University of Nebraska, Lincoln - 2017

Institution Information

Contact Information

Institution's Mailing Address

Institution Name: University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Mailing Address: 114 Othmer Hall
P.O. Box 880642
City: Lincoln
State: NE
Postal Code: 68588
Country: United States
Phone 402-472-3181
Fax: 402-472-7792
Website: http://engineering.unl.edu/

Head of Institution

Mark Riley
Associate Dean
Associate Dean
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
College Of Engineering
OTHM 114G
Lincoln, NE 68588-0642
Phone: 402-472-3386
mriley3@unl.edu

Undergraduate Admission Inquiries

Justin Brown
Director
Scholarships and Financial Aid
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
17 ADMN
Lincoln, NE 68588-0411
Phone: 402-472-2030
justin.brown@unl.edu

Maggie Jobes
Director of Recruitment
Dean's Office
University of Nebraska Lincoln
OTHM 209
Lincoln, NE 68588-0642
Phone: 402-472-7094
maggie.jobes@unl.edu

Graduate Admission Inquiries

Lily Wang
Associate Dean, Graduate Programs & Faculty Development
Architectural Engineering
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
101A PKI
Omaha, NE 68182-0681
Phone: 402-554-2065
lwang4@unl.edu

Hamid Sharif
Professor - Graduate Chair
Telecommunications Engineering
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
200C PKI
Omaha, NE 68182-0572
Phone: 402-554-3628
hsharif@unl.edu

Angela Bryan
Assoc Dir. Of Graduate Admissions
Office of Graduate Studies
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
116 SEH
Lincoln, NE 68588-0619
Phone: 402-472-9541
abryan3@unl.edu

Jeyam Subbiah
Associate Professor
Biological Systems Engineering
University of Nebraska Lincoln
212 L.W. Chase Hall
Lincoln, NE 668583-0726
Phone: 402-472-4944
jeyam.subbiah@unl.edu

Linxia Gu
Associate Professor - Graduate Chair
Biomedical Engineering
University of Nebraska Lincoln
NH W317.2
Lincoln, NE 68588-0526
Phone: 402-472-7680
lgu@unl.edu

Terry Stentz
Associate Professor - Graduate Chair
Construction Engineering & Management
University of Nebraska Lincoln
113 NH
Lincoln, NE 68588-0500
Phone: 402-472-5078
tstentz1@unl.edu

Micah Chafee
Program Coordinator
Engineering Management
University of Nebraska Lincoln
PKI 100
Omaha, NE 68182-0176
Phone: 402-554-6009
mchaffee4@unl.edu

Yusong Li
Associate Professor - Grad. Chair
Civil Engineering
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
SLNK N114
Lincoln, NE 68588-6105
Phone: 402-472-5972
yli7@unl.edu

John Reid
Professor - Grad. Chair
Mechanical & Materials Engineering
University of Nebraska Lincoln
NH W359
Lincoln, NE 68588-0526
Phone: 402-472-3084
jreid@unl.edu

Josephine Lau
Associate Professor - Grad. Chair
Durham School Of Architectural Engineering & Construction
University of Nebraska - Lincoln
PKI 203D
Omaha, NE 68182-0681
Phone: 402-554-2079
jlau3@unl.edu

Institution Information

General Information


Type of institution: PUBLIC
Academic Year: SEMESTERS
Setting of Main Engineering Campus URBAN

Main Campus Information

Is the main campus located in a city with a population greater than 100,000?: Yes
Name of this city, or if no, the name of the nearest city of any size?: Lincoln
This city's population (approx.): 280,364
Distance from Main Campus: 0

Total Enrollment

Total Undergraduate enrollment: 20,954
Total Graduate enrollment: 4,606
Total Professional and other enrollment: 519

Non-Engineering Degree Granting Colleges

Business, Communications, Education, Fine arts, Law, Liberal arts, Natural sciences, Architecture, Agricultural Sciences, Arts & Sciences, Education and Human Sciences

Institution Information

General Admissions

Entrance Requirements and Recommendations

Requirements

You are guaranteed admission if you meet the core course requirements and at least one performance requirement. If you don't meet these requirements, we strongly encourage you to apply anywayâ€"your admission will be determined by a committee appointed by the Director of Admissions and your complete academic profile will be considered.
Performance Requirements

First-Year applicants should:

Score 20 or higher on the ACT, writing portion not required.
Or, score a total of 950 or higher on the SAT Critical Reading and Math sections.
Or, rank in the top half of their high school graduating class.
All first-year applicants under the age of 23 are required to submit an official ACT or SAT score.

Core Course Requirements

There are 16 units of academic courses required for admission.

A unit is one year of high school study or a semester/quarter of college coursework.
High School Classes

Here is a list of Nebraska high school classes that count toward core course requirements.
Ways to Meet Admission Requirements

If you are missing courses required for admission, there are ways to remove the deficiencies before you enroll.
Core Courses
Required academic courses
Category Requirements
English 4 units of English:
Units must include intensive reading and writing experiences.
Mathematics 4 units of math:

Algebra
Algebra II
Geometry
1 additional unit that builds on knowledge and concepts learned in Algebra II

Social Sciences 3 units of social sciences:

1 unit drawn from American and/or world history
1 additional unit drawn from history
American government and/or geography
a 3rd unit drawn from any social science discipline

Natural Sciences 3 units of natural sciences:

At least 2 units selected from:
biology
chemistry
physics
earth sciences
1 unit must include laboratory instruction

Foreign Language 2 units of foreign language:

Both units must be in the same language.
Students who are unable to take 2 years of foreign language in high school may still qualify for admission.
NOTE: Some University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln degree programs require the equivalent of 4 years of high school foreign language in the same language in order to graduate.
View foreign language requirements by degree.

College Specific Requirements

All colleges at the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln require students meet the minimum core course and performance admission requirements. (as listed above)

Some colleges have additional requirements that students must meet in order to be admitted to their requested college.
The Explore Center

If you do not meet college specific requirements you can still be admitted through our Explore Center.

you will be advised by the Explore Center until you meet the college specific requirements for your desired college.
once you've met your college's requirements, you will have the opportunity to transfer into the college you requested.

Colleges With NO Additional Requirements

The colleges below do not have additional requirements beyond core course and performance requirements.

College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources
College of Arts & Sciences
College of Education & Human Sciences
College of Journalism & Mass Communications

Colleges With Additional Requirements

College of Architecture
Architecture course requirements
Category Requirements
Math

1 full unit of Pre-Calc/Trig
OR 1/2 unit Pre-Calc/Trig
1/2 unit Math/Calc

ACT/SAT scores

ACT composite score of 22 or higher.
OR an SAT combined score of 1030 or higher.

Transfer & Readmit Students In addition to the above requirements, must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0.
College of Business Administration
Business administration course requirements
Category Requirements
Transfer & Readmit Students Must have a cumulative GPA of 2.5.
College of Engineering
Engineering course requirements
Category Requirements
First-Year College Students
Math

1 full unit of geometry AND

As part of the 4 units required you must take:

pre-calculus
OR trigonometry
OR calculus

Natural Sciences As part of the 3 units required you must take:

chemistry
AND physics

ACT/SAT Scores

ACT composite score of 24 or higher
OR an SAT combined score of 1110 (old) or 1180 (new) or higher

Domestic Transfer Students

Must have a cumulative and last-term GPA of at least 2.5.

Hixson-Lied College of Fine & Performing Arts

AUDITION AND/OR PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS

You must also meet any audition or portfolio requirements listed below:
Audition requirements
Category Requirements
Art, Art History: No auditions or special applications.
Music, Dance: Auditions are required.

audition requirements
view audition dates by major/minor
schedule an audition

Theatre emphasis in:

performance

Auditions are required.

View the Johnny Carson School of Theatre & Film audition information.
Theatre emphasis in:

design/technical production

No portfolio or audition required.

However, there is an optional portfolio for an additional scholarship.
Theatre emphasis in:

directing & management

Application and portfolio required.

Requirements for the application and portfolio.
Theatre emphasis in:

film/new media

Supporting materials required.

View additional required materials.
Transfer & Readmit Students Film & New Media majors must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 and a semester GPA of 3.0.
College of Public Affairs & Community Service
Public affairs and community service course requirements
Category Requirements
Transfer & Readmit
Students Must have a cumulative GPA of 2.5.
College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources
PGA Golf Management Requirements
Category Requirements
PGA Golf Management
Students A 12 Handicap is required for students entering into this program. For more information, please visit: http://pgm.unl.edu/requirements.
Admission of Students on the Basis of Special Merit

Applicants who do not qualify for assured admission will automatically be considered for full admission to the University on the basis of special merit. The special merit process will make provisions for a variety of circumstances, including allowance for the special consideration to be given to: non- traditional students; returning adult students; students educated at home schools; students who do not meet the required performance criteria but who have performed at a high level of accomplishment towards the conclusion of their high school careers (sometimes called "late bloomers"); students who can provide evidence of special talents, such as outstanding musical performers; those with unique educational experience or career achievements, etc. Such students will be encouraged to provide evidence of their ability to do University level work. In addition, special consideration will be given to members of under-represented groups who present evidence of being able to succeed. Such applications will be considered by University admissions personnel following established policies and procedures. It must be emphasized that students once admitted through this process will be considered fully admitted and will not be considered by the University to have a provisional status. However, some students may have to complete specific University courses to compensate for having not completed all of the required core courses or equivalent educational attainments.
Admissions Committee

Per Admissions Office Procedures Manual in Accordance with RP- 5.2.1-4bâ€"an Admissions Committees may admit students that do not meet the Board of Regents assured admissions requirements for full admission. These decisions are based upon a holistic review of an individual applicants student record including but not limited to: academic achievement (GPA, academic courses, class rank, standardized test scores), high school course availability, recommendation letters, and retention services. The Admissions Committee will utilize this information through the holistic review process to determine whether there are other indicia in the record that would contribute to the applicant's academic success at the University. The Office of Admissions has three committees that perform the above described work: First-Year college students; Transfer/International and Special Circumstances.

The Special Circumstances Committee will holistically review applicants with special merit that are required to participate in intrusive and successful retention programs such as, but not limited to, Nebraska College Preparatory Academy, William H. Thompson Scholars, and Nebraska Athletics Support Services. The Director of Admissions must approve retention programs to be considered for the Special Circumstances Committee. Members of this committee will be appointed by the Director of Admissions.
Don't Forget

After meeting these requirements, you have to apply for admission and pay the $45 application fee to be considered for admission.
Applications After Published Admissions Deadlines

Any application received after the published deadline will be placed on a wait-list. The admissions committee will prioritize the wait-list based upon candidates that meet UNL's assured admission requirements.

Find out more about University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln assured admission requirements.

Please note there is no guarantee of admission for wait-list applicants.

Recommendations

none provided

Engineering Information

Head of Engineering

Head of Engineering

Lance Perez
Dean College of Engineering
College of Engineering
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
114 Othmer Hall
Lincoln, NE 68588-0642
Phone: 402-472-5259
Fax: 402-472-7792
lcperez@unl.edu

Engineering Information

Engineering Degrees Offered

Types of Engineering Degrees

Bachelor's:B.S.
Master's:M.S. with thesis, M.S. without thesis, but with project or report, M.Eng., MARE
Doctoral:Ph.D.

Computer Science Degrees Awarded Outside the College/School of Engineering

Bachelor's, Master's, Doctoral

Engineering Information

Engineering Departments

Engineering Department(s) Degree Granting Level Department Chair Discipline
Biological Systems Engineering Both David Jones Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Both Hossein Noureddini Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering Both Daniel Linzell Civil Engineering
Computer Science and Engineering Both Matthew Dwyer Computer Science (inside engineering)
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Both Jay Puckett Architectural Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Both Jerry Hudgins Electrical/Computer Engineering
Engineering - Dean's Office Both Lance Perez Engineering (General)
Mechanical & Materials Engineering Both Jeffrey Shield Mechanical Engineering

Engineering Information

Research Centers

  • INCOLL - Research center WITHIN the college of engineering
  • INDEPT - Research center WITHIN an engineering department
  • INUNIV - Research center WITHIN university system
  • OUTUNIV - Research center OUTSIDE the university
Center/Lab Discipline Research Class Head Chair
Biological Process Development Facility Chemical Engineering INCOLL Wallace Buchholz
Center For Electro-optics Aerospace Engineering INCOLL Dennis Alexander
Design & Fabrication Lab Engineering (General) INCOLL James McManis
Industrial Agricultural Products Center Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr. INUNIV Mark Wilkins
Mid-America Transportation Center Civil Engineering INCOLL Laurence Rilett
Midwest Roadside Safety Facility Civil Engineering INCOLL Ronald Faller
Nano-Engineering Research Core Facilty Mechanical Engineering INCOLL Joseph Turner
Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research Engr. Science and Engr. Physics INUNIV Michael Nastasi
Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience Engineering (General) INUNIV David Sellmyer
Nebraska Innovation Studio Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering INCOLL Shane Farritor
Nebraska Tractor Test Lab Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering INDEPT Roger Hoy
Nebraska Transportation Center Civil Engineering INCOLL Laurence Rilett
Nebraska Water Center Environmental Engineering INUNIV Chittaranjan Ray
The Holland Computing Center Computer Science (inside engineering) INUNIV David Swanson

Engineering Information

Degree Programs

Bachelor's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Biological Systems Engineering Agricultural Engineering (BSAE) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Biological Systems Engineering Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Chemical Engineering (BSCHE) Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (BSCE) Civil Engineering
Computer Science and Engineering Computer Science (BS) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Computer Science and Engineering Software Engineering (BSSE) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Construction Engineering (BSCN) Architectural Engineering
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Architectural Engineering (BSAR) Architectural Engineering
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Construction Management (BSCM) Architectural Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electronics Engineering (BSEL) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering (BSEE) Electrical Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Computer Engineering (BSCP) Computer Engineering
Engineering - Dean's Office Pre-Engineering Engineering (General)
Note: Pre-Enineering is not a degree program.
Mechanical & Materials Engineering Mechanical Engineering (BSME) Mechanical Engineering

