University of Colorado Denver - 2016

Institution Information

Contact Information

Institution's Mailing Address

Institution Name: University of Colorado Denver
Mailing Address: 1250 14th Street
City: Denver
State: CO
Postal Code: 80204
Country: United States
Phone 303-315-5969
Fax:
Website: http://www.ucdenver.edu/

Institution Information

General Information


Type of institution: PUBLIC
Academic Year: SEMESTERS
Setting of Main Engineering Campus URBAN

Main Campus Information

Is the main campus located in a city with a population greater than 100,000?: Yes
Name of this city, or if no, the name of the nearest city of any size?: Denver
This city's population (approx.): 682,545
Distance from Main Campus: 0

Total Enrollment

Total Undergraduate enrollment: 10,493
Total Graduate enrollment: 4,277
Total Professional and other enrollment: 0

Non-Engineering Degree Granting Colleges

Business, Dentistry, Education, Fine arts, Liberal arts, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Architecture and Planning, Public Health, Public Affairs

Institution Information

General Admissions

Entrance Requirements and Recommendations

Requirements

Engineering applicants will receive priority consideration if they have fulfilled all HEAR and MAPS requirements, have a cumulative 3.0 GPA and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT (16 or higher in English and 27 or higher in mathematics) or a combined score of at least 1100 on the SAT (excluding essay with 410 or higher in critical reading and 600 or higher in mathematics). For admission to the College of Engineering and Applied Science, applicants must have an admission index score of 103. Applicants not meeting requirements for direct admission to the College of Engineering and Applied Science will be automatically considered for admission as Pre-Engineering majors in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

There is no direct admission into the Bioengineering major. Applicants will apply and be considered for admission as Bioengineering pre-majors. Pre-majors may apply for the major after successfully completing a series of pre-major requirements.

Nontraditional admission requirements

Home school students - Home school students may be considered for admission using the same criteria as those applied to traditional freshman applicants. A detailed home school transcript indicating courses of study and grades earned must be provided at the time of application and after graduation, with date of graduation indicated. ACT or SAT scores are also required.

GED students - Students with a general equivalency diploma (GED) may be considered for admission. An average score of at least 550 is expected, but all students applying for admission are fully considered. GED students are subject to HEAR and MAPS requirements. Though GED students must submit official GED score reports and official high school transcripts, the high school GPA is not considered in the admission review process. ACT or SAT scores are also required.

Nontraditional high school students - Students attending nontraditional high school programs where letter grades are not awarded may be considered for admission. Official high school transcripts along with portfolio summaries or other assessment documents must be provided at the time of application and after graduation, with date of graduation indicated. For ungraded students, the state of Colorado has determined that a 3.3 GPA will be used for index calculation purposes. ACT or SAT scores are also required.

Recommendations

Applicants should have successfully completed a solid college-bound curriculum in high school.

Engineering Information

Head of Engineering

Head of Engineering

Marc Ingber
Dean and Professor
College of Engineering and Applied Science
University of Colorado Denver
Campus Box 104
PO Box 173364
Denver, CO 80217-3364
Phone: 303-556-2870
Fax: 303-556-2511
marc.ingber@ucdenver.edu

Engineering Information

Engineering Degrees Offered

Types of Engineering Degrees

Bachelor's:B.S.
Master's:M.S. with thesis, M.S. without thesis, but with project or report, M.Eng.
Doctoral:Ph.D.

Computer Science Degrees Awarded Outside the College/School of Engineering

Engineering Information

Engineering Departments

Engineering Department(s) Degree Granting Level Department Chair Discipline
Bioengineering Both Robin Shandas Biomedical Engineering
Civil Engineering Both Kevin Rens Civil Engineering
College of Engineering and Applied Science Graduate Engineering (General)
Computer Science and Engineering Both Gita Alaghband Computer Science (inside engineering)
Electrical Engineering Both Stephen Gedney Electrical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Both Samuel Welch Mechanical Engineering

Engineering Information

Research Centers

  • INCOLL - Research center WITHIN the college of engineering
  • INDEPT - Research center WITHIN an engineering department
  • INUNIV - Research center WITHIN university system
  • OUTUNIV - Research center OUTSIDE the university
Center/Lab Discipline Research Class Head Chair
Center for Bioengineering Biomedical Engineering INDEPT Robin Shandas
Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Advancing Cognitive Technologies (RERC-ACT) Biomedical Engineering INDEPT
Note: Cathy Bodine, Director

Engineering Information

Degree Programs

Bachelor's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Bioengineering Bioengineering (B.S.) Biomedical Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (B.S.) Civil Engineering
College of Engineering and Applied Science Undeclared (B.S.) Engineering (General)
Computer Science and Engineering Computer Science (B.S.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Electrical Engineering Electrical Engineering (B.S.) Electrical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) Mechanical Engineering

Master's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Master's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Bioengineering Bioengineering (M.S.) Biomedical Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (M.Eng) Civil Engineering
Note: The master’s of engineering (MEng) is an interdisciplinary degree program which follows an integrated program of studies in engineering and allied subjects. Students can combine advanced engineering course work with graduate-level non-engineering courses such as business administration, environmental sciences, social sciences, biological sciences or public administration.
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (M.S.) Civil Engineering
Computer Science and Engineering Computer Science (M.S.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Electrical Engineering Electrical Engineering (M.S.) Electrical Engineering
Electrical Engineering Electrical Engineering (M.Eng) Electrical Engineering
Note: The master’s of engineering (MEng) is an interdisciplinary degree program which follows an integrated program of studies in engineering and allied subjects. Students can combine advanced engineering course work with graduate-level non-engineering courses such as business administration, environmental sciences, social sciences, biological sciences or public administration.
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (M.Eng) Mechanical Engineering
Note: The master’s of engineering (MEng) is an interdisciplinary degree program which follows an integrated program of studies in engineering and allied subjects. Students can combine advanced engineering course work with graduate-level non-engineering courses such as business administration, environmental sciences, social sciences, biological sciences or public administration.
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) Mechanical Engineering

Doctoral Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Doctoral Degree Program(s) Discipline
Bioengineering Bioengineering (PhD) Biomedical Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (PhD) Civil Engineering
College of Engineering and Applied Science Engineering and Applied Science (PhD) Engineering (General)
Note: The Engineering and Applied Science Doctor of Philosophy is a multidisciplinary program which consists of studies in engineering and engineering-related disciplines. The degree is conferred by the College. However, applicants apply to and enter the program through one of four departments based on the intended primary concentration of study.
Computer Science and Engineering Computer Science and Information Systems (PhD) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Note: The Department of Computer Science and Engineering and the Business School offer a joint doctor of philosophy degree program in computer science and information systems (CSIS). The program provides research training that combines computer science and information systems along with strong industry interaction.

