University of Kentucky - 2017

Institution Information

Contact Information

Institution's Mailing Address

Institution Name: University of Kentucky
Mailing Address: College of Engineering Dean's Office
351 Ralph G. Anderson Building
City: Lexington
State: KY
Postal Code: 405060503
Country: United States
Phone 859-257-1687
Fax:
Website: http://www.engr.uky.edu

Head of Institution

Eli Capilouto
President
Office of the President
University of Kentucky
101 Main Building
Lexington, KY 40506-0032
Phone: 859-257-1701
Fax: 859-257-1760
pres@uky.edu

Engineering College Inquiries

Jennifer Doerge
Director, Advising and Engineering Student Services
College of Engineering
University of Kentucky
355P F. Paul Anderson Tower
Lexington, KY 40506-0046
Phone: 859-257-1021
jennifer.doerge@uky.edu

Undergraduate Admission Inquiries

Jennifer Doerge
Director, Advising and Engineering Student Services
College of Engineering
University of Kentucky
355P F. Paul Anderson Tower
Lexington, KY 40506-0046
Phone: 859-257-1021
jennifer.doerge@uky.edu

Don Witt
Associate Provost for Enrollment Management, Admissions and Registrar
Enrollment Management
University of Kentucky
100 Funkhouser Building
Lexington, KY 40506-0054
Phone: 859-257-3458
Fax: 859-257-3823
dwitt@uky.edu

Graduate Admission Inquiries

Brian Jackson
Interim Dean
The Graduate School
University of Kentucky
101 Gillis Building
Lexington, KY 40506-0033
Phone: 859-257-7132
Fax: 859-323-1928
brian.jackson@uky.edu

Patricia Bond
Senior Assistant Dean
The Graduate School
University of Kentucky
202-A Gillis Building
Lexington, KY 40506-0033
Phone: 859-257-2771
Fax: 859-323-1928
pat.bond@uky.edu

Institution Information

General Information


Type of institution: PUBLIC
Academic Year: SEMESTERS
Setting of Main Engineering Campus URBAN

Main Campus Information

Is the main campus located in a city with a population greater than 100,000?: Yes
Name of this city, or if no, the name of the nearest city of any size?: Lexington
This city's population (approx.): 318,449
Distance from Main Campus: 0

Total Enrollment

Total Undergraduate enrollment: 22,618
Total Graduate enrollment: 4,962
Total Professional and other enrollment: 2,980

Non-Engineering Degree Granting Colleges

Business, Communications, Dentistry, Education, Fine arts, Law, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Arts and Sciences, Agriculture, Food and Environment, Design, Health Sciences

Institution Information

General Admissions

Entrance Requirements and Recommendations

Requirements

English/Language Arts " 4 credits (English I, II, III, IV)
Mathematics " 3 credits (Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry - or more rigorous courses in mathematics)
Science " 3 credits (Biology I, Chemistry I, Physics I or life science, physical science, and earth/space science - at least one lab course)
Social Studies " 3 credits (From U.S. History, Economics, Government, World Geography and World Civilization - or comparable courses)
Foreign Language " 2 credits (Two credits in the same foreign language or demonstrated competency)
Health " 1/2 credit
Physical Education " 1/2 credit
History and Appreciation of Visual, Performing Arts " 1 credit
History and appreciation of visual and performing arts or another arts course that incorporates such content
Electives " 7 credits
A total of 24 credits or more must be completed in high school

Recommendations

Recommended strongly: one or more courses that develop computer literacy. Additionally, high school students are encouraged to complete at least one year of mathematics beyond Algebra II.

Engineering Information

Head of Engineering

Head of Engineering

Lawrence Holloway
Interim Dean
College of Engineering
University of Kentucky
351 Ralph G. Anderson Building
Lexington, KY 40506-0503
Phone: 859-257-1687
larry.holloway@uky.edu

Engineering Information

Engineering Degrees Offered

Types of Engineering Degrees

Bachelor's:B.S.
Master's:M.S. with thesis, M.S. without thesis, but with project or report
Doctoral:Ph.D.

Computer Science Degrees Awarded Outside the College/School of Engineering

Engineering Information

Engineering Departments

Engineering Department(s) Degree Granting Level Department Chair Discipline
Biomedical Engineering Graduate Guigen Zhang Biomedical Engineering
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering Both Michael Montross Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical and Materials Engineering Both Douglass Kalika Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering Both Reginald Souleyrette Civil Engineering
Computer Science Both W. Brent Seales Computer Science (inside engineering)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Both Michael Johnson Electrical/Computer Engineering
Manufacturing Systems Engineering Graduate Fazleena Badurdeen Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Both Michael Renfro Mechanical Engineering
Mining Engineering Both Thomas Novak Mining Engineering
Undeclared Freshman Engineering Undergraduate Janet Lumpp Engineering (General)

Engineering Information

Research Centers

  • INCOLL - Research center WITHIN the college of engineering
  • INDEPT - Research center WITHIN an engineering department
  • INUNIV - Research center WITHIN university system
  • OUTUNIV - Research center OUTSIDE the university
Center/Lab Discipline Research Class Head Chair
Center for Aluminum Technology Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering INCOLL Shridas Ningileri
Center for Applied Energy Research Chemical Engineering INUNIV Rodney Andrews
Center for Visualization and Virtual Environments Electrical/Computer Engineering INCOLL W. Brent Seales
Institute for Sustainable Manufacturing Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering INCOLL Ibrahim Jawahir
Institute of Research for Technology Development Mechanical Engineering INCOLL Kozo Saito
Kentucky Transportation Center Civil Engineering INCOLL Joseph Crabtree
Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute Civil Engineering INUNIV Lindell Ormsbee

Engineering Information

Degree Programs

Bachelor's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering Biosystems Engineering (B.S.) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical and Materials Engineering Chemical Engineering (B.S.) Chemical Engineering
Chemical and Materials Engineering Materials Engineering (B.S.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (B.S.) Civil Engineering
Computer Science Computer Science (B.S.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Computer Engineering (B.S.) Computer Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering (B.S.) Electrical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) Mechanical Engineering
Mining Engineering Mining Engineering (B.S.) Mining Engineering
Undeclared Freshman Engineering Undeclared Freshman Engineering Engineering (General)

Master's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Master's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Biomedical Engineering Biomedical Engineering (M.S.) Biomedical Engineering
Biomedical Engineering Professional Biomedical Engineering (P.B.M.E.) Biomedical Engineering
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering (M.S.) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical and Materials Engineering Chemical Engineering (M.S.) Chemical Engineering
Chemical and Materials Engineering Materials Science and Engineering (M.S.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (M.S.) Civil Engineering
Computer Science Computer Science (M.S.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering (M.S.) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) Mechanical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Manufacturing Systems Engineering (M.S.) Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering
Mining Engineering Mining Engineering (M.S.) Mining Engineering

Doctoral Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Doctoral Degree Program(s) Discipline
Biomedical Engineering Biomedical Engineering (Ph.D.) Biomedical Engineering
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering (Ph.D.) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical and Materials Engineering Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) Chemical Engineering
Chemical and Materials Engineering Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) Civil Engineering
Computer Science Computer Science (Ph.D.) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) Mechanical Engineering
Mining Engineering Mining Engineering (Ph.D.) Mining Engineering

Engineering Information

Areas of Expertise

Engineering Departments Areas of Expertise
Biomedical Engineering
  1. Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering
  2. Biophotonics
  3. Bone Quality
  4. Cardiovascular Arrhythmia
  5. Cardiovascular Regulation
  6. Cellular Mechanotransduction
  7. Medical Imaging
  8. Musculoskeletal Biomechanics
  9. Neural Engineering
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
  1. Livestock systems engineering
  2. Solar energy systems for agriculture and residential housing
  3. Lignocellulose conversion systems for biofuels, biomaterials, and bioproducts
  4. Stream restoration
  5. Low Impact Development
  6. Food Processing and Storage for Improved Health
  7. Compost bed packed barn design
  8. Machine systems automation
  9. Unmanned aerial systems
  10. Autonomous vehicles
Chemical and Materials Engineering
  1. Biopharmaceutical Engineering and Bionanotechnology
  2. Membrane Technology
  3. Environmental Engineering
  4. Polymer Science and Engineering
  5. Fuels and Carbon Technology
  6. Sustainability and Renewable Energy
  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Nanomaterials
  8. Energy Storage and Battery Technology
  9. Metals/Aluminum Processing
  10. Computational Materials Science
Civil Engineering
  1. Transportation Engineering
  2. Water Resources Engineering
  3. Structural Engineering
  4. Construction Engineering and Project Management
  5. Environmental
  6. Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering
  7. Railroad Engineering
  8. Resilient and Sustainable Infrastructure
  9. Global Collaboration and Humanitarian Engineering
  10. Safety and Security
Computer Science
  1. Scientific Computing
  2. Information-based Complexity
  3. Networking and Distributed Computing
  4. Computer Vision and Visualization
  5. Artificial Intelligence
  6. Cryptography
  7. Software Engineering
  8. Biomedical Informatics
  9. Privacy, Security, and Cyberinfrastructure
  10. Data Mining
Electrical and Computer Engineering
  1. Computational Electromagnetics
  2. Controls and Manufacturing
  3. Micro/Nano-scale Devices and Materials
  4. Power and Energy
  5. Computer Architecture and Embedded Systems
  6. Signal Processing and Machine Learning
Manufacturing Systems Engineering
  1. Manufacturing Control Systems
  2. Lean Manufacturing
  3. Machining
  4. Welding
  5. Forming
Mechanical Engineering
  1. Aerospace
  2. Autonomous Systems, Robotics and Controls
  3. Biomechanics and Bioengineering
  4. Energy Systems and Combustion
  5. Sustainable Manufacturing
  6. Manufacturing Processes and Systems
  7. Thermal Fluid Sciences
  8. Vibro-acoustics and Noise Control
Mining Engineering
  1. Ground Control and Excavation Design
  2. Reclamation and Environmental Control
  3. Coal and Mineral Processing
  4. Mine Ventilation and Fires
  5. Explosives and Blasting
  6. Mine Electrical Systems

Engineering Information

Societies

Honor Societies

National Groups

  • Alpha Epsilon
  • Alpha Sigma Mu
  • Chi Epsilon
  • Eta Kappa Nu
  • Mu Sigma Rho
  • Omega Chi Epsilon
  • Phi Sigma Rho
  • Pi Tau Sigma
  • Tau Beta Pi

