University of Toronto - 2016

Institution Information

Contact Information

Institution's Mailing Address

Institution Name: University of Toronto
Mailing Address: 35 St. George Street
City: Toronto
State: ON
Postal Code: M5S 1A4
Country: Canada
Phone 416-978-3131
Fax: 416-978-4859
Website: http://www.engineering.utoronto.ca

Graduate Admission Inquiries

Laura DeBartolo
Faculty Graduate Coordinator
Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering
University of Toronto
35 St. George Street
Toronto, ON M5S 1A4
Phone: 416-946-3038
Fax: 416-946-0371
cathy.grilo@utoronto.ca

Institution Information

General Information


Type of institution: PUBLIC
Academic Year: SEMESTERS
Setting of Main Engineering Campus URBAN

Main Campus Information

Is the main campus located in a city with a population greater than 100,000?: Yes
Name of this city, or if no, the name of the nearest city of any size?: Toronto
This city's population (approx.): 2,615,060
Distance from Main Campus: 0

Total Enrollment

Total Undergraduate enrollment: 55,130
Total Graduate enrollment: 9,420
Total Professional and other enrollment: 23,302

Non-Engineering Degree Granting Colleges

Business, Communications, Dentistry, Education, Fine arts, Law, Liberal arts, Medicine, Natural sciences, Nursing, Pharmacy, Arts and Science, Music, Physical and Health Education, Architecture and Landscape Architecture

Institution Information

General Admissions

Entrance Requirements and Recommendations

Requirements

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Admission to the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering is competitive as each year we receive more applications than the number of places available. The Faculty selects students by taking into consideration a wide range of criteria including marks, subjects taken, and supplementary information obtained through the mandatory Student Profile Form . Possession of the minimum entrance requirements does not guarantee admission. Students who have been out of school for more than five years are asked to consult with the Engineering Undergraduate Admissions Office for further advice regarding their high school preparation as they may need to take additional courses to be eligible for admission consideration.

Detailed undergraduate admission requirements can be found online at the Enrolment Services website: http://www.adm.utoronto.ca

Information can also be found on the Faculty website at:
http://discover.engineering.utoronto.ca

ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL DIPLOMA (OSSD)
Applicants must be eligible to receive the Ontario Secondary School Diploma and must present a minimum of six grade 12 U or M courses including:
English (ENG4U)
Calculus & Vectors (MCV4U)
Chemistry (SCH4U)
Physics (SPH4U)
Advanced Functions (MHF4U)
One additional Grade 12 U or M course

CANADIAN STUDENTS
Applicants from Quebec must present 12 academic C.E.G.E.P. courses. Candidates from other provinces and territories of Canada must present grade 12 matriculation, including English, Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry. For more detailed information, visit the Prospective Student website at http://discover.engineering.utoronto.ca

OTHER APPLICANTS
Information on admission requirements for international applicants is available on the Enrolment Services website at http://www.adm.utoronto.ca/admissions. All applicants are required to have completed senior level courses in mathematics, physics and chemistry .

TRANSFER STUDENTS
Candidates with acceptable standing at other post-secondary institutions will be considered for admission with transfer credits on a case-by-case basis. Transfer credits are assessed at the time of admission. Candidates who already hold a recognized degree in engineering will not be permitted to proceed to a second undergraduate degree in engineering.

NON-MATRICULANTS (MATURE STUDENTS)
For information regarding admission as a non-matriculant (mature student), please contact the Engineering Undergraduate Admissions Office, 35 St. George St., Room 153, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A4, or call 416-978-0120.

ENGLISH FACILITY REQUIREMENTS
Students whose first language is not English may have to present proof of English facility. For more information, please visit the Enrolment Services website at http://www.adm.utoronto.ca/eft.


APPLICATION PROCEDURES

Candidates currently studying in an Ontario high school should apply through the Ontario Univeristies’ Application Centre (www.ouac.on.ca) and use form 101. All other candidates should apply online through the Ontario Universities’ Application Centre and use form 105.

The University of Toronto operates on an academic year rather than on a semester or quarter system. Students begin their studies in September and continue until April of the following year. A small number of courses are offered each summer. Typically, these courses could be used to help meet the requirements of one of the minors offered by the Faculty .

Note that there is an application fee when applying through the Ontario Universities' Application Centre. In addition, all applicants are required to complete a Student Profile Form for the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering, the cost of which is $40 for Ontario High School students and $60 for all other applicants.

University policies on access to student records and person privacy allow the Faculty to communicate only with the applicant unless the Faculty has the written permission of the applicant to discuss their application with someone else. For more information on privacy policies, please visit http://www.utoronto.ca/privacy

Recommendations

Please refer to the above

Engineering Information

Head of Engineering

Head of Engineering

Cristina Amon
Dean
Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering
University of Toronto
35 St. George Street
Galbraith Building
Toronto, ON M5S 1A4
Phone: 416-978-3131
Fax: 416-978-4859
dean@ecf.utoronto.ca

Engineering Information

Engineering Degrees Offered

Types of Engineering Degrees

Bachelor's:B.S., B.A.S.E. in Engineering Science
Master's:M.S. with thesis, M.S. without thesis, but with project or report, M.Eng., M.H.Sc.
Doctoral:Ph.D.

Computer Science Degrees Awarded Outside the College/School of Engineering

Bachelor's, Master's, Doctoral

Engineering Information

Engineering Departments

Engineering Department(s) Degree Granting Level Department Chair Discipline
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry Both Grant Allen Chemical Engineering
Department of Civil Engineering Both Brent Sleep Civil Engineering
Department of Materials Science and Engineering Both Jun Nogami Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Both Jean Zu Mechanical Engineering
Division of Engineering Science Undergraduate Mark Kortschot Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Both Farid Najm Electrical/Computer Engineering
Engineering Communication Program Undergraduate Deborah Tihanyi Other Engineering Disciplines
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering Graduate Christopher Yip Biomedical Engineering
Lassonde Institute of Mining Undergraduate Brent Sleep Civil Engineering
Track One - General First Year Engineering Undergraduate Thomas Coyle Other Engineering Disciplines
University of Toronto, Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) Graduate Chris Damaren Aerospace Engineering

Engineering Information

Research Centers

  • INCOLL - Research center WITHIN the college of engineering
  • INDEPT - Research center WITHIN an engineering department
  • INUNIV - Research center WITHIN university system
  • OUTUNIV - Research center OUTSIDE the university
Center/Lab Discipline Research Class Head Chair
BioZone Chemical Engineering INCOLL Elizabeth Edwards
Centre for Advanced Coating Technologies Mechanical Engineering INDEPT Javad Mostaghimi
Centre for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies (CADIF) Mechanical Engineering INCOLL Andreas Mandelis
Centre for Advanced Nanotechnology Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering INCOLL Harry Ruda
Centre for Global Engineering Engineering (General) INCOLL Yu-Ling Cheng
Centre for Maintenance Optimization & Reliability Engineering (C-MORE) Mechanical Engineering INDEPT Andrew K. S. Jardine
Centre for Managment of Technology and Entrepreneurship Chemical Engineering INDEPT J.C. Paradi
Centre for Research in Healthcare Engineering Mechanical Engineering INDEPT Michael Carter
Centre for Research in Sustainable Aviation Aerospace Engineering INDEPT Chris Damaren
Centre for Resilience of Critical Infrastructure Civil Engineering INDEPT Jeffrey Packer
Centre for Technology and Social Development Civil Engineering INDEPT Willem Vanderburg
Emerging Communication Technology Institute Electrical/Computer Engineering INDEPT Yu Sun
Identity, Privacy and Security Institute Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL Dimitrios Hatzinakos
ILead - The Institute for Leadership Education in Engineering Chemical Engineering INCOLL Douglas Reeve
Institute for Multidisciplinary Design and Innovation Mechanical Engineering INDEPT Kamran Behdinan
Institute for Robotics and Mechatronics Mechanical Engineering INCOLL Ridha Ben Mrad
Institute for Sustainable Energy Mechanical Engineering INCOLL Aimy Bazylak
Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Centre and Testbed Civil Engineering INDEPT Baher Abdulhai
Lassonde Institute of Mining Civil Engineering INCOLL John Hadjigeorgiou
Pulp and Paper Centre Chemical Engineering INDEPT H. N. Tran
Southern Ontario Centre for Atmospheric Aerosol Research (SOCAAR) Chemical Engineering INDEPT Greg Evans
Toronto Institute of Advanced Manufacturing (TIAM) Mechanical Engineering INCOLL Hani Naguib
University of Toronto Transportation Research Institute (UTTRI) Civil Engineering INDEPT Eric Miller

Engineering Information

Degree Programs

Bachelor's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry Chemical Engineering (B.A.Sc.) Chemical Engineering
Department of Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (B.A.Sc.) Civil Engineering
Department of Materials Science and Engineering Materials Science Engineering (B.A.Sc.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Mechanical Engineering (B.A.Sc.) Mechanical Engineering
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Industrial Engineering (B.A.Sc.) Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Division of Engineering Science Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Electrical and Computer Engineering Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Division of Engineering Science Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Engineering Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Division of Engineering Science Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Systems Engineering Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Division of Engineering Science Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Computer Engineering Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Division of Engineering Science Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Aerospace Engineering Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Division of Engineering Science Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Energy Systems Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Division of Engineering Science Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Division of Engineering Science Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Manufacturing Systems Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Division of Engineering Science Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Mathematics, Statistics and Finance Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Division of Engineering Science Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Nanoengineering Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Division of Engineering Science Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Physics Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Division of Engineering Science Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Robotics Engineering Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Division of Engineering Science Engineering Science (B.A.Sc. in Engineering Science) - Electrical Engineering Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Division of Engineering Science Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Infrastructure Engineering Engr. Science and Engr. Physics
Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Computer Engineering (B.A.Sc.) Computer Engineering
Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering (B.A.Sc.) Electrical Engineering
Lassonde Institute of Mining Lassonde Mineral Engineering (B.A.Sc.) Mining Engineering
Track One - General First Year Engineering Track One - General Engineering (B.A.Sc) Other Engineering Disciplines

Master's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Master's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) Chemical Engineering
Department of Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) Civil Engineering
Department of Materials Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical and Computer Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering Biomedical Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.H.Sc.) Biomedical Engineering
University of Toronto, Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) Aerospace Science and Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) Aerospace Engineering

Doctoral Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Doctoral Degree Program(s) Discipline
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (Ph.D.) Chemical Engineering
Department of Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) Civil Engineering
Department of Materials Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (Ph.D.) Mechanical Engineering
Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical and Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering Biomedical Engineering (Ph.D.) Biomedical Engineering
University of Toronto, Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) Aerospace Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) Aerospace Engineering

Engineering Information

Areas of Expertise

Engineering Departments Areas of Expertise
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
  1. Pulp and Paper
  2. Information Engineering/Process Informatics
  3. Biomedical and Biomaterials
  4. Alternative Energy Sources
  5. Bioprocessing
  6. Environment
Department of Civil Engineering
  1. Environmental Engineering
  2. Structural Engineering
  3. Geotechnical Engineering
  4. Transportation Engineering
  5. Building Engineering
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
  1. Electronic/Photonic Materials
  2. Physical Metallurgy
  3. Materials Science
  4. Extractive Metallurgy
  5. Nanoengineering
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
  1. Operations Research
  2. Design and Manufacturing Engineering
  3. Robotics, Dynamic Systems and Controls
  4. Thermal/Fluid Sciences
  5. Applied Mechanics
  6. Human Factors/Ergonomics
Division of Engineering Science
  1. Physics & Nanoengineering
  2. Aerospace
  3. Biomedical
  4. Computer & Electrical
  5. Infrastructure Engineering
  6. Energy Systems
  7. Engineering Mathematics, Statistics and Finance
Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
  1. Electronics/Photonics
  2. Electromagnetics
  3. Biomedical Engineering
  4. Communications
  5. Systems Control and Energy Systems
  6. Computer Engineering
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering
  1. Implants and Tissue Repair/Regeneration
  2. Drug Delivery Devices and Systems
  3. Metabolic Control Systems
  4. Biomaterials
  5. Tissue Mechanics
  6. Nuclear Medicine Engineering
Lassonde Institute of Mining
  1. Mineral Exploration
  2. Geotechnical
  3. Mining
  4. Mineral Processing Engineering
University of Toronto, Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS)
  1. Fusion Reactor Materials and Technology
  2. Flight and Ground Vehicle Simulators
  3. Dynamics and Control of Aircraft and Spacecraft
  4. Space Robotics
  5. Compressible Flows and Shock Waves
  6. Low-Speed Aerodynamics

Engineering Information

Societies

Honor Societies

National Groups

  • Golden Key National Honor Soc.

