formula Car. The Mechanical Engineering student section of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) annually designs, builds, and races a formula car in the International SAE competition. A team of approximately 35 students are involved every year with this project. Almost half of these students assume a leading role for one aspect of the project (e.g. powertrain, chassis, body). The completed car and team travel to race location to participate in the competition in the Spring semester each year. Funding for the project comes from corporations, alumni, private donors, the Mechanical Engineering Department, the Bagley College of Engineering, and Mississippi State University.

EcoCAR 3. MSU is competing in year three of the four-year EcoCAR 3 competition, which is the latest in a series of advanced vehicle technology competitions (AVTCs) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and General Motors and managed by Argonne National Laboratory. As the premier collegiate automotive engineering competition in North America, EcoCAR 3 provides MSU students the opportunity to "re-engineer" a GM-donated Chevrolet Camaro to minimize fuel consumption and to reduce its environmental impact, while maintaining the performance expected from a Camaro. MSU’s student teams have historically performed exceptionally well in DOE AVTCs and the EcoCAR 3 team seeks to build on the strong foundation for success established by its predecessors.

ASME Human Powered Vehicle Challenge (HPVC). The Mechanical Engineering student section of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers annually designs, builds, and races a practical, eco-friendly transportation by means of human powered vehicles. A team of approximately 15 students are involved every year with this project. About 5 or 6 of the students assume a leading role for one aspect of the project (e.g. composites, innovation, safety, design). The completed bike and team travel to race location to participate in the competition in the Spring semester each year. Funding for the project comes from corporations, alumni, private donors, the Mechanical Engineering Department, the Bagley College of Engineering, and Mississippi State University.

Engineering Information

College Description

Engineering College Description and Special Characteristics

The Bagley College of Engineering (BCoE) provides both undergraduate and graduate education, and conducts basic and applied research to engage in extension and public service activities. The college offers 11, four-year engineering undergraduate degrees. The undergraduate aerospace, biological, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, industrial, mechanical, petroleum, and software engineering programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET and the computer science program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org. The college offers the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in all of the undergraduate majors, except Software Engineering, as well as graduate degrees in Computational Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Computational Engineering and Applied Physics. The college also offers Master of Engineering (interdisciplinary).

The college has a very strong and active distance education program. Currently, the college offers 12 distance graduate programs: MS and PhD degrees in Aerospace, Civil and Environmental, Electrical and Computer, Industrial and Systems, Computational and Mechanical Engineering, and an MS in Engineering. These programs can be completed fully by distance. Students have the option to complete MS theses in all programs except Civil and the Master of Engineering, which have non-thesis MS distance programs only.

In an effort to increase graduate student enrollments, 6 of the programs now offer Accelerator Programs (Chemical Engineering, Computer Science and Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Industrial and Systems Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and the Master of Engineering). These programs allow students to dual count 9 hours of course credit between the BS and MS degrees. This reduces the amount of time students spend in the MS program by 1 semester.

Our excellence extends beyond the classroom through several state-of-the-art research centers and laboratories that provide hands-on experience for undergraduate and graduate students. Students are involved in various research outlets throughout the college, including the Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET); the Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems (CAVS); the Raspet Flight Research Laboratory; the Sustainable Energy Research Center (SERC); the Center for Computer Security Research (CCSR), and the High Voltage Laboratory. Other research centers on campus in which engineering students and faculty are active participants include, but are not limited to, Geosystems Research Institute (GRI), Institute for Genomics, Biocomputing and Biotechnology (IGBB), Northern Gulf Institute (NGI), and the Distributed Analytics and Security Institute (DASI).

The High Performance Computing Collaboratory (HPC2), is a focal point for much of the College's research activities. The HPC2, an evolution of the MSU NSF Engineering Research Center (ERC) for Computational Field Simulation, is a coalition of member centers and groups that share a common core objective of advancing the state-of-the-art in computational science and engineering using high performance computing; a common approach to research that embraces a multidisciplinary, team-oriented concept; and a commitment to a full partnership among education, research, and service. The mission is to serve the University, State, and Nation through excellence in computational science and engineering using high performance computing. The HPC2 is comprised of seven independent centers:
Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems (CAVS),
Center for Battlefield Innovation (CBI),
Center for Computational Sciences (CCS),
Distributed Analytics and Security Institute (DASI),
Geosystems Research Institute (GRI),
Institute for Genomics, Biocomputing and Biotechnology (IGBB), and
Northern Gulf Institute (NGI).

Additionally, most of our undergraduate programs have very active co-op and internship programs with 60% of all undergraduate students participating in these programs. Some specific departments have participation in the 80% range. The Agricultural and Biological Engineering programs are also 51% female, with 6 female faculty, and are our most diverse programs.

MSU is only 1 of 6 schools that are credentialed as Centers of Academic Excellence in Cyber Operations, Information Assurance/Cyber Defense, and by the NSA and DHS.

Nearly one-third of our entire graduate student population participate via distance with graduation rates in line with on-campus students.

Engineering Information

Engineering Faculty & Research

Teaching, Tenure-Track View Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Full Professors Assoc. Professors Assistant Professors Program Total
0 0 0 0
Aerospace Engineering 8 3 2 13
Agricultural and Biological Engineering 4 6 4 14
Chemical Engineering 1 4 4 9
Civil and Environmental Engineering 3 5 3 11
Computer Science and Engineering 5 6 4 15
Dean of Engineering 3 1 0 4
Electrical and Computer Engineering 10 7 5 22
Industrial and Systems Engineering 2 1 7 10
Mechanical Engineering 6 5 6 17
Totals: 42 38 35 115

Teaching, Non-Tenure-Track

Engineering Department(s) FT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel PT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Teach. Personnel
0 0 0 0.00
Aerospace Engineering 6 0 6 0.00
Agricultural and Biological Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Chemical Engineering 2 0 2 0.00
Civil and Environmental Engineering 0 1 1 0.50
Computer Science and Engineering 3 4 7 1.25
Dean of Engineering 4 6 10 1.35
Electrical and Computer Engineering 2 0 2 0.00
Industrial and Systems Engineering 0 3 3 1.00
Mechanical Engineering 4 4 8 1.50
Totals: 21 18 39 5.60

Non-Teaching, Research

Engineering Department(s) Non-Teach. FT Research Personnel Non-Teach. PT Research Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Non-Teach. Research Personnel
0 0 0 0.00
Aerospace Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Agricultural and Biological Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Chemical Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Civil and Environmental Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Computer Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Dean of Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Industrial and Systems Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Totals: 0 0 0 0.00

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

  • American Indian or Alaska Native (Am Ind): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.
  • Asian: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
  • Black or African American (B/AfrA): A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as "Haitian" or "Negro" can be used in addition to "Black or African American."
  • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (Haw): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
  • Hispanic or Latino (Hisp): A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. The term, "Spanish origin," can be used in addition to "Hispanic or Latino."
  • White: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Full Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Aerospace Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 8 0
Agricultural and Biological Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 0
Chemical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Civil and Environmental Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0
Computer Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 3 2
Dean of Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 1
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 9 1
Industrial and Systems Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 6 0
Totals: 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 33 3 0 0 38 4

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Associate Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Aerospace Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 1
Agricultural and Biological Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1
Chemical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 3 1
Civil and Environmental Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 5 0
Computer Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 5 1
Dean of Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 7 0
Industrial and Systems Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0
Totals: 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 0 1 0 0 16 4 0 0 33 5

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Assistant Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Aerospace Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Agricultural and Biological Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4
Chemical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 0
Civil and Environmental Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0
Computer Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0
Dean of Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 4 1
Industrial and Systems Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 7 0
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 5 1
Totals: 0 0 1 0 0 0 12 0 1 3 2 0 13 3 0 0 29 6

Undergraduate

Admissions/Transfers

Undergraduate Admission to the College of Engineering

Prospective students are encouraged to take as many courses in mathematics, science, English, social studies, and foreign languages as possible in high school. A unit of computer aided graphics is recommended for engineering students and at least one-half unit of keyboarding and one-half unit of computer programming are recommended.

For regular admission to one of the Bagley College of Engineering degree granting programs as a freshman, a student must be admitted to Mississippi State University, complete the following high school core: 4 units of English, 4 units of Math (algebra, geometry, trigonometry), 3 units of science (chemistry, and either biology or physics), 3 units of social studies and/or foreign languages and 2 units of electives, and meet any one of the following criteria:
--Have a composite score greater than or equal to 23 on the ACT or 1130 on the SAT.
--Have a composite score of 20, 21, or 22 on the ACT or between a 1020 and 1100 on the SAT with high school GPA of 3.00 or greater on the academic core courses listed above.
--Have any ACT or SAT score with a high school GPA of 3.5 or greater on the academic core courses listed above.

New freshmen applicants who do not meet these requirements, are otherwise admitted to Mississippi State University, and want to pursue an engineering degree should join the undeclared major with a pre-engineering concentration. These students will be advised for the first 30 hours by the University Advising Center.

Internal Transfers: Students in the pre-engineering concentration, and other students at MSU may transfer into an engineering degree granting program if they satisfy any one of the following criteria:
--Meet engineering new freshman requirements listed above.
--Have completed at least 30 hours with a cumulative GPA greater than or equal to 2.00 and passed Calculus I, English Composition I, and Fundamentals of Chemistry with grades of "C" or better.

Undergraduate Admission to an Engineering Department

Same as above

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

Additional Requirements: International students must submit an international application form, $40.00 non-refundable application fee, certified and translated copies of all transcripts, mark sheets and diplomas, Mississippi State's declaration of financial support form, bank or employer letter documenting support and a minimum TOEFL score of 550 PBT (paper based), 213 CBT (computer based) or 79 iBT (internet based).

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

Same as resident students.

Residency Requirements

The following state laws, court decisions and Institutions of Higher Learning policies apply in determining the residential status of students for the purpose of enrolling and paying fees at a state-supported institution of higher learning:
No student may be admitted to any institution of higher learning as a resident of Mississippi unless his residence has been in the State of Mississippi preceding his/her admission. Residence shall be as defined in Mississippi Code Sections 37-103-7 and 37-103-13 unless excepted below.

A person who has entered the State of Mississippi from another state and enters an educational institution is considered a nonresident. Even though he/she may have been legally adopted by a resident of Mississippi, or may have been a qualified voter, or landowner, or may otherwise have sought to establish legal residence, such a person will still be considered as being a nonresident of Mississippi if he/she has entered this state for the purpose of enrolling in an educational institution.