Local Groups

  • Mu Nu Gamma

Student Organizations

National Groups

  • ACM
  • ACM
  • ACM
  • ACM
  • ACM
  • AIAA
  • AIChE
  • ASCE
  • ASME
  • Biomedical Engineering Society
  • Chi Epsilon
  • Engineering Student Council
  • Eta Kappa Nu
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
  • International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering
  • Material Advantage
  • National Society of Black Engineers
  • Omega Chi Epsilon
  • Pi Tau Sigma
  • Soc. of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Soc. of Women Engineers
  • Society for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration, Inc.
  • Society of Automotive Engineers
  • Tau Beta Pi
  • Triangle

Local Groups

  • Alpha Epsilon
  • Alpha Sigma Mu
  • Biosystems Student Branch
  • Energy Club
  • Engineering Ambassadors
  • Engineers Without Borders
  • Formula Kentucky (UK Formula SAE Team)
  • International Society of Explosives Engineers
  • Kentucky Society of Professional Engineers-KSPE
  • Mu Nu Gamma
  • Mucking Team
  • Phi Sigma Rho
  • Railcats
  • RescUKats-Collegiate Mine Rescue Team
  • Solar Car Team
  • Speedfest
  • Students Participating in Outreach through Research in Engineering Sciences - SPORES
  • Women in Mining

Engineering Information

Support Programs

College's Under-Represented Student Groups

National Groups

  • National Society of Black Engineers
  • Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Society of Women Engineers

Local Groups

  • Association for Computing Machinery for Women
  • Phi Sigma Rho
  • Students Participating in Outreach through Research in Engineering Sciences - SPORES
  • Women in Mining

Other Student Support Programs

The College of Engineering offers many free student support services: Summer and Fall orientation programs for freshman and transfers, academic advising with both professional advisors and faculty members in their disciplines, placement and career development services including opportunities for internships, Co-Ops, study abroad and research, services for students with disabilities, counseling and testing services, special programs to support underrepresented groups in engineering, an engineering living learning program, free tutoring in every field of engineering, math and the sciences, and an eStudio which offers oral presentation rehearsal space, tutoring for technical writing, and thesis and dissertation coaching.

Engineering Information

Student Projects

Student Design Projects Description

*WEIGHTLESS WILDCATS:
The Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program provides a unique academic experience for undergraduate students and educators to successfully propose, design, fabricate, fly, and evaluate a reduced gravity experiment of their choice over the course of six months. The overall experience includes scientific
research, hands-on experimental design, test operations, and educational/public outreach activities.
OBJECTIVES:
To provide students and educators with an outstanding educational opportunity to
explore microgravity.
To attract outstanding young scholars to careers in math, science, and engineering in general.
To introduce young scholars to careers with NASA and in the space program in particular.
To provide a platform for students and educators to understand how microgravity affects research and testing of serious science and engineering ideas.
To provide an opportunity for both the general public and school children to discover educational and professional opportunities available at NASA.


*SOLAR CAR TEAM:
Gato del Sol is the 1982 Kentucky Derby winning thoroughbred and the namesake for our car. Stone Farm, who raised Gato del Sol, has been a longtime supporter of the University of Kentucky Solar Car Team. Gato, meaning cat in Spanish, and Sol, meaning sun in Spanish, is a very fitting name for Wildcats racing on the power of solar energy.

All majors are invited to join. No prior experience necessary.
Electrical Team " Makes the car go
•Integrates the solar array, maximum power point trackers, batteries, and motor controller.
•Sends data from the solar car to chase vehicle’s computer via the telemetry system.
Business " Makes the car possible
•Coordinates sponsorship from generous corporations and individuals
•Manages budget of nearly $500,000
•Plans outreach events and produces media (UK Ch. 50 Videos, Website)


*BIG BLUE BAJA TEAM:
Baja SAE consists of three regional competitions that simulate real-world engineering design projects and their related challenges. Engineering students are tasked to design and build an off-road vehicle that will survive the severe punishment of rough terrain and sometimes even water.

The object of the competition is to provide SAE student members with a challenging project that involves the planning and manufacturing tasks found when introducing a new product to the consumer industrial market. Teams compete against one another to have their design accepted for manufacture by a fictitious firm. Students must function as a team to not only design, build, test, promote, and race a vehicle within the limits of the rules, but also to generate financial support for their project and manage their educational priorities.

All vehicles are powered by a ten-horsepower Intek Model 20 engine donated by Briggs & Stratton Corporation. For over twenty-five years, the generosity of Briggs & Stratton has enabled SAE to provide each team with a dependable engine free of charge. Use of the same engine by all the teams creates a more challenging engineering design test.


*RGAN ENGINEERING BUILDING SOLAR PV INSTALLATION:
A referendum was passed in the 2006 Univ of KY Student Government elections that asked students if they would be willing to pay a fee in order to support the development of renewable energy on campus. This fee currently results in about $150,000 per year in funds that are allocated by the UK Student Sustainability Council to promote sustainability on the UK campus. Working with leaders of this group it was determined that the campus should have some PV installed and engineering students could have a significant part in the design of that system as part of their coursework.

A semester project is assigned each year in the EE/BAE Solar Devices and Systems graduate level class. The objectives of the project are to gain analytical and numerical modeling skills for modeling and designing a photovoltaic system and to understand the integration, installation, performance evaluation, and economic issues related to PV systems. In 2013, the class was divided into four teams that each evaluated potential campus locations for the installation of a small, expandable, solar PV array and then did a complete design and economic analysis for a system installed in that location.

These designs have subsequently been used by the Student Sustainability Council in coordination with the UK Physical Plant to inform the bid documents for the installation of a 112-panel, 14kW system on the roof of the Ralph G. Anderson Engineering Building. The system is to be installed in December 2014 and will be operational for monitoring by classes during the 2015 spring semester.


*AVENUE OF CHAMPIONS DESIGN CHALLENGE:
CE 429, Civil Engineering Systems Design, is the capstone design experience for the Civil Engineering program. Students take this course in their final semester before graduation; it is intended to provide the students a project-based introduction to the planning, assessment, and preliminary design of civil engineering projects.
Currently, the seniors are working with the UK Office of Sustainability to study design options for the Avenue of Champions corridor. With the recent and ongoing construction of residential halls and the new Student Center along this corridor, the potential for pedestrian and vehicle conflicts has increased. The students are challenged to develop and assess alternative scenarios for closing all or portions of the corridor for a pedestrian plaza; design considerations must include traffic impacts, safety improvements, site layout, environmental considerations, construction cost, and others.


*WILDCAT PULLING TEAM:
The ASABE International 1/4 Scale Tractor Student Design Competition gives students a comprehensive perspective on what it takes to design, build, test and market a product. Each year, universities across the United States and Canada compete for top honors in design and performance categories. Teams are also judged by a panel of industry experts on a written report and an oral presentation. All teams are given a 31 hp Briggs & Stratton engine and a set of Titan tires " the rest is up to them.
The University of Kentucky Wildcat Pulling Team has fielded an entry every year since 1999 and won the competition in 2012, 2014 and 2015. The latest designs have used a custom-tuned continuously variable transmission in series with a 3-speed manual transaxle to maximize power transfer while keeping the tractor safe and easy to drive. The diverse team includes students across multiple departments from the College of Engineering and the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.


*SPEEDFEST (two teams)
Speedfest is a flight competition started by Oklahoma State University to provide an industry practical alternative to the established AIAA Design Build Fly competition. Each year, Alpha (or collegiate) class teams are given a statement of work to respond to, which, for the past two years, have been performance oriented designs involving a turbine engine. The winning alpha class entries have been complex composite aircraft capable of speeds exceeding 150 mph.

* SAFETY PLATFORMS (Infiltrator Water Technologies):
Design and construct large safety platform(s) that will provide access to two large plastic injection molding machines


* AIR/WIND/WATER TEST WALL (Sun Windows):
This system needs to be designed to test window and door and the tests would be controlled solely from a computer and all readings would be recorded by the computer.


* SURFACE INSPECTION DOOR PANEL (Toyota):
System would be installed immediately prior to the surface inspection light booth to greatly improve TM capability to visually detect surface defects.


* WINDOW PRIMER SKIP DETECTION (Toyota):
Develop a method to detect any skip or void in the primer application path prior to urethane application without adding machine cycle time.


* STAMPING BLANK SIDE PILER (Toyota):
Develop a concept and prototype of a side piler that could be capable of stacking blanks consistently, within 2mm and handle blanks with large amount of variation in size and shape.


* NUT WELDER SAFETY (Toyota):
Provide protection to prevent activation of the feed unit or welding pressure while any object thicker than sheet metal is present (no fingers or hands).


* HDA WEIGHT IMPROVEMENT (Toyota):
Develop a Handling Device Attachment design that is lightweight, fixed dimensionally, and has internal plumbing.


* GREASE PUMP (Murakami):
Develop grease delivery system that removes air pockets, oil/grease separation, and eliminates redundant equipment.


* OPTIMIZE DIFFUSION OF AHU FAN (Trane):
Reduce Air Handler cost by optimizing the unit diffusion length between the discharge of fans and downstream components to ensure proper airflow through downstream components.


* EXPLOSIVE VAPORIZATION (UKME " Dr. Grana):
Design and build an experimental set-up to achieve far-from-equilibrium conditions to visualize explosive vaporization.


* DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF TIRE MOUNTING FIXTURE (UK Solar Car):
Develop mobile fixture to change and balance solar car tires that is safe and requires minimal effort.


• HUMAN POWERED VEHICLE CHALLENGE (ASME):
Redesign and improve HPV to compete in annual challenge, including steering, aero, and rollover protection.


• AUTOMATED TOOL LOCKER (UKME " Mr. Kerr):
Design and build automated and modular tool locker. Develop software interface for swipe card or RFID reader and automate locks.


• NASA ROBOTIC MINING COMPETITION (Joint project with EE):
Design and build a mining robot that can traverse the challenging simulated Martian terrain. Team will redesign some mechanical aspects of previous robot to compete in 2018.


• AUTOMATED SOLI CONSOLIDATION SYSTEM (UKCE " Dr. Bryson):
Design and fabrication of an automated, incremental pressure controller for performing incremental consolidation and one-dimensional swell tests for soil samples.


* LIGHT ALIGNMENT/CHECKING SYSTEM (Bardstown Airport " Jere Roche):
Develop an automated system to check lights at the Bardstown airport and keep runway clear of wildlife.


* IDENTIFICATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF COMPRESSED AIR REDUCTION OPPORTUNITIES (Novelis Aluminum):
Determine and implement the processes, methods, equipment, etc. to provide the necessary compressed air for pulsing the baghouse bags but minimize the overall compressed air usage.