Engineering Information

Areas of Expertise

Engineering Departments Areas of Expertise
Bioengineering
  1. Imaging and Biophotonics
  2. Biomechanics and Microfluidics
  3. Biomaterials and Polymers
  4. Biological Systems Modeling
  5. Biomechatronics and Neural Engineering
  6. Translational Biomedical Engineering
  7. Assistive Technologies
  8. Cardiovascular Biomechanics and Hemodynamics
  9. Tissue Engineering
  10. Mechanical Ventilation Systems in Lung Injury Pathogenesis
  11. Neuroscience Engineering
  12. Ophthalmology
  13. Orthopedic Biomechanics
  14. Surgical Specialties
  15. Diabetes
Civil Engineering
  1. Environment
  2. Water Resources
  3. Water Quality
  4. Structures
  5. Geotechnical
  6. Transportation
  7. Sustainable Energy Systems Engineering
  8. Sustainability Assessment
  9. Biofuels
  10. Center for Sustainable Infrastructure Systems (CSIS)
  11. Earthquake Source Physics
  12. Geosynthetics
  13. Transportation Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions
  14. Hydrologic and Hydraulic Engineering
  15. Ionic Liquids
  16. Structural Engineering
  17. Structural Materials
  18. Structural Repair and Evaluation
Computer Science and Engineering
  1. Algorithms
  2. Computer Architecture
  3. Parallel Processing
  4. Operating Systems
  5. Artificial Intelligence
  6. Computer Graphics
  7. Computer Networks
  8. Animation
  9. Big Data Management and Mining
  10. Cloud Gomputing
  11. Visualization
  12. Data Science
  13. Database Systems
  14. Distributed Computing
  15. Graph Theory
  16. High-Performance Computing
  17. Mobile Computing
  18. Mobile Healthcare
  19. Simulation
  20. Software Engineering
Electrical Engineering
  1. Electrical and Optical Product Design
  2. Electromagnetic Fields and Matter
  3. Microprocessor Design & Computer Engineering
  4. Advanced Energy and Power Systems
  5. Control Systems
  6. Telecommunications and Digital Signal Processing
  7. Communication and Signal Processing
  8. Computer Engineering and Embedded Systems
  9. Energy and Power Systems
  10. Microelectronics and VLSI
  11. Photonics and Biomedical Imaging
  12. Systems and Controls
Mechanical Engineering
  1. Material Science and Composites
  2. Mechanical Systems Design and Manufacturing
  3. Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer
  4. Dynamics and Control Systems
  5. Solid Mechanics
  6. Energy Systems & Thermal Design
  7. Applied and Computational Mechanics
  8. Bioengineering
  9. Biomaterials
  10. Computational Fluid Mechanics
  11. Mechanics of Soft Materials
  12. Tribology, Micro/Mesofluidics and Biomechanics
  13. Vehicle Dynamics

Engineering Information

Societies

Honor Societies

National Groups

  • Tau Beta Pi

Student Organizations

National Groups

  • American Society of Civil Engineers
  • American Society of Mechanical Engineering
  • Associated General Contractors of America
  • Association for Computing Machinery
  • Audio Engineering Society
  • Biomedical Engineering Society
  • Engineers for a Sustainable World
  • Inst. of Transportation Engineers
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
  • National Society of Black Engineers
  • Soc. for Automotive Engineering
  • Soc. of Manufacturing Engineers
  • Soc. of Women Engineers
  • Society for Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science
  • Society of Asian Scientists and Engineers
  • Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Tau Beta Pi

Local Groups

  • American Indian Science and Engineering Society
  • Associated Engineering Students (AES)
  • Construction Management Association of America
  • Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (WISTEM)

Engineering Information

Support Programs

College's Under-Represented Student Groups

National Groups

  • American Indian Science and Engineering Society
  • National Society of Black Engineers
  • Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Society of Women Engineers

Local Groups

  • Society for Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science
  • Society of Asian Scientists and Engineers
  • Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (WISTEM)

Other Student Support Programs

TRiO Student Support Services - TRiO serves first-generation low-income students and students with disabilities with advocacy, peer and professional mentoring, tutoring, advising, and scholarship and financial aid application assistance.

Student Educational Programs and Outreach - Provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, resource referral, student organization sponsorship and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of under-represented students.

Disability Resources and Services Office - DRS serves the needs of a large and diverse community of students with disabilities, providing accommodations including: assistance in identifying volunteer note-takers, alternative testing, textbooks in alternate format, priority registration, interpreters and referral to the Access center.
Campus, Response, & Evaluation Team (CARE) - CARE provides resources and information to faculty, staff or student community members who are confronted with individuals who may be threatening, disruptive or otherwise problematic. The team provides guidance and consultation and may make referrals to appropriate campus or community resources.

Career Center - The center assists and guides students with understanding and leveraging their skills, personality, values and interests as they choose an academic major and determine a career direction. Services include job search and strategies, resume development and writing, practice interviews and salary negotiation. Employers may benefit from online job posting, resume referrals, on-campus interviewing, career fairs, employer presentations, and networking events.

Counseling Center - The center provides mental health counseling services to the CU Denver student body and the Denver Metro community.

First-Year Experience - The FYE is a comprehensive approach to ensure first-year students make a successful transition to college.

Learning Resource Center - The Center provides individual and group tutoring, Supplemental Instruction (SI), study skills workshops and ESL support.

Veteran Student Services - The office is the initial contact point for eligible veterans and dependent students wishing to seek a post-secondary education or CU Denver students who wish to use Veterans Administration educational benefits. This office assists students with VA paperwork and problems associated with the receipt of VA-related educational benefits. The OVSS maintains proper certification for eligible students to ensure that each student meets VA requirements for attendance, course load and content, and other regulations necessary to receive educational benefits payments. In addition, the OVSS provides VA vocational rehabilitation referrals, information on VA tutorial assistance and VA work/study positions for qualified veterans.

Writing Center - The Writing Center at CU Denver and the Anschutz Medical Campus is a free resource available to all university students who wish to improve as writers. Services include in-person and online one-on-one appointments; an asynchronous Drop Box for graduate students and all students on the Anschutz Medical Campus; workshops on a variety of topics (for example: citation, literature reviews, C.V.s, and more); and downloadable handouts, podcasts, and videos. Professional Writing Consultants will work on any type of writing and any aspect of the writing process, including (but not limited to) idea-generation, organization, thesis development, source usage, and grammar. Students bring in documents ranging from C.V.s. and personal statements to research essays and capstone projects to rhetorical analyses and grant applications. All writing is welcome. Interested students can schedule appointments online right from the homepage (http://writingcenter.ucdenver.edu) or visit us at any of our locations

Engineering Information

Student Projects

Student Design Projects Description

In the final year of their engineering curriculum, students take a series of courses that provide an important design experience that is the culmination of the knowledge and skills they have acquired over the course of their studies. Each semester the college holds a competition where industry judges select top projects and teams for recognition. Abstracts of prior student design projects are available at: http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/Engineering/news-events/SeniorDesign/Pages/default.aspx

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:

BIOE 3040 - Bioengineering Design I: This is the beginning of a 3 course sequence that ends with the senior design project and is intended to introduce concepts of classical engineering design and how these concepts can be applied to the field of biomedical device and technology design.

BIOE 4015 - Bioengineering Design II: This course continues from Bioengineering Design I, with focus on developing student-generated design ideas that are developed further into prototypes and pipelined into the Senior Design Project.

BIOE 4020 - Senior Design Project: A capstone course intended to bring students’ design projects that were begun in the prior 2 design courses to completion.

CVEN 4067 - Senior Design Projects: Senior civil engineering students, working in teams, are assigned significant open-ended design problems requiring the synthesis of material learned in previous engineering courses for solution. Design teams work independently under the supervision of a civil engineering faculty member. Prereq: Graduation Agreement and one design course. Co-req: A second design course.

CSCI 4738 - Senior Design I: This is an advanced practical course in which students design, implement, and document and test software systems for use in industry, non-profits, government and research institutions. The course offers practical experience by working closely with project sponsors. It also offers extensive experience in oral and written communication throughout the software life cycle. Prereq: CSCI 3508.

CSCI 4739 - Senior Design II: This course is a continuation of Senior Design I. Students must have taken Senior Design I in order to enroll for Senior Design II. In this course, the projects begun in Senior Design I are completed and presented. Prereq: CSCI 4738.

ELEC 4309 - Senior Design Project I: Design methodology and tools, project planning and team building, ethics in engineering and research, career planning and portfolio building. Project designs are completed and presented to the class. Prereq: Students must complete their Senior/30 hour check prior to enrollment. Prereq/Coreq: All required ELEC 3000-level classes and labs. ELEC 4309 and ELEC 4319 must be completed in subsequent academic semesters.