Legal Residence of a Minor. For purposes of determining whether a person pays out-of-state or in-state tuition for attendance at universities, community and junior colleges, the residence of a person less than twenty-one (21) years of age is that of the father, the mother or a general guardian duly appointed by a proper court in Mississippi. If a court has granted custody of the minor to one (1) parent, the residence of the minor is that of the parent who was granted custody by the court. If both parents are dead, the residence of the minor is that of the last surviving parent at the time of that parent’s death, unless the minor lives with a general guardian duly appointed by a proper court of Mississippi, in which case his residence becomes that of the guardian. A student who, upon registration at a Mississippi institution of higher learning or community college, presents a transcript demonstrating graduation from a Mississippi secondary school and who has been a secondary school student in Mississippi for not less than the final four (4) years of secondary school attendance shall not be required to pay out-of-state tuition. This section shall not apply to the residence of a person as it relates to residency for voter registration or voting.

Legal Residence of an Adult. The residence of an adult is that place where he or she is domiciled; that is, the place where he or she actually resides with the intent of remaining there indefinitely, or of returning there permanently when temporarily absent.

Removal of Parents from Mississippi. If the parents of a minor who is enrolled as a student in an institution of higher learning move their legal residence from the State of Mississippi, the minor is immediately classified as a nonresident student.

Residence Status of a Married Person. A married person may claim the residence of his or her spouse, or may claim independent resident status as any other adult.

Children of Parents Who are Employed by Institutions of Higher Learning. Children of parents who are members of the faculty or staff of any institution under the jurisdiction of the board of trustees may be classified as residents without regard to the residence requirement of twelve (12) months, for the purpose of attendance at the institution where their parents are faculty or staff members. Full-time faculty and staff are also considered residents. Children or spouses of full-time faculty and staff are not automatically considered residents for tuition purposes at the College of Veterinary Medicine.

Military Personnel Assigned an Active Duty Station in Mississippi. Members of the armed forces and members of the Mississippi National Guard on extended active duty and/or stationed within the State of Mississippi, except those military personnel whose active duty assignment in the State of Mississippi is for educational purposes, may be classified as residents, without regard to the residence requirement of twelve (12) months, for the purpose of attending state-supported institutions of higher learning and junior colleges of the State of Mississippi. Resident status of such military personnel who are not legal residents of Mississippi, as defined under “Legal residence of an adult” shall terminate upon their reassignment for duty in the continental United States outside the State of Mississippi.

Children and Spouses of Military Personnel. The resident status of a spouse or child of a member of the Armed Forces of the United States on extended active duty shall be that of the military spouse or parent for the purpose of attending state-supported institutions of higher learning and community/junior colleges of the State of Mississippi during the time that the military spouse or parent is stationed within the State of Mississippi and shall be continued through the time that the military spouse or parent is stationed in an overseas area with last duty assignment within the State of Mississippi, excepting temporary training assignments en route from Mississippi. Resident status of a minor child terminates upon reassignment under Permanent Change of Station Orders of the military parent for duty in the continental United States outside the State of Mississippi, excepting temporary training assignments en route from Mississippi, and except that children of members of the Armed Forces who attain Mississippi residency in accordance with the above provisions, who begin and complete their senior year of high school in Mississippi, and who enroll full time in a Mississippi institution of higher learning or community/junior college to begin studies in the fall after their graduation from high school, maintain their residency status so long as they remain enrolled as a student in good standing at a Mississippi institution of higher learning or community/junior college. Enrollment during summer school is not required to maintain such resident status.
(2) The spouse or child of a member of the Armed Forces of the United States who dies or is killed is entitled to pay the resident tuition fee if the spouse or child becomes a resident of Mississippi within one hundred eighty (180) days of the date of death.
(3) If a member of the Armed Forces of the United States is stationed outside Mississippi and the member’s spouse or child establishes residence in Mississippi and registers with the Mississippi institution of higher learning or community/junior college at which the spouse or child plans to attend, the institution of higher education or community/junior college shall permit the spouse or child to pay the tuition, fees and other charges provided for Mississippi residents without regard to length of time that the spouse or child has resided in Mississippi.
(4) A member of the Armed Forces of the United States or the child or spouse of a member of the Armed Forces of the United States who is entitled to pay tuition and fees at the rate provided for Mississippi residents under another provision of this section while enrolled in a degree or certificate program is entitled to pay tuition and fees at the rate provided for Mississippi residents in any subsequent term or semester while the person is continuously enrolled in the same degree or certificate program. A student may withdraw or may choose not to re-enroll for no more than one (1) semester or term while pursuing a degree or certificate without losing resident status only if that student provides sufficient documentation by a physician that the student has a medical condition that requires withdrawal or non enrollment. For purposes of this subsection, a person is not required to enroll in a summer term to remain continuously enrolled in a degree or certificate program. The person’s eligibility to pay tuition and fees at the rate provided for Mississippi residents under this subsection does not terminate because the person is no longer a member of the Armed Forces of the United States or the child or spouse of a member of the Armed Forces of the United States.
Certification of Residence of Military Personnel. A military person on active duty stationed in Mississippi who wishes to avail himself or herself or his or her dependents of these provisions must submit a certificate from his or her military organization showing the name of the military member; the name of the dependent (if for a dependent), the name of the organization of assignment and its address (may be in the letterhead); that the military member will be on active duty stationed in Mississippi on the date of registration at the state-supported institution of higher learning or junior college of the State of Mississippi; that the military member is not on transfer orders; and the signature of the Commanding Officer, the Adjutant or the Personnel Officer of the unit of assignment with signer’s rank and title. A military certificate must be presented to the registrar of the state-supported institution of higher learning or junior college of the State of Mississippi each semester or trimester at (or within ten (10) days prior to) registration each semester for the provisions hereof to be effective.
Non U.S. Citizens (Alien status). All aliens are classified as nonresidents except that lawfully admitted alien students with permanent resident status, temporary resident status, or refugee status can establish Mississippi residence by meeting the same residency requirements as any U.S. Citizen.

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

Students may transfer from other colleges or universities into Mississippi State University engineering degree programs if they meet all requirements to transfer to Mississippi State University and satisfy any one of the following criteria:
--Meet engineering new freshmen admission standards.
--Have completed at least 30 hours with a cumulative GPA greater than or equal to 2.00 and passed courses equivalent to Calculus I (MA 1713), English Composition I (EN 1103), and Fundamentals of Chemistry I (CH 1213) with grades of C or better.
Transfer students must submit an application with a $40.00 application fee; must submit official transcripts of all course work; and must submit official ACT/SAT test scores.

Number of Transfer Students from:

A two-year community junior college where they were full-time students: 303
A four-year college or university where they were full-time students: 30

Undergraduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): All Students

Undergraduate Group 1
Tuition & Fees: $7,780
Room & Board: $9,418
Books & Supplies: $1,200
Other Expenses: $5,184
Estimated avg. course load per term: 15
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), Institution's Own Application Form, State Student Financial Aid application (Mississippi Residen, Departmental Scholarship application

Additional Financial Aid Information

If interested in work-study be sure to check this box on the FAFSA.

Students who are eligible will automatically be considered for Federal Grants and Federal Direct Student Loans by completing the FAFSA.

If interested in a Direct Parent PLUS Loan, in addition to the FAFSA, the parent borrower must complete the Direct Loan Request Process.

Students who do not qualify for federal financial aid, or who need additional funds beyond what federal financial aid can provide, have an option of applying for an alternative (private, non-federal) educational loan. These loans must be credit approved by lender.

The online scholarship resume is required for consideration of all general university scholarships. Freshmen have a December 1 priority date; community college transfers have a June 1 priority date. For more information regarding admission & the scholarship resume, please visit admissions.msstate.edu.

Students who wish to apply for departmental scholarships will need to complete the General Scholarship Application. They may also need to complete additional departmental applications depending on the scholarship they wish to apply for.

State Student Financial Aid (for residents of Mississippi only):
Several student financial aid programs are offered by the state of Mississippi through the Mississippi Office of Student Financial Aid in Jackson, MS. Some of these programs are offered specifically for teacher education majors, nursing majors, medical students and dental students. Two of the larger programs offered are the Mississippi Tuition Assistance Grant/Mississippi Eminent Scholars Grant (MTAG/MESG). These programs do not require a specific academic major, and are available to all resident students who meet the eligibility criteria.

For information or to receive an application for MTAG/MESG or to learn about other state aid programs such as William Winter Teacher Scholarship, Higher Education Legislative Plan (HELP) or the Critical Needs Teacher Program contact:

Mississippi Office of Student Financial Aid
3825 Ridgewood Road
Jackson, MS 39211
Phone Number: 1-800-327-2980
E-mail: sfa@ihl.state.ms.us
Web Site: www.mississippi.edu

Undergraduate

New Applicants

New Undergraduate Applicants

A. Number of undergraduate applicants to the engineering college: 3,181
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 2,437
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 1,196
Percentage of entering students (excluding transfer students) ranked in the top quarter (25%) of their high schools: 45%

Newly Enrolled Test Scores

Scores Reflect 75th to 25th percentile

SAT 75th 25th
Math Range:
Reading Range: 579 553
Writing Range: 1245 1186
Combined Range:
ACT 75th 25th
Math Range: 27 26
Composite Range: 28 26

Undergraduate

Enrollments by Class

Undergraduate Engr. Programs Fresh
1st Year
Soph
2nd Year
Junior
3rd Year
Senior
4th/5th Year
Full Time Total Part Time Total
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.) 104 68 60 72 304 11
Biological Engineering (B.S.) 129 87 71 113 400 3
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 104 101 83 131 419 47
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 78 75 98 158 409 27
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 72 39 36 43 190 10
Computer Science (B.S.) 76 57 63 74 270 19
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 58 39 66 84 247 47
Industrial Engineering (B.S.) 35 31 35 64 165 14
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 232 152 214 247 845 103
Petroleum Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0
Petroleum Engineering (B.S.) 34 15 16 19 84 3
Software Engineering (B.S.) 32 22 33 42 129 2
Undeclared - Freshman Engineering 42 1 1 0 44 0
Totals: 996 687 776 1047 3506 286