Student Organizations

National Groups

  • American Society of Mechanical Engineers
  • Formula SAE
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
  • National Society of Black Engineers

Local Groups

  • Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
  • Association of Mechanical and Industrial Graduate Students (AMIGAS)
  • Astronomy and Space Exploration Society
  • Biomedical Engineering Students' Association (BESA)
  • Blue and Gold
  • CA Society for Mechanical Engineering. U of T Chapter
  • Canadian National Concrete Canoe Competition 2010 (CNCCC)
  • Canadian Society for Chemical Engineers - UofT Chapter (CSChE)
  • Career Paths
  • Chemical Engineering Graduate Students' Association
  • Chinese Engineering Student's Association (CESA)
  • Cinema Blue Room
  • CitizenEngineer
  • Engineering Chinese Culture Club
  • Engineering Lego Group
  • Engineering Society (EngSoc)
  • Engineers Without Borders, UofT Chapter (EWB)
  • Engineers for Christ/Power to Change
  • Eyes of Hope
  • Institute of Industrial Engineering
  • Iron Dragons - Engineering Dragonboat Team
  • Korean Engineering Students' Association
  • Nawranj Iranian Association
  • Ontario Society of Professional Engineers. U of T Section
  • Ontario Water Works Association
  • Skule Improv Society
  • Skule Nite
  • Skule Orchestra
  • Skule Stage Band
  • The Aeronautics Team
  • The Brass Ring
  • Toastmasters - UofT Engineering Chapter
  • U of T Emergency First Responders
  • Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering, Club for (CUBE)
  • Undergraduate Civil Engineering Club
  • Undergraduate Electrical and Computer Engineering Club
  • Undergraduate Engineering Science Club
  • Undergraduate Industrial Engineering Club (Indy Club)
  • Undergraduate Materials Engineering Club
  • Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering Club
  • Undergraduate Mineral Engineering Club
  • Undergraduate TrackOne Club
  • Unite Chinese Engineers (UCC)
  • UofT Aeronautics Team (UTAT)
  • UofT Blue Sky Solar Racing Team
  • UofT Concrete Toboggan Team
  • UofT Consulting Association (UTCA)
  • UofT Eco-Marathon Club (UTEC)
  • UofT Snowboard Design Team (UTSDT)
  • UofT Space Design Club (UTSDC)
  • UofToronto Concrete Canoe Team (UTCC)
  • Visual Arts Festival (SAF)
  • Water Environmental Association of Ontario - UofT Chapter (WEAO)
  • Web Startup Society (WSS)
  • WebDev - We Make Web Applications
  • Women in Science and Engineering - UofT Chapter (WISE)
  • iGem Club

Engineering Information

Support Programs

College's Under-Represented Student Groups

National Groups

  • Bangladesh Students' Association
  • Chinese Student Association
  • National Society of Black Engineers

Local Groups

  • Afghan Students' Association
  • Afropan Community Campus Group
  • Arab Students' Association
  • Argentine Tango CLub at U of T
  • Armenian Students' Association, U of T
  • Asian Broadcasting Network (ABN)
  • Asian FOCUS
  • Black Students' Association (BSA)
  • Canadian Asian Student Society
  • Celtic Society, U of T
  • Croatian Student's Association
  • Cyprus Student's Association at the U of T
  • Finnish Club, The
  • Greek Students' Association
  • Hong Kong Students at U of T
  • Indonesian Student Fellowship
  • Iranian Association at U of T
  • Iranian Students' Union
  • Japan Canada Student Association
  • Korea Campus Crusade for Christ (KCCC)
  • Korean Canadian U of T Students Association
  • Korean Christian Fellowship (KCF)
  • Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, Transgendered of U of T
  • Malaysian Singaporean Students' Association (MSSA)
  • Mauritian Society (UTMS), U of T
  • Pakistani Students Federation
  • Persian Club
  • Philippine Heritage Association of Toronto (PHAT)
  • Polish Students Association
  • Portuguese Association, U of T
  • Republic of China Students' Association at U of T
  • Romanian Students Club
  • Serbian Students' Association
  • South Asian Alliance (SAA)
  • Toronto Latino Group
  • Turkish Students' Association
  • Ukrainian Students' Club (USC/YCK)
  • West Indian Students' Association (WISA)
  • Women in Science and Engineering (WISE), U of T

Other Student Support Programs

The Faculty of Engineering has more than 25 different programs specifically supporting engineering students, in addition to those available to all students at the university level.

First-year students are offered learning skills workshops and preparatory courses in computer programming, engineering design and mathematics in the summer before they begin. Frosh Week (orientation), special “First Year Friday” events and lectures throughout the year, the Success 101 program, and academic advising through the First Year Office are all aimed at improving the overall first-year experience and maximizing the potential for first-year student success. ReFresh and the T-Program support those who are struggling academically to be able to remain in the program. Students in the General First-Year program (TrackOne) have access to additional lectures, seminars, and career advising to help them navigate their academic program and choices.

In addition to the first-year programs named above, academic support is provided to students through Academic Advisors in each department, through the division-wide Engineering Communications Program, as well as through the Math Aid Office.

Support related to career choices and employment is offered by the Engineering Career Centre, with more experiential opportunities available through the First Year Engineering Strategies and Practice (ESP) course, Engineering Summer Internship Program (ESIP), and the Professional Experience Year (PEY) program.

Undergraduate students can also participate in mentoring programs and leadership training through the Institute for Leadership Education in Engineering (ILead ). Graduate students are offered the Prospective Professors in Training (PPIT) program.

Further to these engineering-specific programs, students also have access to over 50 university-wide student support programs, covering broad categories such as equity and diversity, health and safety, academic support, international student support, money, social life, sports and recreation, professional development, housing, family and legal services. Some of these programs are designed specifically for graduate students.

Engineering Information

Student Projects

Student Design Projects Description

Below is a list of all student clubs involved in design and competition projects, followed by more extensive descriptions of a few of the more prominent ones:

- Robotics for Space eXploration (RSX)
- University of Toronto Space Design Contest (UTSDC)
- University of Toronto Aeronautics Team
- UofT Baja Team
- Multidisciplinary Analytical Kinesthetic Education (MAKE)
- University of Toronto Concrete Canoe Team
- Tetra Society - University of Toronto Chapter
- University of Toronto iGEM
- University of Toronto Robotics Association (UTRA)
- U of T Solar House Design Team
- Spark Design Club
- University of Toronto Concrete Toboggan Team
- University of Toronto Mining Games
- UofT iGEM Club
- University of Toronto Supermileage (UTSM)
- U of T Destination Imagination
- Exoskeleton Design Club

Examples of high profile students design projects include:

FORMULA SAE
This is a collegiate design competition organized by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). The competition involves SAE student members conceiving, designing, fabricating, and competing with small formula-style racing cars.

The restrictions on the car frames and engines are limited, challenging the knowledge, creativity and imagination of the students. The cars are built in a team effort over a period of approximately one year, and are taken to the annual competition for judging and comparison with other vehicles from colleges and universities worldwide.

The team is comprised of approximately 75 students with 30 core team members. The core members are distinguished engineering students that are either completing their final year of study, carrying out graduate work, or are simply undergraduate students with a keen interest in engineering technology and team involvement.

The annual week-long event is staged and hosted by a collaborative effort of Daimler Chrysler, Ford and General Motors. Distinguished professionals from the automotive industry participate in the judging process. At the competition, the designed car is put through a series of intensive race events designed to test performance and reliability.

Static events include an engineering design competition, which focusses on safety, presentation, innovation, cost analysis, as well as aesthetics. This is followed by a series of dynamic solo events.

Acceleration, braking, and handling qualities are also tested in events such as the Autocross, Acceleration Run, and Skid-Pad Test. On the race track, the teams perform in a series of Endurance races, allowing them to accumulate points for their school. There are more than 20 individual awards in key performance and development areas, such as horsepower, car safety, fuel efficiency, and data acquisition. The competitions are judged and awarded by sponsoring companies.

Since the Formula SAE Team is an educational, student-run venture, it is only partially funded by the participating engineering departments and the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering. Additional financial support is provided by private companies.

SUPERMILEAGE
This design competition involves designing and building a one-person, fuel-efficient vehicle based on a small cycle engine. The vehicle is conceived, designed and fabricated by team members without direct involvement from professional engineers, faculty or professionals in the racing community. The vehicle must have a minimum of three wheels contacting the ground at all times. Vehicle length, width, and height are not regulated. The driver must be fully enclosed within the body of the vehicle to prevent driver contact with the pavement.

This is a SAE event sponsored by the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, as well as being privately funded.

AERO DESIGN COMPETITION
The Aero Design competition challenges engineering students to conceive, design, fabricate, and test a remote piloted aircraft.

Teams design and build a radio-controlled aircraft that is optimized for loadbearing and satisfies the requirements and restrictions set forth in the rules. An additional challenge is to accurately predict the weight the aircraft is capable of supporting.

The competition is divided into two parts - design and flight. In the design event, the contestants present their design and demonstrate the accuracy of their calculations in predicting the maximum load it can lift. The flight event determines which aircraft can lift the most weight. Two classes compete simultaneously, but are evaluated separately.

Aerodesign is a SAE sponsored event but there are no additional sponsors involved yet.

CONCRETE CANOE
Over a period of ten months, a group of approximately 30 undergraduate engineering students work on a canoe design project and participate in a competition. To qualify for the competition, teams must demonstrate that their canoe can float, both above and submerged in water. The remainder of the scoring is based on a series of races that test the canoes' speed and manoeuvrability. Winners from 20 different regions compete in the American finals. Unique to the Canadian scene, the team uses a multi-disciplinary approach that combines the talents of various departments in engineering.

The various components of the competition test the teams on technical knowledge as well as innovation. The majority of the total score is based on engineering design and construction principles, which is judged through a technical report, a visual display, an oral presentation, and the final product.

The canoe is built entirely of concrete, with several goals in mind. Reinforced concrete design goals include high tensile and flexural strength, good flexibility and workability, and low density. Hull design goals include high manoeuvrabilitymaneuverability, excellent straight-line speed, and stability.

The Concrete Canoe Team is a student-run venture, and has been partially funded in the past by the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering's participating departments, the Engineering Alumni Association, the Engineering Society, U of T Student Union (UTSU), the Faculty Dean and the University President, and the university community and industry.

GREAT NORTHERN CONCRETE TOBOGGAN RACE (GNCTR)
This is an annual Civil Engineering student design competition hosted each year by a different post-secondary institution. The competitors are required to plan, design and construct a toboggan with a running surface consisting of concrete. Design criteria include weight restrictions, safety requirements and dimension limitations. In addition, each team is judged on their toboggan design, theme, team spirit and ingenuity. Each toboggan of five students is raced twice downhill.

The design competition is partially funded by the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering and the Engineering Alumni Association. It is also funded by private and corporate sponsorships.

SOLAR CAR RACING
The U of T Blue Sky Solar Racing team represents the finest of U of T's undergraduates, synthesizing the academic fields of engineering, science and R&D, coupled with the application of skills developed in the social sciences and humanities. Student participation in the Blue Sky project provides an intense educational experience that highlights practical skills impossible to learn in the classroom, and an outlet to express pride in the U of T institution.

The task entails constructing a solar vehicle that is optimized to endure highway speeds for long distances, powered solely by the sun. This translates into moving a 960lbs vehicle using about the same amount of energy used to power a hair dryer. To maintain such speeds, the car must be designed using the latest technological advances in solar cells, batteries, computing, and composite electric motors.

Solar car racing, by pushing and integrating these technologies, is a proving ground for efficient, alternative-energy vehicles. The source of the students' motivation and drive is rooted in their concern for the environment and future. A large part of their mission is to promote alternative-energy sources within organizations and society as a whole.

The Blue Sky team is an all-encompassing endeavour. For the community, the focus is on promoting and raising awareness in changing consumer habits. For the students involved, the goal is developing important skills and experiences that will be valuable for the work place, as well as fostering good will and camaraderie.

The Solar Car Racing project is the largest undergraduate project at the University, and the team involved is comprised entirely of students. Building a solar car is an enormous undertaking, with the design process being two years in duration. Over 100 students from across the University are currently involved.

In addition to the design and construction of a solar car, the Blue Sky team is committed to raising awareness throughout the community at large by means of public appearances and the Blue Sky News - a monthly newsletter sent to all those involved in the Blue Sky team (sponsors, U of T faculty and administrators).