ELEC 4319 - Senior Design Project II: Project designs completed in ELEC 4309 are constructed and tested. Oral and written presentations of the completed project performance are required. Prereq: ELEC 4309. All required ELEC 3000-level classes and labs. Students must complete their Graduation Agreement prior to enrollment. ELEC 4309 and ELEC 4319 must be completed in subsequent academic semesters.

MECH 4035 - Senior Design I: Group and individual projects to design engineering components and systems. Design methodology, product specs, creativity, design reviews, communication, presentations, and report writing are emphasized. MECH 4035 and MECH 4045 form a one year sequence and must be taken consecutively. Prereq: MECH 3035 and MECH 3042.

MECH 4045, Senior Design II: Student teams manufacture and construct and/or redesign mechanical parts or assemblies that they designed in previous course (MECH 4035). A proposal, oral progress reports, and a final written report and demonstration are required. MECH 4035 and MECH 4045 form a one year sequence and must be taken consecutively. Prereq: MECH 4035.

Engineering Information

College Description

Engineering College Description and Special Characteristics

The College of Engineering and Applied Science (CEAS) is located in the heart of Denver, Colorado, and is the only engineering college in the metro region where working individuals can earn both undergraduate and graduate degrees entirely through afternoon and evening classes. Its proximity to the city offers ample hands-on learning opportunities for students and access to relevant industry connections and partnerships. The student population is diverse in both age and ethnic backgrounds, and the college is one of the fastest growing at the university. Professionalism, ethics and concern for the multi-faceted human element of engineering is a key piece of the curriculum, and graduates are prepared to be successful in their field upon graduation.

The college houses five departments, including Bioengineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Science and Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. It offers bachelors through doctoral degrees in each discipline, including a unique interdisciplinary Engineering and Applied Science PhD (EASPhD) as well as joint graduate programs with the College of Architecture and Planning and the Business School. The new EASPhD degree"the only program of its kind in the state"allows students to focus their doctoral studies on engineering along with a secondary area of study from within the entire university. The college is also home to the first and only bioengineering department in the state. The bioengineering program, which is located on the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, is unique in that it incorporates both the CU Denver and CU Anschutz Medical Campus, giving students the opportunity to learn from engineers and clinicians and to perform research or medical device design in world-class hospitals and clinical research labs. The new undergraduate program in bioengineering allows students to complete their first two years of study at CU Denver and their final two years on the medical campus.

Curriculum and research evolve to meet the needs of the city, state and the world. The college offers new graduate programs in construction engineering and management, biomechanics, and geomatics engineering, and created certificate programs in software engineering and data engineering, and a cooperative certificate in digital arts with the College of Arts & Media. All of our eligible undergraduate programs are fully accredited and the engineering curriculum is constantly evaluated to ensure that our programs are relevant and our graduates are aptly prepared to succeed.

Engineering Information

Engineering Faculty & Research

Teaching, Tenure-Track View Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Full Professors Assoc. Professors Assistant Professors Program Total
Bioengineering 1 3 4 8
Civil Engineering 6 3 1 10
College of Engineering and Applied Science 0 0 0 0
Computer Science and Engineering 3 4 2 9
Electrical Engineering 3 6 0 9
Mechanical Engineering 2 4 4 10
Totals: 15 20 11 46

Teaching, Non-Tenure-Track

Engineering Department(s) FT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel PT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Teach. Personnel
Bioengineering 3 1 4 0.27
Civil Engineering 5 25 30 4.56
College of Engineering and Applied Science 0 0 0 0.00
Computer Science and Engineering 1 8 9 4.90
Electrical Engineering 2 12 14 2.78
Mechanical Engineering 2 5 7 1.38
Totals: 13 51 64 13.89

Non-Teaching, Research

Engineering Department(s) Non-Teach. FT Research Personnel Non-Teach. PT Research Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Non-Teach. Research Personnel
Bioengineering 21 1 22 0.05
Civil Engineering 3 1 4 0.17
College of Engineering and Applied Science 0 0 0 0.00
Computer Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Electrical Engineering 2 0 2 0.00
Mechanical Engineering 1 0 1 0.00
Totals: 27 2 29 0.22

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

  • American Indian or Alaska Native (Am Ind): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.
  • Asian: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
  • Black or African American (B/AfrA): A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as "Haitian" or "Negro" can be used in addition to "Black or African American."
  • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (Haw): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
  • Hispanic or Latino (Hisp): A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. The term, "Spanish origin," can be used in addition to "Hispanic or Latino."
  • White: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Full Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Bioengineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 6 0
College of Engineering and Applied Science 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 1
Electrical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Totals: 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 0 0 14 1

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Associate Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Bioengineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 1
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 1
College of Engineering and Applied Science 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 1
Electrical Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 6 0
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0
Totals: 0 0 2 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 9 3 0 0 17 3

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Assistant Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Bioengineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 3 1
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
College of Engineering and Applied Science 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Electrical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0
Totals: 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 10 1

Undergraduate

Admissions/Transfers

Undergraduate Admission to the College of Engineering

FIRST-TIME FRESHMAN: Engineering applicants will receive priority consideration if they have fulfilled all Higher Education Admission Requirements (HEAR) and Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS) requirements, have a cumulative 3.0 GPA and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT (16 or higher in English and 27 or higher in mathematics) or a combined score of at least 1100 on the SAT (excluding essay with 410 or higher in critical reading and 600 or higher in mathematics). For admission to the College of Engineering and Applied Science, applicants must have an admission index score of 103.

Applicants who do not meet the entrance requirements for direct admission to engineering programs will be automatically considered for admission as Pre-engineering majors in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. If students are admitted as Pre-engineering majors, they must complete the following requirements within their first 45 credit hours at CU Denver before applying to the College of Engineering and Applied Science:

1.) Completion of (but not limited to) the following courses with a C- or higher:
• Calculus 1 (MATH 1401: 4 credit hours)
• Calculus II (MATH 2411: 4 credit hours)
• General Physics I and lab (PHYS 2311/2321: 5 credit hours)
NOTE: The above listed courses must be completed with an overall GPA of a 2.5.

2.) Maintain 2.75 cumulative GPA.

3.) Complete all prerequisite requirements for courses taken at CU Denver.

There is no direct admission into the Bioengineering major. Applicants will apply and be considered for admission as Bioengineering pre-majors. Pre-majors may apply for the major after successfully completing a series of pre-major requirements.

APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR PRIORITY CONSIDERATION:
Fall: August 1
Spring: December 1
Summer: May 1

Applicants are required to: 1) submit an application for admission along with a $50.00 non-refundable application fee, 2) have their high school send an official transcript of their high school grades, including class rank if available, or have a copy of their GED test scores and GED certificate sent directly from the certifying agency, and 3) take either the ACT (essay portion is optional) or the SAT and request that test scores be sent to CU Denver (ACT code 0533, SAT code 4875). Students who completed college course work while in high school must submit an official transcript from each college or university attended.

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

In addition to requirements for domestic freshmen, international students are required to submit the following:

1. A complete international application form along with a $75 non-refundable application fee.

2. Complete and “official” academic records of all course work from secondary schools and any universities attended. Official academic records are those that arrive at our office in an envelope sealed by the institution or local ministry of education. If the documents are not written in English, they must be translated by a certified translator. All documents must be accompanied by a certified English translation. The translation must be literal and no conversion of grades should be attempted by the translator. Official high school transcripts are not required for transfer applicants who have completed more than 30 semester hours of college/university coursework. If applicable, official transcripts from all Colleges/Universities attended should also be submitted. College/University transcripts are always required, if the applicant did not complete a degree or program at the previous institution.