• DIRT DETECTION METHOD FOR PAINTED SURFACE (Ford):
Design a portable system that can be used at various places within the paint shop to find and quantify the number of small dirt particles or contaminants on a vehicle panel (door, fender, hood, roof, etc).


* FAN ISOLATION ATTENUATION DEVICE (Trane):
A fan array is a popular plenum fan configuration as it provides redundancy in the event a fan fails. A fan isolation device is needed to prevent backflow if a fan fails.


* APPARATUS FOR CONTINUOUS CHAIN LUBRICATION (HYSTER):
Create a modular mechanical apparatus that will provide lubrication to ANSI BL544 through BL866 main leaf chains in order to eliminate the need for the technician to lubricate chains manually.


* VEHICLE LIFTER ENERGY RECLAMATION (Toyota):
Design a simple system to reclaim and reuse gravitational energy on lifter to reduce electricity consumption.


* SIMPLIFIED DOOR CHANGING SYSTEM (Toyota):
Design a manufacturing station to lift and swing an automobile door.


• THE CRANKSHAFT KEY AND PIN PRESS BACKUP MACHINE (Toyota):
Design, fabricate, and test a working prototype to back-up the mass production crankshaft key and pin press machine.


* DEVELOP UAV FOR ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE RESEARCH (UKME " Dr. Bailey):
Design, build, and fly an autonomous unmanned aerial vehicle for measuring distributed boundary layer properties as part of a swarm of aircraft.


* EVAPORATOR BOX TEMPERATURE REGULATION (Thermoking):
Design a new evaporator box which will maintain a constant temperature.

*E-VOLE COMPUTER GAMING MOUSE:
The gaming industry keeps growing and expanding every day. When it comes to gaming everyone wants to go along with latest styles and the best gaming mouse on the market for different reasons. The player doesn’t want to have disturbance of accuracy or having a less responsive gaming mouse that destroys the joy of playing. The goal of creating the gaming mouse is to give the player the optimal experience that is available. According to Rantopad a gaming mouse has to be comfortable for long periods of use regardless of which of the three grip types the player uses; palm grip, the fingertip grip, or the claw grip. In the gaming community, another important aspect of the mouse is that of the sensitivity. Due to the importance of this characteristic, the e-Vole team decided to build a high-end precision gaming mouse.

The objective of the team is to design and build a computer gaming mouse that utilizes optical sensors to track and detect movement and rotation of the mouse.


*CAMS: CAMERA ALIGNMENT SYSTEM --- ALIGNMENT IS EVERYTHING
Image processing using multiple cameras has applications in image reconstruction, high resolution capturing, and many others. Implementing singular functionality with multiple cameras manually, however, is both convoluted and imprecise. An automated system seeks to promote accuracy and to facilitate ease of use. High quality cameras have become available at reasonable prices for hobbyists to enjoy. However, high precision mounting and adjustment systems are still expensive. There is a market need for cheaper, high precision alignment systems, so that hobbyists can maximize performance of their cameras. Users also may be able to replicate the performance of a high-end camera through an x number of cheaper, easier to obtain, cameras. 3D scanning technology takes advantage of multiple camera captured images to recreate tangible models of components, and even to replicate and improve those whose designs are lost to time. For example, 3D scanning was used to recreate and re-engineer a fault-prone gearbox for a classic Ford GT40 [1]. A high precision alignment system has potential to be used for similar projects by individuals who may not necessarily have access to more expensive 3D scanning measures.

The objective of this project is to provide a functioning, scalable, and marketable alignment control system for an array of cameras.


*Σ CYCLE: DESIGN AND TESTING OF A STATIONARY ELECTRIC BIKE
The University of Kentucky SPARK Laboratory is a research laboratory affiliated with the Power and Energy Institute of Kentucky, specifically in the areas of renewable energy technologies, electric machines, power systems, electromagnetic devices, and smart grids and buildings. The lab has purchased an electric bike kit and needs a test bench that uses LabView for data acquisition to test the motor and other components of the kit. In addition, the University of Kentucky Electrical Engineering Department needs a product they can display at E-DAY, or Engineers Day, an event devoted to promoting and showcasing engineering projects. This product needs to be available for years to come that will attract young students to the STEM field. This project combines these two needs into a singular focus: the design, construction, and testing of a motorized electric bike, both stationary and mobile, that can be presented for Engineers Day.

The objective of this project is to design and build an electric bicycle that will primarily function as a test bench for the motor kit in the SPARK Laboratory and will be on display at E-DAY for years to come, encouraging young students to get involved in STEM.


*LIVEstock: IoT SURVEILLANCE OF DAIRY COWS
The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment operates a dairy cow research facility that demonstrated a need for a system that could collect and upload data about the dairy cows to a cloud based server.
Two primary reasons that dairy farms are in need of an IoT solution is to capture more frequent data and provide real time remote access to this data. Currently, the dairy farmers are using visual and tactile methods performed by humans to calculate body condition scores (BCS) of the dairy cows. With an IoT solution, data can be collected more frequently and accurately for dairy cow farmers to calculate body condition scores (BCS). Most importantly, providing real time remote access from the cloud enables farmers to better use the data and improve performance of the dairy farm.

The objective of this project is to design and implement an IoT device that can collect images of and identify dairy cows while actively relaying that data to a secure exchange wirelessly that approved users can then access.


*THE CYCLEPATHS: DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF A STATIONARY ELECTRIC BIKE:
The SPARK lab has a need for an exciting interactive display item that can be used as advertisement for the ECE department to create interest for prospective students to join the ECE field. The field of engineering is projected to grow over the next ten years and the SPARK lab wants to gain the interest of the best and brightest future engineers. Having an interesting piece of equipment that is easily displayed and used will help in recruiting future students to the ECE department at UK.

The objective is to design and construct an electric bike that can be both stationary and mobile.


*NetSol: DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF CELLULAR/WiFi/RADIO TELEMETRY SYSTEM FOR THE UK SOLAR CAR TEAM:
The University of Kentucky solar car team currently have an existing telemetry system that consists of a large, power-hungry telemetry modem with a limited range of 900 Mhz. While the current telemetry system is working as intended, it has a few disadvantages. The main reasons for the upgrade of the telemetry system is the high power consumption of the modem, limited range of signal transmission, and interferences of signal from other vehicles during the race is also an issue.

The objective of this project is to design and construct a cellular/WiFi/radio telemetry system that will replace the current University of Kentucky Solar Car Team telemetry system.


*AutoCats: INTELLIGENT GROUND VEHICLE:
Intelligent Ground Vehicles (IGV) are the future of transportation, self-driving cars that can automatically change lanes, navigate in more complex environment by detecting challenging obstacles, and with many other capabilities is what will revolutionize the auto industry. The Auto Kats will design and build an IGV with the latest technology impacting the industrial development in order to compete in the 25th Annual Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) at Oakland University Rochester, Michigan. The IGV must navigate around an outdoor obstacle course laid on grassy area while maintaining an average speed of one mile per hour. During the course run the vehicle must carry payload, avoid collisions, and stay within the define lanes. The team design process will focus on meeting the competition requirement and needs in order to gain points from the judges and avoid from being disqualified.

The objective of this project is to design and construct a functioning Intelligent Ground Vehicle that can compete in the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition.


*HARDWARE HITS: FLOPPY MUSIC
As technological advancement continues to progress, an ever-growing surplus of antiquated electrical and mechanical devices has produced a need for non-traditional solutions for the reuse and recycling of outdated technology. In the interest of reusing a portion of the University of Kentucky’s obsolete hardware, while also providing the computer and electrical engineering departments with a user-friendly interactive installation, the creation of a music machine predicated on, but not limited to, floppy drives is being explored.

The objective of this project is to have a working apparatus that plays music using
floppy drives and possibly other noise making hardware.


*THE PERFECT RUNNER: MEASURING THE FORCE OF A RUNNING PATIENT
The purpose of this project is to design and build a device that measures and transmits force measurement data. This project is being developed for physical therapy research at the University of Kentucky. This device will have the ability to measure the force placed upon the tibia of the person wearing it. Stress fractures are one of the most common injuries among runners. Unfortunately, due to the lack of technology, it can be difficult to tell when and how these injuries occur. There needs to be a means of measuring and monitoring the amounts of force applied to the joints and bones of runners so that one can diagnose the problem. The monitor needs to be practical. This means that it must be accurate, simple to access the stored information, comfortable so that it doesn't affect the results, and more affordable than seeking professional lab equipment. In order to be justified, the monitor has to give the user information that can be used to prevent stress related injuries in the future. It needs to do all of these items in a repeatable, safe, and feasible manner.

The objective of this project is to design and implement a device which can measure the force of impact of a runner’s foot on the ground.


*MicroKats MICROCONTROLLER SOLUTIONS: MICROCONTROLLER CONVERSION FOR NASA RMC:
The NASA RMC robot of the University of Kentucky’s NASA Robotic Mining Competition1 (RMC) Team currently uses the Arduino Mega for controlling the components for the robot in conjunction with the Raspberry Pi 3 for handling the communication between the Xbox 360 controller and the robot. The Arduino adds complexity to the system, as well as adds delay to controlling the robot. Another problem associated with the usage of the Arduino is that an error could be thrown before the task even begins, which requires reinitializing the Arduino and rewriting the serial connection code. For the reasons specified above, the Arduino Mega should be removed from the system.

The primary objective of this project is to remove the Arduino Mega from the NASA RMC robot,and condense the system, so that it only uses a Raspberry Pi 3 microcontroller for all of its functionality.


*LOUDNOIZ: ELECTRIC GUITAR
Music is still a cultural foothold of our society today, and continues to shape the way our culture develops. Music is constantly evolving with the new generations and with this change the instruments that produce the miracle of music must change as well. Instruments that have more unique play styles and accessibility will become the instruments used in the future of music development. Out of these instruments the guitar has seen very rapid improvements and innovations over the years. Even though it has seen much improvement, it is nowhere close to being done with its transformation. New and innovative ways to play the guitar will continue to change the way that the guitar is played.

The objective of this project is to design and create a guitar that can distort and change its sound through movement of the guitar and be able to be played over some device wirelessly from the guitar.