ROBOCUP
This is an international robotics competition whose objective is to promote robotics and artificial intelligence via a soccer game. The RoboCup Federation organizes four leagues every year, namely the Small-Sized, Middle Sized, Simulation, and Sony Four Legged Robot Soccer leagues. The Small-Sized robotics league consists of teams from 32 universities. A variety of nations are represented on these teams.

In order to compete successfully, various technologies are incorporated including design principles of autonomous agents, multi-agent collaboration, strategy acquisition, real-time reasoning, robotics, and sensor fusion.

The project is partially funded by the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering's participating departments, the Faculty, and the Engineering Alumni Association.

Engineering Information

College Description

Engineering College Description and Special Characteristics

AN OVERVIEW
Since its founding in 1873, the School of Practical Science, which became the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering (APSC) in 1906, has conferred more than 23,000 degrees and diplomas. APSC graduates have pursued careers in all fields of engineering throughout Canada and the world. They are found in the resource industries, manufacturing, transportation, communications; in law, finance and health care systems. They are employed by governments, in private enterprise, both large and small, and throughout our educational system. Many have become executives in major corporations and businesses, or technological entrepreneurs.


PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE YEAR (PEY)
The Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering has long recognized the importance of practical professional experience in engineering education. Introduced in 1979, the Professional Experience Year (PEY) internship program provides a unique opportunity for companies to benefit from, and to assess, the capabilities of prospective young employees. The program works to enhance the educational experience of the student. PEY provides full-time undergraduate students who have successfully completed two or three years of their academic program with the opportunity to obtain valuable practical work experience over a 12-16 month period. In 1979, PEY began by placing eight students from the Department of Mechanical Engineering in sixteen-month work terms at Ontario Hydro, General Motors, and de Havilland. Since then, students from all engineering programs have found jobs through the PEY Program. Computer Science students from the Faculty of Arts and Science participated for the first time in May, 1989; several other departments from Arts and Science have since been involved with the Program. To date, thousands of U of T students have found employment through PEY.


ENGINEERING SCIENCE
The Engineering Science program is designed for students primarily interested in the application of science to modern technology, and who wish to prepare themselves for careers in applied research, advanced engineering design or teaching. The courses offered in Engineering Science are of high standard; only students with superior ability in, and aptitude for, mathematics and science can expect to succeed in them.


JEFFREY SKOLL BASc/MBA PROGRAM
The Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering and the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto have established a program unequalled in Canada to provide a fast track for students to earn their Bachelor's degree in engineering, complete a professional experience year and a management internship, and earn an MBA. Highlights of the program include:

1) The opportunity to gain business experience and managerial skills
2) A global perspective
3) The opportunity to graduate in a shorter time frame compared to the conventional path

More information is available in the program website at:
www.rotman.utoronto.ca/skoll


CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PROGRAM ENRICHMENT
Students at the Faculty can choose to enroll in one or more of our undergraduate minors and certificate programs which enhance a student’s degree program experience.

Students may enroll in any of the following minors:

BIOENGINEERING: This minor is open to Engineering students interested in learning more about biology and its application to engineering. Students can examine all areas at the interface of Engineering and Biology. This includes bioprocesses engineering, environmental microbiology, biomaterials, tissue engineering, bioelectricity, biomedical imaging, biomechanical engineering, nanotechnology related to medicine and the environment, and engineering design for human interfaces. For more information, please visit:
(http://www.undergrad.engineering.utoronto.ca/Programs/Minors_Certificates/Engineering_Minors_Certificates/minors/bioengineering.htm)

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING: Specifically designed for undergraduate engineering students interested in applying their engineering knowledge to applications in health care, the Biomedical Engineering Minor is a specialized program that emphasizes opportunities in fields ranging from pharmaceutical and therapeutic technologies, medical devices, medical diagnostics, health care delivery, health regulatory and policy development, medical diagnostic technologies, to biomedical devices and bioinformatics.
The Biomedical Engineering minor will prepare students for direct entry into the applied biomedical engineering industry with a particular specialization in biomedical technologies. Students who successfully complete the Biomedical Engineering Minor will be trained and specialize in areas of bioinstrumentation, biostatistics, biomedical laboratory techniques, biological and biomedical imaging, biomaterials development and processing, biomechanics and rehabilitation technologies, biosystems and quantitative physiology, and cellular, tissue and molecular engineering.
For more information, please visit: http://www.undergrad.engineering.utoronto.ca/programs/minors_certificates/engineering_minors_certificates/minors/biomedical_engineering.htm


ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING: Students interested in learning more about ecology, sustainable design, risk assessment and environmental impact may be interested in this minor. Our definition of environmental engineering is broad, reaching to all areas at the interface of engineering and the environment. This includes ecology and ecological impacts, waste management, water and wastewater treatment, environmental microbiology, water resources engineering, hydrology, preventive engineering, life cycle analysis, design for the environment, and extends to the social and environmental impacts of technology. For more information, please visit: (http://www.undergrad.engineering.utoronto.ca/Programs/Minors_Certificates/Engineering_Minors_Certificates/minors/environmentaleng.htm)

SUSTAINABLE ENERGY: This minor is for students interested in learning more about energy, its sustainable use, energy demand management, and the public policy context in which energy use and production is regulated. Our courses reach all areas of energy use, production, distribution, transmission, storage, and development. This includes energy use and production for transportation, for space cooling and heating demands, and electrical production (from both alternative and conventional sources), energy distribution and storage, and extends to energy conservation, price, greenhouse gas production and control, and aspects of public policy. For more information, please visit: (http://www.undergrad.engineering.utoronto.ca/Programs/Minors_Certificates/Engineering_Minors_Certificates/minors/sustainableenergy.htm)

ENGINEERING BUSINESS: Students eager to make a valuable connection with the business field can pursue a unique-in-Canada Engineering Business Minor. This minor is a collaborative effort between Engineering and the Rotman School of Management. It is designed specifically for Engineering students interested in learning more about the business dimension of engineering, from finance and economics to management and leadership. Courses cover wealth production and creation, accounting, research and development, management, economics and entrepreneurship, all within a global context. For more information, please visit:
(http://www.undergrad.engineering.utoronto.ca/Programs/Minors_Certificates/Engineering_Minors_Certificates/minors/engineering_business.htm)

ROBOTICS AND MECHATRONICS: The minor program in Robotics and Mechatronics will allow students to explore fundamental enabling technologies that render robotic and mechatronic systems into viable consumer products. Coursework will cover micro-electromechanical systems and nanotechnology, advanced techniques for signal processing and systems control, and new system-level principles underlying embedded systems. The minor in Robotics and Mechatronics is a collaborative effort among 5 different engineering departments and institutes. For more information, please visit:
(http://www.undergrad.engineering.utoronto.ca/Programs/Minors_Certificates/Engineering_Minors_Certificates/minors/mechatronicsandrobotics.htm)


We also offer six certificate programs which are awarded based on completion of a required set of courses:
1) Entrepreneurship
2) Preventive Engineering and Social Development
3) Engineering Business
4) Global Engineering
5) Mineral Resources
6) Nuclear Engineering
7) Renewable Resources
8) Engineering Leadership


THE LASSONDE MINING INSTITUTE
The Lassonde Mining Institute was established to facilitate research on important problems related to the mining and mineral industries. Graduate studies in mineral engineering may be pursued through the Departments of Civil Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGES
The Centre for International Experience administers university-wide international and Canadian exchanges for U of T students. The exchange programs offer students a variety of opportunities to study at partner institutions while gaining an understanding of different cultures, heritages, values and lifestyles found across borders.

Exchange programs operate under formal agreements between U of T and partner universities abroad and in Canada. U of T students who participate in exchange programs pay full-time tuition and compulsory incidental fees to U of T. Students can then study at one of U of T’s partner universities without paying tuition fees at the host university.

Engineering Information

Engineering Faculty & Research

Teaching, Tenure-Track View Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Full Professors Assoc. Professors Assistant Professors Program Total
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry 20 2 4 26
Department of Civil Engineering 21 12 8 41
Department of Materials Science and Engineering 8 4 3 15
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 33 11 9 53
Division of Engineering Science 0 0 0 0
Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 51 15 5 71
Engineering Communication Program 0 0 0 0
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering 4 4 4 12
Lassonde Institute of Mining 0 0 0 0
Track One - General First Year Engineering 0 0 0 0
University of Toronto, Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) 7 6 3 16
Totals: 144 54 36 234

Teaching, Non-Tenure-Track

Engineering Department(s) FT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel PT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Teach. Personnel
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry 5 0 5 0.00
Department of Civil Engineering 1 0 1 0.00
Department of Materials Science and Engineering 1 0 1 0.00
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 4 0 4 0.00
Division of Engineering Science 2 0 2 0.00
Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 5 0 5 0.00
Engineering Communication Program 5 0 5 0.00
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering 2 0 2 0.00
Lassonde Institute of Mining 0 0 0 0.00
Track One - General First Year Engineering 1 0 1 0.00
University of Toronto, Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) 2 0 2 0.00
Totals: 28 0 28 0.00

Non-Teaching, Research

Engineering Department(s) Non-Teach. FT Research Personnel Non-Teach. PT Research Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Non-Teach. Research Personnel
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry 16 5 21 3.04
Department of Civil Engineering 4 0 4 0.00
Department of Materials Science and Engineering 11 1 12 0.50
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 6 6 12 3.60
Division of Engineering Science 0 0 0 0.00
Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 16 2 18 1.00
Engineering Communication Program 0 0 0 0.00
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering 7 0 7 0.00
Lassonde Institute of Mining 0 0 0 0.00
Track One - General First Year Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
University of Toronto, Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) 29 0 29 0.00
Totals: 89 14 103 8.14

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

  • American Indian or Alaska Native (Am Ind): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.
  • Asian: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
  • Black or African American (B/AfrA): A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as "Haitian" or "Negro" can be used in addition to "Black or African American."
  • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (Haw): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
  • Hispanic or Latino (Hisp): A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. The term, "Spanish origin," can be used in addition to "Hispanic or Latino."
  • White: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Full Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry 16 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 4
Department of Civil Engineering 18 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 18 3
Department of Materials Science and Engineering 7 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 1
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 28 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 28 5
Division of Engineering Science 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 47 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 47 4
Engineering Communication Program 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1
Lassonde Institute of Mining 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Track One - General First Year Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
University of Toronto, Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0
Totals: 126 18 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 126 18

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Associate Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
Department of Civil Engineering 8 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 4
Department of Materials Science and Engineering 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 6 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 5
Division of Engineering Science 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 12 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 3
Engineering Communication Program 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1
Lassonde Institute of Mining 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Track One - General First Year Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
University of Toronto, Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1
Totals: 38 16 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 38 16

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Assistant Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2
Department of Civil Engineering 4 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4
Department of Materials Science and Engineering 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 6 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 3
Division of Engineering Science 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
Engineering Communication Program 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2
Lassonde Institute of Mining 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Track One - General First Year Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
University of Toronto, Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1
Totals: 23 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 23 13

Undergraduate

Admissions/Transfers

Undergraduate Admission to the College of Engineering

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Admission to the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering is competitive as each year we receive more applications than the number of places available. The Faculty selects students by taking into consideration a wide range of criteria including marks, subjects taken, and supplementary information obtained through the mandatory Student Profile Form. Possession of the minimum entrance requirements does not guarantee admission. Students who have been out of school for more than five years are asked to consult with the Admissions Office for further advice regarding their high school preparation as they may need to take additional courses to be eligible for admission consideration.

Detailed undergraduate admission requirements can be found online at the Enrolment Services website: http://www.adm.utoronto.ca

Information can also be found on the Faculty website at:
http://discover.engineering.utoronto.ca

ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL DIPLOMA (OSSD)
Applicants must be eligible to receive the Ontario Secondary School Diploma and must present a minimum of six grade 12 U or M courses including:
English (ENG4U)
Calculus & Vectors (MCV4U)
Chemistry (SCH4U)
Physics (SPH4U)
Advanced Functions (MHF4U)
One additional U or M course

CANADIAN STUDENTS
Applicants from Quebec must present 12 academic C.E.G.E.P. courses. Candidates from other provinces and territories of Canada must present grade 12 matriculation, including English, Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry. For more detailed information, visit the Prospective Student website at http://discover.engineering.utoronto.ca

OTHER APPLICANTS
Information on admission requirements for applicants from overseas is available on the Enrolment Services website at http://www.adm.utoronto.ca/admissions. All applicants are required to have completed senior level courses in mathematics, physics and chemistry.