Master's Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Master's Degree Program(s) Discipline
Biological Systems Engineering Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering (MS) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Chemical Engineering (MS) Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering Environmental Engineering (MS) Environmental Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (MS) Civil Engineering
Computer Science and Engineering Computer Science (MS) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Architectural Engineering (MARE) Architectural Engineering
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Architectural Engineering (MS) Architectural Engineering
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Construction Engineering and Management (MS) Architectural Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Telecommunications Engineering (MS) Electrical/Computer Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering (MS) Electrical Engineering
Engineering - Dean's Office Engineering Management (MEM) Engineering Management
Note: This degree is offered online with courses provided through the College of Engineering and the College of Business Administration's online MBA program.
Mechanical & Materials Engineering Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (MS) Mechanical Engineering

Doctoral Degree Program(s)

Engineering Department(s) Doctoral Degree Program(s) Discipline
Biological Systems Engineering Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Note: This degree has been discontinued.
Biological Systems Engineering Biological Engineering (PhD) Biological Engr. and Agricultural Engr.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering (PhD) Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering Civil Engineering (PhD) Civil Engineering
Computer Science and Engineering Computer Science (PhD) Computer Science (inside engineering)
Computer Science and Engineering Computer Engineering - Computer Science (PhD) Computer Engineering
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Construction (PhD) Architectural Engineering
Note: This degree has been discontinued.
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Construction Engineering & Management Architectural Engineering
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction Architectural Engineering (PhD) Architectural Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Computer Engineering (PhD) Computer Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Computer Engineering-Comp & Elec Eng (PhD) Computer Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering (PhD) Electrical Engineering
Engineering - Dean's Office Biomedical Engineering (PhD) Biomedical Engineering
Engineering - Dean's Office Materials Engineering (PhD) Metallurgical and Matrls. Engineering
Mechanical & Materials Engineering Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (PhD) Mechanical Engineering

Engineering Information

Areas of Expertise

Engineering Departments Areas of Expertise
Biological Systems Engineering
  1. Bioprocess and Food Engineering
  2. Irrigation Engineering
  3. Biomedical Engineering
  4. Natural Resource Engineering
  5. Precision Agriculture
  6. Livestock Systems
  7. Livestock Systems
  8. Sensing and Instrumentation
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  1. Materials Science
  2. Biochemical Engineering
  3. Biomedical Engineering
  4. Polymers and Nanomaterials
  5. Thin Films and Membranes
  6. Computational Chemistry
Civil Engineering
  1. Reslient and Sustainable Civil Infrastructure
  2. Detection and Mitigation of Contaminants in our Water and Food
  3. Intelligent and Safe Transpotation
  4. Big Data and the Built Environment
  5. Remote and Autonomous Sensing
Computer Science and Engineering
  1. Software Engineering
  2. Robotics
  3. Sensor Networks
  4. Networking
  5. Data Visualization
  6. Constraint Processing
  7. Machine Learning
  8. Bioinformatics
  9. Cybersecurity
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction
  1. Building Systems Science
  2. Building Information Modeling
  3. Building Energy Modeling
  4. Construction Processes
  5. Structural Engineering
  6. Lighting
Electrical and Computer Engineering
  1. Communications and Signal Processing
  2. Electromagnetic Fields and Optics
  3. Electronics
  4. Energy and Power Systems
  5. Materials and Devices
  6. Bioengineering
Engineering - Dean's Office
  1. Undeclared Studies
Mechanical & Materials Engineering
  1. Robotics
  2. Biomedical Engineering
  3. Materials Science
  4. Advanced Manufacturing
  5. Micro/Nanotechnology

Engineering Information

Societies

Honor Societies

Local Groups

  • Alpha Lambda Delta
  • Mortar Board
  • Omicron Delta Kappa
  • Phi Beta Kappa
  • Phi Eta Sigma
  • Tau Beta Pi
  • The Innocents Society

Student Organizations

National Groups

  • ACM
  • ACM
  • ASM international
  • Acoustical Society of America
  • Am. Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics
  • Am. Inst. of Chemical Engineers
  • Am. Inst. of Industrial Eng.
  • Am. Soc. of Agricultural Eng.
  • Am. Soc. of Civil Engineers
  • Am. Soc. of Mechanical Engineers
  • Am. Society of Heating, Refrigerating and AC Engr.
  • Architectural Engineering Institute
  • Assoc. for Computing Machinery
  • Associated General Contractors of America
  • Biomedical Engineering Society
  • Chi Epsilon
  • Earthquake Engineering Research Institute
  • Engineers without Borders
  • Eta Kappa Nu
  • Illuminating Eng. Soc. of North Am.
  • Inst. of Transportation Engineers
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
  • National Society of Black Engineers
  • Natl. Assoc. of Home Builders
  • Pi Tau Sigma
  • Soc. for Automotive Engineering
  • Soc. of American Military Engineers
  • Soc. of Women Engineers
  • Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Tau Beta Pi
  • Water Environment Federation

Local Groups

  • ASABE Fountain Wars Competition Team
  • Aerospace Club
  • Am Society of Agricultural Biological Engineers
  • Architectural Engineering Student leadership & Advisory Committee
  • College of Engineering Student Advisory Board
  • Emerging Green Builders
  • Engineering Ambassadors Network
  • Engineering Student Advisory Board (eSAB)
  • Husker Motorsports, Formula Society of Automotive Engineers
  • Husker Racing, Baja Society Of Automotive Engineers (SAE)
  • Intl Assoc. for the Exchange of Students for Technical Experience
  • Latinos in Science and Engineering (MAES/SHPE)
  • Mechanical Electrical Specialty Contractors
  • Mechanized Systems Management Club
  • Nebraska Blueprint
  • Nebraska Engineering Student Council at Omaha (NESCO)
  • Nebraska Society of Professional Engineers
  • Out in STEM (oSTEM@Nebraska)
  • Sigma Lambda Chi
  • Soil and Water Resources Club
  • Structural Engineering Association of Nebraska (SEAoN)
  • UNL Maker Club
  • UNL Robotics

Engineering Information

Support Programs

College's Under-Represented Student Groups

National Groups

  • African Students Association
  • African Students Association
  • Chinese Student Association
  • Indian Students' Association
  • Korean Student Association
  • Malaysian Students' Association
  • Muslim Student Association
  • Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Society of Women Engineers
  • Taiwanese Students Association
  • Vietnamese Students Association

Local Groups

  • Afghan Student Association
  • Afrikan Peoples Union
  • Asian World Alliance
  • Black Graduate Student Association
  • Black Men Organized for Retnetion and Education
  • Diversity Enhancement Team
  • Iranian Student Organization
  • Iraqi Student Union
  • Mexican American Student Association (MASA)
  • Nepalese Students Association
  • Pakistan Students Association
  • Students of Color Career Advisory Comm.
  • The Academy of National Hispanic Scholars
  • University of Nebraska Inter-Tribal Exchange

Other Student Support Programs

� ASUN Student Legal Services Center (402) 472-3350.
� ASUN NU On Wheels
� Career Services www. unl.edu/careers
� Career Decisions www.unl.edu/careers
� Career Resource Library
� Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)
� Daily Nebraskan www.DailyNebraskan.com
� E-Involvement
� Gender Related Programs
� GLBT and Ally Programs and Services
� International Student and Scholar www.unl.edu/iaffairs
� International Affairs www.unl.edu/iaffairs
� Leadership Development
� Student Employment and Internships www.unl.edu/careers/seic
� Nebraska Unions
� Need-Based Assistance
� Nformation www.unl.edu
� NU Directions
� NU Portfolio
� Off Campus Housing (402) 472-2652.
� Services for Students with Disabilities (402) 472-3787.
� Student Government www.unl.edu/asun
� Student Ombuds Services (402) 472-3755.
� Student Involvement www.si.unl.edu
� Service Learning
� Student Organization and Activity Resources (SOAR)
� University Program Council
� University Bookstores
� University Child Care (402) 472-2101
� University Health Center www.unl.edu/health
� Job Seeking Services
� Office of TRIO Programs Student Support Services (SSS)
� Upward Bound Project (UB)
� Upward Bound Math/Science (UBMS) (402) 472-4050

Engineering Information

Student Projects

Student Design Projects Description

Biological Systems Engineering

Team Number Project Info
Team 1 Project Name:
Monitoring Heat Illness using Core Temperature and Heart Rate Sensors

Project Team:
Anastasia Sanderson
Jacob Lenz
Mitch Misfeldt
Kat Dudley

Project Description:
Outdoor workers, who are often subjected to hot, humid environments and strenuous work, commonly suffer from heat illness. Heat illness encompasses a variety of heat-related conditions, including heat exhaustion (37˚C 40˚C), which are detrimental to workers’ health. The goal of this project is to non-invasively monitor the core temperature of outdoor workers in order to prevent heat illness. To measure core temperature non-invasively, a Kalman Filter is used to ‘filter’ noisy data to provide a more accurate estimation of core temperature. The final design includes a double sensor that will be used to approximate an initial core temperature and an optical heart rate sensor that will acquire continuous heart rate data. The continuous heart rate data and initial core temperature data will be input to a Kalman filter. Both the double sensor and the Kalman filter will be integrated into a LabVIEW program. If the estimated core temperature from the Kalman filter reaches a specified threshold core temperature, the LabVIEW program will notify the user to modify his/her behavior in order to reduce core temperature and prevent heat illness.

Team Number Project Info
Team 10 Project Name:
Pivot Panel for Patient Handling in the VA Radiology Department

Project Team:
Kristina Zvolanek
Merrill Brady
Yukihira Naoe
Douglas Rowen

Project Description:
At the Veterans Affairs (VA) Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System in Omaha, Nebraska, staff in the Radiology department often assist patients to and from the X-ray table. Most commonly, patients require assistance when moving from a supine position to seated at the edge of the X-ray table. The technique used by technicians to aid this movement involves pulling the patient from a supine to upright position in conjunction with a 90 degree rotation of the patient’s lower body. Often, this maneuver is performed without mechanical aid. Most patients requiring assistance are obese, and the force required by technicians to move these patients can lead to injuries and exhaustion. Data from the VA hospital reports numerous lower back and shoulder injuries among the Radiology staff as a result of the physical exertion required in these procedures. The implementation of a patient lift device will minimize the need for staff intervention and reduce the number of patient handling injuries in the VA Radiology department. To this end, our team designed the Pivot Panel, a patient lift which consists of a motorized, rotating panel fixed to a stationary base. When the panel is aligned horizontally on the X-ray table, the patient rolls to his or her side and rests on the device. A 90 degree rotation of the panel assists the patient to a seated position at the edge of the X-ray table. Our final deliverable includes a CAD prototype of the Pivot Panel, a cost analysis, and list of materials and parts.

Team Number Project Info
Team 12 Project Name:
Immobilization of the Fiducial Spatial Marker for the X-Nav Technology Dental Implant System

Project Team:
Freshta Baher
Kevin Vakilzadian
Emily Thrailkill
Calin Kachek

Project Description:
Dental implants are commonly used to replace lost teeth, restoring both form and function. The success of dental implants relies on the accuracy of their placement, as they are placed in narrow bone with slim margins. Due to the importance and challenges of accurately placing a dental implant, computer assisted surgery has been developed to guide implantation. One guidance system is the X-Nav Technologies dental implant system. The system is a dynamic guidance system that gives real-time positioning guidance and feedback to the oral surgeon to achieve higher accuracy. The X-Nav System uses three radio-opaque fiducial markers that are attached to the patient’s mouth via the X-Nav x-clip. These three markers serve as a reference point for the drilling that occurs in the mouth so that the virtual system can provide feedback. The x-clip contains these three markers on the top face, while the bottom face consists of a thermoplastic, which holds the x-clip in place on the patient’s teeth during imaging and again during the implant procedure. The x-clip is placed along the same arch, but on the opposite side of the mouth as the tooth that is being drilled. However, the x-clip is prone to movement during surgery, and the location of the x-clip during surgery prohibits the use of a bite block to keep the patient's mouth open. To solve this problem, an adjustable stabilizing guard made out of polyether ether ketone (PEEK) was designed to fit around the x-clip. The stabilizing guard keeps the clip stationary, while also serving as a bite block to keep the mouth open.

Team Number Project Info
Team 14 Project Name:
Simulation of the Lower Respiratory Tract with Obstructions for Bronchoscopic Navigation

Project Team:
Katie Meiergerd
Hannah Christian
David Lillyman
Courtney Kinser

Project Description:

Within the medical realm, bronchoscopy procedures may pose a serious challenge for even the most skilled professionals. The greatest difficulty arises in navigating past obstructions and anatomical irregularities found in the lower respiratory tract that restrict airway diameter. Some examples include tumors, mucus plugs, and foreign bodies. Structures including the vocal cords, cricoid cartilage, and bronchial branches may also be challenging. Training of physicians in this area currently relies upon on-site training or expensive computer-generated models that lack any sensory perception aspect. Current methods of training are suboptimal in learning such arduous skills because it forces a physician to learn and perfect their bronchoscopy technique on live patients. To combat this, we designed a modular simulation prototype that can provide physicians-in-training an opportunity to improve their tracheobronchial navigation ability in multiple hypothetical patients through various configurations of the model. Included in our prototype design is the fabrication of the trachea, upper and middle bronchus, and obstructions. Use of computer aided design coupled with 3D printing technology provides the consumer a product with unlimited customizability for a robust and innovative simulation. Such a product would provide a safe environment for physicians to work toward performing more arduous bronchoscopies.

Team Number Project Info
Team 15 Project Name:
Device for Air Entrainment Reduction in the Hydraulic System of a John Deere Tractor

Project Team:
Aaron Steckly
Luke Johnson
Bennett Turner
John Nielsen

Project Description:
In the hydraulic oil system of an 8R Series John Deere tractor, large air bubbles are created by the cavitation of a hydraulic pump within the system. These air bubbles can cause damage to a paper element oil filter located downstream of the pump, which decreases the lifespan of the filter and reduces the efficiency of the tractor.

The goal of this project is to reduce these air bubbles in the oil and prevent the paper element filter from being damaged by large slugs of air. The team was cautioned to avoid electronic parts and to limit the size of any new device, as the solution would need to be easily incorporated into the existing hydraulic system. In order to solve this problem, the team designed a device to reduce the amount of air in the system. The device, which was fabricated using 3-D printing and machined aluminum, uses centrifugal motion to separate the air from the oil and return only pure oil to the filter. The effectiveness of the device was tested using various pressure drop measurements at specific points throughout the system.