*THE CRYPTOS: FPGA BASED PHYSICALLY UNCLONABLE FUNCTIONS FOR SECURE KEY GENERATION IN EMBEDDED AND IoT DEVICES:
In 1999, Kevin Ashton coined the term “the Internet of Things”. He describes the Internet of Things (IoT) as an interconnection of a large number of networked smart devices that can sense things for themselves, amongst each other, gathering much more information than before when information was only put into computers via users. The IoT was officially “born” around 2008-2009, when the number of things and objects connected through the internet surpassed the number of people connected on it. Since then, companies have been vigorously producing “smart” devices connected through the IoT. With the increasing number of connections and information passing between objects, hackers and predators become an increasing threat. Ideally, no device should be vulnerable. If one device gets hacked, the rest of a network is vulnerable. Thus, the devices connected in networks such as the IoT need to be very secured. Commonly, devices have used secret keys to decrypt and encrypt data. The keys are stored in secure, nonvolatile memory. Nonvolatile memory is expensive, resource intensive, and has recently become more vulnerable to attacks. The concept of using Physically Unclonable Functions (PUFs) to generate secret keys has been around since the early 2000s, but only recently has it begun being implemented. PUFs are theorized to provide more security to the system, while decreasing the weight and the cost of the system.

The objective of this project is to create a chip that can be used in an Internet of Things (IoT) device to secure the device and prevent against hacking and other attacks. This device will generate a secret key using a physically unclonable function (PUF) that will be mapped onto an FPGA. The PUF has sets of challenge and response pairs (CRP’s) that will be unique to the device itself and used to authenticate the device with a server. This authentication includes the encryption of the key as it passes to the server, and the decryption as the server passes information back to the device.


*SBST: SMART BATTERY TESTING SYSTEM:
There currently exists no highly accurate battery model and it is this lack of an accurate battery charge/discharge model that makes the proposed use of large power banks in the power grid difficult to achieve. This applies to current methods of power analysis such that the operation of a battery and its system response is hard to predict effectively when the system is not in a steady state condition. It is for this reason that a battery model is essential for the proposed use of battery banks in the grid. A model for a battery’s behavioral characteristics is needed such that power analysis for large scale battery banks is made simpler and more accurate.

The objective of this project is to develop an accurate battery model that can used for future power system analysis. This model would serve to be a manner in which the discharging and charging operation of a battery could be predicted and controlled which changes and fluctuations in the power demand on the circuit and what impacts the battery has on the circuit itself.

Engineering Information

College Description

Engineering College Description and Special Characteristics

The College offers four-year undergraduate programs in computer science and engineering, emphasizing basic science and engineering fundamentals in the first two years, followed by two years of more specialized training in one of our majors, with some liberal arts throughout all four years. Our First Year Engineering program provides students with hands-on engineering experiences and an opportunity to explore all the engineering disciplines to make an informed decision on their academic major. Emphasis is on a balanced program in order to prepare each student for an entry level position or graduate studies. Co-op programs are available which would normally extend a program to five years. Transfer programs are articulated with regional colleges and universities.

Engineering Information

Engineering Faculty & Research

Teaching, Tenure-Track View Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Full Professors Assoc. Professors Assistant Professors Program Total
Biomedical Engineering 4 2 1 7
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering 10 1 7 18
Chemical and Materials Engineering 16 4 3 23
Civil Engineering 11 6 3 20
Computer Science 14 4 5 23
Electrical and Computer Engineering 19 3 3 25
Manufacturing Systems Engineering 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering 11 13 7 31
Mining Engineering 6 1 2 9
Undeclared Freshman Engineering 0 0 0 0
Totals: 91 34 31 156

Teaching, Non-Tenure-Track

Engineering Department(s) FT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel PT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Teach. Personnel
Biomedical Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering 1 0 1 0.00
Chemical and Materials Engineering 4 3 7 0.71
Civil Engineering 2 8 10 2.50
Computer Science 3 2 5 0.63
Electrical and Computer Engineering 3 6 9 2.08
Manufacturing Systems Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Mechanical Engineering 4 3 7 1.63
Mining Engineering 0 1 1 0.08
Undeclared Freshman Engineering 0 9 9 1.56
Totals: 17 32 49 9.19

Non-Teaching, Research

Engineering Department(s) Non-Teach. FT Research Personnel Non-Teach. PT Research Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Non-Teach. Research Personnel
Biomedical Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering 1 0 1 0.00
Chemical and Materials Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Computer Science 0 0 0 0.00
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Manufacturing Systems Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Mechanical Engineering 2 0 2 0.00
Mining Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Undeclared Freshman Engineering 0 0 0 0.00
Totals: 3 0 3 0.00

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

  • American Indian or Alaska Native (Am Ind): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.
  • Asian: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
  • Black or African American (B/AfrA): A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as "Haitian" or "Negro" can be used in addition to "Black or African American."
  • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (Haw): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
  • Hispanic or Latino (Hisp): A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. The term, "Spanish origin," can be used in addition to "Hispanic or Latino."
  • White: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Full Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Biomedical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 2 0 0 8 2
Chemical and Materials Engineering 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 9 2 0 0 13 3
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 1 0 0 10 1
Computer Science 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 8 2 0 0 12 2
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 12 1 0 0 18 1
Manufacturing Systems Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 10 1
Mining Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 6 0
Undeclared Freshman Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 0 0 0 1 0 0 22 0 0 0 0 0 59 9 0 0 81 10

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Associate Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Biomedical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Chemical and Materials Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 0
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 4 2
Computer Science 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 1
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0
Manufacturing Systems Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 9 1 0 0 10 3
Mining Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Undeclared Freshman Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 3 1 1 0 0 22 3 0 0 27 7

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Assistant Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Biomedical Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 6 1
Chemical and Materials Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1
Computer Science 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 2
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0
Manufacturing Systems Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 6 1
Mining Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Undeclared Freshman Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 0 0 3 1 0 0 5 2 3 0 0 0 15 2 0 0 26 5

Undergraduate

Admissions/Transfers

Undergraduate Admission to the College of Engineering

All freshman applicants must submit an application for admission, a non-refundable application processing fee, an official high school transcript and a copy of ACT or SAT scores. Applications must be completed by February 15 for fall admission, by October 15 for spring admission. Admission for freshman applicants is based on high school grades, national college admission test results and successful completion of the required precollege curriculum. Minimum entry requirement is ACT Math score of 23 or higher or the SAT equivalent. Required HS courses: English (4 yrs), Math including Algebra I & II and Geometry (3 yrs), Science chosen from Biology, Chemistry & Physics (2 yrs), Social Studies incl American History & World Civ (2 yrs). Recommended HS courses: Foreign Language (2 yrs), Computers (1 yr), Mechanical Drawing (1 yr) Fourth year of Math (1 yr). A new student is admitted into a pre-engineering major or pre-computer science major within the College at the time of admission to the institution. For the first semester only, a new freshman may register as Undeclared Engineering, choosing a major at the end of the first semester.

Undergraduate Admission to an Engineering Department

Admission to engineering standing in any major requires submission of an application for engineering standing in a department, completion of at least 35 hours toward the degree program with a minimum GPA of 2.5, completion of the program requirements with a minimum GPA of 2.5 in freshman English, freshman chemistry, physics course(s), calculus courses and completion of the additional specific program admission requirements.

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

1. International Application for Undergraduate Admission
2. $60 non-refundable application processing fee
3. Official Transcripts: All secondary school and college/university level transcripts must be submitted for review. The transcripts must be official and in student’s native language. Student will also need to provide another official transcript that has been translated into English by their secondary school or college/university. College/university transcripts from institutions outside of the United States will be evaluated for transfer credit. To insure student receives the most transfer credit possible, student may choose to have their transcripts evaluated by a professional credential evaluation agency.
4. Course Descriptions or Syllabi for transfer applicants: Transfer applicants are required to provide course descriptions or syllabi in both native language and in English translation for all the courses on student’s transcript. They must be on official letterhead from all of the institutions student has attended. If admitted, this will allow our Transfer Equivalency Office to begin the course evaluation process before student arrives on campus. (PHOTOCOPIES, SCANNED IMAGES, OR FAXES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED).
5. Bank Statement on bank letterhead is required. Scanned or faxed copies of the official bank statement or an original bank statement will be accepted. Please show an available balance in U.S. dollars of $42,500 if applying for the 2018 Spring and Fall Semesters. Fees are subject to change.
6. Complete the Sponsor Guarantee Form
7. English Proficiency: 
The University of Kentucky accepts official TOEFL and IELTS results from the testing headquarters. The minimum TOEFL score of 71 (iBT), 197 (cbt) or 527 (paper-based) or a minimum score of 6.0 on the IELTS is required for admission to the University of Kentucky. To order official scores, please contact: 
TOEFL UK's Office of Undergraduate Admission TOEFL code is 1234.
8. Freshman applicants who wish to be considered for academic scholarships or a major within UK's College of Engineering must also provide Official ACT or SAT Results. To order an official score report, please contact: 
ACT or (319) 337-1313. UK's school code is 1554.
 SAT or (866) 756-7346. UK's school code is 1837.
 ACT/SAT SCORES MUST NOT BE OVER 5 YEARS OLD. Students living in the U.S. and attending a U.S. high school for one year or more must also submit ACT or SAT scores.
9. Optimal Academic Letter of Recommendation: First-time freshman applicants can submit an academic letter of recommendation from a teacher or guidance counselor. The recommender can submit this electronically or can download a PDF version, complete it, and mail it to the Office of Undergraduate Admission.
10. A copy of student’s passport. Additional documents may be requested at time of application.
FAXES AND PHOTOCOPIES OF OFFICIAL DOCUMENTS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED

Applications must reach the admissions office by May 15 for fall admission, by October 15 for spring admission, by March 1 for summer admission.

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

Same as for resident students

Residency Requirements

Students must complete at least 30 of the last 36 credit hours at the University of Kentucky. No more than 67 semester transfer hours will be accepted from a two-year college toward degree.

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

All transfer applicants must submit one official transcript from each college/univ attended, roster of the courses in which the student is currently enrolled and a final official transcript of work completed. Minimum cum. GPA on all work taken is 2.0. Minimum cum. GPA of 2.0 at the last school attended.

Undergraduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): In-State / Out-of-State

Undergraduate Group 1 Undergraduate Group 2
Tuition & Fees: $11,772 $27,856
Room & Board: $13,024 $13,024
Books & Supplies: $1,800 $1,800
Other Expenses:
Estimated avg. course load per term: 15 15
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Special Programs or Fee Structures

Students are charged an additional $59.30 per credit hour fee for each graduate engineering course and an additional $59.30 per credit hour for each undergraduate engineering course.