3. An official TOEFL or IELTS score report that is no more than two years old. The English language requirement can be satisfied with a TOEFL score of 75 (internet based) or 537 (paper based), or an IELTS score of 6.5. The TOEFL/IELTS requirement can be waived under the following conditions:

- Successful completion of level 5 of the University of Colorado Denver’s ESL Academy.
- Graduation from a US accredited school abroad with English as the medium of instruction.
- Graduation with bachelor’s degree in the US or successful completion of a minimum of two semesters of full-time study in a master’s program at a US accredited institution.
- Graduation from and completion of a minimum of one year of secondary school in the US that included at least one unit of college preparatory English.
- Exempt Countries: Australia, Belize, Botswana, Canada (except Quebec), Commonwealth Caribbean, Ghana, Great Britain, Ireland, Kenya, New Zealand, Scotland, Singapore, South Africa, and Zimbabwe.

NOTE: Some graduate level programs may require a higher score on the TOEFL/IELTS and applicants should consult the department for additional details.

4. ACT/SAT Scores: Results are mandatory for international students who have graduated from a U.S. high school or those seeking freshman admission directly to the College of Engineering and Applied Science programs. For engineering students, admission to CU Denver is still possible without these scores by way of the Pre-engineering program in the College of Liberal Arts and Science.

Advanced planning and early application are necessary for the timely admission of international students. International students are advised that it usually takes 60 days for credentials to reach admissions in the Office of International Affairs from international locations.

Preferred Deadlines
Summer: January 15
Fall: March 15
Spring: September 15

Final Deadlines
Summer: March 15
Fall: May 15
Spring: October 15

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

Same as resident students.

Residency Requirements

At least 30 semester hours of course work applicable to a bachelor of science degree in engineering must be taken at CU Denver while a declared student in good standing at the College of Engineering and Applied Science. Students must be enrolled in the college for at least the final two semesters prior to graduation.

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

One full year of college calculus (Calculus I & II) and one semester of calculus-based physics (Calculus-based Physics I) must be completed, and the cumulative GPA must be at least 2.75. The math and science GPA relating to the above three courses must be 2.5 or better, and the last attempt in each individual course must be C- or better. Applicants not meeting these requirements for direct admission to engineering programs will be automatically considered for admission as pre-engineering majors in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Students who are admitted to Pre-Engineering must apply to transfer to the College of Engineering and Applied Science within three (3) semesters.

NOTE: There is no direct admission to the Bioengineering major; applicants apply and are considered for admission to the Bioengineering pre-major. Pre-majors may apply for the major after successfully completing a series of premajor requirements.

Undergraduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): In-State / Out-of-State

Undergraduate Group 1 Undergraduate Group 2
Tuition & Fees: $11,095 $24,691
Room & Board: $18,820 $18,820
Books & Supplies: $1,800 $1,800
Other Expenses: $2,430 $2,430
Estimated avg. course load per term: 12 12
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Institution's Own Application Form, Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

Additional Financial Aid Information

The types of finanical aid available to engineering students include need-based scholarships/financial aid, student loans, and part-time campus employement (if available).

Undergraduate

New Applicants

New Undergraduate Applicants

A. Number of undergraduate applicants to the engineering college: 1,228
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 482
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 116
Percentage of entering students (excluding transfer students) ranked in the top quarter (25%) of their high schools: 0%

Newly Enrolled Test Scores

Scores Reflect 75th to 25th percentile

SAT 75th 25th
Math Range: 705 625
Reading Range: 630 570
Writing Range:
Combined Range: 1320 1210
ACT 75th 25th
Math Range: 30 27
Composite Range: 29 26

Undergraduate

Enrollments by Class

Undergraduate Engr. Programs Fresh
1st Year
Soph
2nd Year
Junior
3rd Year
Senior
4th/5th Year
Full Time Total Part Time Total
Bioengineering (B.S.) 12 15 27 40 94 17
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 5 10 17 55 87 37
Computer Science (B.S.) 12 22 36 57 127 45
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 6 12 30 62 110 44
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 11 28 41 95 175 58
Undeclared (B.S.) 0 4 1 0 5 3
Totals: 46 91 152 309 598 204

Freshmen

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Bioengineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 4 2 0 0 8 2
Women 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 4 1
Note: Students enter the Bioengineering program through a Pre-Bioengineering (PRBE), pre-major pathway. Students who successfully complete all PRBE prerequisites and meet the program’s selection criteria will be admitted to the major (BSBE). At the freshman and sophomore levels these figures represent PRBE enrollments only.
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 4 2
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 5 3 1 1 10 5
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 1 0 5 2
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 7 1 0 0 10 2
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Undeclared (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 5 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 8 2 1 1 0 0 23 10 4 1 46 14

Sophomores

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Bioengineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 0 5 0 0 0 9 1
Women 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 6 2
Note: Students enter the Bioengineering program through a Pre-Bioengineering (PRBE), pre-major pathway. Students who successfully complete all PRBE prerequisites and meet the program’s selection criteria will be admitted to the major (BSBE). At the freshman and sophomore levels these figures represent PRBE enrollments only.
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 6 3 0 0 8 5
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 5 1 0 0 0 0 10 2 1 0 18 4
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 2
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 4 3 1 0 11 4
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 1 12 1 1 1 22 4
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 6 0
Undeclared (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 2
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Totals: 3 0 0 0 9 3 1 0 21 3 8 5 0 1 46 12 3 1 91 25

Juniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Bioengineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 5 2 3 0 17 3
Women 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 0 0 10 3
Note: Students enter the Bioengineering program through a Pre-Bioengineering (PRBE), pre-major pathway. Students who successfully complete all PRBE prerequisites and meet the program’s selection criteria will be admitted to the major (BSBE). At the junior and senior levels these figures represent enrollments in both the PRBE and BSBE programs.
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 9 3 0 0 15 4
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 7 2 0 0 0 0 20 6 0 2 31 10
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 5 2
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 0 1 8 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 13 3 0 0 27 6
Women 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 1 0 8 1 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 25 8 1 2 39 14
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Undeclared (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 13 0 3 2 23 5 0 0 19 5 5 1 0 0 85 25 4 4 152 42

Seniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Bioengineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 20 2 0 0 25 4
Women 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 1 15 1
Note: Students enter the Bioengineering program through a Pre-Bioengineering (PRBE), pre-major pathway. Students who successfully complete all PRBE prerequisites and meet the program’s selection criteria will be admitted to the major (BSBE). At the junior and senior levels these figures represent enrollments in both the PRBE and BSBE programs.
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 3 1 1 5 3 0 0 2 0 2 3 0 0 27 10 1 1 42 21
Women 0 0 0 1 3 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 8 2 0 0 13 5
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 2 0 0 2 4 3 0 0 5 2 0 1 0 0 36 9 1 1 48 18
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 5 4 0 0 9 4
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 10 0 5 3 6 0 1 0 5 3 4 1 0 0 23 19 2 1 56 27
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 4 1 0 1 6 4
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 2 5 0 9 2 0 0 8 4 2 1 0 0 50 26 0 0 75 35
Women 0 0 3 0 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 2 1 1 20 3
Undeclared (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 18 5 15 8 35 11 1 0 32 11 10 7 0 0 193 75 5 6 309 123

Undergraduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Bioengineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 1 1 5 0 2 2 0 8 0 19 17 2
Computer Science (B.S.) 1 1 1 0 5 0 0 9 1 18 16 2
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 15 2 2 0 4 4 1 18 2 48 43 5
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 5 3 6 0 1 3 0 30 0 48 39 9
Undeclared (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 22 7 14 0 12 9 1 65 3 133 115 18

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Bioengineering (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 1 0 1 0 4 1 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 7 1 0 0 19
Computer Science (B.S.) 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 1 18
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 15 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 3 1 3 1 1 0 16 2 2 0 48
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 5 0 3 0 4 2 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 24 6 0 0 48
Undeclared (B.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 21 1 6 1 11 3 0 0 11 1 7 2 1 0 56 9 2 1 133

Undergraduate

Dual Degrees

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

Not Applicable.