Freshmen

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 1 0 11 0 0 0 68 0 2 0 91 0
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 13 0
Biological Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 6 0 0 0 48 0 0 0 58 0
Women 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 13 0 0 0 55 0 0 0 71 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 5 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 4 0 0 0 47 1 1 0 60 1
Women 3 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 8 0 0 0 26 0 1 0 44 0
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 13 0 0 0 36 0 1 0 53 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 19 0 0 0 25 0
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 15 0 0 0 33 0 3 0 57 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 15 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 3 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 5 0 1 0 40 1 1 0 55 1
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 5 0 0 0 12 0 1 0 21 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 11 0 0 0 35 0 1 0 51 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 7 0
Industrial Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 17 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 18 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 1 1 7 1 0 0 5 0 29 1 0 0 160 0 3 0 209 3
Women 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 16 0 1 0 23 0
Petroleum Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Petroleum Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 24 2 0 0 30 2
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 4 0
Software Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 4 0 0 0 19 0 0 0 25 0
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7 0
Undeclared - Freshman Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 32 0 0 0 35 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 7 0
Totals: 20 0 10 1 30 1 1 0 25 0 159 1 1 0 734 4 16 0 996 7

Sophomores

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 5 0 0 0 44 2 2 0 55 2
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 13 0
Biological Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 30 0 0 0 37 0
Women 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 40 0 2 0 50 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 6 0 0 0 55 2 1 0 68 2
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 30 0 0 0 33 0
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 4 0 0 0 49 0 1 0 58 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 0 0 0 17 0
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 5 0 0 0 22 0 0 0 30 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 9 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 4 0 1 0 39 1 1 0 52 1
Women 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 5 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 28 3 1 0 35 4
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 4 0
Industrial Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 1 0 0 10 0 0 0 16 1
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 9 1 0 0 15 1
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 5 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 2 0 12 0 0 0 111 9 2 0 137 9
Women 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 15 0
Petroleum Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Petroleum Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 13 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Software Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 8 0 1 0 15 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 7 0
Undeclared - Freshman Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Totals: 17 0 2 1 20 0 4 0 18 0 72 1 1 0 538 18 15 0 687 20

Juniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 1 6 0 0 0 32 0 2 0 48 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 9 0 1 0 12 0
Biological Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 5 0 0 0 28 0 0 0 37 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 7 0 0 0 25 1 0 0 34 1
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 3 0 4 0 0 0 51 7 0 0 63 7
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 15 4 2 0 20 5
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 2 0 7 1 0 0 67 5 0 0 80 7
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 14 3 0 0 18 3
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 20 3 1 0 33 3
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 9 0 0 0 43 2 1 0 58 3
Women 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 1
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 3 0 10 3 0 1 41 13 0 0 57 18
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 6 1 1 0 9 1
Industrial Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 15 2 1 0 24 3
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 11 1
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 6 0 1 2 5 0 2 0 4 0 22 2 0 0 145 26 4 0 189 30
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 20 1 1 0 25 1
Petroleum Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Petroleum Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 11 1 0 0 14 1
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Software Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 20 1 0 0 29 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 4 0
Undeclared - Freshman Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 25 1 3 3 30 1 5 1 22 2 103 7 0 1 573 71 15 0 776 87

Seniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 51 6 1 0 63 7
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 9 1
Biological Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 5 0 0 0 54 1 1 0 64 1
Women 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 0 6 0 0 0 35 1 1 0 49 1
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 1 5 2 0 0 81 17 0 0 95 20
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 5 2 0 0 27 9 1 0 36 12
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 1 0 3 1 0 0 0 2 8 2 0 0 117 9 1 0 130 14
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 24 3 0 0 28 3
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 6 0 0 0 26 6 1 0 40 7
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 8 1 0 0 51 11 3 1 66 13
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 8 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 1 2 1 2 0 0 4 0 9 1 0 0 61 16 2 0 79 21
Women 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 5 3
Industrial Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 1 0 0 35 5 1 0 43 6
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 11 2 0 0 21 2
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 5 1 1 0 7 6 2 0 8 0 12 3 0 0 175 46 4 0 214 56
Women 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 26 3 0 0 33 4
Petroleum Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Petroleum Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 0 0 17 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Software Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 35 1 0 0 38 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0
Undeclared - Freshman Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 21 1 4 2 34 10 3 0 31 5 96 13 0 0 842 140 16 1 1047 172

Undergraduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.) 5 1 2 0 1 1 0 26 1 37 31 6
Biological Engineering (B.S.) 2 0 0 0 2 3 0 57 0 64 36 28
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 0 1 4 2 2 1 0 61 4 75 52 23
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 1 1 1 0 1 10 0 74 0 88 78 10
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 1 0 0 5 0 13 0 19 16 3
Computer Science (B.S.) 3 1 0 0 0 6 0 38 2 50 43 7
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 3 0 0 0 3 8 0 39 1 54 47 7
Industrial Engineering (B.S.) 1 0 0 0 1 8 0 23 2 35 27 8
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 4 2 3 0 4 8 0 93 0 114 109 5
Petroleum Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Petroleum Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Software Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 0 13 11 2
Undeclared - Freshman Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 19 6 11 2 14 50 0 437 10 549 450 99

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.) 4 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 21 5 1 0 37
Biological Engineering (B.S.) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 0 0 32 25 0 0 64
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 1 0 3 1 2 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 43 18 2 2 75
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 9 1 0 0 67 7 0 0 88
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 12 1 0 0 19
Computer Science (B.S.) 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 32 6 2 0 50
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 7 1 0 0 35 4 1 0 54
Industrial Engineering (B.S.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 2 0 0 19 4 1 1 35
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 4 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 3 1 7 1 0 0 90 3 0 0 114
Petroleum Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Petroleum Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Software Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 2 0 0 13
Undeclared - Freshman Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 15 4 5 1 10 1 2 0 11 3 38 12 0 0 362 75 7 3 549

Undergraduate

Dual Degrees

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

The dual degree program must meet the minimum degree requirements for a degree in both programs. Students are advised to consult with advisers in the Bagley College of Engineering and other discipline to develop a detailed program.

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degrees Awarded

Undergraduate

Program Comparisons

  • ABET - Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
  • CEAB - Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board
Degree Program ABET/CEAB Accred. Nominal Program Length
(yrs.)
Average Program Length
(yrs.)
Time: Day/Even./
Both
Co-op: None/Opt./
Required
Grads in Co-op Progs.
no Both None
Aerospace Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional 4
Biological Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional 1
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional 28
Civil Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional 9
Computer Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional 4
Computer Science (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional 1
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional 17
Industrial Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional 4
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional 41
Petroleum Engineering (B.S.) no Both None
Petroleum Engineering (B.S.) no 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Software Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Undeclared - Freshman Engineering no Day None

Graduate

Admissions Information

Graduate Admission to the College of Engineering

In addition to regular admission requirements of the Graduate School, individual programs have the following requirements.
Admission to Aerospace Engineering requires a BS in ASE or a closely related field from an EAC/ABET accredited program with a GPA of 3.0 out of 4.0 for the junior and senior years. An applicant with a BS degree from a program that is not EAC/ABET accredited must submit satisfactory GRE general-test scores.
Admission to Applied Physics requires an MS as prerequisite to the Applied Physics PhD program. In order to gain admission, students must meet general graduate student admission requirements. An applicant with a BS degree from a program that is not EAC/ABET accredited must submit satisfactory GRE general-test scores.
Admission to Biological Engineering requires an undergraduate engineering degree (or remedial engineering course work), satisfactory performance on the GRE for a student with a BS from a program that is not EAC/ABET accredited, and identification of a department professor who is willing to serve as research director for the master's or PhD project.
Admission to Biomedical Engineering requires an earned BS degree in an engineering discipline from an EAC/ABET accredited institution (students with a BS from a program that is not EAC/ABET accredited will have to perform satisfactorily on the GRE), receive a positive recommendation by the coordinating committee of the biomedical engineering graduate committee, and be accepted as a student by a member of the biomedical engineering graduate faculty. A student entering the PhD program should have an MS in an engineering field, but special consideration for direct admission to the doctorate may be given to an exceptional student.
Admission to Chemical Engineering requires a BS in Chemical Engineering with a 3.0 GPA out of 4.0 for the junior and senior years (students who do not hold a BS in CHE must complete CHE undergraduate core prerequisites) for admission to the MS program and submit satisfactory quantitative, analytical, and verbal GRE scores for admission to the MS program. Direct admission to the Ph.D. program requires a 3.2 GPA out of 4.0 the junior and senior years and satisfactory GRE scores. For those applicants not possessing a BS in Chemical Engineering or coming from institutions that are not EAC/ABET accredited, admission will be considered on a case by case basis.
Admission to Civil Engineering requires a BS from an EAC/ABET program and a minimum 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale. Graduates of non-EAC/ABET programs must achieve satisfactory performance on the GRE and have an undergraduate record acceptable to CE faculty.
Admission to Computational Engineering requires a student to receive positive recommendation from the Computational Engineering screening committee and be accepted as a student by a member of the graduate faculty. A student with a BS from a program that is not EAC/ABET accredited must submit satisfactory scores on the GRE. A highly qualified undergraduate student with a minimum GPA of 3.5/4.0 for the junior and senior year, or a first class with distinction degree classification for a student whose degree is from an institution where no GPA is reported, may be directly admitted to the doctoral program. Satisfactory GRE scores must be submitted.
For admission to Computer Science an applicant at the MS level is required to have a 3.0/4.0 on the BS degree; an applicant at the doctoral level must have a 3.5/4.0 on a BS or MS for admission. Satisfactory performance on the GRE for a student with a BS from a program that is not EAC/ABET accredited is required. Additional coursework is required for students who do not meet pre-requisite requirements.
An Electrical and Computer Engineering applicant at the MS level is required to have a 3.0/4.0 on the BS degree; an applicant at the doctoral level must have a 3.5/4.0 on a BS or MS for admission. Satisfactory performance on the GRE for a student with a BS from a program that is not EAC/ABET accredited is required.
Admission to Industrial Engineering requires that MS program applicants have a 3.00 GPA on a 4.00 scale during their junior and senior undergraduate years, while Ph.D. (Industrial and Systems Engineering) applicants must have a 3.5 GPA on a 4.00 scale on their M.S. degree. In addition, students with a BS from a non-EAC/ABET accredited program must submit general test GRE scores.
For admission to Mechanical Engineering, a student with a BS from a non EAC/ABET program must submit general test GRE scores.
For admission to the Master of Engineering program, an applicant with a BS degree from a program that is not EAC/ABET accredited must submit satisfactory GRE general-test scores. Students who do not hold a BS in an engineering discipline must satisfy pre-requisite requirements common to EAC/ABET accredited undergraduate engineering programs prior to admission. A minimum 3.0 GPA at the undergraduate level is required for all students admitted.