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Institution's Own Application Form, Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), Supplemental Student Loan Form, Federal Tax Return Forms (IRS), Financial Aid Transcript, University scholarship applications

Additional Financial Aid Information

- Academic scholarship application
- Parker scholarship application
- Transfer student scholarship application
-Continuing student application
-Separate needs based scholarship application for Freshman

Undergraduate

New Applicants

New Undergraduate Applicants

A. Number of undergraduate applicants to the engineering college: 2,530
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 1,989
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 720
Percentage of entering students (excluding transfer students) ranked in the top quarter (25%) of their high schools: 69%

Newly Enrolled Test Scores

Scores Reflect 75th to 25th percentile

SAT 75th 25th
Math Range: 705 605
Reading Range: 655 545
Writing Range: 635 520
Combined Range: 1335 1145
ACT 75th 25th
Math Range: 31 25
Composite Range: 32 25

Undergraduate

Enrollments by Class

Undergraduate Engr. Programs Fresh
1st Year
Soph
2nd Year
Junior
3rd Year
Senior
4th/5th Year
Full Time Total Part Time Total
Biosystems Engineering (B.S.) 7 34 25 80 146 9
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 7 68 96 185 356 26
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 15 72 79 164 330 24
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 8 45 48 73 174 5
Computer Science (B.S.) 26 95 123 181 425 34
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 6 43 55 106 210 14
Materials Engineering (B.S.) 2 18 21 30 71 3
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 41 138 197 365 741 72
Mining Engineering (B.S.) 4 20 20 23 67 2
Undeclared Freshman Engineering 639 41 7 0 687 34
Totals: 755 574 671 1207 3207 223

Freshmen

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Biosystems Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 1
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 0
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 10 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 5 0
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 8 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 11 2 4 0 23 2
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 5 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Materials Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 27 9 0 0 34 9
Women 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 7 0
Mining Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 4 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Undeclared Freshman Engineering
Men 13 0 10 0 29 0 0 0 12 0 21 0 0 0 402 20 20 0 507 20
Women 6 0 3 0 10 0 0 0 3 0 7 0 0 0 98 3 5 0 132 3
Totals: 25 0 17 0 41 0 0 0 23 1 41 0 0 0 578 35 30 0 755 36

Sophomores

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Biosystems Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 1 0 0 17 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 14 0 1 0 17 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 30 1 1 0 38 1
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 24 4 0 0 30 4
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 5 0 0 0 48 1 1 0 60 1
Women 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 12 0
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 26 1 5 0 40 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 5 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 6 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 61 6 4 0 81 6
Women 0 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 14 1
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 30 0 0 0 38 1
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 5 0
Materials Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 13 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 5 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 4 0 6 1 7 1 0 0 7 0 2 0 0 0 92 11 5 0 123 13
Women 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 15 0
Mining Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 9 0 2 0 15 0
Women 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 5 0
Undeclared Freshman Engineering
Men 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 22 5 0 0 28 5
Women 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 4 0 0 13 4
Totals: 26 0 22 2 24 1 0 0 24 0 26 1 0 0 431 34 21 0 574 38

Juniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Biosystems Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 1 1 0 14 1
Women 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 11 0
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 10 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 4 0 2 1 0 0 37 4 3 0 62 5
Women 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 26 5 1 0 34 5
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 9 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 2 0 4 1 0 0 50 4 1 0 70 6
Women 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 1 1 0 9 2
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 35 0 2 0 42 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 6 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 6 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 5 0 2 0 0 0 81 1 8 0 106 2
Women 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 11 1 1 0 17 1
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 2 0 4 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 37 1 2 0 50 1
Women 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 5 1
Materials Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 1 0 13 0
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 8 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 12 0 3 1 5 1 0 0 3 0 4 1 0 0 134 16 2 0 163 19
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 32 0 0 0 34 0
Mining Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 14 1 0 0 17 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0
Undeclared Freshman Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 6 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1
Totals: 50 0 16 2 26 3 1 0 25 0 17 3 1 0 511 37 24 0 671 45

Seniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Biosystems Engineering (B.S.)
Men 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 39 4 2 0 45 6
Women 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 29 0 1 0 35 1
Chemical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 14 0 3 0 4 0 0 0 9 1 3 0 0 0 82 6 4 0 119 7
Women 3 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 55 2 0 0 66 3
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Men 3 0 4 0 5 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 106 10 2 0 124 10
Women 6 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 27 4 0 0 40 5
Computer Engineering (B.S.)
Men 6 0 6 1 3 2 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 42 1 2 0 64 4
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 2 0 9 0
Computer Science (B.S.)
Men 4 1 4 1 9 2 0 0 10 0 2 0 0 0 113 13 9 0 151 17
Women 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 1 0 0 22 2 0 2 30 5
Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 12 0 1 0 4 1 1 0 3 1 6 0 0 0 59 6 2 1 88 9
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 12 1 0 0 18 1
Materials Engineering (B.S.)
Men 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 18 2 2 0 23 3
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 7 0
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
Men 20 1 9 1 13 1 0 0 7 0 4 3 1 0 257 21 8 0 319 27
Women 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 37 4 1 0 46 4
Mining Engineering (B.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 18 1 0 0 19 1
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 0
Undeclared Freshman Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 82 2 33 5 48 7 1 0 42 3 36 6 1 0 929 78 35 3 1207 104

Undergraduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Biosystems Engineering (B.S.) 0 3 2 0 2 0 0 19 0 26 16 10
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 12 3 3 0 3 2 0 71 2 96 63 33
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 2 4 0 0 1 1 0 70 0 78 67 11
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 31 4 39 36 3
Computer Science (B.S.) 3 3 4 0 2 5 0 77 4 98 82 16
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 6 4 0 0 3 2 0 55 2 72 67 5
Materials Engineering (B.S.) 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 12 1 17 13 4
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 13 10 6 0 2 1 0 148 2 182 162 20
Mining Engineering (B.S.) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 21 0 23 19 4
Undeclared Freshman Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 41 27 15 0 17 12 0 504 15 631 525 106

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Biosystems Engineering (B.S.) 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 6 0 0 26
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) 10 2 1 2 1 2 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 49 22 0 2 96
Civil Engineering (B.S.) 2 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 61 9 0 0 78
Computer Engineering (B.S.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 29 2 3 1 39
Computer Science (B.S.) 2 1 3 0 1 3 0 0 2 0 5 0 0 0 67 10 2 2 98
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) 6 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 0 53 2 2 0 72
Materials Engineering (B.S.) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 3 1 0 17
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) 13 0 9 1 6 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 130 18 2 0 182
Mining Engineering (B.S.) 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 18 3 0 0 23
Undeclared Freshman Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 37 4 19 8 9 6 0 0 11 6 10 2 0 0 429 75 10 5 631

Undergraduate

Dual Degrees

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

A "3/2" plus dual degree program with some KY institutions enables students to enroll in a pre-engineering curriculum for the first 2-3 years at their respective schools, then transfer to UK College of Engineering for the final 2 plus years. Upon completion they receive two degrees, one from their original school and a BS in the appropriate engineering field from UK.

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degrees Awarded

Undergraduate

Program Comparisons

  • ABET - Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
  • CEAB - Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board
Degree Program ABET/CEAB Accred. Nominal Program Length
(yrs.)
Average Program Length
(yrs.)
Time: Day/Even./
Both
Co-op: None/Opt./
Required
Grads in Co-op Progs.
Biosystems Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Day Optional
Chemical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Day Optional
Civil Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Day Optional
Computer Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Day Optional
Computer Science (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Day Optional
Electrical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Day Optional
Materials Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Day Optional
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Day Optional
Mining Engineering (B.S.) yes 4.00 5.00 Day Optional
Undeclared Freshman Engineering no Day None

Graduate

Admissions Information

Graduate Admission to the College of Engineering

All applications must be submitted on-line through the Graduate School. Applicants must hold a baccalaureate degree with an overall undergraduate GPA of 2.8/4.0 and 3.0/4.0 on all previous graduate work. Individual programs may require higher GPAs. An undergraduate degree in Engineering is not required. If undergraduate degree is not in graduate major, remedial work in graduate major may be required. Application fee is $65 ($75 international). Applicants must submit official scores from the Educational Testing Service on the verbal, quantitative and analytical portions of the GRE. Domestic applications must be submitted no later than one month prior to the beginning of the term. International applications must be received by March 15 (Fall semester admission) and August 22 (Spring semester admission). Some graduate programs have earlier application deadlines. Admitted students must submit official transcripts before enrollment can be finalized. Three letters of recommendation, resume, and statement of research interests are required and must be submitted on-line through the Graduate School.

Graduate Admission to an Engineering Department

Students are admitted by the Graduate School with recommendations from the Director of Graduate Studies in a particular discipline. Contact Director of Graduate Studies for specific program requirements. Additional information available at http://www.engr.uky.edu.

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

An international applicant must typically hold a four-year bachelor’s degree (exceptions to this rule include countries in the European Union, Canada, Australia and New Zealand), have excellent grades
and rank in the top quarter of their classes (for Indian students: a first-class record is normally expected although high second-class holders in non-science areas may be considered if they can offer further evidence of having been in at least the top 10 percent of their graduating class). When credentials are submitted in support of any application, they should be either the original documents or certified
copies (i.e., copies certified or attested as “true copies” by a notary public). An official translation must be attached to these records if they are in a language other than English. Credentials should include a record of all degrees earned, detailing all subjects taken and grades obtained. Grades must be listed in the indigenous system. The minimum acceptable TOEFL score is 550 (paper based) 213 (computer-based) or 79 (internet-based). The minimum IELTS score is 6.5. Individual programs may however have higher requirements. Submitted scores must be no more than two years old. Official language score must be sent directly by the reporting agency. Applicants must also submit a Financial Certificate for International Applicants. International application fee is $75. Applications must be received by March 15 (Fall semester admission) and August 22 (Spring semester admission).

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

Same as for resident students

Residency Requirements

MS Degree: There is no Graduate School-wide sustained residence requirement for master’s degrees at the University of Kentucky. A final exam (oral and/or written) is given to all candidates for master’s degrees. Students have 6 years to complete all requirements for the degree. Extensions may be requested.
PhD Degree: Students must complete the equivalent of two years of residency (36 credit hours) prior to the qualifying exam and one year of post-qualifying residency. Pre-qualifying residency: Students must complete 36 credit hours of graduate coursework (some programs require more than 36 hours) within five years of enrollment. Extensions may be requested. Post-qualifying residency: Students are required to enroll in a 2 credit hour course after successfully completing the qualifying examination, XXX-767; Dissertation Residency Credit. They will be charged at the in-state tuition rate plus mandatory fees. Students must remain continuously enrolled in this course every fall and spring semester until they have completed and defended the dissertation. This will constitute full-time enrollment. Students are required to complete two semesters of 767 before they can graduate. All degree requirements for the doctorate must be completed within five years following the semester or summer session in which the candidate successfully completes the qualifying examination. Extensions may be requested.

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

Upon request of the DGS, a total of 9 hours (or 25% of regular course degree requirements) may be transferred into a master's degree program or to fulfill doctoral pre-qualifying residency requirement. The doctoral transfer policy would NOT apply in cases where a prior master’s degree is being used to satisfy 18 hours of the pre‐qualifying residency requirement. Additional rules apply. See Graduate School Bulletin for specifics.

Graduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): In-State / Out-of-State

Graduate Group 1 Graduate Group 2
Tuition & Fees: $12,726 $30,224
Room & Board: $10,372 $10,372
Books & Supplies: $1,800 $1,800
Other Expenses:
Estimated avg. course load per term: 9 9
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Special Programs or Fee Structures

Students are charged an additional $59.30 per credit hour fee for each graduate engineering course and an additional $59.30 per credit hour for each undergraduate engineering course.

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Institution's Own Application Form

Additional Financial Aid Information

A separate application is required for merit-based fellowships. Department-based teaching and research assistantships are available on a competitive basis. Contact the DGS for information.

Graduate

New Applicants

New Graduate Applicants

A. Number of graduate applicants to the engineering college: 525
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 232
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 109

Graduate

Enrollments by Class

Master's

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Biomedical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 0
Women 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering (M.S.)
Men 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 0 0 6 5
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 7 0
Chemical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Civil Engineering (M.S.)
Men 6 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 18 6 0 0 27 6
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 4 1
Computer Science (M.S.)
Men 6 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 5 6 0 0 15 8
Women 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2
Electrical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 10 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 4 0 0 19 5
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2
Manufacturing Systems Engineering (M.S.)
Men 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 8 0 0 5 9
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 4
Materials Science and Engineering (M.S.)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.)
Men 14 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 8 0 0 28 11
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 4 2
Mining Engineering (M.S.)
Men 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 0
Professional Biomedical Engineering (P.B.M.E.)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 57 4 7 4 2 2 0 0 4 5 4 0 0 0 69 40 1 0 144 55

Doctoral

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Biomedical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 10 1
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 7 2
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 14 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 12 1 0 0 28 2
Women 9 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 14 0
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 1 0 0 15 1
Women 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
Computer Science (Ph.D.)
Men 32 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 13 6 2 0 50 10
Women 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 10 1
Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 23 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 5 1 0 0 31 3
Women 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 7 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 14 1
Women 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6 2
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 33 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 45 0
Women 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 6 0
Mining Engineering (Ph.D.)
Men 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 11 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Totals: 173 5 2 1 5 1 0 0 2 3 5 1 0 0 74 11 3 1 264 23

Graduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Biomedical Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 3 0
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering (M.S.) 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 0 9 7 2
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Civil Engineering (M.S.) 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 16 0 22 19 3
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Computer Science (M.S.) 7 2 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 12 10 2
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Electrical Engineering (M.S.) 5 0 1 0 1 1 0 3 0 11 11 0
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Manufacturing Systems Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Materials Science and Engineering (M.S.) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 9 8 1
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Mining Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 5 4 1
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Professional Biomedical Engineering (P.B.M.E.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Totals: 24 5 1 0 2 2 0 40 0 74 65 9

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Biomedical Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering (M.S.) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 2 0 0 9
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Civil Engineering (M.S.) 4 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 3 0 0 22
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Computer Science (M.S.) 6 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 12
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Electrical Engineering (M.S.) 5 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 11
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Manufacturing Systems Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Materials Science and Engineering (M.S.) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 9
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Mining Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 5
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Professional Biomedical Engineering (P.B.M.E.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Note: Data on degree type for Master’s Degrees Awarded in the College of Engineering is not available
Totals: 23 1 4 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 33 7 0 0 74

Master's Degree Programs

Master's Degree Program Degree Type
Master's w/ Thesis Master's w/o Thesis or with Proj./Report Program Totals
Biomedical Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0
Chemical Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0
Civil Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0
Computer Science (M.S.) 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0
Manufacturing Systems Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0
Materials Science and Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0
Mining Engineering (M.S.) 0 0 0
Professional Biomedical Engineering (P.B.M.E.) 0 0 0
Totals: 0 0 0

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Biomedical Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 6 0
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 7 6 1
Computer Science (Ph.D.) 5 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 9 9 0
Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.) 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 4 1
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 3 2
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1
Mining Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0
Totals: 26 3 0 0 1 0 0 6 0 36 31 5

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Biomedical Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Chemical Engineering (Ph.D.) 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 7
Computer Science (Ph.D.) 5 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 9
Electrical Engineering (Ph.D.) 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5
Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D.) 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5
Mechanical Engineering (Ph.D.) 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Mining Engineering (Ph.D.) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Totals: 21 5 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 36

Graduate

Research Expenditures

Expenditures by Research Department

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Engineering Department External Funding Source
Biomedical Engineering
Total#: 15 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $1,239,381 Industry: $12,640 Priv/Non: $50,415
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $1,302,436
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Total#: 39 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $1,451,188 Industry: $300 Priv/Non: $83,720
State: $91,798 Local: $4,055 Total Expn.: $1,631,061
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Chemical and Materials Engineering
Total#: 62 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $3,676,072 Industry: $264,323 Priv/Non: $150,629
State: $387,627 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $4,478,651
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Civil Engineering
Total#: 19 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $490,114 Industry: $5,662 Priv/Non: $263,294
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $759,070
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Computer Science
Total#: 29 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $1,952,769 Industry: $143,873 Priv/Non: $36,070
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $2,132,712
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Total#: 30 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $1,407,495 Industry: $138,635 Priv/Non: $34,037
State: $7,014 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $1,587,181
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Manufacturing Systems Engineering
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Mechanical Engineering
Total#: 80 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $2,781,379 Industry: $414,474 Priv/Non: $120,768
State: $300,299 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $3,616,920
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Mining Engineering
Total#: 19 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $1,375,910 Industry: $87,031 Priv/Non: $526,577
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $1,989,518
Totals:
Total#: 293 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $14,374,308 Industry: $1,066,938 Priv/Non: $1,265,510
State: $786,738 Local: $4,055 Total Expn.: $17,497,549

Expenditures by Research Center

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Aluminum Technology
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Applied Energy Research
Total#: 57 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $9,356,367 Industry: $1,336,141 Priv/Non: $25,190
State: $384,320 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $11,102,018
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center for Visualization and Virtual Environments
Total#: 8 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $557,554 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $557,554
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Institute for Sustainable Manufacturing
Total#: 10 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $464,331 Industry: $25,253 Priv/Non: $0
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $489,584
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Institute of Research for Technology Development
Total#: 6 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $96,225 Industry: $184,681 Priv/Non: $55,623
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $336,529
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Kentucky Transportation Center
Total#: 149 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $6,606,294 Industry: $95,327 Priv/Non: $0
State: $1,108,156 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $7,809,777
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute
Total#: 10 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $304,795 Industry: $37,859 Priv/Non: $0
State: $106,950 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $449,604
Totals:
Total#: 240 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $17,385,566 Industry: $1,679,261 Priv/Non: $80,813
State: $1,599,426 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $20,745,066


Grand Totals:
Total#: 533 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $31,759,874 Industry: $2,746,199 Priv/Non: $1,346,323
State: $2,386,164 Local: $4,055 Total Expn.: $38,242,615

The following text was offered to each school as a guideline for the calculation of externally-funded research expenditures:

Include all expenditures associated with grants and contracts specifically budgeted for externally sponsored research and associated programs and expenditures associated with all gifts auditably used for research. Include expended funds provided by the following external sources:

  1. Federal Government
  2. State Government
  3. Foreign Governments
  4. Industry
  5. Non-Profit Organizations (e.g. foundations)
  6. Individuals
  7. Local Government

The expenditures reported should be only those funds provided by organizations, agencies, and individuals external to the institution. Cost sharing/matching funds should be included only if provided from sources external to the institution.

Only State government funds that were obtained competitively or as matching funds associated with other externally funded programs should be included. State funds that are part of the normal operating budget should not be included regardless of purpose.

For all joint or contracted projects or sub-projects, only the portion of the center research performed by faculty, staff, and students of the affiliated engineering school should be credited to that school. Expenditures for capital costs of research laboratory building construction should not be included.

Expenditures for research laboratory renovations should not be included unless the renovation funds expended came from grants and contracts expressly intended for the direct support of engineering research.

Any portion of academic year and/or summer salary for any researcher that is not derived from external research grants or contracts should not be counted.

Total #: Report total number of individual grants, not the total dollar amount of the expenditures.

Expenditures: Report actual expenditures (as opposed to authorization amounts) in U.S. dollars.

Time frame for expenditures: Report expenditures for your current fiscal year.

Research centers listed as "WITHIN an engineering department" on the Research Centers page (screen 7) of the College of Engineering Profile, will not have their expenditures added to the school's total research expenditures. Such expenditures can be included in the department total, while still being listed for the appropriate center. This allows users to list the expenditures in two areas without double-counting.

Graduate

Research Description

Research Description By Graduate Engineering Department

Biomedical Engineering

The Department of Biomedical Engineering offers master's and doctoral degrees. These programs emphasize the application of engineering principles to topics in healthcare, with areas of research specialization including: biomaterials and tissue engineering, biophotonics, bone quality, cardiac arrhythmia, cardiovascular regulation, cellular mechanotransduction, musculoskeletal biomechanics, and neural engineering.

Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering

The Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering offers graduate programs leading to M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering. The Department has active research programs in Food and Bioprocess Engineering, Machine Systems Automation Engineering, Bioenvironmental Engineering, and Controlled Environment Systems Engineering. Research topics under Food Engineering include; food processing for improving nutrition, food security and identification preservation: topics under Bioprocessing include; biofuels, bioproducts, renewable materials, and value-added renewable resource utilization. Research topics in machine systems automation include; design of machines and systems for precision agriculture, autonomous vehicle control and communication, unmanned aerial systems, and grain harvest logistics: bioenvironmental research topics include: surface water hydrology, water quality, stream restoration, low impact development, animal waste management and mined land reclamation. Controlled environment sytems engineering involves; solar energy systems design, design of environmental control systems, green and sustainable building design for optimal interactions between occupants and environment, energy efficiency, energy auditing in agricultural and industrial facilities, and energy and resource assessment.

Chemical and Materials Engineering

The Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering offers programs leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in both Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering. Areas of Research Specialization include: Biomaterials; Bionanotechnology; Biopharmaceutical Engineering; Computational Materials Science; Drug Delivery; Energy Storage and Battery Technology; Environmental Engineering; Fuel Science; Interfacial Engineering; Materials Synthesis and Nanomaterials; Membrane Science and Technology; Metals and Alloys; Polymer Science and Engineering; Sustainable Processes; Thin Films

Civil Engineering

The Department offers programs leading to the Master of Science in Civil Engineering and Ph.D. degrees. Graduate degree specialization focuses on the following areas: Civil Engineering Materials, Construction Engineering and Project Management, Environmental Engineering, Geotechnical Engineering, Structural Engineering, Transportation Engineering, and Water Resources Engineering. Department strengths include: Construction, Transportation (interdisciplinary), Resilient and Sustainable Infrastructure, Global Collaboration and Humanitarian Engineering, Safety and Security, and Railroad Engineering. Research opportunities are experiential and field-oriented.