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degrees Awarded

Undergraduate

Program Comparisons

  • ABET - Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
  • CEAB - Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board
Degree Program ABET/CEAB Accred. Nominal Program Length
(yrs.)
Average Program Length
(yrs.)
Time: Day/Even./
Both
Co-op: None/Opt./
Required
Grads in Co-op Progs.
Bioengineering (B.S.) no Both None
Civil Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Both None
Computer Science (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Both None
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Both None
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Both None
Undeclared (B.S.) no Both None

Graduate

Admissions Information

Graduate Admission to the College of Engineering

Qualified students are admitted to regular degree status by the appropriate department. An ABET-accreditated undergraduate degree and an undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 (on a 4-point scale) or better for regular admission. Students with lower GPAs may qualify for provisional admission and applicants are strongly encouraged to submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores in such cases.

Graduate Admission to an Engineering Department

In addition to the minimum application requirements set forth by the Graduate School, each department may have additional admission requirements, as follows:

BIOENGINEERING (MS)
Applicants to the master’s degree program in Bioengineering are required to submit an online application, a personal statement, and a resume. A secondary application document called the Applicant Background Survey is emailed to each person who completes the online university application. The deadline is March 15 of each calendar year. Admissions are for fall of that year only. There are no conditional or delayed enrollment options. Applicants must demonstrate preparedness for interdisciplinary graduate-level study in mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, computer programming, and physical sciences or engineering. It is recommended that students have four semesters of math (through multivariable calculus and differential equations), two semesters each of physics, biology & chemistry and one semester of basic programming (ideally in MatLab). Preferred minimum GRE scores are 156/72% verbal, 160/84% quantitative, 4.5 analytical on the current scale or 550 verbal, 760 quantitative, 4.5 analytical on the pre-August 2011 scale.

BIOENGINEERING (PhD)
Doctoral degree students are further encouraged to contact faculty mentors in whose research they are interested; this process may result in informal (and optional) personal interviews between the faculty and applicant. The deadline is January 15 of each calendar year. Admissions are for fall of that year only. There are no conditional or delayed enrollment options.

CIVIL ENGINEERING (MS/MEng)
Applicants to the master’s degree programs in Civil Engineering are required to submit an online application and a statement of purpose. The deadlines are July 15 (fall), December 1 (spring), and March 15 (summer). Strong candidates will have verbal plus quantitative GRE scores exceeding 315, with a minimum of 300 expected. For tests taken prior to 2011, these scores are equivalent to 1200 and 1000, respectively.

CIVIL ENGINEERING (PhD)
Doctoral degree students are also required to submit a letter of support from one of the Civil Engineering faculty, which should include a statement of willingness to serve as the dissertation advisor and an outline of the plan for financial support. This letter may (or may not) be one of the three required for a complete file. The deadlines are May 15 (fall), October 1 (spring), and January 15 (summer).

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING (MS)
Applicants to the master’s degree programs in Computer Science and Engineering must have sufficient programming experience and mathematical maturity to understand advanced courses. Additional requirements include 10 semester hours of university-level calculus and at least one math course beyond calculus, such as advanced calculus, differential equations, linear algebra, probability, statistics or combinatorial analysis. The department offers rolling admissions. Strong candidates will have verbal plus quantitative GRE scores exceeding 310, a minimum score of 290 Verbal + Math, and 3.0 Written is required (New GRE Scores.) Under the old GRE scores, strong candidates would have verbal plus quantitative scores exceeding 1200, a minimum GRE score of 1000 Verbal + Math, and 3.0 Written.

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING (PhD)
Applicants to the doctoral degree program in Computer Science and Engineering may apply to either the Department of Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) or the Business School"students with a computer science background should apply through the CSE department and students with an information systems background should apply through the Business School. Application materials include a cover checklist, Parts I and II of the Application for Graduate Admission, and essay, and a resume.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (MS/MEng)
Applicants to the master’s degree programs in Electrical Engineering are required to submit an online application and a statement of purpose. This department offers rolling admissions.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (MS/MEng)
The deadlines are April 1 (fall) and October 1 (spring).

EASPhD
Applicants to the EASPhD are required to submit a personal statement of academic and research interests, including intended primary concentration within the host department. The deadlines are April 1 (fall) and October 1 (spring). Domestic applicants who only have a B.S. degree or fewer than 12 hours of transferable graduate-level coursework are required to submit GRE scores. Preferred minimum GRE scores are 150 Verbal, 153 Quantitative, and 3.5 for Analytical Writing for tests taken August 1, 2011 or later. For tests taken prior to August 1, 2011, preferred minimum GRE scores are 450 Verbal, 680 Quantitative, and 3.5 for Analytical Writing. Host departments may have additional requirements regarding the GRE exam.

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

International applicants must apply through the Office of International Admissions.

Documentation in English (or a certified English translation) of the completion of a bachelor’s degree, master’s degree or the equivalent at the time of matriculation as evaluated by the International Admissions Office.

Applicants whose native language is not English must take either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) exam and must score above 525 (paper) or 192 (computer) or 71 (Internet based) on the TOEFL or 6.0 on the IETLS. Applicants whose native language is not English are not required to take the TOEFL test if they have completed a baccalaureate or graduate-level degree program at an English-speaking college or university or have completed at least two semesters at a college or university in the United States as a full-time student and obtained a “B” average (3.0 GPA) or higher. International students who successfully complete study at Spring International with a grade of B or better are not required to submit TOEFL scores. Students must successfully complete studies through Level Six to be eligible for the waiver consideration.

Financial and other documents required by the International Scholars and Students Office to process immigration documents.

A certified English translation of all records and references not in English.

Additional requirements and documentation may also be required.

CIVIL ENGINEERING (MS)
The deadlines are June 15 (fall), November 1 (spring), and February 15 (summer)

CIVIL ENGINEERING (PhD)
The deadlines are April 15 (fall), October 1 (spring), and January 15 (summer)

EASPhD
International applicants who do not have an M.S. earned in the U.S. are required to submit GRE scores. Host departments may have additional requirements regarding the GRE exam, please check the pages of each. The deadlines are March 1 (fall) and September 15 (spring).

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

Same as resident.

Residency Requirements

A limited amount of high-quality resident graduate work done in a recognized graduate school elsewhere within the time allowed may be accepted, provided it is recommended by the department concerned and approved by the school or college dean. The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this university is 12 semester hours or 40 percent of the number of credits required for the master’s degree, whichever is higher, and 30 hours for PhD degrees.

The school or college shall determine if graduate classes taken by an undergraduate can be transferred to a graduate program. They shall also determine if courses taken in the University of Colorado System are considered resident or transfer courses.

Courses taken as pass/fail or satisfactory/unsatisfactory will not be transferred. In addition, a grade of B- or above must be earned for a course to be transferred. Courses taken some time ago will need to be validated by the program director.

Graduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): In-State / Out-of-State

Graduate Group 1 Graduate Group 2
Tuition & Fees: $8,883 $19,599
Room & Board: $18,820 $18,820
Books & Supplies: $1,800 $1,800
Other Expenses: $2,430 $2,430
Estimated avg. course load per term: 7 7
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Institution's Own Application Form, Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

Additional Financial Aid Information

The types of finanical aid available to engineering students include need-based scholarships/financial aid, student loans, and part-time campus employement (if available).