Team Number Project Info
Team 16 Project Name:
Stormwater and Erosion Control at Roger's Memorial Farm

Project Team:
Anna Petrow
Mara Zelt
Samuel Hansen
Megan Gren
Patrick Woldstad

Project Description:
Over the last 5 years, the Rogers Memorial Farm has experienced an increase in flooding, resulting in significant damage to crops and arable land. The increase in flooding is due to greater observed rainfall intensity and amassed runoff due to land use change upstream. This project is to design a low maintenance stormwater management system to control the runoff from at least a 10-year, 24-hour storm event. The project designed a retention pond with controlled outflow to decrease the volume of water and soil entering the existing stormwater control system. Four variations for pond design volume were developed to account for potential changes in upstream land use. The alternatives were created because the neighboring farm has just been sold to a seeding company, which may add terraces to their land, reducing the peak flow of water onto Rogers Memorial Farm. The alternatives allow the client options to choose the best retention pond lifetime for his desired investment. The design would also include recommendations for reshaping and regrading the waterway downstream to prevent water overflow onto the cropland and sedimentation. The waterway is being reshaped because over time, the waterway has developed a non-uniform slope and has created depressions and places of steep slopes. These steep slopes increase the velocity of the water, creating more erosion along the waterway, and the depressions disrupt the uniform movement along the grassed waterway.

Team Number Project Info
Team 17 Project Name:
Steering System for Go Baby Go!

Project Team:
Emmie Johnson
Jordan Verplank
Zainab Alsughayer
Hannah Jones
Ravi Raghani

Project Description:
Go Baby Go! is a national movement that works to increase the mobility of children suffering from various physical and cognitive disabilities by modifying commercially available child ride-on cars (e.g. PowerWheelsTM). These modified cars are targeted for children ages 1-3, due to their ineligibility for power wheelchairs. Through increased mobility, these cars promote cognitive and social development analogous to their peers. Currently, modifications include implementation of additional safety features and rewiring of the steering system to allow for kids with lower limb disabilities to operate the car by pressing a large button on the steering wheel instead of a foot pedal. While these cars have been successful in increasing the mobility of children suffering from disabilities, the current modifications make it difficult for these children to push the large button while steering. The objective of our design project is to improve the current vehicle design to allow for more effective steering without compromising the current safety features. Our design team has innovated a joystick based steering mechanism for the Go Baby Go! cars. This system involved programming a microcontroller and electronic circuit design in conjunction with a mechanical rack and pinion steering system and second motor for right/left turning. This system allows for 360 degree movement by simply moving the joystick in the desired direction. With this updated steering system, Go Baby Go! cars are able to better serve children of a wide range of disabilities and allow for more independence and an increased cognitive and social development.

Team Number Project Info
Team 19 Project Name:
Fiber Optics and 4D Ultrasound for Intracardiac Catheterization

Project Team:
Bailey Helmink
Anna Toner
Robert Moore
Dillon Wordekemper
Juan Rodriguez

Project Description:
Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect and the leading cause of death in the first year of life. Cardiac catheterization procedures typically use hemodynamic catheters, a minimally invasive and effective tool to diagnose and treat heart conditions. However, the current imaging modality used for monitoring the position of the catheter within the heart is X-ray, which uses radiation and radioactive contrast agents. Both of these have long-term health consequences, particularly for pediatric patients who will need many of these procedures in their lifetime. A secondary health concern of hemodynamic catheters is the increased risk of an air embolism due to the administration of contrast or the disconnection of the catheter from the transducer for the manual withdrawal of blood samples. We propose to eliminate these risks by designing a catheter that continuously measures blood pressure and oxygen saturation, two common metrics in catheterization procedures, with optic fibers monitored by 4D Ultrasound. Our catheter will be 2 mm in diameter and contain three fiber optics: one multimode fiber in conjunction with a fabry-perot interferometer to measure blood pressure and two multimode fibers using pulse oximetry to measure intracardiac oxygen saturation.

Team Number Project Info
Team 24 Project Name:
Motion Tracking of Neonate Activity

Project Team:
Sarah Heindl
Allison Porter
Kevin Real
Victoria Bart

Project Description:
Movement disorders are neurological conditions that influence speed, fluency, quality, and ease of movement. Scientists and physical therapists conducting research concerning pediatric movement disorders have noted that newborn preterm infants, compared to newborn full term infants, are at a higher risk of developing of motor and movement disorders; corresponding with a decrease in movement as these preterm infants age. Currently, it is unknown whether preterm infants move less immediately after birth, or if the decline in movement begins at a later age. In order to determine if a decrease in movements increases the likelihood of developing movement disorders, the goal of this project is to design a device that is able to track the movements of infants, both the intrinsic, movement done by the infant itself, and extrinsic, movement done upon the infant from an outside source, movements, to determine when a significant decline in movement occurs. Our final design solution consists of an infrared camera video tracking system that utilizes MATLAB code to distinguish and record notable changes of centroids of an infant’s body to provide a representation of overall infant movement. The infrared camera is oriented in an aerial viewpoint, and clothing color and sheet color of an infant’s crib are adjusted as needed to provide adequate contrast, which allows the MATLAB code to distinguish between the infant and the background, increasing tracking accuracy. This solution provides an affordable, reliable, and safe method of motion tracking without contacting the sensitive skin of infants.

Team Number Project Info
Team 25 Project Name:
Fountain Wars: Scrambled Eggs

Project Team:
Anthony Zach
Trevor Hinn
Max Hjermstad
Jeff Ostermiller

Project Description:
ASABE’s Fountain Wars is an intercollegiate design competition where members are tasked with assembling their projects on-site after giving a brief marketing promotion. Our group is tasked with designing a system that uses water in a swimming pool and energy supplied by a pump to transport an egg repeatedly across the swimming pool and which meets the competition rules and regulations established by ASABE.

To win the design competition, we designed a system that can move multiple eggs at one time, cycle eggs multiple times, move eggs through a larger net path, and be easily decorated for optimal scoring. Our design includes a triangular-shaped water wheel with three fixed buckets at each vertex to transport 3 eggs at once in a circular net path. A trough is used for the egg path at the bottom of the wheel, and a catch system that funnels into the trough is placed to catch the egg after the bucket passes vertical. A turbine is attached to the wheel to rotate the wheel when water is pumped onto it. A wooden support system with metal braces is used to anchor the entire system in the bottom of the pool.

Team Number Project Info
Team 27 Project Name:
Tumbleweed Mitigation for Eastern Colorado Solar Farms

Project Team:
Spencer Myrlie
Mitchell Frischmeyer
Lindsey Hollmann

Project Description:
Tumbleweeds pose a major problem to solar arrays in Eastern Colorado. A buildup of tumbleweeds on top of solar panels have a potential to cause shading and decrease energy output and profitability of the solar farm. Tumbleweeds can also cause increased wear, misalignment, and malfunctions that require maintenance. Accumulation of tumbleweeds also present a potential fire hazard. Using a fluid dynamic approach, we designed a wall system to divert the tumbleweeds. A curved wall design redirects surface winds, and with it the tumbleweeds, to travel around the solar farm. By utilizing past wind rose data, we were able to optimize our design to have the least impact on the encompassed solar farm. This approach reduces costs created by tumbleweeds while maintaining constant solar farm operation.

Team Number Project Info
Team 30 Project Name:
2017 ASABE Robotics Competition - Development of an Agricultural Based Robotic System

Project Team:
John Shook
Alec Fuelberth
Purity Muhia
Karlie Knoepfler

Project Description:
For the 2017 ASABE Robotics Competition, BSEN 470/480 Senior Design assigned four members to assist the University of Nebraska â€" Lincoln ASABE Robotics Team in designing a robot to compete in the ASABE Robotics Competition held in Spokane, Washington, on July 16-17th, 2017. The competition this year was to design a robotic system that could locate simulated raspberry canes on a white competition board and remove them cleanly from that board. There are additional constraints and criteria listed in the 2017 competitions rules and regulations that would need to be analyzed and accounted for. Our team was tasked with creating the chassis, intercommunication between chassis movement and robotic arm, and lastly the line-following ability of the robot. The chassis would need to be able to withstand multiple forces from the motors, robotic arm, and receptacle tasked with discarding the cut canes. Furthermore, the communication between where the robot is located on the board and where the robotic arm must go to cut the correct canes needs to be seamless, and was completed using Arduino software. The line-following ability of the robot was completed using an infrared sensor placed on the bottom of the chassis. The competition board is outlined in a black line for which the sensor uses to keep itself in line with the board and canes. These three tasks were completed with the help and guidance of two faculty members and several UNL ASABE robotics team members.

Team Number Project Info
Team 31 Project Name:
Robotic Cover Crop Planter

Project Team:
Jacob Will
Michael Kirstein
Austin Hines

Project Description:
Current methods to plant cover crops involve broadcasting seed either with a highboy sprayer or aircraft. Both methods have issues penetrating the corn canopy and establishing seed to soil contact, delaying emergence. The seed needs to be dispensed under the corn canopy and into the soil. The current solution is to pull a ground driven broadcast seeder, similar to a fertilizer spreader used on lawns, through individual rows. This task is fatiguing for the person who has to pull the broadcaster. In addition, this solution does not place the seed into the soil but rather on top. Cover crops can emerge up to three weeks earlier if positively displaced into the soil using a no-till seed drill. Some of the issues involved with using a no till seed drill is the accessibility or space between rows. Another is the high draft force required to pull a seed drill through the soil. Our team overcame these challenges by designing a narrow tractor unit with power to pull the seed drills. The vehicle is designed to be operated with remote control, with the intent to be fully autonomous in the future. The vehicle was designed to be upgradeable and modular for the planned upgrade to fully autonomous operation. The vehicles pump in the hydrostatic transmission, the valves for steering, and the three-point lift are all electronically controlled, allowing the full control of the unit without any operator control.

Team Number Project Info
Team 33 Project Name:
Heart Rate Monitors for Crisis Intervention in Grain Handling

Project Team:
Kari Heck
Austin Helmink
Breck Ostrander
Joey Stapleton

Project Description:
Grain handling is a labor-intensive job with many daily hazards including a high risk for falls, entrapment, and overexertion. As a result, improved safety is a necessary to protect the lives of grain handlers. While improving infrastructure and safety guidelines could reduce disaster risk and improve worker safety, doing so will take years and would be economically burdensome. Therefore, an inexpensive and more immediate solution is needed. We hypothesized monitoring the biometric data of workers could improve workplace safety by providing an effective crisis intervention system. In recent years, wearable devices that collect biometric data, particularly heart rate, have become popular in the consumer market. Heart rate is an excellent biometric data point to measure for grain handler safety because it directly correlates with many of the risk factors grain handler's face on the job like overexertion, heat stroke, and dehydration. In addition, heart rate can be an indirect indicator of a variety of dangerous situations, such as falls and entrapment, due to the nature of the body’s intrinsic crisis response system, the sympathetic nervous system. Although current devices are suitable to provide insight into heart rate data trends for the average consumer, a customized device is needed to increase workplace safety for grain handlers. Thus, we proposed and designed a prototype heart rate application and hard hat-integrated-heart rate sensor system to enable the acquisition and presentation of heart rate data, as well as trigger emergency alerts in response to dangerous heart rate levels and trends.

Team Number Project Info
Team 36 Project Name:
Processing Nigerian Tomatoes: Rural, Community-Based Production of Tomato Paste

Project Team:
Clayton Blagburn
Tafla Al Ruzaiqi
Grant Zebold
Mandy VanSant

Project Description:
Nigeria is Africa's second largest producer of tomatoes with over 1.5 million tons harvested; but a majority of rural tomato farmers lack consistent access to a market and due to the short storage life of tomatoes, over 80 percent of them go to waste. Nigeria is concurrently the world’s largest importer of tomato paste, leading to large economic losses. Our designed small scale tomato paste plant would provide a method for the farmers to reduce the portion of their crops wasted and encourage them to expand their current operations and adopt best management farming practices. By locally producing tomato paste, farmers become more profitable and use tomatoes that would otherwise rot to make a value-added product and contribute beneficially to the growing global and local food crisis. Our design solution includes equipment recommendations and associated costs for the production of 4000 kg of tomato paste per day during the three-month period corresponding with local tomato harvest. Dr. Joseph Akpan, our client and international business consultant, intends to take this information and conduct an economic feasibility and plans to implement the design to help the women and other rural farmers of Makurdi, Benue, Nigeria.

Team Number Project Info
Team 37 Project Name:
Bench Scale Bioseperations for Conversion of Cellulosic Biomass

Project Team:
Deidre Sandall
Emily Bender
Bryan Brunson
Alexandra Wallin

Project Description:
The remaining corn stalks and cobs (cellulosic biomass) that are typically a waste product from harvest can be broken down into usable components. Methods have been developed to use this biomass and break it down into fermentable sugars and residual solid biomass using enzymes. The goal of our project was to separate the three components--sugars, enzymes, and residual solid biomass--on a laboratory scale without destroying their properties. From the designed two-step system, our client will be able to further his research in the area of biofuels, which is a growing field of study in renewable energy. The separated components can be analyzed to understand the processing steps needed for biomass, potential reusability, and possible byproducts associated with the breakdown of cellulosic biomass.

Team Number Project Info
Team 40 Project Name:
Design of Ergonomic Device for Sonographers at the VA Hospital in Omaha

Project Team:
Erica Hedrick
Chris Cunningham
Madison Burger
Marissa Nitz

Project Description:
Sonographers, or ultrasound technicians, at the Veterans Affairs (VA) Hospital in Omaha have been experiencing musculoskeletal injuries that result from continually applying force during long ultrasound scans, which is required to obtain a high quality signal and image. The sonographers typically suffer injuries of the wrist, elbow, bicep and shoulder. In order to solve this pressing problem, we have designed an ergonomic solution for sonographers at the VA, which includes functional prototypes of a device that will aid them in their scanning procedure. Our design, the Exoskeleton Elbow Brace, assists the sonographers by applying an adjustable load that reduces the amount of force the sonographer has to contribute. In order to quantify the risk associated with the sonographers’ scanning procedure and evaluate the success of our prototype, we used a postural analysis called the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA). Our design reduces the RULA score by 20%, indicating the device provides 3 ft*lbs of assistance for the sonographer during the scan.

Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

Team Number Project Info
Team 2 Project Name:
Process Model of Chelating Agent for Wastewater Treatment

Project Team:
Hannah Evans
Cing Hawm Lian
Imad Albulushi
Zachary Van Ede
Devin Westerman
Joseph McCright

Project Description:
The design team will create a scheme to produce 1,500,000 pounds per year of potassium butyl dithiophosphate as to sell as a chelating agent for heavy metal elimination in wastewater. This amount of agent could help remove heavy metals from 250,000,000 gal of wastewater. With greater than 99% removal of heavy metal ions achieved by potassium butyl dithiophosphate, toxicity of wastewater sludge will be reduced and use of sludge as agricultural fertilizer would be possible. Unlike traditional methods of heavy metal removal, potassium butyl dithiophosphate also offers a more effective and pH-friendly removal process. To reduce emissions and minimize environmental impact, the production process will incorporate organic synthesis, carbon capture, and continuous chlorination.

Team Number Project Info
Team 3 Project Name:
Nebraska Biogas Upgrading Refinery​

Project Team:
Meryl Bloomfield
Heather Newell
David Hansen
Kevin Hafer

Project Description:

Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD) has a goal to reach 10% of their total energy supply from renewable resources by 2020. Biogas as a renewable energy source is anticipated to be the fastest growing energy sector over the next two decades and Nebraska ranks number one in manure resource potential. Biogas is a fuel produced from organic waste materials (such as cow manure) through a process called anaerobic digestion. Our team has designed and evaluated the economic viability of a complete biorefinery located in Broken Bow, Nebraska capable of adding 60 MW capacity to the NPPD system. The biorefinery includes an anaerobic digester followed by an upgrading process where contaminants such as carbon dioxide are removed from the biogas to produce 620 SMCF of purified natural gas with 90% methane content. A solution of aqueous potassium carbonate in combination with an enzymatic catalyst, carbonic anhydrase, is used as the solvent in the biogas upgrading process. Through a drying process, any remaining water is removed and the resulting pipeline quality renewable natural gas (RNG) is fed to NPPD’s Canaday Station. Finally, the carbon dioxide is captured and then converted to 19 tons per day of 99% methanol using renewable hydrogen produced through electrolysis with energy from a nearby NPPD wind farm.

Team Number Project Info
Team 6 Project Name:
Project Helios: Solar Power Plant

Project Team:
Drew Allgood
Adil Alsiyabi
Cody Vavra
Conor Tomac
Matt Gregoire

Project Description:

Our project is to design a net zero carbon footprint solar power plant with no reliance on fossil fuels. It will be capable of storing thermal energy for use during periods of low solar radiation output with a two-tank heat storage system. The plant will be able to operate at full capacity (10 MW, 50 MW, or 100 MW) at all times of day. Solar collectors combined with a power tower will heat a molten salt heat carrier fluid loop which will transfer energy to a water/steam working fluid loop and power a turbine paired with a generator to create clean electricity. The molten salt composition was optimized based on thermal properties to maximize thermal storage and heat transfer efficiency. Aspen simulations will be used to verify literature data for both loop fluids. The plant will create a slight excess of energy to account for energy usage in the process, thus achieving our goal of net zero emissions.

Team Number Project Info
Team 13 Project Name:
Co-production of Ethylene and Acetic Acid from Ethane

Project Team:
Joshua Mueller
Jon Duerschner
Henry Kutilek
Mark Sauer

Project Description:
Our project explores a new way of producing and separating ethylene and acetic acid using a more economical and less energy intensive method.

Team Number Project Info
Team 18 Project Name:
Algae to Biodiesel

Project Team:
Ranil Joshua Philipose
Erica Schneider
Abdullah Al Balushi
Sangwon Bahng
Chau Bui

Project Description:
Our team is working to produce 1000kg/batch of high-quality, cost-effective biodiesel from a high lipid production, renewable algal source. This will be achieved by employing an innovative method of cultivation, combining both open and closed systems. These methods also include utilizing a recycled wastewater stream of 380,000kg/batch, as well as an extra 10.2kg/batch nitrogen and 320kg/batch phosphate to positively influence algal growth and reduce overall cultivation cost. Additionally, processing steps to obtain and convert triglycerides to biodiesel will include mechanical disruption, a method that reduces dewatering costs by up to 80-85%. In terms of waste reduction, used algal biomass will be co-digested anaerobically with wastewater sludge for bio-gas production. This allows energy production to lean towards a self-sustaining process, while exhaust gas is re-utilized as a carbon dioxide supply for algal growth.

Team Number Project Info
Team 20 Project Name:
Waterless Biodiesel Production from Waste Cooking Oil

Project Team:
Hannah Hassenstab
Nick Mulinix
Mark Casper
Fatimah Barnawi

Project Description:
Traditional biodiesel production plants use large amounts of water for the removal of impurities from the product. Our team will focus on designing a sustainable, waterless process for the production of biodiesel to avoid these issues. Our design will utilize waste cooking oil as a feedstock and a magnesium silicate adsorbent will be used to purify biodiesel to meet U.S. standards.

Team Number Project Info
Team 22 Project Name:
Fuel Grade Ethanol from Genetically Modified Switchgrass

Project Team:
Steven Lesher
Jackson Bauer
Justin Wurgler
Colin Milos
Alexandra Mosquera

Project Description:

High energy density liquid fuels are an important commodity because of their ability to be easily and efficiently transported as well as safely handled. Certainly, gasoline has played its part in being an excellent liquid fuel candidate, but more sustainable and environmentally friendly alternatives need to be developed. Ethanol fuels are a prime candidate for future energy needs, but the current ethanol supply comes largely from corn and other food sources, putting a strain on the global food supply. Grasses like switchgrass can be grown in a wider variety of climates and soils, use less water, and their conversion cycle to ethanol and then energy nets less CO2 emissions. However, they require more work to turn into ethanol. By doing an economic analysis of a genetically modified variant of switchgrass, we hope to show that, through genetic research, switchgrass can be an effective source of ethanol and can move us toward a sustainable, high energy density liquid fuel supply.

Team Number Project Info
Team 34 Project Name:
Purification of Hydrogen Fluoride

Project Team:
Ryan Buettner
Jordan Glover
Zachary Bell
Nicholas Zuercher

Project Description:
Hydrogen fluoride is a toxic and corrosive compound that is produced from metal processing and fertilizer production plants. Current safety standards dictate that the compound is to be reacted with activated alumina to dispose of as a salt compound. Hydrogen fluoride can be reclaimed from the product waste stream by separation and purification process. Our process aims to collect Hydrogen fluoride from a given metal waste stream at a concentration of 70 weight percent.

Team Number Project Info
Team 41 Project Name:
Production of L-Lysine HCI by Fermentation of 2nd Generation Biomass

Project Team:
Elizabeth Boschult
Bree Drda
Shang-ah Han
Michael Le

Project Description:
Amino acids are the primary component of all proteins and thus the building blocks for the function of both humans and animals. L-lysine, specifically, is an essential amino acid meaning it is not synthesized biologically in the body so it must be added as a supplement to both human and animal food sources. It is most commonly supplied by red meats, fish, and dairy products. With population growth comes the increased need for larger production rates of this essential amino acid. While chemical synthesis has been shown to produce L-lysine, more environmentally friendly processes are desired to decrease the amount of harsh chemicals used while also using renewable resources throughout the production process. The use of second generation biomasses (switchgrass and corn stover) was explored to produce the carbon source needed for fermentation to ultimately produce 98.5% Feed Grade L-lysine HCl. A triple-effect evaporation scheme was also explored to decrease energy consumption during the separation and purification of the final product.


Civil Engineering


Team Number Project Info
Team 39 Project Name:
Westwood Heights Golf Course Rehabilitation Project

Project Team:
Michael Greufe
Austin Moran
Nate Morhardt
Dayton Maul
Jordan Vietz
Adrian Tarango

Project Description:
The Westwood Heights Golf Course Rehabilitation project will work to help reduce the flooding and channel degradation that is occurring in and around Hell Creek, in Omaha, Ne; while working to improve the natural habit and limit the impact to the surrounding wetlands. In this project ERSO Engineering will look at different alternatives to solve the various issues while limiting the impact to the golf course and surrounding area. We will also look at replacing the roadway drainage structure located at the south end of the project.

Electrical & Computer Engineering


Team Number Project Info
Team 4 Project Name:
UkeBox

Project Team:
Drew Wiseman
Terrill Murray
Brad Naughton
Andrew Tompkins
Zachary Kentner

Project Description:

The UkeBox’s goal is to teach new users how to play the ukulele by lighting up frets that correspond to various notes and chords. It will analyze the notes played to determine if they are being played correctly. This product will allow new ukulele players to learn how to play the ukulele faster and more independently than traditional teaching methods. The design of the instrument consists of a single board computer with a touchscreen, a digital signal processor, and a custom microcontroller PCB. The communication protocol for communicating between devices consists of both UART and parrallel GPIO. The system is powered by a battery bank consisting of 18650 Lithium Ion batteries.

Team Number Project Info
Team 5 Project Name:
E-PDK

Project Team:
Moustafa Aladawi
Anthony Mainelli
Jacob Weskamp
Avery Miller

Project Description:
The E-PDK is a wireless electronic control system for a grain auger hopper developed for PECK manefacturing to give the company a competitive advantage in their target market.

Team Number Project Info
Team 7 Project Name:
STEM-Meter

Project Team:
Josh Hansen
Steven Towne
Monroe Mallum

Project Description:
STEM educators can benefit from a method to get students more involved in their learning beyond solving problems on paper. Real world experiments are one way to achieve this goal because they provide an interactive way for students to apply the concepts they are learning in their lectures and homework. However, measuring the results of such experiments is not always easy and can be a barrier for younger students. The STEM-Meter provides a way for STEM educators and students to perform their experiments using just one device. The STEM-Meter achieves this goal by providing a base unit with four ports to which sensor modules can be attached. The types of sensors that can be attached to the base unit include, but are not limited to: accelerometer, gyroscope, altimeter, light intensity, magnetic field, temperature, and humidity. The function of the STEM - Meter is to collect data from the connected sensor modules and log that data to a SD card and/or wirelessly transmit the data to an Android application using where it can be viewed and analyzed.

Team Number Project Info
Team 8 Project Name:
Vibration-based Machine Health Monitoring

Project Team:
Nathan Nordbrock
Michael Weskamp
Neil Morrissette

Project Description:
Electric machines, particularly generators, produce small vibrations while in use. Most machines will have a resonant frequency at which the machine itself will vibrate when operating under steady state conditions. By monitoring these vibrations, it can be determined whether or not the machine is operating correctly. The device will monitor these vibrations, and send that data through email so that an engineer or technician can properly diagnose and rectify the issue.

Team Number Project Info
Team 9 Project Name:
Retrovair

Project Team:
Arthur Fischer
Eric Peterson
Samuel Wildman

Project Description:
We are retrofitting a 1964 Chevrolet Corvair with an entirely new electric drive system to research the difficulties behind designing an electric car system and building a low cost vehicle that will meet the need of most American consumers. The system will include a 96 Volt 3-phase AC motor and controller with 48 12-Volt Sealed lead acid batteries and charging system. The design goals of the car include a range of 35 miles with a top speed of 55 mph and be able to charge from any standard 15 Amp receptacle. The Corvair will also include a computer system that will be accessible via touchscreen within the vehicles dashboard that will output real time data and have access to change motor controller settings on the fly. This retrofit will take an old classic car and modernize it to make it more energy efficient and environmentally friendly.

Team Number Project Info
Team 11 Project Name:
Wide Range Property Monitoring System

Project Team:
Riyadh Al Hinai
Adam Knodel
Mohammed Albusaidi

Project Description:
This project will introduce a simple yet reliable low-cost wide range monitoring system. It will be an image capture devices that are triggered by motion sensors. These devices will be able to send the images for a distance up to a half a mile.

Team Number Project Info
Team 21 Project Name:
Recon Rover

Project Team:
Taylor Roan
Jonathan Williams
Sebastian Chang
Dylan Hall

Project Description:
The Recon Rover is a manually controlled, small exploration vehicle. The rover will consist of a wireless interface from a laptop that will communicate with a single board computer attached to the rover. The user will have control over forward, backwards, and turning capabilities of the rover. The rover will also stream a live video feedback to the laptop; this will allow the user to control the rover without physically looking where it is headed. The user will also be able to turn the direction of the camera to examine points of interest that may not be directly in front of the vehicle. A solar panel will be attached to the top of the rover that will provide charging for the batteries when the rover is not in use. The solar panel will find the optimum light intensity of the sun using a six-point tracking system.

Team Number Project Info
Team 23 Project Name:
Amateur Radio and Digital Messaging

Project Team:
Matthew Fritz
Nick Lang
Austin Koch
Ahmed Alserhani

Project Description:

This project was to design an amateur radio transceiver that communicates digital text messages. The transceiver operates in the 40 meter amateur radio band, which is in the high frequency range. The transceiver utilizes the PSK31 modulation scheme. PSK31 is a method to send and receive text messages at a slow rate using a narrow frequency spectrum. The device will include an integrated touchscreen display as part of the user interface. A standard USB computer keyboard will be used to type the text messages.

Team Number Project Info
Team 28 Project Name:
Environment Monitor

Project Team:
Vojislav Medic
Aaron Ediger
Angoua Konan
Matthew Hilfiker

Project Description:
Environment monitor built with low power, long life, and temperature/light measurement capability. Designed with a purpose of data collection for rural engineering projects by Engineers Without Borders.

Team Number Project Info
Team 29 Project Name:
Mueller Matrix Imaging Microscope

Project Team:
Alex Ruder
Brandon Wright
Becca Horzewski
Tyler Martin

Project Description:
Our project uses the concept of ellipsometry to measure spatially resolved optical properties of a microscopic sample. It probes the sample with various polarization states of light, measures the intensity and polarization of light passing through the sample, and then uses this data to determine the mueller matrix elements of the sample. The resulting images can then be used to provide marker-free enhanced contrast images of cellular samples, flow cells, thin films, etc.