Computer Science

The Department offers programs leading to the Master of Science and PhD degrees. Areas of research actively pursued by faculty and students in the department include: artificial intelligence, bio-informatics, computer vision, cryptography, database and data mining, design and analysis of algorithms, distributed and parallel computing, knowledge representation and declarative programming, networking, security, software engineering, theory of computation, visualization and graphics.

Electrical and Computer Engineering

The department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers programs leading to an M.S. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering. Research focus areas include micro and nano-scale devices and materials, power and energy, computational electromagnetics, computer engineering, and communications and signal processing. The department plays a leading role in several large-scale research centers and institutes, including the Center for Visualization and Virtual Environments, the Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CeNSE), as well as the Power and Energy Institute of Kentucky (PEIK).

Manufacturing Systems Engineering

The College of Engineering offers a master's degree program in Manufacturing Systems Engineering. It is designed to equip the student for opportunities in modern manufacturing processes and systems. Areas of concentration for research and study are: Sustainable Materials; Sustainable Product Development; Sustainable Manufacturing Processes; Sustainable Manufacturing Systems and Supply Chains; Society, Public Policy, and Regulations; Economic Models for Sustainable Manufacturing; Lean manufacturing.

Mechanical Engineering

Current research in Mechanical Engineering is focused of the following strategic areas and topics:
Aerospace: Unmanned aircraft systems, atmospheric reentry, atmospheric turbulence, computational modeling of high-speed reacting flows and fluid structure interactions, smart materials, thermal barrier coatings, plasma diagnostics
Autonomy and Robotics: Control of unmanned systems, microrobotics, adaptive control, machine human interactions, precision agriculture
Bioengineering: Cardiovascular mechanics, cell mechanics, modeling of human tissue
Energy: Combustion, carbon management and pollution control, fire modeling, heat exchangers, boiling
Sustainable Manufacturing: Manufacturing processes and systems, computer integrated manufacturing, production scheduling, optimization
Vibro-acoustics and noise control

Mining Engineering

Current research areas include the following: rock mechanics and ground control, operations research, mine ventilation, underground construction, surface mining and reclamation, mine environmental engineering, mine power systems, coal preparation, mineral economics, explosives and blasting, geotechnical engineering, ore reserve evaluation, mine health and safety, mine automation and control, minerals processing.

Research Description By Engineering Research Center

Center for Aluminum Technology

The College of Engineering’s Center for Aluminum Technology was established in September 1999 as a multidisciplinary center providing research and educational services to the aluminum industry in the United States. Aluminum industry leaders, local officials, the University of Kentucky, and the Kentucky Economic Development Cabinet collaborated to form the nation’s only aluminum research laboratory supported by such a partnership. One of the ways that the research and educational services are delivered to the Aluminum industry is through Secat, Inc.
The Center supports and conducts research and development, provides technical assistance to the aluminum industry, assists with training and retaining an educated workforce, and promotes and participates in the expanding use of aluminum. The Center provides research opportunities for the undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate students, along with non-degree students from community colleges and technical schools.
Affiliated with the Center are researchers from a variety of disciplines, including materials engineering, chemical engineering, mathematics, chemistry, electrical and computer engineering and mechanical engineering. The Center is funded through two sources: an endowment established with private contributions from the aluminum industry and matching support from Kentucky’s Research Challenge Trust Fund, and with state and federal grants.

Center for Applied Energy Research

CAER is an energy technology research facility whose broad mission is to conduct basic and applied research designed to generate information on Kentucky energy resources; ascertain the associated environmental impacts; and produce, test and evaluate new technologies. Current activities include coal cleaning, catalysis, emissions control, separation technologies, coal combustion byproducts research, and activated carbon research. CAER's industrial support group works with industry to solve industrial problems through utilization of the center's analytical services expertise and facilities. The Center for Applied Energy Research each year sponsors seminars by distinguished experts on current scientific topics of interest to the academic and research communities.

Center for Visualization and Virtual Environments

With programs in research, education and industrial outreach, the Center brings together researchers with expertise in computer vision and image processing, data acquisition, graphics, human-computer interaction, multimedia, and teleconferencing and is dedicated to research and development of computer-generated immersive environments, ambient environments, dynamic scene acquisition and preservation, advanced telepresence and telecommunications, and visualization applications in areas such as education and training, medicine, manufacturing, security and daily life . Researchers are building state-of-the-art visualization and display environments for different applications. The research includes efficient 3D data acquisition and analysis and computer vision and graphics problems related to model acquisition and tracking of people and objects in order to populate and preserve realistic three-dimensional scenes.

Institute for Sustainable Manufacturing

The Institute for Sustainable Manufacturing (ISM) is a multi-disciplinary research unit within the College of Engineering. The ISM focuses on strategic areas of sustainable manufacturing, and its major activities are: (a)conducting academic research (basic and applied), (b) inventing and commercializing innovative products, processes and technologies, (c) transferring knowledge to industry through extension/outreach, and(d) supporting the graduate and undergraduate educational programs offered by the College and individual departments. Six major research areas of ISM are:
* Sustainable materials
* Sustainable product development
* Sustainable manufacturing processes
* Sustainable manufacturing systems
* Society, public policy and regulatory issues in sustainable manufacturing
* Economic analysis of sustainable products and processes

Institute of Research for Technology Development

The Institute of Research for Technology Development (IR4TD) addresses industry problems, with a goal of technology development, by conducting multi-disciplinary research, drawing on a wide array of technical and scientific fields.
IR4TD directly responds to industry's immediate and long-term needs for solutions to process problems and challenges. It is an outgrowth of the highly successful Painting Technology Consortium (PTC) which joined academic researchers and industrial resources to develop a new generation of energy efficient, environmentally friendly painting technology

Kentucky Transportation Center

Serving as the focal point in the state for interdisciplinary transportation research, the center works closely with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, the Federal Highway Administration, and various other private and governmental agencies to develop innovative technological advances in transportation. An ongoing technology-transfer program provides services to state and local governmental transportation agencies as well as the private sector through training programs, workshops, conferences, technical publications, and on-site consultation. The center's research capabilities span a wide range of areas with a major focus on applied research and problem solving for the Transportation Cabinet. Their areas of expertise include pavements, materials, structures, traffic/safety, geotech, construction management, environmental analysis, intelligent transportation systems, transportation planning, economics and finance, policy, and multimodal transportation. The center provides a myriad of opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to benefit from hands-on experience addressing transportation issues.

Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute

The KWRRI is part of a national network of state water institutes which was created by Congress in 1964. The KWRRI stimulates and supports water research, education, and technology transfer by identifying current and emerging water issues for Kentucky and the nation. Institute research programs include the USGS 104(b) and 104(g) grant programs and the faculty proposal development program. Educational programs include am undergraduate student intern program and Environmental Protection Scholarships which support both undergraduate and graduate students with full scholarships in exchange for employment with the state upon graduation. The institute's technology-transfer activities include short courses, seminars and conferences, and distribution of research results. The KWRRI works closely with several Kentucky water related state agencies and NGOs such as the Kentucky Cabinet for Energy and Environment, the Kentucky River Authority, and the Kentucky Watershed Watch. In 2010, the KWRRI was designated by USEPA as a Center of Excellence for Watershed Management.