Graduate Admission to an Engineering Department

Same as above. Contact the graduate coordinator or department head in each of the engineering departments for additional information.

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

Same general requirements as US Citizens. Proof of English language skills for international students may be satisfied with satisfactory scores on a TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language), an IELTS (International English Language Testing Systems) examination, or satisfactory completion of required ESL courses as determined by testing through ESL center. International students must earn a minimum TOEFL score of 550 PBT (paper based), 213 CBT (computer based), or 79 iBT (internet based). The minimum acceptable score for the IELTS examination is 6.5. However, programs may have higher minimum requirements for admission.

An international student holding one or more degrees (baccalaureate or higher) from a college or university in the U.S. is not required to submit English language test scores for admission.
Similarly, an international student from a country where English is the first language, as documented by a statement on the high school graduating certificate that English is the official (first) language of the country, and who holds one or more degrees (baccalaureate or higher) from a college or university where English is the first language is not required to submit English language test scores. However, such student, after admission and registration at MSU and upon the recommendation of the department, may be required to schedule one or more ESL (English as a Second Language) courses.

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

Same as resident students.

Residency Requirements

Ph.D. candidates are required to complete one-half of all required course work hours and all research hours at Mississippi State University.

There is no residency requirement for master's students.

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

Transfer credit may be granted provided hours were earned in programs with full accreditation by the appropriate regional and national accrediting bodies and approved by the major professor. Grades below "B" are not transferable. Aerospace will accept a maximum of 6 semester hours transfer credit. Other programs will accept 9 hours at the master's level. At the doctoral level, one-half of all coursework may be transferred with the approval of the major professor . Pass/Fail grades will not transfer.

Graduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): All Students

Graduate Group 1
Tuition & Fees: $7,780
Room & Board: $12,288
Books & Supplies: $1,200
Other Expenses: $5,238
Estimated avg. course load per term: 9
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), Institution's Own Application Form, Departmental Scholarship application

Additional Financial Aid Information

Mississippi State University offers graduate students an array of financial aid opportunities. Financial aid is awarded in the form of loans, part-time employment, waivers, assistantships, and fellowships. Assistantships and fellowships are offered through the various academic and administrative departments.

Students who wish to apply for departmental scholarships will need to complete the General Scholarship Application. They may also need to complete additional departmental applications depending on the scholarship they wish to apply for

Graduate

New Applicants

New Graduate Applicants

A. Number of graduate applicants to the engineering college: 609
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 259
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 131

Graduate

Enrollments by Class

Master's

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (M.S.)
Men 12 3 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 3 0 0 19 8
Women 12 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 7
Biological Engineering (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Biomedical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 1 0 1 5 2
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 6 0
Chemical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Civil Engineering (M.S.)
Men 0 2 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 3 34 0 1 4 47
Women 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 9 0 0 3 12
Computational Engineering (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Computer Science (M.S.)
Men 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 20 7 1 0 30 8
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 8 0
Electrical and Computer Engineering (M.S.)
Men 3 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 4 1 0 0 10 12 0 0 17 16
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Industrial Engineering (M.S.)
Men 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 3 13 0 0 6 17
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 0 0 1 14
Women 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 12
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 7 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 17 13 0 0 29 17
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 4 2
Totals: 45 14 0 1 4 14 0 0 5 5 9 14 0 0 87 118 1 2 151 168

Doctoral

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 10 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6 8 0 0 16 10
Women 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 1
Applied Physics (Ph.D.)
Men 14 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 14 2
Women 7 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 1
Biological Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 1
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0
Biomedical Engineering (P.h.D.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 4 1
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 6 0
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 9 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 9 3
Women 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 3 1 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 15 0 0 6 21
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 5 0 0 3 6
Computational Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 5 0 0 3 7
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2
Computer Science (Ph.D.)
Men 6 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 6 4 0 0 16 6
Women 7 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 10 0
Electrical and Computer Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 23 5 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 14 0 0 26 22
Women 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 1
Industrial and Systems Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 11 4 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 1 3 15 0 0 14 29
Women 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 1 6 0 0 4 10
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 21 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 18 10 1 0 42 12
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 5 2
Totals: 140 16 0 3 2 12 0 0 3 6 6 12 0 1 56 87 1 1 208 138

Graduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Aerospace Engineering (M.S.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 5 4 1
Biological Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Biomedical Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 3 2 1
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 3 1
Civil Engineering (M.S.) 3 2 3 0 0 0 0 5 0 13 9 4
Computational Engineering (M.S.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0
Computer Science (M.S.) 4 0 0 0 2 0 0 10 1 17 11 6
Electrical and Computer Engineering (M.S.) 5 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 10 8 2
Industrial Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 12 0 13 8 5
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 5 2 3
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 4 0 0 0 0 1 0 11 0 16 15 1
Totals: 20 3 3 0 4 4 0 51 2 87 63 24

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Aerospace Engineering (M.S.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 5
Biological Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Biomedical Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 3
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
Civil Engineering (M.S.) 2 1 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 13
Computational Engineering (M.S.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Computer Science (M.S.) 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 7 3 1 0 17
Electrical and Computer Engineering (M.S.) 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 10
Industrial Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 5 0 0 13
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 5
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 16
Totals: 15 5 2 1 2 1 0 0 1 3 4 0 0 0 38 13 1 1 87

Master's Degree Programs

Master's Degree Program Degree Type
Master's w/ Thesis Master's w/o Thesis or with Proj./Report Program Totals
Aerospace Engineering (M.S.) 5 0 5
Biological Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0
Biomedical Engineering (M.S.) 3 0 3
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 2 2 4
Civil Engineering (M.S.) 5 8 13
Computational Engineering (M.S.) 1 0 1
Computer Science (M.S.) 3 14 17
Electrical and Computer Engineering (M.S.) 6 4 10
Industrial Engineering (M.S.) 4 9 13
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) 0 5 5
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 10 6 16
Totals: 39 48 87

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Aerospace Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Applied Physics (Ph.D.) 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 0
Biological Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0
Biomedical Engineering (P.h.D.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 1
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 8 6 2
Computational Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0
Computer Science (Ph.D.) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 5 5 0
Electrical and Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 7 6 1
Industrial and Systems Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 3 0
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 2 1
Totals: 17 0 1 0 4 0 0 11 1 34 29 5

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Aerospace Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Applied Physics (Ph.D.) 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
Biological Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Biomedical Engineering (P.h.D.) 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 8
Computational Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Computer Science (Ph.D.) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 5
Electrical and Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7
Industrial and Systems Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3
Totals: 14 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 11 0 1 0 34

Graduate

Research Expenditures

Expenditures by Research Department

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Engineering Department External Funding Source
Aerospace Engineering
Total#: 29 Foreign: $15,119 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $1,236,915 Industry: $51,468 Priv/Non: $49,398
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $1,352,900
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Total#: 21 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $947,346 Industry: $52,246 Priv/Non: $62,322
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $1,061,914
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Chemical Engineering
Total#: 15 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $1,097,719 Industry: $54,856 Priv/Non: $86,690
State: $-1,896 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $1,237,369
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Total#: 35 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $539,067 Industry: $98,950 Priv/Non: $16,285
State: $99,827 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $754,129
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Computer Science and Engineering
Total#: 50 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $6,053,727 Industry: $81 Priv/Non: $20,492
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $6,074,300
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Dean of Engineering
Total#: 5 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $1,458
Fed/Nat: $152,470 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $153,928
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Total#: 84 Foreign: $-16,085 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $10,866,232 Industry: $338,314 Priv/Non: $225,925
State: $243,086 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $11,657,472
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Total#: 46 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $3,369,005 Industry: $313,977 Priv/Non: $125,580
State: $58,568 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $3,867,130
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Mechanical Engineering
Total#: 58 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $2,714,052 Industry: $74,092 Priv/Non: $1,007,500
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $3,795,644
Totals:
Total#: 343 Foreign: $-966 Indiv: $1,458
Fed/Nat: $26,976,533 Industry: $983,984 Priv/Non: $1,594,192
State: $399,585 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $29,954,786

Expenditures by Research Center

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Center/Lab External Funding Source
Alliance for Systems Safety of UAS through Research Excellence (ASSURE)
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems (CAVS)
Total#: 20 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $3,730,074 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $150,311
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $3,880,385
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems Extension (CAVS-E)
Total#: 1 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $2,951 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $2,951
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Battlefield Innovation (CBI)
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Biomedical Research Excellence
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Computational Sciences1
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Computer Security Research (CCSR)
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Cyber Innovation
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Distributed Analytics and Security Institute (DASI)
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Energy Institute (EI)
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Geosystems Research Institute (GRI)
Total#: 4 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $32,087 Industry: $10,023 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $42,110
Center/Lab External Funding Source
High Performance Computing Collaboratory (HPC2)
Total#: 1 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $3,870 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $3,870
Center/Lab External Funding Source
High Voltage Laboratory
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Institute for Clean Energy Techolology (ICET)
Total#: 7 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $4,069,495 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $4,069,495
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Institute for Computational Research for Engineering and Science (ICRES)
Total#: 1 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $26,983 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $26,983
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Institute for Imaging and Analytical Technologies
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Institute for Systems Engineering Research
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Institute of Genomics, Biocomputing & Biotechnology (IGBB)
Total#: 2 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $33,987 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $33,987
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Mississippi Transportation Research Center (MTRC)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
National Center for Intermodal Transportation for Economic Competitiveness (NCITEC)
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
National Forensic Training Center (NFTC)
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Northern Gulf Institute (NGI)
Total#: 3 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $289,554 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $289,554
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Raspet Flight Research Laboratory (RFRL)
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Sustainable Energy Research Center (SERC)
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
The Critical Infrastructure Protection Center (CIPC)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Totals:
Total#: 39 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $8,189,001 Industry: $10,023 Priv/Non: $150,311
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $8,349,335

1The department is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.



Grand Totals:
Total#: 382 Foreign: $-966 Indiv: $1,458
Fed/Nat: $35,165,534 Industry: $994,007 Priv/Non: $1,744,503
State: $399,585 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $38,304,121

The following text was offered to each school as a guideline for the calculation of externally-funded research expenditures:

Include all expenditures associated with grants and contracts specifically budgeted for externally sponsored research and associated programs and expenditures associated with all gifts auditably used for research. Include expended funds provided by the following external sources:

  1. Federal Government
  2. State Government
  3. Foreign Governments
  4. Industry
  5. Non-Profit Organizations (e.g. foundations)
  6. Individuals
  7. Local Government

The expenditures reported should be only those funds provided by organizations, agencies, and individuals external to the institution. Cost sharing/matching funds should be included only if provided from sources external to the institution.