What sets our mueller matrix imaging microscope apart from others is that it uses a new, patent pending technique to generate and analyze the polarization of light in the system. This new technique uses fewer parts, lower cost components, and allows for a folded optical path. All of these features combine to form a very small, incredibly affordable instrument. This will lower the price of entry for this type of research and lead researchers to new discoveries faster than ever.

Team Number Project Info
Team 38 Project Name:
Electronic Implantable Total Knee Replacement

Project Team:
Brenden Gatzemeyer
Owen Fike
Cassandra Sulski
Edgard Boko

Project Description:
The idea behind this project is to improve the recovery analysis of knee replacement recipients. Today’s advancements in the engineering field allow doctors and engineers to combine their efforts to provide better medical care to patients. The Electronic Implantable Total Knee Replacement of Group 105 is intended to simplify the after surgery range of motion measurement in the patient. The project involves two major components: a small printed circuit board (PCB) that goes into the femur end of the knee replacement and a hand-held device with an LCD display. The PCB in the knee replacement has an accelerometer that takes data measurements of the knee’s range of motion, then transmits this data to the hand-held device to be displayed to the user. This project will relieve stress on the patient and simplify the recovery process by eliminating the need to measure the knee’s extension and flexion by using x-ray images and a protractor.

Team Number Project Info
Team 43 Project Name:
Socket-Master

Project Team:
Winston Larson
Eugene Kuznetsov
Manoupouguine Baniab
Vi-Awou Agbosse

Project Description:
Socket-Master provides an implementation to obtain information about, and better control over, the power usage in a home through integrating internet connectivity to a home’s power outlets. Socket-Master is a device that allows a user to wirelessly control the operation of power outlets in a home, regardless of distance from the home. This is accomplished by having user input commands communicated over the internet to a microprocessor located at a home, which will then communicate with a controller, or an array of controllers, installed on wall outlets via radio frequency transmission. Specified controllers can then be switched on or off according to the signal received, and will relay status updates to the user about current settings and power consumption.

Team Number Project Info
Team 44 Project Name:
The Bus Factor

Project Team:
Nate Pettepier
Remy Patterson
Chen Chen
DJ Steffensmeier

Project Description:
The bus factor is a system that allows students to track the location of a shuttle bus on campus and view the bus's estimated time of arrival. The hardware device placed inside the shuttle obtains GPS coordinates and transmits them wirelessly via GSM cellular network to a remote server. Anyone with an internet connection and a web browser can view the tracking information on the bus factor webpage. Currently a proof of concept which tracks one bus on one route, the bus factor could be expanded to track multiple buses.

Mechanical & Materials Engineering


Team Number Project Info
Team 26 Project Name:
Safe Balance Training System

Project Team:
Sean Dugan
Robert Brockhaus
Jason De Kock
Drew Reese

Project Description:
Our design is a balance training system that allow a platform to rotate about 2 axes. This is to help train people with balance issues to prevent them from falling when they are on an uneven surface.

Team Number Project Info
Team 32 Project Name:
Compliant Membrane with in-Situ Actuation

Project Team:
Scott Schenkelberg
Chandler Sandman
Nick Underwood

Project Description:
Deform-able surfaces are critical to many applications such as adaptive optics, but actuation range is limited by current technology to be on the order of microns. By developing a deform-able membrane that has a range of motion orders of magnitude larger than the state-of-the-art technology currently used, thus enabling novel applications ranging from micro-lander mobility systems to adjustable focal length telescope mirrors. To do this, a technique wherein a prescribed pattern is cut into a rigid 2D sheet of material, such as wood or acrylic, to make the material flexible in desired directions is utilized. Intelligently arrayed small surface mount actuators, such as shape memory alloys, are then be used to control surface deformation. The resulting device is a robust, compliant mechanism with multiple degrees of freedom, yet functionally only a single moving part. This platform could enable a single micro-vehicle on another world to perform multiple scientific measurements within a region or complete other useful tasks such as correctly orienting solar panels. This project builds on a previously established proof of concept with the goal of constructing a higher fidelity proof of concept prototype with innovative functionalities.

Team Number Project Info
Team 35 Project Name:
Fatigue Life of Shot Peened Aluminum 7075

Project Team:
Jacob Havranek
Austin Unseld
Kole Krueger
Connor Palic

Project Description:
We designed and built a rotating bending fatigue tester. With this we conducted research on the effect of shot peening of Aluminum 7075 T6 to see if the fatigue life was increased or decreased.

Team Number Project Info
Team 42 Project Name:
ISTAND

Project Team:
Zachary Bram
Isaac Fuhrman
Ty Rempe

Project Description:

The ISTAND mechanism, or Improved Stabilizing Transfer Device Aiding Neurological Development, is a device designed to lift rehabilitation patients from a seat, transfer them to a new location, and safely lower them back into a new seat. A common application would be to transfer someone from the bed to a toilet seat and back again. The ISTAND needed to assist rehabilitation by guiding the patient through proper kinematic standing and sitting motion. Currently, there are several commercial sit-to-stand models that are used in hospitals to lift patients, but they reinforce poor posture that hinders their rehabilitation progress. This project was assigned to us by Lincoln’s Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital with the goal of creating a prototype that is ergonomic for patients and simple to use by CNA’s. The project also involves a senior group of students from the college of Journalism and Mass Communication who helped survey, research, and advertise for the product.

Team Number Project Info
Team 45 Project Name:
Formula SAE Variable-Runner Length Harmonically Tuned Intake Manifold

Project Team:
Cody Voris
Nic Meyer

Project Description:

We have designed a harmonically tuned variable-length runner intake manifold for the Husker Motorsports HM-06 FSAE open-wheel race car. The new intake manifold has been tuned using Helmholtz resonance-frequency tuning to provide a wider, more usable power band in the Kawasaki 636cc engine. The variable-length runners allow for the plenum to be tuned to provide increased volumetric efficiency at 8,000 and 10,500 RPM. This will allow for a wider power band than is usually available from fixed-length runner intake manifolds that will result in faster acceleration and better fuel efficiency.

Team Number Project Info
Team 46 Project Name:
Formula SAE Carbon Fiber Wheels

Project Team:
Jonathan Berger
Steven Christy
Brady Pramberg
Jacob Quint

Project Description:
The UNL Formula SAE team (Husker Motorsports) competes in the International Formula SAE competition every year. This competition involves designing, fabricating, and racing a student-built miniature formula race car. The Husker Motorsports team is always seeking to design the best, fastest, and most importantly, coolest race car possible! The purpose of this senior design project is to design, manufacture, and test carbon fiber wheel rims. These carbon fiber rims are lighter, stiffer, and WAY cooler looking! Hopefully they will help the Husker Motorsports team to take home the gold this year!

Engineering Information

College Description

Engineering College Description and Special Characteristics

As the only engineering college in Nebraska, we take our role very seriously. We provide our students with professors with national and international expertise in their fields, the latest technology, quality facilities, a vast network of successful alumni and friends of the college, and caring staff. The UNL College of Engineering is also unique in its variety of locations: three campuses in Nebraska's two largest cities.

College of Engineering Role and Mission

The College of Engineering enthusiastically embraces its unique role as the singular intellectual and cultural resource for engineering instruction, research, and outreach within the state. It provides the people of Nebraska with comprehensive engineering academic programs to fulfill their highest aspirations and ambitions.

The missions of the College of Engineering are to:
•deliver relevant and challenging educational programs to attract an outstanding diverse student body
•prepare graduates for rewarding careers in their chosen professions and encourage graduates to extend their level of knowledge through lifelong learning
•conduct leading edge research advances engineering science and stimulate the intellectual development and creativity of both students and faculty,
•extend exemplary engineering service and transfer knowledge that contributes to the well-being and betterment of society.

Engineering Information

Engineering Faculty & Research

Teaching, Tenure-Track View Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Full Professors Assoc. Professors Assistant Professors Program Total
Biological Systems Engineering 14 9 14 37
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 7 4 5 16
Civil Engineering 9 11 8 28
Computer Science and Engineering 12 7 9 28
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction 6 15 3 24
Electrical and Computer Engineering 21 11 4 36
Engineering - Dean's Office 0 0 0 0
Mechanical & Materials Engineering 18 7 11 36
Totals: 87 64 54 205

Teaching, Non-Tenure-Track

Engineering Department(s) FT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel PT Instr. & Other Teach. Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Teach. Personnel
Biological Systems Engineering 1 1 2 0.40
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 1 0 1 0.00
Civil Engineering 1 2 3 0.90
Computer Science and Engineering 8 1 9 0.15
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction 6 8 14 1.25
Electrical and Computer Engineering 4 1 5 0.75
Engineering - Dean's Office 0 1 1 0.25
Mechanical & Materials Engineering 2 5 7 1.25
Totals: 23 19 42 4.95

Non-Teaching, Research

Engineering Department(s) Non-Teach. FT Research Personnel Non-Teach. PT Research Personnel Total Personnel FTE of all PT Non-Teach. Research Personnel
Biological Systems Engineering 10 0 10 0.00
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 8 0 8 0.00
Civil Engineering 9 0 9 0.00
Computer Science and Engineering 2 1 3 0.50
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction 0 0 0 0.00
Electrical and Computer Engineering 12 2 14 1.50
Engineering - Dean's Office 0 0 0 0.00
Mechanical & Materials Engineering 13 0 13 0.00
Totals: 54 3 57 2.00

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Gender/Ethnicity Profiles

  • American Indian or Alaska Native (Am Ind): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.
  • Asian: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.
  • Black or African American (B/AfrA): A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as "Haitian" or "Negro" can be used in addition to "Black or African American."
  • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (Haw): A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.
  • Hispanic or Latino (Hisp): A person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. The term, "Spanish origin," can be used in addition to "Hispanic or Latino."
  • White: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Full Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Biological Systems Engineering 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 14 0
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 6 1
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 9 0
Computer Science and Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 11 1
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 5 1
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 21 0
Engineering - Dean's Office 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical & Materials Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 12 1 0 0 17 1
Totals: 0 0 5 0 1 0 23 1 0 0 0 0 54 3 0 0 83 4

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Associate Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Biological Systems Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 1 0 0 8 1
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 1
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 4 2 0 0 8 3
Computer Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 5 2
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 9 1 0 0 11 4
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 9 2
Engineering - Dean's Office 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical & Materials Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 5 2
Totals: 0 0 0 0 0 0 19 7 0 1 0 0 30 7 0 0 49 15

Teaching, Tenure-Track: Assistant Professor Profiles

Engineering Department(s) Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or more Total Personnel
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Biological Systems Engineering 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 5 5 0 0 8 6
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 1
Civil Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 6 2
Computer Science and Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 7 2
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Electrical and Computer Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 1
Engineering - Dean's Office 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical & Materials Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 11 0
Totals: 0 0 1 0 0 0 20 5 1 0 0 0 20 7 0 0 42 12

Undergraduate

Admissions/Transfers

Undergraduate Admission to the College of Engineering

Freshman Admission Requirements

In addition to university requirements, students must meet the following College of Engineering requirements:

4 years of high school math, including:

2 years of algebra l
1 year of geometry l
1 year of trigonometry, pre-calculus or calculus

3 years of natural science, including:

1 year of physics l
1 year of chemistry

ACT composite of 24 or higher or SAT total score (Critical Reading and Math only) of 1180 or higher (if the minimum admission has not been met, a student still may be admitted based on an individual review of his/her application).

UNL Admission Information and Requirements
If you will be enrolling in our Omaha programs, you'll apply through the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO), while still remaining a Nebraska Engineering student.

Transfer Student Admission Requirements

2.5 transfer cumulative GPA
Ready to take Calculus (MATH 106) in math course sequence


Undergraduate Admission to an Engineering Department

Freshman Admission Requirements

In addition to university requirements, students must meet the following College of Engineering requirements:

4 years of high school math, including:

2 years of algebra l
1 year of geometry l
1 year of trigonometry, pre-calculus or calculus

3 years of natural science, including:

1 year of physics l
1 year of chemistry

ACT composite of 24 or higher or SAT total score (Critical Reading and Math only) of 1180 or higher (if the minimum admission has not been met, a student still may be admitted based on an individual review of his/her application).

UNL Admission Information and Requirements
If you will be enrolling in our Omaha programs, you'll apply through the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO), while still remaining a Nebraska Engineering student.
Transfer Student Admission Requirements

2.5 transfer cumulative GPA
Ready to take Calculus (MATH 106) in math course sequence


Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

International Freshmen

Application Fee
There is a $45 application fee payable online with a credit card.

Deadlines

Summer/Fall â€" May 1
Spring â€" December 1


Additional Documents
In addition to the online application, International Freshmen students are required to submit:
Secondary school transcript
Secondary school certificate/diploma
English proficiency scores
Bank statement

English Proficiency Deadlines
To be fully-admitted, you must meet English proficiency by the following deadlines:
Fall Term â€" July 15
Spring Term â€" December 1
Summer Term â€" May 1

Thanks for your interest in the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln! Here is a complete list of all the documents and requirements you will need to complete for your application.
Send all admission materials to:

Office of Admissions
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
1410 Q St
P.O. Box 880417
Lincoln, NE 68588-0417

You can contact the University to apply for admission by yourself. You are not required to use an agent to apply for admission or enroll at the University of Nebraska. If you chose to use someone to assist you in applying for admission or enroll for classes, that is your responsibility.
Official Secondary School Transcripts and Certificate/Diploma

Send in your original secondary school transcripts.

Include the original native language transcript and an English language translation.
Copies and English translations must be stamped by the issuing institution, Education USA, Embassy, or a certified notary confirming it is a literal translation.

Submit a certificate or diploma confirming graduation from a secondary education institution.

Include the original certificate or diploma in your native language as well as an English translation.
Copies and English translations must be stamped by the issuing institution, Education USA, Embassy, or a certified notary confirming it is a literal translation.

Completed Coursework Requirements

A broad section of course work in English
Native language courses
Math
Natural Sciences
Social Sciences

English Proficiency

Non-native English speakers must submit an IELTS or TOEFL score demonstrating proficiency in English. Contact your IELTS testing center or TOEFL to have your official scores sent directly to the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln.