TRANSFER STUDENTS
Candidates with acceptable standing at other post-secondary institutions will be considered for admission with transfer credit on a case by case basis. Transfer credits are assessed at the time of admission. Candidates who already hold a recognized degree in engineering will not be permitted to proceed to a second undergraduate degree in engineering.

NON-MATRICULANTS (MATURE STUDENTS)
For information regarding admission as a non-matriculant (mature student), please contact the Engineering Undergraduate Admissions Office, 35 St. George St, Room 153, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A4, or call 416-978-0120.

ENGLISH FACILITY REQUIREMENTS
Students whose first language is not English may have to present proof of English facility. For more information, please visit the Enrolment Services website at http://www.adm.utoronto.ca/eft.


APPLICATION PROCEDURES
Candidates currently studying in an Ontario high school should apply through the Ontario Univeristies’ Application Centre (www.ouac.on.ca) and use form 101. All other candidates should apply online through the Ontario Universities’ Application Centre and use form 105.

The University of Toronto operates on an academic year rather than on a semester or quarter system. Students begin their studies in September and continue until April of the following year.

Note that there is an application fee for the Ontario Universities' Application Centre. In addition, all applicants are required to complete a Student Profile Form for the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering, the cost of which is $40 for Ontario High School students and $60 for all other applicants.

University policies on access to student records and person privacy allow the Faculty to communicate only with the applicant unless the Faculty has the written permission of the applicant to discuss their application with someone else.

Undergraduate Admission to an Engineering Department

Please refer to the above.

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS COMPLETING THEIR EDUCATION OUTSIDE OF CANADA
Information on admission requirements for applicants completing their education outside of Canada from overseas is available on the Enrolment Services website at http://www.adm.utoronto.ca/admissions/. All applicants are required to have completed senior level courses in mathematics, physics and chemistry.

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

CANADIAN STUDENTS
Applicants from Quebec must present 12 academic C.E.G.E.P. courses. Candidates from other provinces and territories of Canada must present grade 12 matriculation, including English, Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry. For more detailed information, visit the Prospective Student website at: http://discover.engineering.utoronto.ca/apply/admission-requirements/canadian-high-schools/h

OTHER APPLICANTS
Information on admission requirements for applicants completing their education outside of Canada from overseas is available on the Enrolment Services website at http://www.adm.utoronto.ca/next-steps/admission-awards/. All applicants are required to have completed senior level courses in mathematics, physics and chemistry.

Residency Requirements

Students must complete at least 4 terms full-time in the Faculty to be eligible for a degree from this institution.

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

TRANSFER STUDENTS
Candidates with acceptable standing at other post-secondary institutions will be considered for admission with transfer credits on a case by case basis. Transfer credits are assessed at the time of admission.
Candidates who already hold a recognized degree in engineering will not be permitted to proceed to a second undergraduate degree in engineering.

Undergraduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): In-State / Out-of-State

Undergraduate Group 1 Undergraduate Group 2
Tuition & Fees: $15,900 $49,620
Room & Board: $13,221 $13,221
Books & Supplies: $1,750 $1,750
Other Expenses: $2,000 $2,000
Estimated avg. course load per term: 5 5
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Federal Tax Return Forms (IRS), Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), Student Data Form (SDF), College Scholarship Service Financial Aid PROFILE (CCS/PROFILE), Financial Aid Form (FAF), Institution's Own Application Form, Family Financial Statement (FFS)

Additional Financial Aid Information

There are 3 types of financial aid forms:

1. Federal and/or Provincial Government Assistance
2. UTAPS (Grant specific to U of T)
3. Faculty Grants (specific to U of T's Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering)

Undergraduate

New Applicants

New Undergraduate Applicants

A. Number of undergraduate applicants to the engineering college: 12,298
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 2,983
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 1,053
Percentage of entering students (excluding transfer students) ranked in the top quarter (25%) of their high schools: 0%
Note: High school ranking not recorded in our records. The SAT and ACT tests are not standard in Canada

Newly Enrolled Test Scores

Scores Reflect 75th to 25th percentile

SAT 75th 25th
Math Range:
Reading Range:
Writing Range:
Combined Range:
ACT 75th 25th
Math Range:
Composite Range:

Undergraduate

Enrollments by Class

Undergraduate Engr. Programs Fresh
1st Year
Soph
2nd Year
Junior
3rd Year
Senior
4th/5th Year
Full Time Total Part Time Total
Chemical Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 111 112 136 136 495 106
Civil Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 82 116 120 108 426 77
Computer Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 91 172 159 122 544 121
Electrical Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 102 187 173 222 684 162
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) 236 232 0 0 468 8
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Aerospace Engineering 0 0 26 27 53 17
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Systems Engineering 0 0 22 25 47 13
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 25 56 81 34
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Energy Systems 0 0 6 27 33 7
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Infrastructure Engineering 0 0 6 7 13 13
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Manufacturing Systems 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Mathematics, Statistics and Finance 0 0 26 15 41 14
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Nanoengineering 0 0 0 2 2 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Physics 0 0 20 9 29 3
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Robotics Engineering 0 0 63 0 63 0
Engineering Science (B.A.Sc. in Engineering Science) - Electrical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 66 125 109 92 392 97
Lassonde Mineral Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 23 16 22 20 81 13
Materials Science Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 53 42 49 42 186 27
Mechanical Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 99 213 199 190 701 165
Track One - General Engineering (B.A.Sc) 181 0 0 0 181 9
Totals: 1044 1215 1161 1100 4520 886

Freshmen

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Chemical Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 9 0 40 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 49 0
Women 28 0 34 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 62 2
Civil Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 13 1 32 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 45 4
Women 14 0 23 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 37 2
Computer Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 21 0 42 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 63 3
Women 9 0 19 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 28 2
Electrical Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 22 0 51 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 73 3
Women 5 1 24 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 29 2
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science)
Men 29 1 132 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 161 3
Women 28 2 47 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 75 4
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Aerospace Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Systems Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Computer Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Electrical and Computer Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Energy Systems
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Infrastructure Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Manufacturing Systems
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Mathematics, Statistics and Finance
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Nanoengineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Physics
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Robotics Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.Sc. in Engineering Science) - Electrical Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 12 0 17 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 29 5
Women 7 0 30 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 37 3
Lassonde Mineral Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 3 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 0
Women 3 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0
Materials Science Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 13 0 23 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 36 1
Women 7 2 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 2
Mechanical Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 28 0 31 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 59 4
Women 11 0 29 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 0
Track One - General Engineering (B.A.Sc)
Men 21 2 82 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 103 5
Women 16 1 62 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 78 4
Totals: 299 10 745 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1044 49

Sophomores

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Chemical Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 18 1 42 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 60 6
Women 27 0 25 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 52 1
Civil Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 18 0 56 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 74 0
Women 9 2 33 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 42 3
Computer Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 44 2 80 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 124 8
Women 17 1 31 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 48 1
Electrical Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 59 4 90 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 149 11
Women 17 0 21 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 38 2
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science)
Men 31 0 146 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 177 1
Women 12 0 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 55 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Aerospace Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Systems Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Computer Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Electrical and Computer Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Energy Systems
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Infrastructure Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Manufacturing Systems
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Mathematics, Statistics and Finance
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Nanoengineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Physics
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Robotics Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.Sc. in Engineering Science) - Electrical Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 23 0 53 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 76 2
Women 22 1 27 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 49 6
Lassonde Mineral Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 1 0 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 0
Women 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Materials Science Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 8 0 15 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 23 1
Women 5 0 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 19 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 52 0 108 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 160 0
Women 18 0 35 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 53 1
Track One - General Engineering (B.A.Sc)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 381 11 834 32 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1215 43

Juniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Chemical Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 25 1 51 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 76 2
Women 26 1 34 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 60 1
Civil Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 14 0 62 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 76 1
Women 17 1 27 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 44 1
Computer Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 35 2 92 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 127 5
Women 14 0 18 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 32 0
Electrical Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 59 1 75 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 134 6
Women 14 0 25 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 39 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Aerospace Engineering
Men 3 0 20 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 23 1
Women 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Systems Engineering
Men 0 0 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 0
Women 2 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Computer Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Electrical and Computer Engineering
Men 1 1 13 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 2
Women 2 0 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Energy Systems
Men 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
Women 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Infrastructure Engineering
Men 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
Women 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Manufacturing Systems
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Mathematics, Statistics and Finance
Men 5 0 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 18 0
Women 1 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Nanoengineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Physics
Men 1 0 16 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 1
Women 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Robotics Engineering
Men 13 0 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 52 0
Women 6 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 0
Engineering Science (B.A.Sc. in Engineering Science) - Electrical Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 21 1 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 64 1
Women 11 1 34 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 45 2
Lassonde Mineral Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 6 0 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 19 0
Women 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Materials Science Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 12 0 16 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 28 1
Women 8 0 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 21 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 50 1 100 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 150 8
Women 11 0 38 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 49 1
Track One - General Engineering (B.A.Sc)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 361 10 800 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1161 33

Seniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Chemical Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 20 5 70 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 90 55
Women 12 9 34 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 46 39
Civil Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 15 9 60 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 75 42
Women 10 9 23 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 24
Computer Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 14 26 86 57 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 83
Women 7 3 15 16 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 22 19
Electrical Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 49 35 139 70 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 188 105
Women 13 17 21 16 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 34 33
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Aerospace Engineering
Men 5 2 18 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 23 12
Women 1 1 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Systems Engineering
Men 0 0 11 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 7
Women 2 2 12 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 6
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Computer Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Electrical and Computer Engineering
Men 8 3 37 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 45 26
Women 1 2 10 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 6
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Energy Systems
Men 4 1 18 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 22 3
Women 1 0 4 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 4
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Infrastructure Engineering
Men 1 2 5 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 10
Women 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Manufacturing Systems
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Mathematics, Statistics and Finance
Men 2 1 10 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 11
Women 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Nanoengineering
Men 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Physics
Men 1 0 6 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 2
Women 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Robotics Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.Sc. in Engineering Science) - Electrical Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 16 9 42 37 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 58 46
Women 8 11 26 21 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 34 32
Lassonde Mineral Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 2 0 12 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 10
Women 1 0 5 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 3
Materials Science Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 11 3 15 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 26 17
Women 8 2 8 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 5
Mechanical Engineering (B.A.Sc.)
Men 33 37 120 86 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 153 123
Women 5 4 32 24 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 37 28
Track One - General Engineering (B.A.Sc)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 252 194 848 567 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1100 761

Undergraduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Chemical Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 34 81 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 115 66 49
Note: The Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering has an internship program, as opposed to a co-op program.
Civil Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 21 84 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 105 72 33
Computer Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 37 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 157 126 31
Electrical Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 30 97 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 127 98 29
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Aerospace Engineering 3 24 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 27 20 7
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Systems Engineering 2 32 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 34 20 14
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Electrical and Computer Engineering 2 57 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 59 49 10
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Energy Systems 5 20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 19 6
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Infrastructure Engineering 3 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 18 12 6
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Manufacturing Systems 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Mathematics, Statistics and Finance 8 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 31 18 13
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Nanoengineering 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Physics 1 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 8 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Robotics Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.Sc. in Engineering Science) - Electrical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 28 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 88 50 38
Lassonde Mineral Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 5 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 28 22 6
Materials Science Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 10 32 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 42 24 18
Mechanical Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 39 144 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 183 162 21
Track One - General Engineering (B.A.Sc) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 228 822 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1050 769 281

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Chemical Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 19 15 47 34 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 115
Note: The Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering has an internship program, as opposed to a co-op program.
Civil Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 12 9 60 24 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 105
Computer Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 26 11 100 20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 157
Electrical Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 20 10 78 19 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 127
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Aerospace Engineering 1 2 19 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 27
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Systems Engineering 1 1 19 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 34
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Electrical and Computer Engineering 2 0 47 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 59
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Energy Systems 3 2 16 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Infrastructure Engineering 1 2 11 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 18
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Manufacturing Systems 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Mathematics, Statistics and Finance 3 5 15 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 31
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Nanoengineering 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Physics 1 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Robotics Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Engineering Science (B.A.Sc. in Engineering Science) - Electrical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 18 10 32 28 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 88
Lassonde Mineral Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 3 2 19 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 28
Materials Science Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 2 8 22 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 42
Mechanical Engineering (B.A.Sc.) 34 5 128 16 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 183
Track One - General Engineering (B.A.Sc) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 146 82 623 199 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1050

Undergraduate

Dual Degrees

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

N/A

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degrees Awarded

0

Undergraduate

Program Comparisons

  • ABET - Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
  • CEAB - Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board
Degree Program ABET/CEAB Accred. Nominal Program Length
(yrs.)
Average Program Length
(yrs.)
Time: Day/Even./
Both
Co-op: None/Opt./
Required
Grads in Co-op Progs.
Chemical Engineering (B.A.Sc.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Note: The Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering has an internship program, as opposed to a co-op program.
Civil Engineering (B.A.Sc.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Computer Engineering (B.A.Sc.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Electrical Engineering (B.A.Sc.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Aerospace Engineering yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Engineering yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Biomedical Systems Engineering yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Computer Engineering yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Electrical and Computer Engineering yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Energy Systems yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Infrastructure Engineering yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Manufacturing Systems yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Mathematics, Statistics and Finance yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Nanoengineering yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Physics yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Engineering Science (B.A.S E. in Engineering Science) - Robotics Engineering yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Engineering Science (B.A.Sc. in Engineering Science) - Electrical Engineering yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Industrial Engineering (B.A.Sc.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Lassonde Mineral Engineering (B.A.Sc.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Materials Science Engineering (B.A.Sc.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Mechanical Engineering (B.A.Sc.) yes 4.00 4.00 Day Optional
Track One - General Engineering (B.A.Sc) yes 1.00 1.00 Day Required

Graduate

Admissions Information

Graduate Admission to the College of Engineering

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION

Listed below are the minimum admission requirements set by the School of Graduate Studies. Some departments require a higher average.