Only State government funds that were obtained competitively or as matching funds associated with other externally funded programs should be included. State funds that are part of the normal operating budget should not be included regardless of purpose.

For all joint or contracted projects or sub-projects, only the portion of the center research performed by faculty, staff, and students of the affiliated engineering school should be credited to that school. Expenditures for capital costs of research laboratory building construction should not be included.

Expenditures for research laboratory renovations should not be included unless the renovation funds expended came from grants and contracts expressly intended for the direct support of engineering research.

Any portion of academic year and/or summer salary for any researcher that is not derived from external research grants or contracts should not be counted.

Total #: Report total number of individual grants, not the total dollar amount of the expenditures.

Expenditures: Report actual expenditures (as opposed to authorization amounts) in U.S. dollars.

Time frame for expenditures: Report expenditures for your current fiscal year.

Research centers listed as "WITHIN an engineering department" on the Research Centers page (screen 7) of the College of Engineering Profile, will not have their expenditures added to the school's total research expenditures. Such expenditures can be included in the department total, while still being listed for the appropriate center. This allows users to list the expenditures in two areas without double-counting.

Graduate

Research Description

Research Description By Graduate Engineering Department

Aerospace Engineering

Aerodynamics; Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD); Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM); Solid Mechanics; Multidisciplinary design optimization; Large-scale simulations of fluid flows; Turbulence modeling;Turbomachinery; Fluid-structure interaction; Grid generation for CFD modeling; Experimental aero-hydrodynamics; Fracture and fatigue failure of aircraft structures including metal and composites; Analysis and fabrication of composite materials; Guidance, navigation and control (GNC); Spacecraft trajectory design and mission planning with operational constraints; Sports equipment engineering; Integrated control of position, attitude, and flexible motion for satellite proximity operations.

Agricultural and Biological Engineering

Orthopedic Tissue Engineering; Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering; Cell and Tissue Biomechanics; Cellular and Molecular Mechanobiology; Biosimulation and Modeling; Bio-Energy; Water Quality and Modeling; GIS/GPS Applications; Synthetic Biology; Sustainable Design.

Chemical Engineering

Environmental Remediation; Chemical Extraction; Stabilization/Solidification; Waste Treatment; Heavy Metal Soils Applied Microbiology; Bioremediation; Industrial Microbiology; Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery; Industrial Biotechnology; Industrial Applications of Microwave Power/Heating and Electrochemistry; Process Instrumentation and Control; Chemical Plant/Oil Refinery Operations and Safety Integrated Remediation Technologies; Chemical/Physical Treatment Processes; Environmental Catalysis; Biofuels and Co-products; Crystallization; Process Design; Solids Processing; Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization; Natural Gas Production from Seabed Hydrates; Surface Science; Electronic Materials; Nanocomposites; Catalysis; Fuel Cells/Li-lon Batteries; Thermodynamics of Liquid Mixtures; Thermodynamics; Separations; Chemical Oxidation; Biotreatment; Hyphenated Remediation Techniques; Polymer Science, Design and Synthesis; Surface Modification to Polymers; Polymer Properties and Processing; Nuclear Waste Processing; Nanomaterials; Sustainability; Soft Materials; Synthesis and Characterization; Bacterial Polymers; Biomaterials; Thin Films; Microfluidics, Microreactors; Computational Modeling; Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle; Biomass Transformation
Algorithm and Force Field Development.

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Accident Analysis; Aeration Process Modeling; Aerator System Prototype Evaluation; Alternative Disinfection Strategies; Alternative Aquaculture Design and Operation; Analysis and Optimization of Metal Building Systems; Asphalt Pavement Materials Development and Modeling; Asphalt Maintenance and Extenders, Biokinetics Analysis and Simulation; Biological Desalinization; Biological Fuel Cells; Biological Management of Synthetic Organic Compounds; Biological reactor process control; Biological Reactor Process Optimization; Blast Effects on Structures; Bridge Integrity Evaluation; Carbon Dioxide Conversion; Coastal Water Quality Modeling; Composite Highway Materials; Composite Structural Materials; Concrete Aging and Rehabilitation; Concrete Development and Material Modeling; Construction Project Cost Management; Construction Project Risk Mitigation; Dynamic Structural Systems; Earthen Structure Design and Optimization; Ecological Process Modeling; Emergency Repair of Earthen Structures; Environmental Assessment; Environmental Remediation; Estuary Water Quality Modeling; Evacuation Simulation; Innovative Foundation Systems; Intermodal Transportation Modeling; Geotechnical Containment Modeling and Design; Hazardous Wastes; Highway Control Systems Modeling; Highway Materials Testing and Analysis; Hydrodynamic Modeling of Surface Water; Intermodal Transportation Management and Design; Levee Design and Remediation; Modeling Fate and Transport of Hazardous Materials; Modeling of Failed Geotechnical Systems; Multimodal Transportation Network Modeling; Nutrient Management; On-Site Wastewater Management; Pavement System Design; Physicochemical Contaminant Reduction; Portland Limestone Cement; Remote Sending Uses in Environmental Management; Remote Sensing Uses in Transportation and Environmental Management; Revetment Repair and Reinforcement; Railway Management; Seismic Analysis; Ship Structures Analysis; Solid Mechanics Modeling; Structural Mechanics Modeling; Structural Reliability; Traffic Simulation; Transportation Modeling; Transportation Safety; Waste Minimization; Waterborne Contaminant Management; Water Quality Modeling; Water Supply Development and Projection; Water and Wastewater Treatment Plant Optimization; Watershed Management.

Computer Science and Engineering

Computer Forensics; Computer Security; Information Visualization; Augmented Reality; Virtual Reality; Medical Imaging; Reasoning under Uncertainty; Computational Biology; Bioinformatics; Empirical Software Engineering; Software Change Management; Human-Computer Interactions; Human-Robotics Interactions; Cryptography; Network security; Autonomous Computing; High-Performance Computing; Scalable Computing; Parallel Computing; Computer Learning; Vector-Field Visualization; Systems Engineering; Computational Science; Human Centered Computing.

Dean of Engineering

Applied Physics: Computational Physics; Theoretical and Experimental Optics; Diagnostics Using the Techniques of Conventional, Imaging, and Laser Spectroscopy; Experimental and Theoretical Nuclear Structure Physics; Microwave Spectroscopy; Astrophysics; Astrochemistry; and Physics.
Computational Engineering: Computational Fluid Dynamics; Fluid-Structure Interactions; Computational Structural Mechanics; Visualization; Multi-Scale Modeling; High Performance Computing; Multidisciplinary Design Optimization; Uncertainty Quantification.

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Analysis of Sensors and Weapon Technology; Image and Signal Processing; Image and Data Compression; Remote Sensing; Scientific Visualization and Computer Vision, Data Analytics, Lightning/Impulse Evaluation of Insulators and Composite Structures; Power systems; Power electronics; High Voltage Engineering; Smart Grid; Computational Electromagnetics; Antenna Design and Analysis; Electromagnetic Compatibility; Asynchronous Design; Design Methodologies for Embedded Systems; Autonomic Computing; Cyber Security; Industrial Control Systems; Microelectronics and VLSI design; and Robotic and Control Systems.

Industrial and Systems Engineering

Design of Enterprises by Integration of Methods Dealing with People, Process and Technology; Enterprise Systems Simulation; Supply Chain Design and Optimization; Human-Computer Interaction; Service Quality and Usability; Health Care Systems Engineering; Decision Support Systems; Intermodal Transportation and Logistics; Disaster Preparedness and Response; Pedestrian Traffic Simulation; Applied Operations Research; Production Planning and Control; System Informatics and Control; Reliability and Sustainability of Complex Systems; Simulation Optimization; and Extended Enterprise Systems.

Mechanical Engineering

Computational Fluid Dynamics; Thermal and Fluid Systems Modeling; Energy Conservation; Advanced HVAC Technology; Computer-Aided Design; Finite Element Analysis; Fatigue and Fracture; Solidification and Welding; Internal Combustion Engine Testing; Constitutive Modeling; Composite Materials; Uncertainty Analysis, and Additive Manufacturing.

Research Description By Engineering Research Center

Alliance for Systems Safety of UAS through Research Excellence (ASSURE)

Air traffic control interoperability, UAS airport ground operations, control and communications, detect and avoid, human factors, UAS noise reduction, UAS wake signatures, unmanned aircraft pilot training and certification, low altitude operations safety, spectrum management and UAS traffic management

Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems (CAVS)

The Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems (CAVS) is an interdisciplinary center comprised of engineering, research, development, and technology transfer teams focused on providing solutions through synergistic use of simulation tools, theoretical analysis, and experimentation. The CAVS activities are clustered around material science, manufacturing process modeling, computational mechanics, computational fluid dynamics, multi-scale modeling, vehicular systems engineering, design optimization, human factors and ergonomics, alternative powered systems, and intelligent electronic systems. Research activities include efforts on vehicle weight reductions, structural integrity, hybrid power train design, energetics, advances in improved design and predictability as well as advances in improved diagnostics, manufacturing, training systems, and computational design technologies. While CAVS projects generate timely solutions relevant to regional manufacturers, CAVS research seeks to expand knowledge that is essential for sustained economic development. Through direct involvement in various activities at CAVS, students gain valuable experience that leverages on their classroom learning.

Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems Extension (CAVS-E)

The mission of the Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems Extension (CAVS-E) is to provide engineering support to advanced manufacturers around the state. Capabilities have been developed based on the needs of the automotive industry, but other advanced manufacturers around the state are also served. This support occurs in a variety of ways including direct engagement with manufacturers and other key stakeholders (e.g., state agencies and industrial associations). Engagements with manufacturers focus on introducing and applying best practices and technologies through both on-site projects and professional development workshops. The center possesses expertise in Lean Manufacturing, Six Sigma, Simulation Modeling, Innovation, Solid Modeling, and Transportation and Logistics. Also, the center connects manufacturers with faculty expertise from across the Bagley College of Engineering.

Center for Battlefield Innovation (CBI)

The Center for Battlefield Innovation (CBI) is a member of the High Performance Computing Collaboratory (HPC2). The center is dedicated to developing cutting-edge solutions for the nation's armed forces and is headquartered at the Stennis Space Center. The center’s research activities include rapid prototyping for unmanned aerial vehicles, improved signature processing for full motion and wide area imagery and cyber warfare applications.