If you do not meet proficiency requirements, you can still be offered conditional admission.

View English proficiency requirements.
ACT/SAT Requirements

ACT/SAT tests are not required for admission to UNL but may be required for entry into specific colleges.

Colleges that require ACT/SAT scores:

College of Architecture
College of Engineering

Bank Statement Requirements

In order to be issued an I-20, you must submit a bank statement showing sufficient support for the first year of study.

You will still be evaluated for admission without submitting the bank statement, but admission letters and I-20s will not be sent until the bank statement requirement has been met.

Statements must include:

Student's name
NUID Number

NOTE: Scholarship letters can be used in place of bank statements.

International Transfer

Application Fee
There is a $45 application fee payable online with a credit card.

Deadlines
Summer/Fall 2017 â€" May 1, 2017
Spring 2017 â€" December 1, 2016

Additional Documents
In addition to the online application, International Transfer students are required to submit:
Secondary school transcript
Secondary school certificate/diploma
University Transcript
English proficiency scores
Bank statement

English Proficiency Deadlines
To be fully-admitted, you must meet English proficiency by the following deadlines:
Fall Term â€" July 15
Spring Term â€" December 1
Summer Term â€" May 1

Thanks for your interest in the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln! Here is a complete list of all the documents and requirements you will need to complete for your application.
Send all admission materials to:

Office of Admissions
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
1410 Q St
P.O. Box 880417
Lincoln, NE 68588-0417

You can contact the University to apply for admission by yourself. You are not required to use an agent to apply for admission or enroll at the University of Nebraska. If you chose to use someone to assist you in applying for admission or enroll for classes, that is your responsibility.
Official Secondary School Transcripts and Certificate/Diploma

Send in your original secondary school transcripts.

Include the original native language transcript and an English language translation.
Copies and English translations must be stamped by the issuing institution, Education USA, Embassy, or a certified notary confirming it is a literal translation.

Submit a certificate or diploma confirming graduation from a secondary education institution.

Include the original certificate or diploma in your native language as well as an English translation.
Copies and English translations must be stamped by the issuing institution, Education USA, Embassy, or a certified notary confirming it is a literal translation.

Completed Coursework Requirements

A broad section of course work in English
Native language courses
Math
Natural Sciences
Social Sciences

English Proficiency

Non-native English speakers must submit an IELTS or TOEFL score demonstrating proficiency in English. Contact your IELTS testing center or TOEFL to have your official scores sent directly to the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln.

If you do not meet proficiency requirements, you can still be offered conditional admission.

View English proficiency requirements.
ACT/SAT Requirements

ACT / SAT tests are not required for admission to UNL but may be required for entry into specific colleges.

Colleges that require ACT / SAT scores:

College of Architecture
College of Engineering

Bank Statement Requirements

In order to be issued an I-20, you must submit a bank statement showing sufficient support for the first year of study.

You will still be evaluated for admission without submitting the bank statement, but admission letters and I-20s will not be sent until the bank statement requirement has been met.

Statements must include:
Student's name
NUID Number

NOTE: Scholarship letters can be used in place of bank statements

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

Residency Policy

Determining your residency status is an important part of your application for admission at the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln. Residents of the state of Nebraska will be billed in-state tuition and non-residents will be billed out-of-state tuition. Don't worry it's pretty simple, here's the gist.

You will be classified as a non-resident if:

You are not attending a Nebraska high school
Or, you are not a graduate of an accredited Nebraska high school

Qualifying for Residency Status For The Purpose of In-State Tuition

Persons of legal age (19 or older) or emancipated minors who:
have established a home in Nebraska for at least 12 months.*
AND can verify by documentation that he/she intends to make Nebraska their permanent residence.
Dependent students whose parent/guardian has established a home in Nebraska.
Persons who are married to Nebraska residents who had established a home in Nebraska prior to the marriage.
Permanent resident aliens or individuals who have been granted asylum or refugee status and who have established a home in Nebraska for at least 12 months.
Dependents or spouses of permanent university, state college, or community college employees in the State of Nebraska who have at least part-time (.5 FTE) employment status.
Active duty military personnel and their dependents whose permanent duty station or home of record is in Nebraska.
Persons who graduated from an accredited high school in Nebraska and were legal residents of Nebraska at the time of graduation.
Individuals who previously attended the University of Nebraska or one of the Nebraska state colleges as a resident within the last two years.
Individuals, and their spouses and dependents, who were recruited for full-time employment to the state of Nebraska because of their special talents or skills.
Members of tribes who live outside the state of Nebraska qualify for in-state tuition rates upon providing documentation of membership.
You need to apply for residency classification in order to determine if you qualify for in-state tuition.

NOTE: *Individuals who move to Nebraska primarily to enroll in a post-secondary institution in Nebraska will be considered a non-resident for tuition purposes for the duration of his/her attendance.
Native American Tribes Indigenous to Nebraska OR Tribes Migrated to or from the State of Nebraska

The following have been identified as Native American tribes indigenous to Nebraska or tribes that historically migrated to or from the state of Nebraska: Arapaho, Hidatsa, Missouria, Sac and Fox, Arikara, Jicarilla, Apache, Omaha, Dakota Sioux, Northern Cheyenne, Iowa, Otoe, Lakota Sioux, Southern Cheyenne, Kickapoo, Pawnee, Nakota Sioux, Comanche, Kiowa, Ponca, Santee Sioux, Crow, Mandan, Potawatomie, and Winnebago

It is the responsibility of the student to submit a copy of his or her tribal card to the Office of Admissions if he/she wants to be considered a resident for tuition purposes. Students who do not provide this documentation will be determined to be non-residents without further notification.
Housing

All incoming students under the age of 19 or students who have not completed or transferred 27 or more accepted semester hours of post-secondary education as of the first day of fall semester classes are required to live in University-approved on-campus housing.

Residency Requirements

Residency Policy

Determining your residency status is an important part of your application for admission at the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln. Residents of the state of Nebraska will be billed in-state tuition and non-residents will be billed out-of-state tuition. Don't worry it's pretty simple, here's the gist.

You will be classified as a non-resident if:

You are not attending a Nebraska high school
Or, you are not a graduate of an accredited Nebraska high school

Qualifying for Residency Status For The Purpose of In-State Tuition

Persons of legal age (19 or older) or emancipated minors who:
have established a home in Nebraska for at least 12 months.*
AND can verify by documentation that he/she intends to make Nebraska their permanent residence.
Dependent students whose parent/guardian has established a home in Nebraska.
Persons who are married to Nebraska residents who had established a home in Nebraska prior to the marriage.
Permanent resident aliens or individuals who have been granted asylum or refugee status and who have established a home in Nebraska for at least 12 months.
Dependents or spouses of permanent university, state college, or community college employees in the State of Nebraska who have at least part-time (.5 FTE) employment status.
Active duty military personnel and their dependents whose permanent duty station or home of record is in Nebraska.
Persons who graduated from an accredited high school in Nebraska and were legal residents of Nebraska at the time of graduation.
Individuals who previously attended the University of Nebraska or one of the Nebraska state colleges as a resident within the last two years.
Individuals, and their spouses and dependents, who were recruited for full-time employment to the state of Nebraska because of their special talents or skills.
Members of tribes who live outside the state of Nebraska qualify for in-state tuition rates upon providing documentation of membership.
You need to apply for residency classification in order to determine if you qualify for in-state tuition.

NOTE: *Individuals who move to Nebraska primarily to enroll in a post-secondary institution in Nebraska will be considered a non-resident for tuition purposes for the duration of his/her attendance.
Native American Tribes Indigenous to Nebraska OR Tribes Migrated to or from the State of Nebraska

The following have been identified as Native American tribes indigenous to Nebraska or tribes that historically migrated to or from the state of Nebraska: Arapaho, Hidatsa, Missouria, Sac and Fox, Arikara, Jicarilla, Apache, Omaha, Dakota Sioux, Northern Cheyenne, Iowa, Otoe, Lakota Sioux, Southern Cheyenne, Kickapoo, Pawnee, Nakota Sioux, Comanche, Kiowa, Ponca, Santee Sioux, Crow, Mandan, Potawatomie, and Winnebago

It is the responsibility of the student to submit a copy of his or her tribal card to the Office of Admissions if he/she wants to be considered a resident for tuition purposes. Students who do not provide this documentation will be determined to be non-residents without further notification.
Housing

All incoming students under the age of 19 or students who have not completed or transferred 27 or more accepted semester hours of post-secondary education as of the first day of fall semester classes are required to live in University-approved on-campus housing.


Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

Transfer

Transcript
You will self-report your academic record. Use an unofficial transcript to fill in your information.

Deadlines
Deadlines

Summer/Fall â€" May 1
Spring â€" December 1


Application Fee
There is a $45 application fee payable with a credit card or a check. Make the check out to the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln and put the applicant's name on the memo line. If you have applied for undergraduate admission at UNK or UNO within the last year and submitted an application fee to either of those campuses, you do not need to pay the $45 admission fee.

Personal Statement
To be considered for leadership and diversity scholarships, you must write a 350-word essay all about you. Focus on leadership, career goals and community service.

You are guaranteed admission if you meet the core course requirements and the performance requirements. If you don't meet these requirements, we strongly encourage you to apply anywayâ€"your admission will be determined by a committee appointed by the Director of Admissions and your complete academic profile will be considered.
Performance Requirements

Transfer applicants should:

Demonstrate a 2.0 ("C" average) cumulative grade point average (GPA) on all college-level coursework.
Have a 2.0 GPA for the most recent term of attendance.

Core Course Requirements

There are 16 units of academic courses required for admission.

A unit is one year of high school study or a semester/quarter of college coursework.
High School Classes

Here is a list of Nebraska high school classes that count toward core course requirements.
Ways to Meet Admission Requirements

If you are missing courses required for admission, there are ways to remove the deficiencies before you enroll.
Core Courses
Required academic courses
Category Requirements
English 4 units of English:
Units must include intensive reading and writing experiences.
Mathematics 4 units of math:

Algebra
Algebra II
Geometry
1 additional unit that builds on knowledge and concepts learned in Algebra II

Social Sciences 3 units of social sciences:

1 unit drawn from American and/or world history
1 additional unit drawn from history
American government and/or geography
a 3rd unit drawn from any social science discipline

Natural Sciences 3 units of natural sciences:

At least 2 units selected from:
biology
chemistry
physics
earth sciences
1 unit must include laboratory instruction

Foreign Language 2 units of foreign language:

Both units must be in the same language.
Students who are unable to take 2 years of foreign language in high school may still qualify for admission.
NOTE: Some University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln degree programs require the equivalent of 4 years of high school foreign language in the same language in order to graduate.
View foreign language requirements by degree.

College Specific Requirements

All colleges at the University of Nebraskaâ€"Lincoln require students meet the minimum core course and performance admission requirements. (as listed above)

Some colleges have additional requirements that students must meet in order to be admitted to their requested college.
The Explore Center

If you do not meet college specific requirements you can still be admitted through our Explore Center.

you will be advised by the Explore Center until you meet the college specific requirements for your desired college.
once you've met your college's requirements, you will have the opportunity to transfer into the college you requested.

Colleges With Additional Requirements

College of Engineering
Engineering course requirements
Category Requirements
First-Year College Students
Math

1 full unit of geometry AND

As part of the 4 units required you must take:

pre-calculus
OR trigonometry
OR calculus

Natural Sciences As part of the 3 units required you must take:

chemistry
AND physics

ACT/SAT Scores

ACT composite score of 24 or higher
OR an SAT combined score of 1110 (old) or 1180 (new) or higher

Domestic Transfer Students

Must have a cumulative and last-term GPA of at least 2.5.

Hixson-Lied College of Fine & Performing Arts

Applicants who do not qualify for assured admission will automatically be considered for full admission to the University on the basis of special merit. The special merit process will make provisions for a variety of circumstances, including allowance for the special consideration to be given to: non- traditional students; returning adult students; students educated at home schools; students who do not meet the required performance criteria but who have performed at a high level of accomplishment towards the conclusion of their high school careers (sometimes called "late bloomers"); students who can provide evidence of special talents, such as outstanding musical performers; those with unique educational experience or career achievements, etc. Such students will be encouraged to provide evidence of their ability to do University level work. In addition, special consideration will be given to members of under-represented groups who present evidence of being able to succeed. Such applications will be considered by University admissions personnel following established policies and procedures. It must be emphasized that students once admitted through this process will be considered fully admitted and will not be considered by the University to have a provisional status. However, some students may have to complete specific University courses to compensate for having not completed all of the required core courses or equivalent educational attainments.
Admissions Committee

Per Admissions Office Procedures Manual in Accordance with RP- 5.2.1-4bâ€"an Admissions Committees may admit students that do not meet the Board of Regents assured admissions requirements for full admission. These decisions are based upon a holistic review of an individual applicants student record including but not limited to: academic achievement (GPA, academic courses, class rank, standardized test scores), high school course availability, recommendation letters, and retention services. The Admissions Committee will utilize this information through the holistic review process to determine whether there are other indicia in the record that would contribute to the applicant's academic success at the University. The Office of Admissions has three committees that perform the above described work: First-Year college students; Transfer/International and Special Circumstances.

The Special Circumstances Committee will holistically review applicants with special merit that are required to participate in intrusive and successful retention programs such as, but not limited to, Nebraska College Preparatory Academy, William H. Thompson Scholars, and Nebraska Athletics Support Services. The Director of Admissions must approve retention programs to be considered for the Special Circumstances Committee. Members of this committee will be appointed by the Director of Admissions.

Number of Transfer Students from:

A two-year community junior college where they were full-time students: 74
A four-year college or university where they were full-time students: 83

Undergraduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): In-State / Out-of-State

Undergraduate Group 1 Undergraduate Group 2
Tuition & Fees: $10,208 $29,213
Room & Board: $11,234 $4,234
Books & Supplies: $1,024 $1,024
Other Expenses: $1,762 $1,762
Estimated avg. course load per term: 15 15
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

Additional Financial Aid Information

Please go to:
http://admissions.unl.edu/cost-aid/financial-aid.aspx

Undergraduate

New Applicants

New Undergraduate Applicants

A. Number of undergraduate applicants to the engineering college: 1,339
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 1,277
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 872
Percentage of entering students (excluding transfer students) ranked in the top quarter (25%) of their high schools: 61%
Note: Too few SAT scores are being recorded to determine range.