Graduate

New Applicants

New Graduate Applicants

A. Number of graduate applicants to the engineering college: 716
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 400
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 100

Graduate

Enrollments by Class

Master's

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Bioengineering (M.S.)
Men 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 1 0 1 16 2
Women 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 1 0 12 3
Civil Engineering (M.Eng)
Men 3 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 13 1 0 17 13
Women 3 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 0 0 9 6
Civil Engineering (M.S.)
Men 11 3 2 2 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 11 13 1 0 28 21
Women 6 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 0 1 12 5
Computer Science (M.S.)
Men 30 3 1 1 2 0 0 0 5 1 0 1 0 0 12 3 0 0 50 9
Women 18 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 21 3
Electrical Engineering (M.Eng)
Men 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 25 5 1 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 7 7 0 1 36 16
Women 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 8 2
Mechanical Engineering (M.Eng)
Men 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 6 2
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 9 2 1 1 5 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 7 6 0 0 22 12
Women 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 1 0 5 3
Totals: 117 16 11 4 12 8 1 0 15 3 1 3 0 1 85 59 4 3 246 97

Doctoral

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Bioengineering (PhD)
Men 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 7 4 0 0 12 5
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 9 0
Civil Engineering (PhD)
Men 4 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 6 5
Women 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 2
Computer Science and Information Systems (PhD)
Men 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 8 3
Women 4 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 3
Engineering and Applied Science (PhD)
Men 20 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 3 7 0 0 26 12
Women 8 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 9 2
Totals: 43 11 1 4 1 0 0 0 6 0 6 0 0 0 19 17 1 0 77 32

Graduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Bioengineering (M.S.) 0 1 1 0 2 2 0 9 0 15 11 4
Civil Engineering (M.Eng) 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 9 0 13 6 7
Civil Engineering (M.S.) 7 2 2 0 1 1 0 15 1 29 21 8
Computer Science (M.S.) 30 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 33 14 19
Electrical Engineering (M.Eng) 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0
Electrical Engineering (M.S.) 32 0 1 0 0 1 0 3 1 38 29 9
Mechanical Engineering (M.Eng) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 6 0 0 0 3 0 0 4 0 13 11 2
Totals: 80 4 6 0 6 5 0 42 2 145 95 50

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Bioengineering (M.S.) 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 5 4 0 0 15
Civil Engineering (M.Eng) 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 4 0 0 13
Civil Engineering (M.S.) 5 2 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 10 5 1 0 29
Computer Science (M.S.) 11 19 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 33
Electrical Engineering (M.Eng) 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Electrical Engineering (M.S.) 24 8 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 1 0 38
Mechanical Engineering (M.Eng) 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 13
Totals: 47 33 3 1 5 1 0 0 6 0 4 1 0 0 28 14 2 0 145

Master's Degree Programs

Master's Degree Program Degree Type
Master's w/ Thesis Master's w/o Thesis or with Proj./Report Program Totals
Bioengineering (M.S.) 11 4 15
Civil Engineering (M.Eng) 0 13 13
Civil Engineering (M.S.) 11 18 29
Computer Science (M.S.) 0 33 33
Electrical Engineering (M.Eng) 0 3 3
Electrical Engineering (M.S.) 9 29 38
Mechanical Engineering (M.Eng) 0 1 1
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 1 12 13
Totals: 32 113 145

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Bioengineering (PhD) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1
Civil Engineering (PhD) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0
Computer Science and Information Systems (PhD) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1
Engineering and Applied Science (PhD) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 4 2 2
Totals: 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 8 4 4

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Bioengineering (PhD) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
Civil Engineering (PhD) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Computer Science and Information Systems (PhD) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
Engineering and Applied Science (PhD) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 4
Totals: 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 0 0 8

Graduate

Research Expenditures

Expenditures by Research Department

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Engineering Department External Funding Source
Bioengineering
Total#: 47 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $3,750,049 Industry: $128 Priv/Non: $468,982
State: $579,018 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $4,798,177
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Civil Engineering
Total#: 42 Foreign: $14,581 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $487,465 Industry: $89,544 Priv/Non: $28,098
State: $245,373 Local: $1,390,364 Total Expn.: $2,255,425
Engineering Department External Funding Source
College of Engineering and Applied Science
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Computer Science and Engineering
Total#: 5 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $35,701 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $14,726
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $50,427
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Electrical Engineering
Total#: 19 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $1,231,002 Industry: $6,363 Priv/Non: $5,945
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $1,243,310
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Mechanical Engineering
Total#: 14 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $400,057 Industry: $366,188 Priv/Non: $0
State: $93,383 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $859,628
Totals:
Total#: 127 Foreign: $14,581 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $5,904,274 Industry: $462,223 Priv/Non: $517,751
State: $917,774 Local: $1,390,364 Total Expn.: $9,206,967

Expenditures by Research Center

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Bioengineering
Total#: 47 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $5,268,622 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $279,345 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $5,547,967
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Advancing Cognitive Technologies (RERC-ACT)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Note: The RERC-ACT grants were part of the Center for Bioengineering during the reporting period, so the expenditures are reported under the Center for Bioengineering.
Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0


Grand Totals:
Total#: 127 Foreign: $14,581 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $5,904,274 Industry: $462,223 Priv/Non: $517,751
State: $917,774 Local: $1,390,364 Total Expn.: $9,206,967

The following text was offered to each school as a guideline for the calculation of externally-funded research expenditures:

Include all expenditures associated with grants and contracts specifically budgeted for externally sponsored research and associated programs and expenditures associated with all gifts auditably used for research. Include expended funds provided by the following external sources:

  1. Federal Government
  2. State Government
  3. Foreign Governments
  4. Industry
  5. Non-Profit Organizations (e.g. foundations)
  6. Individuals
  7. Local Government

The expenditures reported should be only those funds provided by organizations, agencies, and individuals external to the institution. Cost sharing/matching funds should be included only if provided from sources external to the institution.

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Research centers listed as "WITHIN an engineering department" on the Research Centers page (screen 7) of the College of Engineering Profile, will not have their expenditures added to the school's total research expenditures. Such expenditures can be included in the department total, while still being listed for the appropriate center. This allows users to list the expenditures in two areas without double-counting.

Graduate

Research Description

Research Description By Graduate Engineering Department

Bioengineering

Faculty, staff and students in Bioengineering conduct research at the intersection of medical science, biology and engineering. Our main areas of research are (1) cardiovascular biomechanics and hemodynamics, (2) diabetes, (3) imaging and biophotonics, (4) tissue engineering, (5) neuroscience engineering, (6) ophthalmology, (7) orthopedic biomechanics, and (8) surgery and urological sciences.

Examples of research in cardiovascular biomechanics and hemodynamics include development of novel structural models of vascular mechanics, evaluation of structure-function relationships in extracellular matrix, myocardial mechanics in heart failure, role of blood flow in changes in vascular cell expression, role of flow factors in bicuspid aortic valves, hemodynamics of congenital heart disease, and computational measurement in mechanical ventilation.

Research in the area of diabetes includes the biology and biophysics of insulin secretion, metabolic imagining of insulin action, pancreatic islet transplantation and understanding diabetic complications, particularly in children with Type I diabetes. We collaborate with the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes.

Our imaging research includes development of new transducers and instrumentation, analysis of clinical imaging data from MRI, PET, SPECT, angiography, ultrasound modalities, development of next-generation post-processing tools, coupling of 3D imaging with patient-specific computational modeling, and development of advanced optical imaging techniques for live tissue histopathology.

Faculty working in tissue engineering engineer reparative heart tissue using stem cells found in amniotic fluid grown on novel multilayered biomaterials. These tissues are designed to fix heart defects in infants, eliminating the need for heart transplants or multiple and complex surgeries.
Neuroscience research topics include evaluation of neuromuscular disorders, diagnosis of neural processes using functional MRI, and development of next-generation brain telemetry systems.

Research in ophthalmology and bioengineering revolves around new imaging techniques for high-resolution optical imaging, development of new devices to treat glaucoma, development of new surgical instruments for corneal transplant surgery, and evaluation of eye mechanics.

Research in the area of orthopedic biomechanics includes evaluation of gait in children with congenital diseases, examination of neuromuscular control, knee and spine biomechanics, and rehabilitation engineering.