ADMISSION TO A MASTER'S PROGRAM OR AS A FULL-TIME SPECIAL STUDENT

To be considered for admission, the minimum requirement is an appropriate bachelor's degree from a recognized university that has appropriate breadth and depth.

An average grade equivalent of at least mid-B or better, normally demonstrated by an average grade in the final year or over senior level courses.

At least two letters of reference.

Other qualifications as specified by the graduate unit.


ADMISSION TO A DOCTORAL PROGRAM

To be considered for admission, applicants must hold an appropriate master's degree or an appropriate bachelor's degree with high academic standing from a recognized university.

An average grade equivalent to a B+ or better in a previous master's degree program, and demonstrated research competence equivalent to at least a B+ grade will be considered.

Direct-entry from a bachelor's degree to the Ph.D. program is possible in some graduate units. For direct-entry applicants, an average grade, equivalent to A- or better, in courses in the relevant discipline is required.

At least two letters of reference.

Other qualifications as specified by the graduate unit.


ADMISSION AS A PART-TIME SPECIAL STUDENT

To be considered for admission, an applicant must hold a degree from a recognized university. Before applying, applicants should identify the courses they wish to take and obtain approval from the graduate unit offering the courses.

Part-Time special students require an average grade equivalent to at least mid-B or better, normally demonstrated by an average grade in the final year or over senior level courses. Students with a mid-B standing are not normally considered admissible to a master's degree at a later date.

COURSES TAKEN AS A SPECIAL STUDENT

On the recommendation of the graduate unit, and with the School of Graduate Studies' approval, graduate courses taken as a Special Student may count for up to one full-course equivalent or 25% of the course requirements for the degree, whichever is greater, in a subsequent degree program, provided that they have not already been credited towards another degree, diploma, certificate, or any other qualification. With the approval of the graduate unit, they may serve to satisfy prerequisite requirements.

Special Students' programs must include at least one graduate course.

Any tuition fees paid as a special student cannot be transferred to a subsequent degree program.

Applicants who graduated five or more years ago but without achieving sufficiently high standing for admission to a graduate program may be considered for admission if, since graduation, they have done significant intellectual work and/or made a significant professional contribution that can be considered equivalent to a higher academic standing. This contribution and its impact on the profession must be detailed and documented (e.g., publications, research, professional advancement, development of new skills, responsibility) and presented as part of the application. Such applicants may be considered for admission if they have achieved qualifications at least equivalent to the academic standing required for admission, and if a graduate unit so recommends.

APPLICATION FORM AND FEE

The School of Graduate Studies Application for Admission is an online tool available at:
apply.sgs.utoronto.ca

Applicants must pay an application fee of $110. The preferred method of payment is online by Visa or MasterCard. No decision on the application will be sent to the applicant until the fee has been paid.


APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

Applicants may also have to apply to the graduate unit of interest. Please refer to the website below for a list of graduate units and contact information.

http://www.engineering.utoronto.ca/Page4.aspxh

Applicants will be asked to upload scanned transcripts, and if offered admission, will be asked to arrange that original documents be sent to the admitting graduate unit. Certified English translations of all international documentation written in a language other than English or French must also be submitted.

. Two letters of reference are also required.

ADMISSION STANDARDS AND PROCEDURES

The School's admission standards and procedures are designed so that students entering a graduate program may normally have the capacity and preparation necessary to meet the challenge of the program effectively. The regulations for admission specify minimal requirements only. Many graduate units have additional requirements. Meeting the minimal requirements of the graduate unit and the School of Graduate Studies does not necessarily guarantee admission.

The University reserves the right to determine whether or not credentials of other degree-granting institutions meet the standards for admission to University of Toronto programs.

The University may confer upon a person more than one graduate degree having the same title provided the degrees are completed in different fields of study.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE FACILITY
It is essential that all incoming graduate students have a good command of English. Facility in the English language must be demonstrated by all applicants educated outside Canada whose primary language is not English. This requirement is a condition of admission and should be met before application, but must be met before registration. This requirement may be satisfied using one of the following tests . Minimum scores are shown; however, many graduate units require a higher score, and applicants should consult the graduate unit to determine whether a higher minimum score applies.

A list of English language proficiency tests, and the required scores, are listed at:

http://www.sgs.utoronto.ca/prospectivestudents/Pages/English-Language-Proficiency-Testing.aspx

Graduate Admission to an Engineering Department

To contact a specific graduate engineering department for admission requirements, please refer to the website below:

http://gradstudies.engineering.utoronto.ca/

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

ENGLISH-LANGUAGE FACILITY
If your primary language is not English and you graduated from a non-Canadian university where the language of instruction and examination were not English, then you must demonstrate your facility in English by completing one of the tests described below . This requirement should be met at the time you submit your application.

You are not required to complete an English-language facility test if you are a Canadian citizen who studied at a Canadian university where the language of instruction is French.

If you are an international applicant whose primary language is not English, you may not be required to complete an English-language facility test if you have completed a program of study at a university where the language of instruction and examination has largely been in English. This is at the discretion of the department to which you have applied. If you are such an international applicant, please consult the department to which you are applying to determine if the test will be required. An official statement from your institution will be required, confirming the use of English as the language of instruction and examination.


EQUIVALENT QUALIFICATIONS

Qualifications from a number of educational systems around the world are listed in the web site link below. Normally they are recognized as equivalent to a University of Toronto four-year bachelor's degree if they have been awarded from an institution which is recognized by the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants who have completed a first degree program of five or more years in length which included a thesis may be considered for admission to some doctoral programs. The academic standings indicated are normally accepted as equivalent to a University of Toronto mid-B grade average.

Please refer to:
http://www.sgs.utoronto.ca/prospectivestudents/Pages/International-and-Exchange-Students.aspxh

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

Please refer to the above information.

Residency Requirements

RESIDENCE

Many programs specify a period of residence during which the student is required to be on campus and consequently in such geographical proximity as to be able to participate fully in the university activities associated with the program. Residence provides the student with an opportunity to become immersed in the intellectual environment of the university.

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

Please refer to the information under Graduate Admission to the College of Engineering above.

Graduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): In-State / Out-of-State

Graduate Group 1 Graduate Group 2
Tuition & Fees: $8,492 $22,604
Room & Board: $13,221 $13,221
Books & Supplies: $1,750 $1,750
Other Expenses: $2,000 $2,000
Estimated avg. course load per term: 4 4
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Supplemental Student Loan Form, Financial Aid Form (FAF), Institution's Own Application Form

Additional Financial Aid Information

The University of Toronto provides minimum guaranteed funding for eligible doctoral-stream graduate students for a period of up to five years of full-time study. In the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, doctoral-stream students are eligible for a minimum support package of $15,000 plus tuition and fees. International (visa) student tuition and fees include the compulsory UHIP (University Health Insurance Plan) coverage for a single student.

Components of a Funding Package

Graduate support packages are composed from a variety of sources: fellowship or scholarship funds, research assistantship stipends from faculty research grants, teaching assistantships and other U of T funding.

Packages for Scholarship Holders

Students with external scholarships such as NSERC (Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada), CIHR (Canadian Institutes of Health Research), OGS (Ontario Graduate Scholarship), etc., have the opportunity to significantly enhance their funding packages. Students holding these awards will receive additional funds in recognition of their achievement. Package totals, including the scholarship, vary according to scholarship and program. Students should contact their department for the exact details of the top-up packages. Eligible students are strongly encouraged to apply for these awards.

Funding Eligibility Criteria

All doctoral-stream graduate students in good standing are eligible for funding for a limited period. Doctoral-stream programs include M.A.Sc. and Ph.D. programs. Students registered as "special students" are not eligible for graduate funding.

Maintaining Funding Support

Doctoral-stream students must maintain satisfactory progress toward their degree to receive support. These funds are provided to enable students to focus on their research. Lack of visible effort may result in the withdrawal of funding.

It is expected that students will take every reasonable opportunity to apply for scholarships and awards that they are eligible for. Winning an NSERC, CIHR, OGS or other external award, offers the opportunity for students to significantly enhance their funding package. Eligible students who choose not to apply for these awards may forfeit their eligibility for graduate support. Likewise, students who decline a teaching assistantship (TA) offered as part of their funding package will forgo that portion of the package.

Funding Duration

The University of Toronto has guaranteed funding to doctoral-stream students for up to five years. In the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, the Masters program is normally longer than one year. Most departments have chosen to divide guarantee funding between Masters and Ph.D. programs with between 5 and 6 terms of funding (20 to 24 months) in the Masters program and the remaining 10-11 terms (3.3-3.7 years) funding directed to the Ph.D. program. In all cases, exact distribution of the guaranteed funding packages is determined by the department. Students are advised to consult with their home department for detailed information.

Students who are nearing the end of their program, and are not able to complete their degree requirements within the funded period, should consult their supervisors and graduate department coordinators. Please see graduate department websites for scholarship and funding details.

Scholarship Opportunities
CGS and NSERC: Natural Sciences & Engineering Research Council Scholarships
OGS: Ontario Graduate Scholarships ($15,000)
OGSST: Ontario Graduate Scholarships in Science and Technology ($15,000)
Connaught Scholarships
University of Toronto Fellowships (UTF)
Engineering Scholarships - consult your department for a list of scholarships in your field
Other scholarships

Financial Aid

The main source of financial aid for students not eligible under the guaranteed funding program is the federally and provincially funded Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP). Application forms are available after April 1 at the School of Graduate Studies Student Services Office. Students may also apply online at the OSAP website at: http://www.adm.utoronto.ca/financial-aid/

A limited amount of emergency assistance is also available on a case-by-case basis through the School of Graduate Studies bursary and emergency loan programs.