Newly Enrolled Test Scores

Scores Reflect 75th to 25th percentile

SAT 75th 25th
Math Range:
Reading Range:
Writing Range:
Combined Range:
ACT 75th 25th
Math Range: 31 26
Composite Range: 31 25

Undergraduate

Enrollments by Class

Undergraduate Engr. Programs Fresh
1st Year
Soph
2nd Year
Junior
3rd Year
Senior
4th/5th Year
Full Time Total Part Time Total
Agricultural Engineering (BSAE) 18 15 16 23 72 4
Architectural Engineering (BSAR) 41 29 37 50 157 15
Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE) 57 31 42 99 229 8
Chemical Engineering (BSCHE) 51 47 58 90 246 8
Civil Engineering (BSCE) 90 85 128 163 466 43
Computer Engineering (BSCP) 86 54 64 69 273 25
Computer Science (BS) 167 78 143 117 505 33
Construction Engineering (BSCN) 8 5 13 19 45 9
Construction Management (BSCM) 23 58 74 109 264 15
Electrical Engineering (BSEE) 65 40 75 95 275 36
Electronics Engineering (BSEL) 1 3 6 6 16 7
Mechanical Engineering (BSME) 149 128 176 206 659 36
Pre-Engineering 143 25 12 3 183 12
Software Engineering (BSSE) 64 23 6 2 95 3
Totals: 963 621 850 1051 3485 254

Freshmen

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Agricultural Engineering (BSAE)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 0 1 0 17 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Architectural Engineering (BSAR)
Men 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 25 1 1 0 30 1
Women 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 11 0
Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 26 0 2 0 30 0
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 20 0 0 0 27 0
Chemical Engineering (BSCHE)
Men 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 24 0 2 1 31 1
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 13 0 2 0 20 0
Civil Engineering (BSCE)
Men 9 0 0 0 4 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 61 0 3 1 81 2
Women 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 9 0
Computer Engineering (BSCP)
Men 5 0 3 0 6 1 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 58 0 4 0 81 1
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 5 0
Computer Science (BS)
Men 36 0 1 0 7 0 0 0 13 0 4 0 0 0 83 0 2 0 146 0
Women 7 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 21 0
Construction Engineering (BSCN)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 7 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Construction Management (BSCM)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 21 0 0 0 22 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Electrical Engineering (BSEE)
Men 9 0 1 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 44 0 1 0 63 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Electronics Engineering (BSEL)
Men 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering (BSME)
Men 9 0 3 0 8 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 109 0 2 0 135 0
Women 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 14 0
Pre-Engineering
Men 3 0 0 0 15 0 0 0 6 1 6 0 0 0 94 4 4 0 128 5
Women 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 9 2 1 0 15 2
Software Engineering (BSSE)
Men 4 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 41 0 4 0 57 0
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 7 0
Totals: 91 0 12 0 60 2 1 0 49 1 22 0 1 0 696 7 31 2 963 12

Sophomores

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Agricultural Engineering (BSAE)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 1 0 14 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Architectural Engineering (BSAR)
Men 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 1 1 0 20 1
Women 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 9 2
Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 10 0 3 0 16 0
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 15 0
Chemical Engineering (BSCHE)
Men 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 0 0 19 0 0 0 31 0
Women 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 10 0 1 0 16 0
Civil Engineering (BSCE)
Men 10 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 54 3 2 0 70 6
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 1 2 0 15 1
Computer Engineering (BSCP)
Men 6 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 35 1 2 0 49 1
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 5 0
Computer Science (BS)
Men 28 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 34 1 1 0 70 1
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 8 0
Construction Engineering (BSCN)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 5 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Construction Management (BSCM)
Men 4 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 47 1 0 0 55 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 3 1
Electrical Engineering (BSEE)
Men 11 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 23 4 1 0 37 7
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Electronics Engineering (BSEL)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 3 2
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering (BSME)
Men 17 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 93 1 5 0 124 1
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 0
Pre-Engineering
Men 1 0 1 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 1 0 0 23 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0
Software Engineering (BSSE)
Men 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 14 2 1 0 19 2
Women 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0
Totals: 100 1 9 2 24 3 1 0 23 0 8 1 0 0 435 20 21 0 621 27

Juniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Agricultural Engineering (BSAE)
Men 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 2 0 0 15 2
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Architectural Engineering (BSAR)
Men 2 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 0 0 0 25 1
Women 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 12 0
Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE)
Men 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 19 2 0 0 24 2
Women 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 1 0 0 18 1
Chemical Engineering (BSCHE)
Men 12 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 22 1 1 0 40 1
Women 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 0 1 0 18 0
Civil Engineering (BSCE)
Men 13 0 3 0 9 0 0 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 61 5 3 0 95 5
Women 6 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 19 0 1 0 33 0
Computer Engineering (BSCP)
Men 6 0 2 0 3 2 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 45 3 0 0 59 6
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 5 0
Computer Science (BS)
Men 31 1 4 0 5 1 0 0 4 0 4 0 0 0 66 4 2 0 116 6
Women 11 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 10 1 1 0 27 1
Construction Engineering (BSCN)
Men 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 12 1
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Construction Management (BSCM)
Men 7 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 54 2 2 0 70 2
Women 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 1
Electrical Engineering (BSEE)
Men 15 0 0 1 5 2 0 0 2 0 2 1 0 0 39 4 1 0 64 8
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 11 0
Electronics Engineering (BSEL)
Men 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 5 0 0 0 6 3
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering (BSME)
Men 24 0 1 0 7 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 126 4 1 1 164 5
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 1 0 12 0
Pre-Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 3 1 1 0 7 2
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 5 0
Software Engineering (BSSE)
Men 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 6 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
Totals: 146 1 15 1 53 8 0 0 35 0 16 4 0 1 569 31 16 2 850 48

Seniors

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Agricultural Engineering (BSAE)
Men 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 18 2 0 0 19 2
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 4 0
Architectural Engineering (BSAR)
Men 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 25 5 0 0 30 7
Women 6 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 12 1 1 0 20 3
Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE)
Men 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 45 1 1 0 51 2
Women 4 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 40 3 0 0 48 3
Chemical Engineering (BSCHE)
Men 12 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 44 0 1 4 64 5
Women 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 22 0 0 0 26 1
Civil Engineering (BSCE)
Men 15 3 1 1 7 2 0 0 0 0 9 1 0 0 99 19 2 0 133 26
Women 4 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 21 3 0 0 30 3
Computer Engineering (BSCP)
Men 3 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 4 1 0 1 0 0 51 10 3 0 63 14
Women 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 6 3
Computer Science (BS)
Men 24 4 2 1 5 0 0 0 7 3 3 2 0 0 56 14 4 0 101 24
Women 6 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 16 1
Construction Engineering (BSCN)
Men 1 1 0 0 2 2 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 9 4 0 0 15 7
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 1
Construction Management (BSCM)
Men 5 0 1 1 5 1 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 83 7 0 0 99 9
Women 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 0 0 10 1
Electrical Engineering (BSEE)
Men 12 1 3 0 8 2 0 0 0 1 5 2 0 0 54 12 2 0 84 18
Women 6 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 4 0 0 0 11 3
Electronics Engineering (BSEL)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 1 1 0 6 2
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering (BSME)
Men 20 1 2 0 7 3 0 0 5 0 3 1 0 0 136 24 5 0 178 29
Women 5 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 18 0 1 0 28 1
Pre-Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 3 2
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Software Engineering (BSSE)
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
Totals: 131 17 20 6 41 10 2 0 33 8 31 12 0 0 771 110 22 4 1051 167

Undergraduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Agricultural Engineering (BSAE) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 8 8 0
Architectural Engineering (BSAR) 9 0 1 0 0 0 0 18 0 28 24 4
Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE) 2 0 1 0 2 3 0 43 2 53 26 27
Chemical Engineering (BSCHE) 6 0 1 0 4 0 0 37 0 48 35 13
Civil Engineering (BSCE) 3 1 7 0 0 4 0 65 1 81 68 13
Computer Engineering (BSCP) 2 1 1 0 2 0 0 31 0 37 35 2
Computer Science (BS) 13 0 2 0 3 0 0 54 2 74 70 4
Construction Engineering (BSCN) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6 0 7 7 0
Construction Management (BSCM) 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 66 4 74 72 2
Electrical Engineering (BSEE) 13 0 1 0 3 5 0 36 1 59 55 4
Electronics Engineering (BSEL) 6 0 0 0 0 2 0 9 0 17 15 2
Mechanical Engineering (BSME) 6 2 2 0 2 0 0 77 2 91 85 6
Pre-Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Note: Pre-Engineering is not a degree program.
Software Engineering (BSSE) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 60 6 17 0 18 14 0 450 12 577 500 77

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Bachelor's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Agricultural Engineering (BSAE) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 8
Architectural Engineering (BSAR) 8 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 3 0 0 28
Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE) 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 21 22 1 1 53
Chemical Engineering (BSCHE) 4 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 29 8 0 0 48
Civil Engineering (BSCE) 2 1 1 0 6 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 55 10 1 0 81
Computer Engineering (BSCP) 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 30 1 0 0 37
Computer Science (BS) 13 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 50 4 2 0 74
Construction Engineering (BSCN) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 7
Construction Management (BSCM) 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 65 1 3 1 74
Electrical Engineering (BSEE) 11 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 5 0 0 0 36 0 0 1 59
Electronics Engineering (BSEL) 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 7 2 0 0 17
Mechanical Engineering (BSME) 6 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 71 6 2 0 91
Pre-Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Note: Pre-Engineering is not a degree program.
Software Engineering (BSSE) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 53 7 6 0 14 3 0 0 13 5 12 2 0 0 393 57 9 3 577

Undergraduate

Dual Degrees

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

Undergraduate Engineering Dual Degrees Awarded

0

Undergraduate

Program Comparisons

  • ABET - Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
  • CEAB - Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board
Degree Program ABET/CEAB Accred. Nominal Program Length
(yrs.)
Average Program Length
(yrs.)
Time: Day/Even./
Both
Co-op: None/Opt./
Required
Grads in Co-op Progs.
Agricultural Engineering (BSAE) yes 4.00 4.70 Day None
Architectural Engineering (BSAR) no 4.00 4.20 Both None
Biological Systems Engineering (BSBSE) yes 4.00 4.60 Both None
Chemical Engineering (BSCHE) yes 4.00 4.60 Day None
Civil Engineering (BSCE) yes 4.00 4.60 Both None
Computer Engineering (BSCP) yes 4.00 4.50 Both None
Computer Science (BS) no 4.00 4.50 Both None
Construction Engineering (BSCN) yes 4.00 4.30 Both None
Construction Management (BSCM) no 4.00 4.60 Both None
Electrical Engineering (BSEE) yes 4.00 4.70 Both None
Electronics Engineering (BSEL) yes 4.00 4.60 Both None
Mechanical Engineering (BSME) yes 4.00 4.70 Day None
Pre-Engineering no Both None
Note: Pre-Engineering is not a degree program.
Software Engineering (BSSE) no Day None

Graduate

Admissions Information

Graduate Admission to the College of Engineering

Eligibility
An applicant with any of the following is eligible for graduate admission:
A four-year U.S. bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university.
An equivalent degree as evaluated by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Office of Graduate Studies.
UNL senior standing within 9 hours of graduation. See Hold for Graduate Credit.

1. Application, communication, and materials
Submit the following to Graduate Studies:
Application for Graduate Admission
$50.00 non-refundable application fee
A transcript confirming eligibility, uploaded to MyRED (see transcript requirements)
If your native language is not English: verification of English proficiency
Submit items required by your academic dept.:
If pursuing a degree or certificate: Consult its program summary for dept.-specific items.
Otherwise: Non-degree, non-cert. students typically have no additional dept. items.

Submitting the Application for Graduate Admission form begins a series of email communications:

On our next business day you'll receive email:
From Graduate Studies, summarizing your application objective. Alert us promptly if this doesn't match what you intended to apply for.
From TrueYou, providing your NU ID number and a temporary password if you don't already have an active TrueYou account. Once you've set up your TrueYou account you can use MyRED to check your application status. See About MyRED for details.
Within 24 hours of those messages you'll receive email about GAMES, if applicable. Nearly all of our degree programs use the Graduate Admissions Management and Evaluation System (GAMES) for online submission of their departmental materials.
Within 10 days of applying, typically much sooner, you'll receive email from the admissions evaluator assigned to your application.

2. Review

2.1. Preliminary Grad Studies review
Once we have your application, fee, and uploaded transcripts, we will review your file and contact you if additional information is needed by Graduate Studies. You can monitor your application's progress via the Graduate Application Status page (under Admissions) in MyRED.
When the preliminary review is complete we will notify your academic department of your eligibility for admission.
Once all materials have been received, allow 3 to 5 business days for this step.


2.2. Departmental review
Each academic department has a Graduate Admissions Committee to decide whether a student will be accepted into their program. Non-degree applicants skip this step.
Your application will be reviewed only after you have submitted all required program-specific application materials. We recommend verifying receipt of all materials before the department's stated deadline â€" via GAMES if your program uses GAMES, otherwise by contacting your department directly.
Department graduate committees meet on varying schedules; contact your department for information regarding your application status.


2.3. Final Graduate Studies review
As soon as the department notifies Graduate Studies of their admission recommendation, we will conduct a final review of your file. This includes checking that all eligibility, English proficiency, and funding requirements have been met.
If additional materials are needed Graduate Studies will notify you by email.
If you are not a US citizen and you expect to hold an F or J visa we will ask you to submit the Financial Resource Certification (FRC) form with documentation. The FRC is not needed if your department offers you an assistantship sufficient to cover those expenses.

3. Admission and enrollment
If you're admitted Graduate Studies will notify you by email.
We'll mail your Certificate of Admission along with other important information for incoming students.
International students will be asked to complete the Visa Data Form to verify information for the Form I-20 or Form DS-2019. We will express mail your Certificate of Admission, your I-20 or DS-2019, and information for new students.
You'll be eligible to enroll for the entry term shown on your Certificate of Admission. If you're an international student you'll become eligible when you check in on campus.
MyRED is the self-service system where you'll register for classes. See Enrollment Toolbox for links to course descriptions, schedules, etc.
Arriving on Campus, Relocating to Lincoln, and Arriving in the United States may also help you prepare for your journey.