Graduate

Subject Areas of Research

Subject Areas

  • 3D data acquisition
  • 3D modeling
  • 3D printing
  • Ablation Modeling - Vehicle Reentry
  • Abrasive waterjet
  • Accident proclivity to roadway geometrics
  • Accidents, characteristics of
  • Acoustical simulation
  • Acoustics
  • Active vibration suppression
  • Adaptive Traffic Signal Systems
  • Additive manufacturing (or 3D printing)
  • Adhesion studies
  • Adhesives, metal-polymer conductive
  • Adiabatic logic and computing
  • Advanced material coatings
  • Aeroelasticity of turbines
  • Aerospace and electronic systems
  • Agricultural air quality
  • Alternative energy
  • Aluminum products and processing
  • Aluminum, thermomechanical processing of
  • Antennas and propagation
  • Applied Geophysics
  • Applied surface chemistry
  • Artificial intelligence and planning
  • Asphalt stabilized railroad beds
  • Atmospheric turbulence
  • Audio, speech and language processing
  • Automated reasoning
  • Automatic Speech Recognition
  • Automation
  • Automotive painting technology
  • Autonomous vehicles
  • Battery Technology
  • Bearings and seals
  • Bio-heat mass transfer
  • Bioacoustics
  • Biofuels
  • Bioinformatics
  • Bioinstrumentation
  • Biological materials, composting
  • Biological materials, conversion
  • Biological materials, energy sources
  • Biological materials, methane production
  • Biological materials, recycling
  • Biological signals and systems, analysis and modeling
  • Biological systems
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomechanics
  • Biomedical imaging
  • Biomedical informatics
  • Biomedical signal processing
  • Bionanotechnology
  • Biophotonics
  • Bioprocessing of waste materials
  • Bituminous mixtures, design of
  • Blast mitigation
  • Bone quality
  • Brazing
  • Bridge Component Strengthening/Retrofitting
  • Bridge vibrations
  • Broadcast and television
  • Building Information Modeling (BIM)
  • Building emissions measurement
  • C1 chemistry to produce transportation fuel
  • Carbon anode and cathode
  • Carbon materials: nanotubes, fibres, pitches
  • Cardiovascular regulation
  • Catalysis
  • Cell membranes, properties of
  • Cellular mechanotransduction
  • Channel development, modeling of
  • Channel erosion
  • Channel modeling
  • Chemical removal, nonpoint source
  • Chemical vapor deposition
  • Chip formation, theory of
  • Circuits
  • Close-range photogrammetry
  • Coal beneficiation
  • Coal combustion products: recovery, utilization
  • Coal surface phenomena
  • Coal utilization byproducts
  • Coal, biological desulfurization
  • Coal, biosolubilization
  • Coal, hydrogenation
  • Coal, in situ biocatalyst formation
  • Coarse-grained modeling and simulation
  • Collocation discretization procedures
  • Combustion
  • Communication networks
  • Comparative decision-making
  • Compilers
  • Complexity of continuous problems
  • Complexity theory
  • Compliance control
  • Component packaging
  • Compressible flow, high speed
  • Computational Materials Science
  • Computational fluid dynamics
  • Computational learning theory
  • Computational photography
  • Computer architecture
  • Computer security
  • Computer vision and graphics
  • Computing, neural-based
  • Concrete structures
  • Concrete, fiber reinforced
  • Constraint satisfaction
  • Constraint solving
  • Constructability
  • Constructed wetlands
  • Construction health and safety
  • Construction management practices
  • Construction productivity
  • Construction work force demographics
  • Context Sensitive Highway Design/Construction
  • Controlled release
  • Craft training
  • Cryptography
  • Cybernetics
  • Cyberphysical Systems
  • Cybersecurity
  • Data mining
  • Database systems
  • Decision-theoretic planning
  • Declarative programming
  • Decontamination of metals
  • Dense slurries, flow of
  • Design/Modeling/Transport
  • Dielectrics and electrical insulation
  • Digital Learning Technologies
  • Digital media
  • Digital signal processors
  • Discrete-event systems
  • Distributed computer architectures
  • Distributed computing systems
  • Driver characteristics
  • Drug delivery
  • Dynamic programming
  • Electric machines
  • Electric motors and drives
  • Electrodischarge compaction
  • Electroluminescent display devices
  • Electromagnetic compatibility
  • Electromagnetic devices
  • Electromagnetic fields
  • Electronic Screening of Vehicles
  • Electronics thermal management
  • Embedded systems
  • Energy
  • Energy Storage
  • Energy conservation
  • Energy conversion
  • Energy efficiency
  • Environmental
  • Environmental
  • Environmental impacts of blasting (vibration)
  • Environmental policy
  • Evolutionary computing
  • Export System GPS-Based Predictive Models
  • Fault tolerant/robust systems
  • Finite difference procedures
  • Finite element procedures
  • Finite volume procedures
  • Fire research
  • Flame behavior
  • Fluidized bed combustion
  • Food processing systems
  • Food products, modification of
  • Fossil fuels
  • Future network design
  • Fuzzy systems
  • GIS
  • Geological Hazards
  • Geometric modeling
  • Geosciences and remote sensing
  • Geotechnical Engineering
  • Geotechnics
  • Ground Penetrating Radar Application/Analysis
  • Ground vibration monitoring and mitigation
  • Groundwater flow characteristics
  • Groundwater remediation
  • Hazard Mitigation
  • Hazardous waste destruction
  • Heat transfer
  • Heating and cooling
  • High cycle fatigue
  • High-level interpretation of image data
  • High-performance computing
  • Highway Safety and Risk Analysis
  • Highway design
  • Human factors
  • Humanitarian engineering
  • Hydrogen
  • Hydrologic modeling
  • Hydrological cycle, improved models of
  • Hydrology
  • Image processing
  • Image-based rendering
  • Indoor environmental quality
  • Inelastic material response
  • Information-based complexity
  • Infrastructure resilience
  • Injection molding
  • Inland Waterway Capacity Analysis
  • Instrumentation
  • Intelligent systems
  • Intelligent transportation systems
  • Interfaces/Nano-scale materials
  • Intermodal Transport Substitution Analysis
  • Knowledge representation
  • LIDAR Application/Analysis
  • Land use and access management
  • Landfill Geotechnology
  • Landfill covers
  • Laser diagnostics
  • Lean systems
  • Lightweight space structures
  • Linear programming
  • Logic programming
  • Low impact development
  • MEMS
  • Machine learning
  • Machine systems, control of
  • Machine vision
  • Machining chatter, control of
  • Machining process, modeling of
  • Magnetic bearings
  • Manufacturing control systems
  • Manufacturing processes
  • Manufacturing systems
  • Mass customization
  • Medical imaging
  • Membrane separation processes
  • Metal forming and materials processing
  • Metal-polymer conductive adhesives
  • Metal-slap interactions
  • Metals science
  • Metrology
  • Micro-machining and manufacturing
  • Mine electrical system safety
  • Mine ventilation
  • Mine, health and safety
  • Mineral processing, advanced particle-particle separations
  • Mineral processing, processing modeling & control
  • Mineral processing: slurry densification
  • Mineral processing: solid-liquid separations
  • Mining, economical
  • Mobile networks
  • Modeling, building energy
  • Modeling, overland/channel/pipe flow
  • Molecular dynamics modeling
  • Multimedia networks
  • Musculoskeletal modeling
  • Nanoelectronic devices
  • Nanomaterials
  • Nanoparticles
  • Nanotechnology
  • Network security
  • Neural engineering
  • Nonlinear optimization
  • Nonlinear oscillations
  • Numerical analysis
  • Numerical modeling of wave propagation through soil and rock
  • Occupational safety and health
  • Operating systems
  • Optics
  • Optoelectronic devices
  • Organic semiconductors
  • Orthopedic biomechanics
  • Overland modeling
  • Ozonation
  • PM2.5 from fossil fuels
  • PV systems
  • Parallel computing
  • Pattern analysis
  • Pavement management and maintenance
  • Piezoelectric actuation
  • Pipe flow modeling
  • Pollutants, groundwater
  • Polymer Processing
  • Polymer systems
  • Port Sustainability Analysis/Audit
  • Power electronics
  • Power systems
  • Precision engineering
  • Privacy Enhancing Technologies
  • Public transportation
  • Quantum electronics
  • Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology
  • Railroad Crossings
  • Railroad beds, asphalt stabilized
  • Rapid construction techniques
  • Rapid prototyping
  • Reasoning under uncertainty
  • Reinforced concrete slab-column interaction
  • Remote Sensing
  • Remote sensing instrumentation
  • Remote sensing technology for structures
  • Renewable energy
  • Requirements engineering
  • Retrofit of Structures
  • Reuse of coal combustion byproducts
  • Roadway Intersection Design/Analysis
  • Robotics
  • Rock mechanics
  • Rotating machinery dynamics
  • Roundabouts
  • Scale modeling
  • Scientific computing
  • Scour at bridge sites
  • Sedimentation
  • Seepage and underground flow
  • Seismic Analysis and Retrofit of Structures
  • Semiconductor manufacturing
  • Sensors
  • Separation and membranes
  • Sheet metal forming, models of
  • Signal processing
  • Silo/grain interaction
  • Slope stability analysis
  • Smart Health Systems
  • Smart Materials
  • Smart Structures
  • Smart composite structures
  • Smart grid
  • Software engineering
  • Software maintenance
  • Software testing
  • Software verification and validation
  • Soil characteristics and engineering properties
  • Soil dynamics
  • Solar cells
  • Solar energy
  • Stakeholder engagement
  • Steel structures
  • Stereolithography
  • Stochastic modeling
  • Stochastic models
  • Stormwater modeling
  • Stream restoration
  • Stream restoration design
  • Structural Health Monitoring
  • Structural analysis, modeling, and design
  • Structural hazard mitigation
  • Structural laboratory and field testing
  • Structural preservation
  • Structural stability
  • Structural vibration
  • Structured Public Involvement Infrastructure Design
  • Stud-brick wall interaction
  • Supercomputing
  • Surface mine reclamation
  • Surface plasmon resonance
  • Sustainable design
  • Sustainable manufacturing
  • Sustainable production systems
  • Synthesis gas conversion
  • Synthetic fuels
  • Systems analysis
  • Tensioned gossamer membrane structures
  • Theoretical computer science
  • Thermal characteristics of materials
  • Thermal control, advanced
  • Thermal effect on Structures
  • Thermomechanical processing of aluminum
  • Thin films/electronics
  • Tissue engineering
  • Toxic substance removal, membranes for
  • Toxic trace metals from coal combustion
  • Traffic control systems, enhanced
  • Traffic operations/safety/design
  • Transportation Planning Models
  • Transportation linkages, survivability
  • Transportation planning and network analysis
  • Transportation policy and finance
  • Transportation security
  • Treatment of waste materials
  • Tribology
  • Turbomachinery
  • Turbulence modeling
  • Ultrasonics
  • Unmanned aerial systems
  • Unsteady aerodynamics
  • Value engineering
  • Vapor intrusion
  • Vehicular technology
  • Vessel Impact on Bridges
  • Visualization
  • Waste recycling
  • Waste treatment
  • Waste, bioprocessing
  • Waste, destruction of hazardous
  • Water distribution system modeling
  • Water distribution system security
  • Water quality
  • Water quality evaluation in karst areas
  • Water quality modeling
  • Water resource systems analysis
  • Water, quality
  • Water, surface supply
  • Watershed management
  • Watershed modeling
  • Waterway Shipment/Logistics Management System
  • Welding automation and control
  • Wind turbine systems
  • Wireless and ad-hoc networks
  • Yield line theory

Graduate

Dual Degrees

Graduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

n/a

Graduate

Student Appointments

Appointments by Department

Appointments - Number of Appointments
Stipend - Average Monthly Stipend

Department Fellowships TA RA Other Total Appts.
Biomedical Engineering
Appointments: 1 0 13 4 18
Stipends: $2,273 $0 $1,462 $3,956
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Appointments: 0 0 22 1 23
Stipends: $0 $0 $1,390 $3,956
Chemical and Materials Engineering
Appointments: 7 7 46 6 66
Stipends: $2,026 $2,043 $2,026 $3,956
Civil Engineering
Appointments: 6 24 13 0 43
Stipends: $1,344 $1,163 $1,200 $0
Computer Science
Appointments: 2 21 25 2 50
Stipends: $1,800 $1,800 $1,800 $1,800
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Appointments: 2 14 22 2 40
Stipends: $1,048 $1,462 $1,635 $4,856
Manufacturing Systems Engineering
Appointments: 0 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0 $0
Mechanical Engineering
Appointments: 0 23 35 2 60
Stipends: $0 $1,596 $1,698 $3,956
Mining Engineering
Appointments: 7 3 11 1 22
Stipends: $1,673 $2,130 $2,083 $4,000
All Total Appointments 25 92 187 18 322

Appointments by Research Center

Appointments - Number of Appointments
Stipend - Average Monthly Stipend

Graduate Research Center Fellowships RA Other Total Appts.
Center for Aluminum Technology
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Center for Applied Energy Research
Appointments: 0 3 1 4
Stipends: $0 $1,680 $3,956
Center for Visualization and Virtual Environments
Appointments: 0 1 0 1
Stipends: $0 $930 $0
Institute for Sustainable Manufacturing
Appointments: 0 5 1 6
Stipends: $0 $1,612 $3,956
Institute of Research for Technology Development
Appointments: 0 3 0 3
Stipends: $0 $1,500 $0
Kentucky Transportation Center
Appointments: 0 5 0 5
Stipends: $0 $1,117 $0
Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
All Total Appointments 0 17 2 19