Through strong ties with the Department of Surgery at the University of Colorado Denver, several projects are underway on new designs for artificial hearts, novel robots for in vivo biomechanical assessment, minimally invasive surgical methods, next-generation methods to diagnose and treat urinary incontinence, and assessment of aortic valve mechanics.

Civil Engineering

The Structures Group at the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Colorado Denver completes various aspects of experimental and computational research. Current research interest includes infrastructure assessment and rehabilitation, advanced composite materials for structural applications, bridge engineering, soil-structure interaction, non-metallic load-bearing systems, fire-structure interaction, multi-material mechanics, and science-based structural engineering. These research activities are sponsored externally by federal, state, and local agencies such as the US Department of Transportation, Transportation Research Board, Colorado Department of Transportation, and City and County of Denver. The Structures Laboratory houses four universal testing machines (20 kip to 1000 kip capacity) with data acquisition systems. Facilities for concrete-related research include a 5cf capacity concrete mixer, water-lime tanks for moisture curing, and a large temperature controlled curing room.

The Hydrology and Hydraulics Graduate Program has been working on various research projects focusing on the areas of surface water drainage improvements using best management practices, groundwater hydrology focusing on plume spreading and clogging effects, flood mitigation using low-impact approaches, floodplain management using structural and non-structural methods, and improvements on highway drainage designs and maintenance. The hydraulic and environmental laboratory has been equipped with measurement devices for water infiltration tests, clogging tests on filtering media, and flumes for Type C and D model inlet tests. This laboratory is also equipped to perform water quality measurements. The on-campus stormwater test site was constructed in 2010 with a mini weather station for rain and wind gages, flow loggers to measure inflows and outflows through a detention basin, and water sample collectors for water quality tests through filtering process in the basin. These research activities are sponsored externally by federal, state, and local agencies, and results are routinely published in top-tier peer-reviewed journals"often with student coauthors. The Hydrology and Hydraulics program has also established student internship programs with the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District and with Denver Water Department for senior and graduate student placement and on-job training.

The transportation group is currently focusing its research on topics of transportation safety and sustainability. Current topics include: (1) child safety awareness and risk near open spaces, (2) ride sourcing impacts on mode choice and vehicle travel, (3) effects of canopy coverage on crash frequencies, (4) dooring collisions as affected by bike lane design, and (5) helmet effectiveness in crashes by motorcyclists and bicyclists. Our research projects also involve students in planning, public affairs, and public health doing research on many aspects of sustainable transportation and urban design. Those activities can be seen at the website www.actresearchgroup.org. Dr. Wesley Marshall directs the CU Denver affiliation with the Mountain Plains Consortium, which is a regional University Transportation Center funded by the U.S. Department of Transportation. In addition, he also directs the CU Denver Transportation Research Center (TRC), which is one point of contact for that affiliation.

The Geotechnical Engineering Graduate Program devotes its research activity in the following areas: 1) GRS/MSB earth retaining structures and bridge abutment, 2) earthquake-induced soil liquefaction, 3) constitutive modeling of liquefiable soils, 4) liquefaction resistance of soils with fines, 5) large scale geotechnical model tests of GRS/MSB Integrated Bridge System, Pile Bend Static Load Tests, Truncated GRS/MSB Wall Base Bearing Pressures Evaluation, and GRS/MSB Wall Earth Pressure Coefficients evaluation using a stiff steel cage with dimensions of 4 ft wide x 6 ft high and 12 ft long, named Tiger Cage, 6) deep foundation performance (drilled shafts and driven piles) under sequential multi-directional loads (vertical, torsional and lateral) using ¼ inch steel Goliath Pipe (GP) of dimensions, 6 ft 6 inches (or 78 inches) in diameter and 13 ft in height and laboratory evaluations of various retaining wall backfills and geotextiles. The measured performances of all large scale model tests are used as a calibrator for the numerical computation codes. When validated, the computer codes are then used to compute full-scale performance of the above-mentioned geo-structures and to formulate design codes.

Construction Engineering and Management is a graduate program with Masters and Ph.D. students within the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Colorado Denver. Current construction related research focuses on developing theories, methods, and tools for multidisciplinary systems thinking in high-performance building and infrastructure. Examples include optimal selection of building upgrade measures for existing building, maximizing thermal comfort of building occupants, and minimizing greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution of business commute systems. Projects are externally funded by a variety of agencies including Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT), California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), Mountain Plains Consortium (MPC) and the Rexel Foundation.
The Geomatics Engineering and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) graduate program at the University of Colorado Denver provides broad-based expertise and cutting-edge skills that span the growing geospatial field, and helps alleviate the shortage of well-educated geospatial professionals. The Geomatics and GIS program is intended for engineers and other geospatial, environmental and urban infrastructure professionals seeking skills in using and managing rapidly developing geospatial data technologies.

Computer Science and Engineering

The Department has three laboratories that it uses for its research: the DECENT lab, a Graphics lab and Parallel Distributed lab. The DECENT lab is dedicated to the research and development of high-performance distributed computing and computer networking techniques. The Computer Graphics lab is an interdisciplinary research center dedicated to the development of interactive computer graphics and scientific visualization techniques. The Parallel Distributed Systems lab houses a 192 core cluster computers to support teaching and research in all areas of parallel and distributed computing: advanced computer architectures, operating systems, parallel programming languages, applications and high-performance computing and networking.

Electrical Engineering

Faculty of Electrical Engineering department conduct research in the areas of electromagnetics, bioengineering, energy and powers systems, controls, communications, signal processing, computer engineering, nanotechnology and microelectronics. The emphasis of electromagnetics research is propagation of electromagnetic waves in the ionosphere. Research in bioengineering is focused on biomedical imaging, and photonics. Bioengineering research faculties have tight cooperation with faculty from the University of Colorado Medical School. Department has power systems laboratory where faculty and students conduct research in smart grids and energy storage systems.

Mechanical Engineering

3D and 4D Printing of active polymers: After 3D printing (or additive manufacturing), active polymers (such as SMPs, liquid crystal elastomers and hydrogels) can transform into new shapes upon activation. This technique is referred as 4D printing with time being the 4th dimension of shape formation. Our research in this area focuses on the spontaneous and sequential shape changing of printed active polymers. By using simulation based design, we aim to fabricate superior functional devices that can be widely applied in microsystem actuation components, as well as biomedical devices and aerospace deployable structures.

Stimuli-Sensitive and Smart Materials: Synthesis, experimental characterization, and constitutive modeling of stimuli-sensitive and active materials. This includes shape-memory polymers, liquid-crystalline elastomers, and aromatic ultra-polymers. The fundamental understanding of these materials are applied towards the development of real-world applications, such the design of novel biomedical devices.

Image-Based Finite Element Analysis: Using digital images, including those obtained using computed tomography and confocal microscopy, 3D computer models are used to perform finite element analysis. The mechanical effects of exercise, drugs, and implanted medical devices on skeletal tissues can then be evaluated on a patient-specific basis. Ongoing projects in the department are investigating the effects of two different exercise programs on the strength of the femur and lumbar spine, the effects of age and kidney disease on bone micro-structure, and the mechanical interactions between bone and implants made of porous polymers.

Research Description By Engineering Research Center

Center for Bioengineering

Bioengineering research and education at the University of Colorado Denver focuses on the application of engineering principles in the design, analysis, construction, and manipulation of biological systems and biomedical technologies, and on the discovery and application of new engineering principles and technologies inspired by the properties of biological systems. Current areas of research and teaching emphasis include biomedical devices, biomechanics, medical imaging and diagnostics and cell and tissue engineering. Emerging areas include synthetic biology, systems biology, biomedical computation and modeling, biomedical nano-and microscale systems and fabrication, and environmental bioengineering.