Graduate

New Applicants

New Graduate Applicants

A. Number of graduate applicants to the engineering college: 4,589
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 1,458
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 885

Graduate

Enrollments by Class

Master's

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Science and Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.)
Men 22 0 80 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 102 4
Women 9 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 0
Biomedical Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.H.Sc.)
Men 3 0 60 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 63 2
Women 7 0 46 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 53 0
Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.)
Men 28 0 54 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 82 8
Women 20 0 32 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 52 2
Civil Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.)
Men 32 1 91 32 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 123 33
Women 15 0 44 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 59 8
Electrical and Computer Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.)
Men 140 6 120 48 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 260 54
Women 51 0 26 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 77 6
Materials Science and Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.)
Men 13 0 32 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 45 0
Women 7 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 1
Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.)
Men 107 3 177 38 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 284 41
Women 43 0 50 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 93 9
Totals: 497 10 823 158 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1320 168

Doctoral

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Aerospace Science and Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 11 0 40 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 51 0
Women 3 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0
Biomedical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 13 0 78 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 91 1
Women 9 0 49 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 58 1
Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (Ph.D.)
Men 21 0 47 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 68 0
Women 9 0 31 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 0
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 28 0 46 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 74 0
Women 19 0 19 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 38 0
Electrical and Computer Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 75 0 105 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 180 0
Women 17 0 25 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 42 0
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 5 0 25 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 30 0
Women 1 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0
Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 66 0 84 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 150 1
Women 12 0 26 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 38 0
Totals: 289 0 585 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 874 3

Graduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Aerospace Science and Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 18 46 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 64 56 8
Biomedical Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.H.Sc.) 4 20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 24 12 12
Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 22 53 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 75 37 38
Civil Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 30 87 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 117 75 42
Electrical and Computer Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 61 106 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 167 131 36
Materials Science and Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 4 20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 24 17 7
Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 72 137 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 209 167 42
Totals: 211 469 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 680 495 185

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Aerospace Science and Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 14 4 42 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 64
Biomedical Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.H.Sc.) 0 4 12 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 24
Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 11 11 26 27 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 75
Civil Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 17 13 58 29 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 117
Electrical and Computer Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 45 16 86 20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 167
Materials Science and Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 1 3 16 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 24
Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 60 12 107 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 209
Totals: 148 63 347 122 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 680

Master's Degree Programs

Master's Degree Program Degree Type
Master's w/ Thesis Master's w/o Thesis or with Proj./Report Program Totals
Aerospace Science and Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 30 34 64
Biomedical Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.H.Sc.) 11 13 24
Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 25 50 75
Civil Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 40 77 117
Electrical and Computer Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 70 97 167
Materials Science and Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 11 13 24
Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (M.A.Sc., M.Eng.) 51 158 209
Totals: 238 442 680

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Aerospace Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) 2 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 12 1
Biomedical Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 19 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 19 13 6
Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (Ph.D.) 3 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 7 8
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 7 6
Electrical and Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) 10 37 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 47 42 5
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 2
Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (Ph.D.) 6 28 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 34 25 9
Totals: 24 121 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 145 108 37

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Aerospace Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) 2 0 10 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13
Biomedical Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 13 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 19
Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (Ph.D.) 2 1 5 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 0 4 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13
Electrical and Computer Engineering (Ph.D.) 9 1 33 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 47
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (Ph.D.) 6 0 19 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 34
Totals: 22 2 86 35 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 145

Graduate

Research Expenditures

Expenditures by Research Department

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Engineering Department External Funding Source
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Department of Civil Engineering
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Engineering Department External Funding Source
University of Toronto, Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0

Expenditures by Research Center

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Center/Lab External Funding Source
BioZone
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Centre for Advanced Coating Technologies
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Centre for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies (CADIF)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Centre for Advanced Nanotechnology
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Centre for Global Engineering
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Centre for Maintenance Optimization & Reliability Engineering (C-MORE)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Centre for Managment of Technology and Entrepreneurship
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Centre for Research in Healthcare Engineering
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Centre for Research in Sustainable Aviation
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Centre for Resilience of Critical Infrastructure
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Centre for Technology and Social Development
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Emerging Communication Technology Institute
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Identity, Privacy and Security Institute
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
ILead - The Institute for Leadership Education in Engineering
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Institute for Multidisciplinary Design and Innovation
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Institute for Robotics and Mechatronics
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Institute for Sustainable Energy
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Centre and Testbed
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Lassonde Institute of Mining
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Pulp and Paper Centre
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Southern Ontario Centre for Atmospheric Aerosol Research (SOCAAR)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Toronto Institute of Advanced Manufacturing (TIAM)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
University of Toronto Transportation Research Institute (UTTRI)
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0


Grand Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0

The following text was offered to each school as a guideline for the calculation of externally-funded research expenditures:

Include all expenditures associated with grants and contracts specifically budgeted for externally sponsored research and associated programs and expenditures associated with all gifts auditably used for research. Include expended funds provided by the following external sources:

  1. Federal Government
  2. State Government
  3. Foreign Governments
  4. Industry
  5. Non-Profit Organizations (e.g. foundations)
  6. Individuals
  7. Local Government

The expenditures reported should be only those funds provided by organizations, agencies, and individuals external to the institution. Cost sharing/matching funds should be included only if provided from sources external to the institution.

Only State government funds that were obtained competitively or as matching funds associated with other externally funded programs should be included. State funds that are part of the normal operating budget should not be included regardless of purpose.

For all joint or contracted projects or sub-projects, only the portion of the center research performed by faculty, staff, and students of the affiliated engineering school should be credited to that school. Expenditures for capital costs of research laboratory building construction should not be included.

Expenditures for research laboratory renovations should not be included unless the renovation funds expended came from grants and contracts expressly intended for the direct support of engineering research.

Any portion of academic year and/or summer salary for any researcher that is not derived from external research grants or contracts should not be counted.

Total #: Report total number of individual grants, not the total dollar amount of the expenditures.

Expenditures: Report actual expenditures (as opposed to authorization amounts) in U.S. dollars.

Time frame for expenditures: Report expenditures for your current fiscal year.

Research centers listed as "WITHIN an engineering department" on the Research Centers page (screen 7) of the College of Engineering Profile, will not have their expenditures added to the school's total research expenditures. Such expenditures can be included in the department total, while still being listed for the appropriate center. This allows users to list the expenditures in two areas without double-counting.

Graduate

Research Description

Research Description By Graduate Engineering Department

Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

With more than 30 professors, 200 graduate students, and 220 undergraduates, the University of Toronto has one of the largest chemical engineering departments in the world. Research is being conducted in: applied organic chemistry; biochemical engineering; biomaterials; biomedical engineering; biotechnology; ceramics engineering; chemical analysis; chemical reactor design; combustion engineering; composite materials; electrochemical engineering; energy engineering; environmental engineering; fluid mechanics; food engineering; heat, mass and momentum transport; hydrometallurgy; polymer science and engineering; process control; process modelling and optimal control; pulp and paper; radiochemistry; separation processes; thermodynamics, kinetics and catalysis. For further information, students may refer to the department's website: http://www.chem-eng.utoronto.ca

Department of Civil Engineering

The Department of Civil Engineering has a tradition of excellence dating back to 1873. It is the largest Civil Engineering program in Canada. With close ties to the profession and a strong research base, graduate programs are designed to develop students' capacity for research and innovation. Areas of research include: structural engineering, concrete, steel, and composite structures, materials engineering, building science, rehabilitation and restoration of structures, construction engineering and management; geomechanics; rock mechanics and engineering, soil mechanics, mining applications; transportation planning and engineering; intelligent infrastructure systems; environmental and water resource engineering; environmental remediation; environmental planning. For further information, students may refer to the department's website: http://www.civil.engineering.utoronto.ca

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Toronto is one of the oldest materials departments in Canada and offers graduate programs at all levels in metallurgy and materials science.

Areas of research include: nonferrous pyrometallurgy; iron and steel making; process metallurgy; welding; phase transformations; mechanical properties; corrosion; ceramics; biomaterials; amorphous materials; composite materials, nuclear materials; electronic materials; microstructural science; nanotechnology. For further information, students should refer to the department's website: http://www.mse.utoronto.ca

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

The Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering has over 45 professors and 270 students engaged in M.A.Sc and Ph.D. programs. The department maintains close relations with industry and several government sponsored Centres of Excellence. Research is being conducted in: applied mechanics; biomedical engineering; computer-aided engineering; energy studies; fluid mechanics and hydraulics; human factors engineering; management information systems; management science; materials; manufacturing, operations research; robotics, automation and control; social impact of technology; systems design and optimization; surface science; thermodynamics and heat transfer; plasma processing; vibration; computational fluid dynamics; environmental engineering; coatings; finite element methods; internal combustion engines; spray-forming processes; laser photothermal and optoelectronic diagnostic science and instrumentation; ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation. For further information, students should refer to the department's website: http://www.mie.utoronto.ca/

Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

With over 60 professors, close to 500 graduate students and over 1000 undergraduates, this is the largest department of its kind in Canada. The graduate department is organized into eight research groups which provide a home and research focus for graduate students. Research is being undertaken in:

Communications:
digital signal processing; digital communications; communication networks; data compression; information theory and coding; satellite communications; image processing and retrieval; multimedia systems; spread spectrum systems; wireless communications; radio networks.

Computers:
computer architecture; systems programming; computer networks; distributed systems; trusted systems; array processors; non-binary logic; digital circuits; computer-aided design; computer applications.

FPGA applications and systems

Electronics:
semiconductor device physics; integrated circuit design; network theory linear and digital circuits; transport and optical properties of semiconductors; VLSI design and technology; filters; computer-aided circuit design and testing; solid-state transducers.

Power devices and systems:
electric power systems; high-voltage phenomena; energy conversion; power modulators; power semiconductor systems; induction heating; electromagnetic field-fluid interaction; magnetic materials; linear motors; electric propulsion systems; machine systems stability; wave interactions; quasi-optics; microwave circuits; bioelectromagnetics.

Systems control:
foundations of control theory; control of multivariable systems; control of discrete-event systems; process modelling and identification; stochastic control; adaptive control; control of queuing systems; microprocessor control systems; large-scale system theory; optimization and simulation; metallurgical control; urban traffic control.

Photoelectronics:
crystal optics; fiber sensors; solar cells; integrated optics; lightwave technology; optoelectronic devices; nonlinear optics; optical properties of semiconductors; semiconductor laser and optoelectronic devices; short-wavelength lasers.

For further information, students may refer to the department's website: http://www.ece.utoronto.ca

Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering

Faculty members of the Institute are drawn from a wide variety of disciplines in engineering, medicine and dentistry, including members of the extensive teaching hospitals network in Toronto. The Institute also provides undergraduate biomedical engineering through the Biomedical Option in the prestigious Engineering Science program as well as through the Biomedical Engineering Minor option. For further information on the Biomedical Engineering Minor, please see http://www.undergrad.engineering.utoronto.ca/programs/minors_certificates/engineering_minors_certificates/minors/biomedical_engineering.htm

Members of IBBME are conducting research in: metabolic control systems; biomaterials; vascular disease detection; microprocessors in medicine; nuclear medicine engineering; neurophysiology; hearing and acoustics; ultrasound; microcirculation; vision research; drug delivery devices and systems; orthopaedic implant design; bone-material interface; biodegradable implants; tissue mechanics; load-bearing biomaterials; microencapsulation of mammalian cells; biomechanics; tissue engineering; implants and tissue repair/regeneration; dental implant design; dental restorative materials; degradation of biomaterials; mechanical characteristics of biomaterials; blood-interfacing biomaterials; surface modification; composite biomaterials; metallic biomaterials; bioceramics; biopolymers; hydrogels; trace element analysis; processing and properties of biomaterials; neural grafts; cell-biomaterials interactions; implant-related bone remodeling; device retrieval and analysis; surface science. For further information, students may refer to the Institute's website: http://www.ibbme.utoronto.ca

University of Toronto, Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS)

The University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) has been a leading multidisciplinary research facility since the 1940s. In addition to graduate programs, the Institute provides undergraduate aerospace studies through the Aerospace Option in the prestigious Engineering Science program. Faculty members of UTIAS are involved in research in: dynamics and control of aircraft and spacecraft; space robotics; compressible flows and shock waves; combustion and propulsion; low-speed aerodynamics; mechanics of gases, plasmas, and molecular beams; ultrahigh vacuum technology; mechanics of solids and structures; air-cushion and air-bearing technology; fusion reactor materials and technology; smart structure and optical-fiber sensor technology; helicopter flight testing; man-machine systems; hypersonic and high-temperature gas dynamics; flight and ground vehicle simulators; computational fluid dynamics. For further information, students may refer to the UTIAS website: http://www.utias.utoronto.ca

Research Description By Engineering Research Center

BioZone

BioZone’s mission is to advance and capitalize on the dramatic progress in recent years in biology, particularly in genome science and genome analysis tools. There is a vast untapped reservoir of biological diversity, primarily in the microbial world, that is ripe to be mined for useful products and processes. Unfortunately, applied and environmental microbiology are not the prime focus of any specific department on campus. BioZone fills a clear gap in this area, providing a means to connect microbiology research groups around campus and a clearinghouse for information in this area. Most importantly, BioZone fosters innovation at the interface of biology and engineering such that meaningful iterations from ideas to applications can be achieved in the context of technological, economic and public policy constraints.

Centre for Advanced Coating Technologies

The principal focus of research in the Centre for Advanced Coating Technologies is on thermal spray coatings--one of the most important and versatile surface modification technologies. Thermal spray coating is fueled by resurgence in the manufacture, overhaul, and maintenance of gas turbines, and is rapidly expanding into non-aircraft market sectors. The new applications of thermal spray coating technologies are in automotive systems, pulp and paper industry, boiler components, power generation equipment, chemical process equipment, bridges, steel mills, concrete reinforcements, orthopedics/dental, land based/marine turbines, and ships.