Center for Biomedical Research Excellence

This center focuses on cutting edge research on the relationship of pathogens and hosts, with the ultimate goal of developing new strategies to treat or control diseases such as Listeriosis, a potentially lethal food-borne disease, Influenza (including human seasonal flu and flu in various animal species), Stapylococcus aureus infections (wound infections, blood poisoning, pneumonia, and mastitis), and Streptococcus pneumoniae infections (bacterial pneumonia and blood poisoning). In addition, the COBRE includes activities designed to improve the competitiveness of our young investigators and help them establish careers that will be a valued national resource for many years to come.

Center for Computational Sciences

enhance the applicability and usability of simulations involving interacting physical, chemical, biological, and engineering phenomena by developing integrated computational environments and crosscutting tools that synergistically couple information technology with computation science and engineering

Center for Computer Security Research (CCSR)

The Mississippi State University Center for Computer Security Research (CCSR) has been nationally certified as a Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education,
Research, and Cyber Operations. The Center promotes computer security education and research.
The CCSR is dedicated to the scientific exploration of computer vulnerabilities and misuse with the
objective of improving prevention and detection techniques. Current research efforts include digital
forensics and the application of software engineering to digital forensics tool construction, security
visualization, FPGA security implementations, high performance computing security, intrusion
detection, and cyber threat attribution.

Center for Cyber Innovation

The Center for Cyber Innovation (CCI) is part of the High Performance Computing Collaboratory at Mississippi State University. CCI develops cutting-edge solutions for Defense, Homeland Security and the Intelligence Community. The primary focus of the CCI is to research, prototype and deliver cutting-edge cyber solutions that support global national security, homeland security and peacekeeping operations.

Distributed Analytics and Security Institute (DASI)

The Distributed Analytics and Security Institute (DASI) is part of the High Performance Computing Collaboratory at Mississippi State University. DASI is dedicated to excellence in the areas of distributed computing, big data analytics, cyber security, and critical infrastructure protection. The primary focus of the DASI is to coordinate, facilitate, and expand research activities across academic and research units involved in the application of high performance distributed computing platforms to the areas of big data analytics, cyber security, and critical infrastructure protection. DASI also provides science-based strategies aimed at increasing our ability to process large volumes of data in a highly secure way over a secure infrastructure.

DASI is a unique multidisciplinary center dedicated to excellence in research and will carry out its mission by:
• Generating high-quality basic and applied research in the areas of distributed computing, big data analytics, and cyber security;
• Bringing together scientific and technical expertise from the private, public, and academic worlds;
• Using state-of-the-art high performance computing technology and analytical procedures to increase the cyber security capability of organizations across the spectrum from local government to federal government, corporations to academia;
• Providing training for first-responders and wounded warriors to put into practice the technology developed in the center.
Specifically, the center helps expand research opportunities and promote economic development that leads to a better quality of life in Mississippi and throughout the nation by integrating and organizing the university's extensive capabilities and forming relationships with agencies to improve the cyber security awareness and intelligence capabilities at all levels.

Energy Institute (EI)

The mission of the Energy Institute is to coordinate energy research activities at MSU that will lead to innovative solutions for the energy challenges facing the world. Current focus areas for the Institute include the development of biofuels for blending with gasoline, diesel, and aviation fuel, the utilization of distributed electric generation for increased efficiency, the assessment and remediation of the environmental effects of energy production, and the implementation of energy conservation practices for buildings and industries. The Energy Institute also serves as a focal point for developing teams to address other critical energy issues. The EI is comprised of several affiliated research centers including the Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET), the Sustainable Energy Research Center (SERC), the Micro-Cooling, Heating, Power& Bio-fuel Center, the Southeast Clean Energy Application Center, and the Save Energy Now Project.

Geosystems Research Institute (GRI)

The Geosystems Research Institute (GRI) is part of the coalition of member centers and groups that make up the High Performance Computing Collaboratory (HPC2). Its mission is to understand earth's natural and managed systems and provide comprehensive solutions for socioeconomic and environmental requirements, leading to an improved quality of life. The GRI is active in providing capabilities in remote sensing computational technologies, visualization techniques, natural resource management, and the transition of these into operational agency research, planning, and decision-support programs. With its multi-disciplinary team of researchers and educators, the GRI has developed nationally recognized research strengths, with strong relationships and inherent respect from state, regional and national agencies and business entities. The Geosystems Research Institute brings together faculty from across the university. The GRI also collaborates with many businesses, community colleges, governmental agencies, and economic development organizations. Engineering research areas include: Image analysis; Digital signal processing; Feature extraction; Visualization; 3-D environments; Information processing; Image mining; Data management and exploitation; Data compression; Earth remote sensing from UAVs, airborne, and space based platforms; Watershed modeling; Environmental assessments; Smart growth; Mesoscale numerical weather prediction; Decision support systems; Geographic information systems (GIS); Global positioning systems (GPS).

High Performance Computing Collaboratory (HPC2)

The High Performance Computing Collaboratory (HPC2) is a coalition of member centers and groups that share a common core objective of advancing the state-of-the-art in computational science and engineering using high performance computing; a common approach to research that embraces a multi-disciplinary, team-oriented concept; and a commitment to a full partnership between education, research, and service. The mission is to serve the University, State, and Nation through excellence in computational science and engineering. The HPC2 provides substantial high performance computing resources for use by its member centers. The HPC2 is comprised of six independent centers with the common characteristics of a multi-disciplinary, team-oriented effort that is strategically involved in the application and advancement of computational science and engineering using high-performance computing. The seven centers include:
(i) Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems,
(ii) Center for Battlefield Innovation,
(iii) Center for Computational Sciences,
(iv) Distributed Analytics and Security Institute
(v) Geosystems Research Institute,
(vi) Institute for Genomics, Biocomputing and Biotechnology, and
(vii) Northern Gulf Institute.

High Voltage Laboratory

The Paul B. Jacob High Voltage Laboratory at Mississippi State University serves as an independent, non-industrial, university center for high voltage engineering. The laboratory focuses on high voltage research, evaluation, and education. This multi-purpose high voltage facility is designed to meet the evaluation needs of the industry, and provides the necessary environment for academic research in high voltage engineering. As an integral part of our national high voltage technology structure, the laboratory serves as a means of strengthening the U.S. position in this specialized technical area.

The High Voltage Laboratory was constructed in 1977 and is the largest university operated high voltage laboratory in North America, enabling full-scale evaluation of large equipment with impulses up to 3000 kV and 1000 kV AC-voltage.

Institute for Clean Energy Techolology (ICET)

The Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) is a multidisciplinary group of scientists and engineers focused on measurement technologies and engineering scale testing for energy and environmental systems. The Institute has a tradition of excellence in diagnostic instrumentation development, including imaging and laser-based techniques, and in the utilization of these systems in large-scale applications. Current initiatives within ICET include characterizing and processing legacy radioactive waste within the U.S. Department of Energy's national security complex, development of sensors and methods for U.S. Department of Defense applications, solutions to greenhouse gas emissions including carbon sequestration, conventional and alternative energy sources and technologies, environmental monitoring and remediation, and robust instrumentation to characterize difficult real-world conditions. Most recent efforts at ICET are focused on HEPA filtration in nuclear energy applications. ICET is at the forefront of developing advanced diagnostic technologies. ICET's research results and partnerships with industry are designed to enhance economic development. The Institute offers students non-traditional educational experiences through a multidisciplinary approach to research.

Institute for Computational Research for Engineering and Science (ICRES)

Utilizing high performance computational resources and state-of-the-art analytical tools for modeling, simulation, and experimentation, ICRES will provide a distinctive, interdisciplinary environment that will support economic development and outreach activities throughout the State of Mississippi and beyond. Consists of CAVS, CAVS-E and ISER

Institute for Imaging and Analytical Technologies

The Institute for Imaging & Analytical Technologies (I²AT) is a university-wide research institute and core facility which meets MSU's missions in research, teaching and service by facilitating inter- and multi-disciplinary research, education and outreach in the life and materials sciences. I²AT houses major research instrumentation that is available to faculty, staff, students, and outside users. Instrumentation includes technologies for diverse microscopy (light, confocal, atomic force, and electron) and microanalysis (e.g. X-ray diffraction) applications, in addition to magnetic resonance imaging used in areas of veterinary medicine, cognitive science and medical systems. These technologies provide MSU, the State of Mississippi and the local community with state-of-the-art resources that facilitate scholarly research, spawn competitive funding, foster project completion, enable high-quality undergraduate and graduate education, enhance impact of outreach, and promote economic development. I²AT as a university-level research institute, is organized with university-wide responsibilities, and is administered out of MSU's Office of Research and Economic Development.

Institute for Systems Engineering Research

The Institute for Systems Engineering Research is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center and Mississippi State University.

The goal of ISER's efforts and products is to mitigate risk, reduce cost and improve efficiency in Department of Defense (DoD) acquisition programs, serve as an additional asset for the state's industrial base for systems engineering related tasks, and create an environment that draws DoD and civilian industry development to the state of Mississippi.

The ISER's primary objectives include:
•To research systems engineering concepts and design of tools to facilitate DoD systems development and decision making processes.
•To enhance strategic and operational analysis for ERDC and MSU programs and efforts.
•To leverage existing capabilities and expertise previously developed at MSU and ERDC to establish a national center of excellence in systems engineering.

Institute of Genomics, Biocomputing & Biotechnology (IGBB)

The Institute for Genomics, Biocomputing & Biotechnology (IGBB) at Mississippi State University (MS State) was founded in 2011 to increase the ability of Mississippi scientists to lead high-throughput, multi-disciplinary projects focused on understanding the biomolecular interactions underlying the diversity, value, and sustainability of species of agricultural, medical, bioenergy, and/or ecological importance. The IGBB provides researchers access to a team of highly-skilled professionals trained in cutting edge genomics, proteomics, and high performance computing principles and techniques. The IGBB team not only generates molecular data using state-of-the-art equipment, but works with investigators to efficiently derive biological knowledge from that data. As one of the six member institutes of MS State’s High Performance Computing Collaboratory (HPC2), the IGBB represents a means through which the supercomputing power of the HPC2 can be leveraged to advance high-throughput biomolecular research across campus and throughout the state. Specific goals of the IGBB include: (a) Conducting scientific research that meets the needs of society and further enhances the unique strengths of MS State; (b) Attracting and retaining outstanding faculty and students at MS State; (c) Offering researchers at MS State and elsewhere the opportunity to collaborate with the IGBB's genomics, proteomics, and computational biology experts; (d) Helping principal investigators leverage the experience and expertise of the IGBB to make their research programs more productive, increase the number and scientific impact of their publications, and enhance their ability to procure extramural funding; and (e) Supporting educational activities that enhance the abilities of students and faculty to succeed in the multi-disciplinary fields of computational biology, genomics, and biotechnology.