The impact of the Center for Bioengineering lies in the creation of new research opportunities at the interface between engineering/physical sciences and medicine/biomedical science. Such opportunities have translated into significant new research funding for UC Denver, primarily within the CU School of Medicine, and this success is projected to continue and accelerate as additional bioengineering faculty, researchers and graduate students join the Department. Additional impact continues around the creation of start-up companies from technologies created by inter-disciplinary teams of engineers and clinicians, around the submission of new training grant applications, development of a highly reputable bioengineering research and training program in Colorado, and the creation of new jobs in the University and State of Colorado.

The SOM Center for Bioengineering is thus well positioned to become the premier research and training program for Bioengineering in the Rocky Mountain Region, and to serve as one of the catalysts for economic growth in the Denver-Metro area. The robust research opportunities on a medical school campus engage students in from day one of their training.

Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Advancing Cognitive Technologies (RERC-ACT)

The Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Advancing Cognitive Technologies (RERC-ACT) is the nation’s first center to conduct research and development of assistive technologies for people with cognitive disabilities. The RERC-ACT includes research and development projects, training activities, and the dissemination of informational materials. Twelve universities and private companies throughout the United States are involved in projects that will improve the lives of people with cognitive disabilities such as traumatic brain injuries, intellectual disabilities, and dementia.

Research Projects:

Influence of Technology Design on the Usability of Thirty Assistive and Mainstream Commercial Devices Used by Working Age Adults with Mild to Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) " This research project is centered on our Product Testing Lab and the critical need to perform usability tests with the myriad of technologies used by persons with cognitive disabilities in order to improve individual consumer selection of the "right" technology as well as improving the design and development of existing, emerging and new technologies. Over the past five years, our population of interest was persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD). For this round, our target population is working age adults with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). This will begin to enable us to understand more fully what, if any, differences might be present in usability issues across different populations of persons with cognitive disabilities.

Identifying User Interface (UI) Design Features Most Likely to Promote Technology Adoption and Effective Use by Working Age Adults (18-64) With Mild to Moderate Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Using a Tablet-based Simulation to Model " This research project represents an outgrowth of the Formative Review of our RERC-ACT conducted by NIDRR in 2012. This highly innovative and exciting research project is focused on a simulator we developed enabling us to test, in a very controlled manner, specific User Interface (UI) features with specific populations. This has never been done before and it represents an opportunity to extend and improve the way technologies are designed and used.

Measuring the Effectiveness of an Interactive Non-Linear Context-Aware Platform Prompting System (IPPS) Designed for Working Age Adults with Cognitive Disabilities Use in a Warehouse Environment: A Cross-Sectional Study " This research project is directly related to the Center’s development work and involved conducting an applied clinical trial of the Non-Linear Context-Aware Interactive Prompting Platform (IPP); an enterprise solution that has three major development components.

Graduate

Subject Areas of Research

Subject Areas

  • A Biomimetic Reverse Thermal Gel for Optic Nerve Regeneration
  • A Biomimetic Reverse Thermal Gel for the Treatment of Myocardial Infarction
  • A Functional Reverse Thermal Gel for Retinal Ganglion Cell Axon Regeneration
  • Alkaline Phosphates in Infant Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Kinetics and Relationship to Inflammation Organ Injury and Outcome
  • Application of Nanogel-modified Resins for Improved Polymeric Dental Materials
  • Bio Text NLP
  • Cardiolipin Biosynthesis and Mitochondrial Energy Production in Pediatric Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy
  • Cholinergic Modulation of Olfaction
  • Chrolinergic Modulation of Motor Preparation in the Midbrain
  • Comprehensive Clinical Assessment of Pediatric PHT
  • Control of Protein Activity via Light Stimulated Dimerizers
  • Development of a Bidirectional Optogenetic Minimally Invasive Peripheral Nerve Interface with Single Axon Read-in & Read-out Specificity
  • Fibroblasts and Mononuclear Fibrogenic Cells Drive Right Ventricular Pulmonary Artery
  • Fibroblasts and Mononuclear Fibrogenic Cells in Right Ventricular Failure
  • Functional and Biological Phenotyping of Pediatric PH
  • High Throughput Lipidomics Analysis by MALDI/Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry
  • Imaging Transporter Protein Dynamics in Living Cells
  • Institutional Training Grant in Pediatric Gastroenterology
  • Liquid-Crystalline Elastomers for Orthopedic Applications
  • Monomers and Nanogel to Improve Adhesive Resin Structural Integrity/Durability
  • Multimedia Asset Creation and Management at the National Center for Media Forensics in Support of the MediFor Program
  • NCS-FO: Collaborative Research: Rebuilding Neural Pathway Function Using Miniature Integrated Optics for Neuron-Level Readout and Feedback
  • Neuroscience Training Grant
  • Non-invasive Diagnostics & Outcomes Predictors in Pediatric PAH
  • Olfactory Receptors for Semiochemical Detection in the Main Olfactory Epithelium
  • Peers Enhancing Education and Retention in STEM (PEER-STEM)
  • Platelet and Tissue Camp: Novel Biomarkers of Milrinone Efficacy in Children
  • Porous, Patient Specific Interbody Fusion Cages with Enhanced Loading Characteristics to Reduce Subsidence
  • Proof-of-Concept Fiber-Based Miniature Multiphoton Microscope Using Adaptable Optics
  • Regulation of Islet Gap Junction Coupling and Function Under Inflammatory Conditions
  • Right Ventricular Lymphatic Dysfunction Causes Failure in Pulmonary Hypertension
  • Rocky Mountain Neurological Disorders Core Center
  • Role of Mucin in Lung Homeostasis and Pathophysiology
  • Sustainable Stem Learning Program (S2P): Promoting Systems Thinking to Aid Holistic Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Sustainability Education
  • Targeting Lipid Oxidation for Prostate Cancer Imaging and Therapy
  • The Role of Gap Junction Coupling in Regulating Islet Dysfunction in Type2 Diabetes
  • Training in Basic and Translational Child Health Research
  • Transcriptional Control of Epithelial Behaviors that Drive Mammalian Neural Tube Closure
  • Translational Pulmonary Vascular Biology Program

Graduate

Dual Degrees

Graduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

The Department of Bioengineering offers a number of dual degree programs. The dual MS degree program is intended for students already enrolled or accepted into another MS program in the University of Colorado system. Students wishing to combine the MS in Bioengineering with another master’s degree must: 1) be accepted and concurrently registered in both programs; dual MS cannot be earned sequentially because credit from a conferred Master's cannot be applied toward a second Master's, as per the Graduate School Rules, and 2) satisfy all requirements of both degree programs. Up to 15 credit hours of courses may be used to satisfy both programs. However, each program will determine which courses count on a case-by-case basis. The dual MD/MS degree program is offered in partnership with the University of Colorado School of Medicine and is available to current CU medical students only. The MS/MBA program is offered in partnership with the CU Denver Business School. The MD/PhD program is for students already enrolled or accepted into the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) in the CU School of Medicine. Degree completion in 7-8 years with highly individualized training pathway and multidisciplinary research dissertation.

Graduate

Student Appointments

Appointments by Department

Appointments - Number of Appointments
Stipend - Average Monthly Stipend

Department Fellowships TA RA Other Total Appts.
Bioengineering
Appointments: 0 1 27 7 35
Stipends: $0 $315 $1,672 $315
Civil Engineering
Appointments: 0 4 27 1 32
Stipends: $0 $662 $1,549 $1,300
College of Engineering and Applied Science
Appointments: 0 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0 $0
Computer Science and Engineering
Appointments: 0 8 3 7 18
Stipends: $0 $559 $706 $1,725
Electrical Engineering
Appointments: 0 4 15 4 23
Stipends: $0 $331 $1,350 $1,788
Mechanical Engineering
Appointments: 0 7 4 3 14
Stipends: $0 $438 $2,337 $972
All Total Appointments 0 24 76 22 122