Thermal spray coatings are formed by heating, melting, and accelerating powdered material in a high temperature, high velocity gas and depositing them onto a substrate. Three main sources of heat and momentum are employed for particle melting and acceleration: a) dc plasmas, either at atmospheric pressure (APS) or under vacuum (VPS); b) radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma (rf-ICP); and, c) high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) jets. HVOF is a novel technique, introduced only in the last fifteen years, that has proved to be an excellent method of producing high-quality metallic and carbide coatings, particularly tungsten carbine. One of the most important emerging applications of HVOF spraying is in production of coatings that can be used to replace hard chrome, a material widely used to provide corrosion and wear resistant coatings on aircraft landing gear components. Due to environmental concerns, hard chrome electroplating is no longer commercially feasible.

This application is of special importance to Canadian companies, which control 60% of the landing gear market in North America, and are urgently trying to identify alternate technologies.

The Centre for Advanced Coating Technologies includes researchers in both Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, and has major facilities for basic and applied research and development in thermal spray coating. The Centre has established very strong links with Canadian and US industries. The research includes: development of diagnostic equipment to characterize thermal sprays; improvement to the design of existing processes; use of computational techniques to simulate the coating process; coating property characterization.

Centre for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies (CADIF)

For more than a quarter century, we have been researching the unique depth-profilometric diagnostic capabilities of diffusion waves which include a very wide range of physical fields and phenomena (thermal, electronic, photonic, atmospheric, to name a few) thus offering exceptionally wide trans-disciplinary research opportunities. Reflecting this realization, the CADIFT has emerged as a unique research center in Canada and in the world.

The CADIFT activities offer students and other researchers cross-fertilization opportunities in a uniquely wide spectrum of research including: the physics, mathematics, engineering, instrumental implementation and experimental applications of novel laser-based analytical inspection and monitoring techniques; high-precision measurement methodologies; environmental sensor device development; analytical, non-destructive and spectroscopic methodologies; signal processing and measurement science; imaging techniques for industrial and health sector applications.

The CADIFT is thus very adaptable to new fast-evolving scientific and technological challenges which ultimately benefit Canadian competitiveness on the international scale. Outstanding opportunities in the biomedical and dental sectors have also emerged for the CADIFT. They include building the scientific foundations of biothermophotonics, biophotoacoustic imaging and research in novel biosensor technologies for sub-surface probing of hard (dental) and soft tissues.

Centre for Advanced Nanotechnology

The Centre for Advanced Nanotechnology (ECAN) was established in 1977. It is based on a multidisciplinary team of faculty and researchers from various departments including both applied science and engineering, arts and sciences, and mathematics and applied mathematics. ECAN is Canada's first centre for nanotechnology research, and is closely tied to industry and other key research institutions in nanotechnology throughout the world.

Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary field (or set of technologies) for designing, fabricating, and applying nanometer-scale materials, structures and devices. In general, nanotechnology may involve such engineering disciplines as materials science, electrical, computer and mechanical engineering, as well as chemistry, physics, mathematics, and biotechnology. Specifically, in semiconductor applications, nanotechnology refers to the technology for fabricating electronic and photonic devices with feature sizes ranging from a few nanometers to the sub-micron range, and these fields are commonly termed nanoelectronics and nanophotonics, respectively. In addition, nanotechnology currently is also used to refer to the rapidly developing area of nanoelectro-mechanical systems (NEMS) which have only just began to show their promise for fields such as sensing, biotechnology, integrated opto-electronic and fiber assemblies.

Major efforts in the Centre are directed at both theoretical and experimental aspects of nanotechnology, related to applications in nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, and NEMS research.

Centre for Global Engineering

Background

In the first half of 2008, the Dean’s Task Force on Globalization and Engineering recommended exploring the creation of a centre to focus the Faculty’s activities on global engineering issues. A working group consisting of Phil Byer, Yu-Ling Cheng, Bryan Karney and Murray Metcalfe was established to explore the concept of a centre.


Objectives

The Centre will play a key role in both the education and research mission of the Faculty by promoting interdepartmental and interdivisional research and other scholarly activities related to engineering in a global environment.

The Centre's activities will be carried out by existing faculty, working with internal and external partners.

The Centre members will conduct research that is either:(1) discipline specific research projects with relevance to global issues, and/or (2) research in knowledge translation or diffusion of innovation in the engineering context.

The Centre will help to enhance the global experience of students.

Faculty affiliated with the centre will contribute to the education mission by: teaching courses, supervising design projects or undergraduate and graduate theses with international content, participating in the development of academic initiatives including undergraduate minors and graduate certificate programs, and serving as links to departments outside the Faculty who may be beneficial partners in the Faculty’s global programs.

The Centre will be the face of global engineering to both internal and external communities and will identify to potential external partners that research and educational activities on global issues exists within the Faculty, and will thus lead to collaborative opportunities.

Centre for Maintenance Optimization & Reliability Engineering (C-MORE)

C-MORE´s research is driven by close interactions with industry, in particular with MORE consortium members and with researchers at universities world-wide. The focus is on real-world research in engineering asset management in the areas of condition-based maintenance, spares management, protective devices, maintenance and repair contracts, and failure-finding intervals.

Centre for Managment of Technology and Entrepreneurship

The Research of CMTE members focuses on the Financial Services Industry and its technological needs. Most of the work is carried out in collaboration with the FSI firm which typically supplies the problem and the data for the studies. The staff of these firms take an active part in collaborative research with students and scientists working at the Centre.

Productivity and Efficiency in the Services Industry is the major focus of our research interests. This includes the examination of productivity measures for independent Decision Making Units (DMU) within an FSI organization. Such groups include software development teams, branch employees and management, loan portfolio lending teams, credit rating of corporate loans, etc. This area of research involves Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) methodologies and modelling of the DMU's in the FSI corporation. Other applications of DEA include modelling the efficiency and effectiveness of Bell Canada service provisioning teams in Ontario; temporal analysis of Canadian Schedule I Bank performance; the study of Credit Unions' economic performance in several Canadian Provinces. New theoretical approaches in DEA applications, user friendly GUI for use by practitioners designing DEA solutions, and computer programs to solve large and complex DEA models are also under development.

The research also involves the examination of economic returns on Information Technology investments. The FSI members spend as much as 1 billion dollars per annum in this area and their returns on this investment have never been accurately determined . Additional areas of interest include:

Mutual Fund Performance Evaluation using DEA
DEA-based Analysis of Corporate Failure
Internet Banking
Applications of DEA to Software Engineering Management
Credit Card Fraud Detection
Multimedia Banking Kiosks
Opportunities/Impediments of Information Technology systems in Canadian Schedule II Banks

Centre for Research in Healthcare Engineering

An initiative of the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, the Centre for Research in Healthcare Engineering (CRHE) is a response to the immediate and compelling desire for efficiency and quality improvements in the Canadian health care system. The Centre will provide both theoretical and practical advice as well as support for many of today's most pressing problems. CHRE research is focused on the application of Industrial/Systems Engineering techniques in relation to demand and capacity modelling and resource allocation issues in the health care industry. Our goals include creating quantitative decision support tools to help policy makers and industry leaders make better informed decisions.

CRHE is committed to:

Education
The Centre offers a wide variety of educational opportunities ranging from full time graduate programs to courses, workshops, and seminars. The exchange of ideas and experience through the networking opportunity in each of the educational events enhances the learning experience of all of those involved.

Research
The Centre conducts multi-disciplinary applied research in all areas related to health care engineering, including but not limited to: operational management: information systems engineering: and ergonomics/human factors engineering. While our research questions are often motivated by challenges faced in member organizations, the findings advance the whole field of health care engineering and are beneficial to the academic society, as well as various healthcare institutions and policy making authorities. We are committed to disseminating our research findings by publishing in both peer-reviewed and established professional journals.

Centre for Research in Sustainable Aviation

With the help of a $1.65-million six-year grant from NSERC’s CREATE (Collaborative Research and Training Experience) program, a team of UTIAS professors, in collaboration with professors from other parts of the Faculty and University, will develop the next generation of aerospace engineers to take on the challenge of ensuring the industry is environmentally sustainable. Building on U of T’s reputation for research into ways to reduce aviation’s carbon footprint, the new Environmentally Sustainable Aviation certificate program will train more than 130 undergraduate and graduate students. They will learn about aerodynamics to reduce drag on airplanes, study lightweight options in aircraft construction and examine biofuel options.

Centre for Resilience of Critical Infrastructure

The Centre for the Resilience of Critical Infrastructure (RCI), launched in September 2011, is looking into the ability of buildings and utilities to withstand the onslaught of a disaster, whether it is a natural calamity or a terrorist threat. Today’s society requires structures that are resilient enough to withstand such pressures " the kinds of pressures never anticipated by traditional procedures of engineering design. RCI, based in Civil Engineering, is bringing together expertise in research and practice in academia, government and industry. It will be expanding the dialogue on infrastructure resilience through workshops and presentations.

Centre for Technology and Social Development

The Centre has built databases of preventive approaches in six areas of application: materials and production; energy; work; the built habitat; computer-based technologies; technology transfer for development.

Apart from developing this new frontier in engineering education and practice, the Centre encourages the introduction of preventive approaches into the core of the curricula of engineering, management science, business administration, accounting and public policy within the university, as well as into industry and government.

Emerging Communication Technology Institute

The Nortel Institute promotes, facilitates and conducts innovative, intensely collaborative research too long-range in scope for corporations or too large for even the best-equipped individual university research groups. The Institute is mandated both to pursue research that is long-term and exploratory, leading to advances and continued leadership in the future, as well as to engage in short-term development of technology to find specific solutions to problems faced by industry.

Telecommunications research is increasingly cross-disciplinary, encompassing and transcending such fields as satellites, microwaves, computing, electronics, optics advanced materials, management and sociology. The Institute is positioning itself at the focal point for the fusion of advances in disciplines including: physics; mathematics; chemistry; materials science; computer science; electrical and computer engineering. Institute researchers collaborate with colleagues from across the University of Toronto, sister institutions in Canada and around the world, and researchers from industry, in particular from the founding industry partner, Nortel Networks.

Researchers and scholars from the fields of management and languages are also contributing to the Institute's studies of technology trends, policy, regulation and impact. At present, there are five principal research thrusts in highly competitive areas: Novel Network Architectures and Management; Novel Microwave Technologies; Advanced Wireless/Mobility; All-Optical Networks Emerging Technologies / Device Prototyping; Organic and Polymer Photonic Materials and Devices.

The Nortel Institute's research and development program is designed to respond to and work towards the resolution of specific challenges.




Challenges

The increasing global competition that has forced industry to retreat from long-term, exploratory research necessary to develop new technologies.

The very high cost to a national economy that must "catch up" in technological development and the significant rewards to an economy that achieves leadership.

The increasingly cross-disciplinary nature of advanced information technologies research.

The vital necessity of attracting and retaining top researchers.

Responses

Create a mutually beneficial three-way partnership among academia, industry and government to establish the resources for both long-term exploratory research and shorter-term research in support of industry.

Develop a comprehensive, focused research program, led by internationally recognized experts in their fields.

Develop first-class research infrastructure, structured for maximum flexibility and efficiency, fostering creative collaborations and attracting top researchers.

Objectives

Accelerate the advance and convergence of information technologies through long-term exploratory research programs to gain and maintain technological competitive advantage.

Support the growth of Canadian industry both at home and internationally through collaborative research and development projects.

Contribute to future growth by providing the concepts and testing facilities for technological entrepreneurs to develop the new products and services arising from new technologies.

Identity, Privacy and Security Institute

Background
In the spring of 2007, ECE Professor Dimitrios Hatzinakos and colleagues from the Faculty of Information and U of T Mississauga created a new initiative at U of T focusing on identity, privacy and security. This initiative was established to carry out a pioneering, interdisciplinary program of research, education, outreach, industry collaboration and technology transfer with emphasis on technology, policy and science. In May 2009, IPSI became an EDU-C and became the Identity, Privacy and Security Institute.

Objectives

To advance the integration of the basic, social and engineering science research required to generate sustainable solutions to identity, integrity, privacy and security.

To assemble a cross-disciplinary community of researchers and community partners to create excellence in interdisciplinary research and education in the field of identity, privacy and security technologies, policies and sciences.

To provide interdisciplinary high level training in identity, privacy and security applications through state of the art educational programs and specializations that will bring together faculty and students from different disciplines to study and think together about identity, privacy and security and related technologies, policies and sciences.