Mississippi Transportation Research Center (MTRC)

The purpose of the Mississippi Transportation Research Center (MTRC) is to provide efficient point of contact for solicitation, evaluation, execution and administration of selected research and technology development efforts or services to be performed at MSU or other universities in the state for the Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT). The center also promotes and advances the transportation industry within the state of Mississippi and provides educational opportunities for MDOT personnel in order to advance their professional standing as related to formal advanced degrees, professional engineering registration and professional advancement. Research through the center is being conducted at MSU, the University of Mississippi, the University of Southern Mississippi, and Jackson State University. Research projects include: design, construction and evaluation of pavement materials; transportation issues including intermodal policy planning and design; accident detection; work zone safety; inter-vehicle communications; user cost and training in bridge design.

National Center for Intermodal Transportation for Economic Competitiveness (NCITEC)

The National Center for Intermodal Transportation for Economic Competitiveness (NCITEC) is one of the Tier 1 University Transportation Centers funded by the U.S. Department of Transportation. Led by MSU, the NCITEC is a consortium of the following universities in addition to MSU: University of Denver, Louisiana State University, University of Mississippi, and Hampton University. NCITEC is an interdisciplinary team of researchers from engineering, technology, management, psychology, political sciences, sociology, and architecture. The primary objective of NCITEC is to develop an integrated and sustainable intermodal transportation system network for North America. This network vision for the 21st century transportation system integrates highways and airport hubs with rail networks and shipping terminals to offer efficient intermodal freight movement and passenger mobility. The integrated approach reduces congestion on highways, saves fuel, reduces vehicle emissions, protects the environment, and provides the U.S. an economic competitive edge, which is essential to maintain our quality of life, compete in the global economy, and enhance business retention.

National Forensic Training Center (NFTC)

The Mississippi State University National Forensics Training Center is a Department of Justice-funded activity that provides no-cost digital forensics training to the law enforcement community and supports research activity in the area of computer crime and digital evidence recovery. With the growing incidence of cybercrime today, it is critical that law enforcement officers have the ability to handle and examine digital evidence. The NFTC seeks to solve this issue by offering training in a broad range of cybercrime areas.

Northern Gulf Institute (NGI)

Northern Gulf Institute is part of the coalition of member centers and groups that make up the High Performance Computing Collaboratory (HPC2). The Northern Gulf Institute (NGI), a National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Cooperative Institute, develops, operates, and maintains an increasingly integrated research and transition program focused on filling priority gaps and reducing limitations in current Northern Gulf of Mexico awareness, understanding and decision support.
Engineering research areas include: Watershed modeling; Environmental assessments; Smart growth; Mesoscale numerical weather prediction; Earth remote sensing from UAVs, airborne, and space based platforms; Decision support systems; Geographic information systems (GIS); Visualization; Information processing; Image mining; Data management and exploitation.

Raspet Flight Research Laboratory (RFRL)

Bagley College of Engineering’s Raspet Flight Research Laboratory (RFRL), established in 1948, possesses a rich heritage in design, development, and testing of full scale flight vehicles and advanced composite structures. Current research related to unmanned aerial systems (UAS) include airframe design, autonomy, detect & avoid, rapid prototyping, and flight testing. Composite materials & structures research include predictive modeling and structural integrity, multifunctional nanocomposites, out-of-autoclave composites, bonding, joining, and repair of composites, and damage diagnostics and prognostics. The laboratory is well-equipped with several general aviation aircraft, multiple UAS, composite fabrication rooms, small and large-scale autoclaves, ovens, CNC machines, structural and engine test facilities, and over 50,000 square feet of hangar space.

Sustainable Energy Research Center (SERC)

The goal of the Sustainable Energy Research Center (SERC) at Mississippi State University (MSU) is to develop a coordinated approach to renewable energy research at MSU. SERC engineers and scientists are developing new engineering and scientific knowledge to create sustainable energy industries in Mississippi and the Southeast. The current focus of SERC is on renewable transportation fuels to meet the nation’s goal of replacing 20% of the fuel supply with renewable energy by 2020. The purpose of this project is the development of renewable transportation fuels and refinery feedstock's that have the potential to achieve this national goal. This research represents solutions for the southeastern region of the US, which contains a substantial amount of the biomass that can be converted into renewable fuel on a sustainable basis. SERC’s renewable fuel and refinery feedstock research portfolio includes development of 1) pyrolysisoil, 2) microbial oil, 3) liquid hydrocarbons derived directly from synthesis gas, and, 4) feedstocks associated with these products.

The Critical Infrastructure Protection Center (CIPC)

The Critical Infrastructure Protection Center (CIPC) was founded for the purpose of research related to securing the nation’s critical infrastructure. The CIPC maintains a very unique industrial control systems laboratory and conducts interdisciplinary research into software vulnerabilities, security mitigation strategies, audit mechanisms, forensic analysis, and attack vulnerabilities.

Graduate

Subject Areas of Research

Subject Areas

  • 3-D Environments
  • Accident Detection and Analysis
  • Additive Manufacturing
  • Advanced HVAC Technology
  • Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle
  • Advanced Vehicular Systems
  • Aeration Process Modeling
  • Aerator System Prototype Evaluation
  • Aerodynamics
  • Algorithm and Force Field Development
  • Alternative Aquaculture Design and Operation
  • Alternative Disinfection Strategies
  • Alternative Disinfection of Water
  • Alternative Powered Systems
  • Analysis and Fabrication of Composite Materials
  • Analysis and Optimization of Metal Building Systems
  • Analysis of sensors and weapon technology
  • Antenna Design and Analysis
  • Application of Software Engineering to Digital Forensics Tool Construction
  • Applied Operational Research
  • Applied Physics
  • Aquaculture System Design
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Artificial Wetlands to Treat Waste
  • Asphalt Binders
  • Asphalt Maintenance and Extenders
  • Asphalt Pavement Extenders
  • Asphalt Pavement Materials Development and Modeling
  • Assessment and Remediation of the Environmental Effects of Energy Production
  • Astrochemistry
  • Astrophysics
  • Asynchronous Design
  • Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics
  • Augmented and Virtual Reality
  • Autonomic Computing
  • Bacterial Polymers
  • Big Data
  • Biocomputing
  • Bioenergy
  • Biofuels
  • Biofuels and Co-Products
  • Biofuels for Blending with Gasoline, Diesel, and Aviation Fuel
  • Bioinformatics
  • Bioinstrumentation
  • Biokinetics Analysis and Simulation
  • Biological Desalinization
  • Biological Fuel Cells
  • Biological Management of Synthetic Organic Compounds
  • Biological Reactor Process Control
  • Biological Reactor Process Optimization
  • Biological Simulations
  • Biomass transformation
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomechanics and Mechanobiology
  • Bioremediation
  • Biotreatment
  • Blast Effects on Structures
  • Bridge Integrity Evaluation
  • Carbon Dioxide Conversion
  • Carbon Sequestration
  • Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering
  • Catalysis
  • Cell and Gene Therapy
  • Cell and Tissue Biomechanics
  • Cellular and Molecular Mechanobiology
  • Chemical Extraction
  • Chemical Oxidation
  • Chemical Plant/Oil Refinery Operations and Safety Integrated Remediation Technologies
  • Chemical/Physical Treatment Processes
  • Chemicals/Fuels
  • Cloud Computing
  • Coastal Water Quality Modeling
  • Composite Highway Materials
  • Composite Materials
  • Computational Biology
  • Computational Electromagnetics
  • Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)
  • Computational Mechanics
  • Computational Modeling
  • Computational Physics
  • Computational Science and Engineering
  • Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM)
  • Computer Attack Vulnerabilities
  • Computer Crime
  • Computer Forensics
  • Computer Graphics
  • Computer Intrusion Detection
  • Computer Learning
  • Computer Security
  • Computer Vision
  • Computer-Aided Design
  • Concrete Aging and Rehabilitation
  • Concrete Development and Material Modeling
  • Concrete Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Constitutive Modeling
  • Construction Engineering and Management
  • Construction Materials Design and Optimization
  • Construction Project Cost Management
  • Construction Project Risk Mitigation
  • Conventional and Alternative Energy Sources and Technologies
  • Critical Infrastructure Protection
  • Cryptography
  • Crystallization
  • Cyber Security
  • Cyber Threat Attribution
  • Data Analytics
  • Data Compression
  • Data Fusion
  • Data Management and Exploitation
  • Data Mining
  • Decision Support Systems
  • Design Optimization
  • Design and Analysis of Production Systems
  • Design, Construction and Evaluation of Pavement Materials
  • Diagnostics Using the Techniques of Conventional, Imaging, and Laser Spectroscopy
  • Digital Evidence Recovery
  • Digital Forensics
  • Digital Signal Processing
  • Disaster Preparedness and Response
  • Distributed Computing
  • Dynamic Structural Systems
  • Dynamic Systems
  • Earthen Structure Design and Optimization
  • Earthen Structures
  • Ecological Process Modeling
  • Electromagnetic Compatibility
  • Electronic Materials
  • Embedded Systems
  • Emergency Repair of Earthen Structures
  • Empirical Software Engineering
  • Energy Conservation
  • Energy Systems
  • Engineered Earthen Systems
  • Engineering Education
  • Engineering Management
  • Enterprise Systems Engineering
  • Enterprise Systems Simulation
  • Environmental Assessment
  • Environmental Catalysis
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Monitoring and Remediation
  • Ergonomics
  • Estuary Water Quality Modeling
  • Evacuation Planning
  • Evacuation Simulation
  • Event Management Systems
  • Experimental Aero-Hydrodynamics
  • Experimental and Theoretical Nuclear Structure Physics
  • Extended Enterprise Systems
  • FPGA Security Implementations
  • Fatigue and Fracture
  • Feature Extraction
  • Filtration
  • Flight Research on Manned and Unmanned Aircraft
  • Fluid-Structure Interaction
  • Fracture and Fatigue Failure of Aircraft Structures Including Metal and Composites
  • Fuel Cells/Li-lon Batteries
  • GIS/GPS Applications
  • Gas Hydrate Science & Engineering
  • Genomics
  • Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
  • Geotechnical Containment Modeling and Design
  • Geotechnical Engineering
  • Global Positioning Systems (GPS)
  • Grid Generation for CFD Modeling
  • Ground Vehicle Simulation
  • Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC)
  • HEPA Filtration in Nuclear Energy Applications
  • Hazardous Waste
  • Hazardous Waste Management
  • Health Care Systems Engineering
  • Healthcare Informatics
  • Heavy Metal Soils Applied Microbiology
  • Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Catalysis
  • Heuristic Optimization
  • High Performance Computing
  • High Voltage Engineering
  • Highway Control Systems Modeling
  • Highway Materials Testing and Analysis
  • Homeland Security
  • Human Centered Computing
  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Human-Computer Interactions
  • Human-Robotics Interactions
  • Hydrodynamic Modeling of Surface Water
  • Hyphenated Remediation Techniques
  • Image Mining
  • Image and Data Compression
  • Image and Signal Processing
  • Implementation of Energy Conversation Practices for Buildings and Industries
  • Industrial Applications of Microwave Power/Heating and Electrochemistry
  • Industrial Biotechnology
  • Industrial Control Systems
  • Industrial Microbiology
  • Information Processing
  • Information Visualization
  • Innovative Foundation Systems
  • Integrated Control for Satellite Proximity Operations
  • Integrated and Sustainable Intermodal Transportation System Network
  • Intelligent electronic systems
  • Inter-Vehicle Communications
  • Intermodal Transportation Modeling and Optimization
  • Internal Combustion Engines
  • Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining
  • Land Application of Animal Waste
  • Large-Scale Simulations of Fluid Flows
  • Levee Design and Remediation
  • Life-Cycle Environmental Assessment
  • Lightning/Impulse Evaluation of Insulators and Compose Structures
  • Logistics & Transportation Systems Engineering
  • Malware Reverse Engineering
  • Management Systems Engineering
  • Manufacturing Process Modeling
  • Manufacturing Production Systems Engineering
  • Materials Informatics
  • Materials Science
  • Materials, Biomaterials, and Surface Science
  • Mathematical Programming
  • Mechanical Design
  • Medical Imaging
  • Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction
  • Meta-Heuristic Algorithms
  • Micro Medical Devices
  • Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery
  • Microelectronics
  • Microfluids, Microreactors
  • Microwave Spectroscopy
  • Modeling Fate and Transport of Hazardous Materials
  • Modeling of Failed Geotechnical Systems
  • Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO)
  • Multifunctional Materials
  • Multimodal Transportation Network Modeling
  • Multiscale Modeling
  • Nanocomposites
  • Nanomaterials
  • Natural Gas Production from Seabed Hydrates
  • Network Algorithms
  • Network Optimization
  • Network Security
  • Nuclear Physics
  • Nuclear Waste Processing
  • Nutrient Management
  • Occupational Safety and Health
  • On-Site Wastewater Management
  • Ontology Engineering and Semantics
  • Operations Research
  • Optimization of Agricultural Chemicals Application
  • Orthopedic Tissue Engineering
  • Parallel Algorithms
  • Parallel Computing
  • Particulates
  • Pattern Recognition
  • Pavement Systems
  • Pedestrian Traffic Simulation
  • Petrochemical/Refining Processes
  • Physicochemical Contaminant Reduction
  • Physics
  • Planning and Reasoning under Uncertanity
  • Pollution Prevention and Solid Waste Recycling
  • Polymer Properties and Processing
  • Polymer Science, Design and Synthesis
  • Polymers, Plastics and Composite Materials
  • Portland Limestone Cement (PLC)
  • Power Electronics
  • Power Systems
  • Power Trains-Internal Combustion Engines and Electric Drives
  • Process Instrumentation and Control
  • Production Planning and Control
  • Project Management and Optimization
  • Project Scheduling
  • Quality Management
  • Railway Management
  • Rapid Prototyping
  • Reactor Design
  • Real Time Computing
  • Reasoning Under Uncertainty
  • Reliability and Sustainability of Complex Systems
  • Remote Sensing
  • Remote Sensing Issues in Transportation and Environmental Management
  • Renewable Energy
  • Revetment Repair and Reinforcement
  • Risk Minimization
  • River and Waterway Sediment Transport
  • River and Waterway Water Quality Modeling
  • Robotic and Control Systems
  • Robust Instrumentation to Characterize Difficult Real-World Conditions
  • Scale Computing
  • Scientific Visualization and Computer Vision
  • Security Mitigation Strategies
  • Security Visualization
  • Seismic Analysis
  • Semiconductor Materials and Devices
  • Sensor Webs
  • Service Quality and Usability
  • Ship Structure Analysis
  • Signal and Image Processing
  • Simulation Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization
  • Simulation Optimization
  • Six Sigma
  • Smart Grid Technologies
  • Smart Growth
  • Soft Materials
  • Software Change Management
  • Software Engineering
  • Software Evolution
  • Software Metrics
  • Software Vulnerabilities
  • Solid Mechanics
  • Solid Mechanics Modeling
  • Solidification and Welding
  • Solids Processing
  • Spacecraft Trajectory Design and Mission Planning with Operational Constraints
  • Sports Equipment Engineering
  • Stabilization/Solidification
  • Structural Mechanics Modeling
  • Structural Reliability
  • Supercritical Processes
  • Supply Chain Design and Management
  • Supply Chain Design and Optimization
  • Surface Modification to Polymers
  • Surface Science
  • Sustainability
  • Sustainable Design
  • Synthesis and Characterization
  • Synthetic Biology
  • System Informatics and Control
  • Systems Engineering
  • Systems Simulation Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization
  • Telecommunications
  • Terramechanics
  • Theoretical and Experimental Optics
  • Thermal and Fluid Systems Modeling
  • Thermodynamics and Separation
  • Thermodynamics of Liquid Mixtures
  • Thin Films
  • Timber Systems Optimization
  • Tissue Engineering
  • Traffic Management
  • Traffic Simulation
  • Transportation Engineering
  • Transportation Modeling
  • Transportation Safety
  • Turbomachinery
  • Turbulence Modeling
  • Uncertainty Analysis
  • Uncertainty Quantification
  • Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Remotely Piloted Aircraft (UAVs/RPAs)
  • Unmanned Ground Vehicles
  • User Cost and Training in Bridge Design
  • Utilization of Distributed Electric Generation for Increased Efficiency
  • VLSI Design
  • VLSI and CAD Tool Development
  • Vector-Field Visualization
  • Vehicle dynamics
  • Vehicular Systems Engineering
  • Visualization and Computer Graphics
  • Waste Minimization
  • Waste Treatment
  • Water Quality and Modeling
  • Water Resources Engineering
  • Water Supply Development and Projection
  • Water and Wastewater Treatment Plant Optimization
  • Waterborne Contaminant Management
  • Watershed Modeling
  • Watershed Protection and Management
  • Wireless Communications
  • Work Physiology
  • Work Zone Safety

Graduate

Dual Degrees

Graduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

Must meet the minimum degree requirements for a degree in both programs. Students are advised to consult with advisors in the Bagley College of Engineering and other discipline to develop a detailed program of study.

Graduate

Student Appointments

Appointments by Department

Appointments - Number of Appointments
Stipend - Average Monthly Stipend

Department Fellowships TA RA Other Total Appts.
Aerospace Engineering
Appointments: 24 8 8 0 40
Stipends: $994 $1,663 $1,591 $0
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Appointments: 1 0 11 0 12
Stipends: $2,833 $0 $1,605 $0
Chemical Engineering
Appointments: 0 4 10 0 14
Stipends: $0 $1,689 $1,690 $0
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Appointments: 3 4 6 0 13
Stipends: $2,083 $1,638 $1,369 $0
Computer Science and Engineering
Appointments: 13 18 8 1 40
Stipends: $3,778 $1,606 $1,647 $1,200
Dean of Engineering
Appointments: 5 10 9 4 28
Stipends: $2,267 $1,550 $1,738 $1,350
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Appointments: 3 19 19 1 42
Stipends: $1,701 $1,845 $2,006 $1,200
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Appointments: 4 3 13 0 20
Stipends: $2,083 $1,733 $1,662 $0
Mechanical Engineering
Appointments: 2 4 15 1 22
Stipends: $2,153 $1,500 $1,760 $1,000
All Total Appointments 55 70 99 7 231

Appointments by Research Center

Appointments - Number of Appointments
Stipend - Average Monthly Stipend

Graduate Research Center Fellowships RA Other Total Appts.
Alliance for Systems Safety of UAS through Research Excellence (ASSURE)
Appointments: 0 1 0 1
Stipends: $0 $1,500 $0
Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems (CAVS)
Appointments: 0 91 0 91
Stipends: $0 $1,717 $0
Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems Extension (CAVS-E)
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Center for Battlefield Innovation (CBI)
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Center for Biomedical Research Excellence
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Center for Computational Sciences1
Appointments: 0 3 0 3
Stipends: $0 $16,667 $0
Center for Computer Security Research (CCSR)
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Center for Cyber Innovation
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Distributed Analytics and Security Institute (DASI)
Appointments: 0 4 0 4
Stipends: $0 $2,000 $0
Energy Institute (EI)
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Geosystems Research Institute (GRI)
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
High Performance Computing Collaboratory (HPC2)
Appointments: 0 1 0 1
Stipends: $0 $1,600 $0
High Voltage Laboratory
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Institute for Clean Energy Techolology (ICET)
Appointments: 0 4 0 4
Stipends: $0 $1,729 $0
Institute for Computational Research for Engineering and Science (ICRES)
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Institute for Imaging and Analytical Technologies
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Institute for Systems Engineering Research
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Institute of Genomics, Biocomputing & Biotechnology (IGBB)
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Mississippi Transportation Research Center (MTRC)
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
National Center for Intermodal Transportation for Economic Competitiveness (NCITEC)
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
National Forensic Training Center (NFTC)
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Northern Gulf Institute (NGI)
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Raspet Flight Research Laboratory (RFRL)
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Sustainable Energy Research Center (SERC)
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
The Critical Infrastructure Protection Center (CIPC)
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
All Total Appointments 0 101 0 101

1The department is outside the engineering school/college and is not included in the totals.