To facilitate the commercialization of technologies through effective technology transfer mechanisms and industrial partnerships.

To work with policymakers and regulatory agencies to inform their judgment of identity, privacy and security realities with evidence-based considerations of the scientific, ethical, legal and social issues involved.

ILead - The Institute for Leadership Education in Engineering

The Institute is the first of its kind in the Canadian engineering landscape, and positions the University of Toronto Engineering to lead the way in empowering engineering students to succeed as leaders in their profession and beyond. The Institute creates a recognizable hub for student leadership education activities and programming, and for faculty who seek to teach, and conduct research on engineering leadership. The Institute creates visibility with funders for supporting engineering leadership education. It promotes the building of resources and recognition of engineering leadership theory and practice at the University of Toronto and beyond.

The function of the Institute is threefold: teaching, research and outreach in the realm of engineering leadership development. The Institute provides focus and resources for a leadership curriculum planning committee. Co-curricular and extra-curricular leadership development activities continue to be led by the Engineering Leaders of Tomorrow program operating under the umbrella of the Institute. The Institute facilitates research and scholarly work on leadership pedagogy and engages with others around the world doing this kind of work.

Institute for Multidisciplinary Design and Innovation

Launched within MIE in January 2012, the University of Toronto Institute for Multidisciplinary Design & Innovation (UT-IMDI) teams students with clients to work on design and development challenges facing industry. A senior engineer in the client’s organization and a faculty member supervise the specially designed projects, running primarily from May to August. Projects are open to all U of T Engineering undergraduates, with plans to expand the program to include M.Eng students.

Led by Professor Kamran Behdinan (MIE) " who was appointed NSERC Chair in Multidisciplinary Engineering Design in 2012 " UT-IMDI’s emphasis is on the multidisciplinary nature of design and evolving technology. For students, it builds on design experience already gained through their coursework, including the capstone design course. UT-IMDI projects bring together design initiatives from across the Faculty, encouraging collaboration and innovation on both national and international scales. Projects also help our students and faculty forge even stronger links within industry.

Institute for Robotics and Mechatronics

The main objective of the Institute is to coordinate the large number of academic and research activities underway within the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering at the University of Toronto and facilitate the development of large teaching and research initiatives in the areas of Mechatronics and Robotics. Specifically:

To assemble a number of research groups in the areas of Robotics and Mechatronics in order to enhance cross-disciplinary research and lead cross-disciplinary research programs and initiatives.

To facilitate the commercialization of technology through proper technology transfer mechanisms and industrial collaborations.

To lead the establishment of high caliber teaching programs focused on Robotics and Mechatronics at the undergraduate and graduate levels and establish the necessary infrastructure to deliver such programs.

To enhance the visibility of research and teaching programs within the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering at the University of Toronto nationally and internationally.

To provide outreach to high schools and community, so as to promote engineering and attract students to the field.

Institute for Sustainable Energy

The University of Toronto Institute for Sustainable Energy is an inclusive, multidisciplinary centre designed to bring together researchers, students, and teachers from across the university, together with partners from industry and government, with the goal of increasing energy efficiency and reducing the environmental impact of energy use and conversion.

By bringing together information about energy-related pursuits throughout the university in one central location and by organizing seminars and events with an energy-related theme, the Centre will facilitate the formation of connections between researchers, students, and teachers interested in energy issues. These connections can lead to the formation of multidisciplinary research or project teams to solve complex problems related to energy systems or to research advanced technologies that enable cleaner and more sustainable use, conversion, storage, and distribution of energy. An interdisciplinary approach to the solution of complex energy problems will allow synergies between different energy sources and technologies to be identified and utilized to design more effective larger-scale energy systems that can improve on the separate performance of the individual components. The centre will also serve as a source of information for students and faculty members regarding scholarships, research opportunities, course offerings, thesis projects, funding opportunities, seminars, and opportunities for collaboration, all with a specific energy-related focus. " See more at: Institute for Sustainable Energy

Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Centre and Testbed

At the University of Toronto, our definition of ITS is broad and inclusive. It involves applying information technology and other advanced methods and techniques to improve transportation system performance and to increase these systems contribution to our economic and social well-being.

Addressing transportation problems involves: a complex interplay between technology; human perception; cognition and behavior; social, economic, and political systems. So, transportation research is inherently multi- and interdisciplinary.

ITS Centre and Testbed

The ITS Centre and Testbed provides an instrumented, multijurisdictional, multiagency transportation operations environment linked to university laboratories for real-world development, testing, and evaluation of ITS technologies and applications. It is also a meeting ground or melting pot for public, academic, and private practitioners and researchers to explore new approaches to transportation system management. It offers a site for private industry to demonstrate and evaluate its prototype technologies under live traffic conditions and an ongoing testing ground for Canadian ITS efforts.

Lassonde Institute of Mining

The Lassonde Institute of Mining is an interdisciplinary research institute within the University of Toronto created to be at the forefront of leading edge research in Engineering Geoscience. It is an international center of excellence in Engineering Geoscience encompassing engineers, geophysicists, geologists, geochemists, materials scientists and environmental scientists who are interested in research that crosses disciplines and traditional boundaries. Engineering Geoscience is the science of human interaction with the earth. The earth is a dynamic planet and the goal of Engineering Geoscience is to pursue fundamental understanding of the earth’s response to human activities. Graduate research at the Lassonde Institute seeks to further that understanding.

Through the Lassonde Institute, the University of Toronto is positioned as an international centre of excellence in Engineering Geoscience, with research groups performing fundamental and critical science at the interface of engineering, geology and geophysics. The Lassonde Institute is charged with solving first-order scientific problems in support of future development efforts that will fundamentally change the way companies in the minerals and energy sectors work with and exploit the earth’s crust. The Institute is composed of several research groups and laboratories within the University covering the fields of rock physics, rock fracture dynamics, seismology, computational geomechanics, mineral engineering, and soil and rock mechanics. Research groups collaborate with each other, with other international research groups and with industrial partners in extensive multi-disciplinary research projects. This leads to a unique synergy contributing to world-class research and the development of exciting new technologies.

Pulp and Paper Centre

The Pulp & Paper Centre (PPC) at the University of Toronto, which exists within the umbrella of the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, was founded in 1987. Although the Centre has grown and changed with the challenges that face the industry, its mission has remained the same: it continues to facilitate partnerships between the University and the pulp and paper industry in order to provide excellence in education, research, and information transfer.

Embracing the new biological and hi-tech tools in a multidisciplinary approach, the Centre has broadened its activities to include biorefinery research projects which seek to convert forest biomass and mill effluents into alternative sources of energy, including methane and bio-ethanol.

Research within the Pulp & Paper Centre is organized around five groups: Environment, led by Professor Grant Allen; Energy and Chemical Recovery, led by Professor Hongi Tran; Lignocellulosic Fibres, led by Professor Mohini Sain; Surface Science of Paper, led by Professors Ramin Farnood and Doug Reeve; and Biotechnology, led by Professor Emma Master . Cutting-edge projects are carried out with the support of three industrial consortia and various grants. In the past year alone, a total of $3.2 million in research funding was provided by NSERC and over 30 pulp and paper related companies in Canada, the United States, Finland, Sweden, Japan, Brazil, and New Zealand.

In addition to working with industry partners, the Centre has collaborated with numerous universities and research institutions, both domestic and international. It also actively participates in the Canadian Forest Biorefinery Network established by Pulp and Paper Innovation in Education and Research (PAPIER), an organization consisting of industry sponsored PAPRICAN and the seven pulp and paper centres in Canadian universities. PAPIER allows its members to combine industry experience and research on a national scale to “get the best out of the forest.”

The Pulp & Paper Centre encourages extensive student involvement at both the graduate and the undergraduate level, drawing upon an impressive pool of talent: 51 graduate students, 28 undergraduate students, 25 associated staff, and 46 faculty from several departments within the University of Toronto. The graduate student training and professional development programs are a core activity. Students have enthusiastically participated in the Industrial Internship program, which allows selected candidates to work in a pulp and paper mill for two months in their research areas. They have also organized many technology tours, both within Canada and to the United States, Scandinavia, Japan, and Brazil, and they are planning a tour to China this summer. The vibrant program mounted by TISCUT enables students to develop outstanding research and leadership skills so that they become active members of the pulp and paper community.

In recent years, the Centre and its faculty have received broad recognition, winning a 2003 NSERC Synergy Award for Innovation with ERCO Worldwide. In addition, Professor David Goring was inducted into the Pulp and Paper Industry Hall of Fame in 2006, Professor Honghi Tran, recently appointed to the Frank Dottori Chair in Pulp & Paper Engineering, was the recipient of the prestigious TAPPI Beloit Engineering Award (2006), and Professor Doug Reeve was awarded the 2007 John S. Bates Memorial Award, the highest honour bestowed on an individual by the Pulp and Paper Technical Association of Canada.

On July 1, 2012, the PPC celebrated a milestone: 25 years of self-supporting operation. The Centre will continue to make flexibility its major operating principle in order to keep up with the challenges of a post-Kyoto world and help transform the pulp and paper industry into a sustainable industry of the future.

Southern Ontario Centre for Atmospheric Aerosol Research (SOCAAR)

The vision of the Southern Ontario Centre for Atmospheric Aerosol Research (SOCAAR) is:

A world class centre for environmental research. SOCAAR is comprised of exceptional people and state-of-the-art facilities. The centre is committed to innovative thinking and high quality results so as to produce a broad, trans-disciplinary and actionable understanding of the origins, characteristics, environmental impact, and human health consequences of atmospheric aerosols.

SOCAAR will:
Advance the thinking and understanding of aerosol science.

Energize and support its members in the pursuit of aerosol research.

Promote collaboration, collegiality and community, and foster sustained interdisciplinary partnerships.

Promote linkages between academia, government, industry and the public.

Attract and produce top students, post-doctoral fellows, and other researchers.

Provide trans-disciplinary training of future environmental science and technology professionals.

Generate knowledge that supports short and long-term decision-making and the development, implementation, or compliance with policies and regulations.

Be recognized for its contributions and excellence.

Be respected for providing an unbiased and accurate perspective.

so as to improve air quality and human health, and reduce the adverse ecological and climatic influences of aerosols on the environment.

Toronto Institute of Advanced Manufacturing (TIAM)

The Toronto Institute of Advanced Manufacturing (TIAM) is an Urban Transportation Think Tank for Policy Analysis & System Design

The mandate of TIAM is to provide innovation and leadership in advanced manufacturing through research and development, training and education in Ontario, Canada, and worldwide.

University of Toronto Transportation Research Institute (UTTRI)

The University of Toronto Transportation Research Institute (UTTRI) is a new initiative that brings the considerable depth and breadth of University of Toronto research to bear on real-world urban transportation problems from perspectives of engineering, humanities and science.

UTTRI:

Is a solution-oriented think tank that fills a critical gap between traditional academic basic research, professional consulting and public sector transportation planning and operations.

Seeks solutions to pressing problems facing our cities, such as: cost-effective suburban transit systems; politically acceptable road pricing systems for network performance optimization; dynamic real-time control of road and transit systems for capacity maximization; improved urban logistics systems for goods movements; improved urban and street design for walking and cycling; etc.

Provides the coordination and integration needed to support large-scale, high-impact research, to provide the foundation for a comprehensive central hub for transportation-related research at the University of Toronto.

Supports research partnerships the University of Toronto establishes with other institutions around the world.

Graduate

Subject Areas of Research

Subject Areas

  • Please refer to the Research Description section.

Graduate

Dual Degrees

Graduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

N/A

Graduate

Student Appointments

Appointments by Department

Appointments - Number of Appointments
Stipend - Average Monthly Stipend

Department Fellowships TA RA Other Total Appts.
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Appointments: 124 113 158 46 441
Stipends: $1,229 $708 $1,586 $1,002
Department of Civil Engineering
Appointments: 159 160 176 102 597
Stipends: $1,143 $714 $1,339 $731
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Appointments: 41 42 57 17 157
Stipends: $1,426 $795 $1,494 $1,240
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Appointments: 311 171 276 109 867
Stipends: $1,305 $949 $1,214 $788
Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Appointments: 368 332 372 80 1152
Stipends: $1,350 $762 $1,509 $1,142
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering
Appointments: 175 63 158 72 468
Stipends: $1,733 $799 $1,527 $1,057
University of Toronto, Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS)
Appointments: 35 39 110 34 218
Stipends: $1,762 $946 $2,016 $898
All Total Appointments 1213 920 1307 460 3900