Graduate Admission to an Engineering Department

Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the admissions information. Telephone number is (402) 472-2875.

For individual departments and programs; http://engineering.unl.edu/graduate-programs/prospective-students/

Entrance Requirements for Foreign Students

International students comprise a significant portion of our applicants and our graduate student body. At the Fall 2016 census, international students representing 97 countries made up 23% of our total graduate enrollment.

While many aspects of the application process are the same for all students, applicants from outside the U.S. have a few additional requirements in recognition of their wide variety of linguistic and educational backgrounds and their need to follow U.S. immigration regulations.

Parade with flags
Application for Graduate Admission

If you are not a U.S. citizen or you have been educated outside the U.S. you may be asking yourself these questions:
•Is my degree equivalent to a U.S. bachelor's degree?
•What academic records will I need to provide?
•Will I have enough money to support myself and my family?
•Am I prepared for graduate coursework taught in English?
•Am I allowing enough time to meet deadlines and to schedule my visa appointment?
•Will I need a form from Nebraska for a visa interview?
•How should I prepare for arriving in the United States?

These resources will help you answer your questions.

Entrance Requirements for Non-Resident Students

http://www.unl.edu/gradstudies/home

Residency Requirements

Students applying for residence will be required to have established a home in Nebraska at least 12 months immediately preceding the semester or term for which resident status is sought.

Admissions Requirements for Transfer Students

Contact Graduate Studies:
http://www.unl.edu/gradstudies/home

Graduate

Expenses & Financial Aid

Student Group(s): In-State / Out-of-State

Graduate Group 1 Graduate Group 2
Tuition & Fees: $7,799 $20,822
Room & Board: $12,484 $12,484
Books & Supplies: $1,024 $1,024
Other Expenses: $3,926 $3,926
Estimated avg. course load per term: 9 9
Does your institute have any special programs or fee structures for the expenses category "All Students"?: No

Financial Aid Information

Required financial aid forms

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), Family Financial Statement (FFS)

Additional Financial Aid Information

See Scholarships and Financial Aid
(http://www.unl.edu/scholfa/)

Graduate

New Applicants

New Graduate Applicants

A. Number of graduate applicants to the engineering college: 747
B. Of those in (A), how many were offered admission? 213
C. Of those in (B), how many were enrolled in the fall? 116

Graduate

Enrollments by Class

Master's

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering (MS)
Men 6 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 5 1 0 15 7
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 4 3
Architectural Engineering (MARE)
Men 4 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 3 0 0 19 4
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 2 3
Architectural Engineering (MS)
Men 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Chemical Engineering (MS)
Men 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Civil Engineering (MS)
Men 5 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 14 8 0 0 22 13
Women 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 3
Computer Science (MS)
Men 17 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 4 3 1 0 25 10
Women 6 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 7 2
Construction Engineering and Management (MS)
Men 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 3
Women 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Electrical Engineering (MS)
Men 4 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 3 0 0 9 6
Women 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
Engineering Management (MEM)
Men 0 1 0 4 0 3 0 0 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 32 0 2 1 46
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 5
Environmental Engineering (MS)
Men 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 1
Women 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1
Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (MS)
Men 4 5 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3 2 0 17 8
Women 0 3 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 3
Telecommunications Engineering (MS)
Men 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals: 63 23 4 6 8 7 0 0 3 10 1 2 0 0 60 71 4 2 143 121

Doctoral

Group Nonresident Alien Unknown Hispanic American Indian Asian Black Pacific Islander White Two or More Total
  FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT FT PT
Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering
Men 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Architectural Engineering (PhD)
Men 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 16 0
Women 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0
Biological Engineering (PhD)
Men 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 18 0
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 6 0
Biomedical Engineering (PhD)
Men 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 14 0
Women 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 7 0
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering (PhD)
Men 9 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 17 0
Women 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0
Civil Engineering (PhD)
Men 44 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 48 0
Women 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 13 0
Computer Engineering (PhD)
Men 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0
Women 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Engineering - Computer Science (PhD)
Men 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 14 0
Women 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0
Computer Engineering-Comp & Elec Eng (PhD)
Men 10 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 12 0
Women 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0
Computer Science (PhD)
Men 32 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 49 0
Women 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 12 0
Construction (PhD)
Men 6 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 8 0
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Construction Engineering & Management
Men 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0
Women 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Electrical Engineering (PhD)
Men 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 2 0 53 0
Women 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 9 0
Materials Engineering (PhD)
Men 12 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 16 0
Women 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 9 0
Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (PhD)
Men 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 36 0
Women 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Totals: 293 0 5 0 5 0 0 0 9 0 1 0 0 0 73 0 5 0 391 0

Graduate

Degrees Awarded by Program

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering (MS) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 4 4 0
Architectural Engineering (MARE) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 17 12 5
Architectural Engineering (MS) 5 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 9 6 3
Chemical Engineering (MS) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0
Civil Engineering (MS) 11 1 1 0 1 0 0 11 0 25 22 3
Computer Science (MS) 21 0 0 0 1 1 0 6 2 31 19 12
Construction Engineering and Management (MS) 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 4 1
Electrical Engineering (MS) 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 6 6 0
Engineering Management (MEM) 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 7 0 10 10 0
Environmental Engineering (MS) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 2 1
Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (MS) 6 0 1 0 1 0 0 13 0 21 18 3
Telecommunications Engineering (MS) 1 0 0 0 3 1 0 1 0 6 5 1
Totals: 54 2 2 0 7 3 0 68 2 138 109 29

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Master's Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering (MS) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 4
Architectural Engineering (MARE) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 5 0 0 17
Architectural Engineering (MS) 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 9
Chemical Engineering (MS) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Civil Engineering (MS) 9 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 25
Computer Science (MS) 11 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 4 2 2 0 31
Construction Engineering and Management (MS) 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5
Electrical Engineering (MS) 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 6
Engineering Management (MEM) 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 10
Environmental Engineering (MS) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 3
Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (MS) 5 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 1 0 0 21
Telecommunications Engineering (MS) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6
Totals: 39 15 1 1 1 1 0 0 6 1 3 0 0 0 57 11 2 0 138

Master's Degree Programs

Master's Degree Program Degree Type
Master's w/ Thesis Master's w/o Thesis or with Proj./Report Program Totals
Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering (MS) 0 0 0
Architectural Engineering (MARE) 0 0 0
Architectural Engineering (MS) 0 0 0
Chemical Engineering (MS) 0 0 0
Civil Engineering (MS) 0 0 0
Computer Science (MS) 0 0 0
Construction Engineering and Management (MS) 0 0 0
Electrical Engineering (MS) 0 0 0
Engineering Management (MEM) 0 0 0
Environmental Engineering (MS) 0 0 0
Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (MS) 0 0 0
Telecommunications Engineering (MS) 0 0 0
Totals: 0 0 0

Degrees By Ethnicity

Nra - Nonresident aliens
Asi - Asian American
Blk - Black
His - Hispanic
Ind - American Indian
Pac - Pacific Islander
Unk - Unknown
Wht - White
Tot - Program Totals
Two - Two or More
Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot Male Female
Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Architectural Engineering (PhD) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0
Biological Engineering (PhD) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 0
Biomedical Engineering (PhD) 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 4 0
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering (PhD) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1
Civil Engineering (PhD) 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 2 2
Computer Engineering (PhD) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Engineering - Computer Science (PhD) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0
Computer Engineering-Comp & Elec Eng (PhD) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Science (PhD) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 2 1
Construction (PhD) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
Construction Engineering & Management 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0
Electrical Engineering (PhD) 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 7 5 2
Materials Engineering (PhD) 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 5 1
Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (PhD) 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 7 6 1
Totals: 28 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 1 40 31 9

Degrees By Ethnicity & Gender

Doctoral Degree Program(s) Nra Unk His Ind Asi Blk Pac Wht Two Tot
M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F
Agricultural & Biological Systems Engineering 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Architectural Engineering (PhD) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Biological Engineering (PhD) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2
Biomedical Engineering (PhD) 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering (PhD) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
Civil Engineering (PhD) 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4
Computer Engineering (PhD) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Engineering - Computer Science (PhD) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Computer Engineering-Comp & Elec Eng (PhD) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Computer Science (PhD) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3
Construction (PhD) 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Construction Engineering & Management 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Electrical Engineering (PhD) 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7
Materials Engineering (PhD) 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6
Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics (PhD) 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 7
Totals: 22 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 3 1 0 40

Graduate

Research Expenditures

Expenditures by Research Department

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Engineering Department External Funding Source
Biological Systems Engineering
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $1,738,426 Industry: $993,053 Priv/Non: $966,381
State: $395,752 Local: $121,151 Total Expn.: $4,214,763
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $382,272 Industry: $1,826,387 Priv/Non: $76,811
State: $2,453 Local: $33,161 Total Expn.: $2,321,084
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Civil Engineering
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $937,347 Industry: $475,393 Priv/Non: $2,280,960
State: $1,687,844 Local: $149,965 Total Expn.: $5,531,509
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Computer Science and Engineering
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $2,668,223 Industry: $3,962 Priv/Non: $1,777,911
State: $297,907 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $4,748,003
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $327,617 Industry: $76,626 Priv/Non: $437,638
State: $250,533 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $1,092,414
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $4,542,734 Industry: $784,099 Priv/Non: $383,088
State: $156,057 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $5,865,978
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Engineering - Dean's Office
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $0 Priv/Non: $0
State: $10,500 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $10,500
Engineering Department External Funding Source
Mechanical & Materials Engineering
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $3,364,161 Industry: $677,928 Priv/Non: $1,405,967
State: $1,934,287 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $7,382,343
Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $13,960,780 Industry: $4,837,448 Priv/Non: $7,328,756
State: $4,735,333 Local: $304,277 Total Expn.: $31,166,594

Expenditures by Research Center

Total: Total number of contracts & grants Fed/Nat: Federal & National Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. State: State Government contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes. Foreign: Foreign Goverment grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.
Industry: Business and Industrial grants, contracts, and gifts used for research. Priv/Non: Grants, contracts, and gifts from private non-profit organizations (e.g. foundations) used for research. Indiv: Grants, contracts, and gifts from individuals used for research. Local: Local government grants and contracts specifically budgeted for engineering research purposes.

Dollar Amounts by External Funding Source

Center/Lab External Funding Source
Biological Process Development Facility
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Center For Electro-optics
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Design & Fabrication Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Industrial Agricultural Products Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Mid-America Transportation Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Midwest Roadside Safety Facility
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Nano-Engineering Research Core Facilty
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $0 Industry: $536,748 Priv/Non: $9,524
State: $0 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $546,272
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $2,958,082 Industry: $72,395 Priv/Non: $289,841
State: $3,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $3,323,318
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Nebraska Innovation Studio
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Nebraska Tractor Test Lab
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Nebraska Transportation Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
Nebraska Water Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Center/Lab External Funding Source
The Holland Computing Center
Total#: Foreign: Indiv:
Fed/Nat: Industry: Priv/Non:
State: Local: Total Expn.: $0
Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $2,958,082 Industry: $609,143 Priv/Non: $299,365
State: $3,000 Local: $0 Total Expn.: $3,869,590


Grand Totals:
Total#: 0 Foreign: $0 Indiv: $0
Fed/Nat: $16,918,862 Industry: $5,446,591 Priv/Non: $7,628,121
State: $4,738,333 Local: $304,277 Total Expn.: $35,036,184

The following text was offered to each school as a guideline for the calculation of externally-funded research expenditures:

Include all expenditures associated with grants and contracts specifically budgeted for externally sponsored research and associated programs and expenditures associated with all gifts auditably used for research. Include expended funds provided by the following external sources:

  1. Federal Government
  2. State Government
  3. Foreign Governments
  4. Industry
  5. Non-Profit Organizations (e.g. foundations)
  6. Individuals
  7. Local Government

The expenditures reported should be only those funds provided by organizations, agencies, and individuals external to the institution. Cost sharing/matching funds should be included only if provided from sources external to the institution.

Only State government funds that were obtained competitively or as matching funds associated with other externally funded programs should be included. State funds that are part of the normal operating budget should not be included regardless of purpose.

For all joint or contracted projects or sub-projects, only the portion of the center research performed by faculty, staff, and students of the affiliated engineering school should be credited to that school. Expenditures for capital costs of research laboratory building construction should not be included.

Expenditures for research laboratory renovations should not be included unless the renovation funds expended came from grants and contracts expressly intended for the direct support of engineering research.

Any portion of academic year and/or summer salary for any researcher that is not derived from external research grants or contracts should not be counted.

Total #: Report total number of individual grants, not the total dollar amount of the expenditures.

Expenditures: Report actual expenditures (as opposed to authorization amounts) in U.S. dollars.

Time frame for expenditures: Report expenditures for your current fiscal year.

Research centers listed as "WITHIN an engineering department" on the Research Centers page (screen 7) of the College of Engineering Profile, will not have their expenditures added to the school's total research expenditures. Such expenditures can be included in the department total, while still being listed for the appropriate center. This allows users to list the expenditures in two areas without double-counting.

Graduate

Research Description

Research Description By Graduate Engineering Department

Biological Systems Engineering

Research is conducted in five focus areas:

Bioengineering for health and productivity
Environmental engineering
Bioprocess engineering for adding value
Site-specific crop management
Water resources and ecosystems engineering

Research endeavors are a valuable component of our mission to the students, faculty, state, region, and world. Research is conducted in university labs, and in the field utilizing four Research and Extension Centers located throughout Nebraska. In addition to research conducted in Nebraska, faculty have also worked overseas in developing agricultural and irrigation systems of benefit to specific locales. Students have the opportunity to be involved in faculty research as part of their education, or to develop research in areas of their own interest.

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

The Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering has extensive research facilities. These facilities include unique capabilities for the: 1) measurement science involving study of biophysical phenomena at molecular level to develop principles to build novel sensors and devices with emphasis in using approaches in optics, electronics and nanomaterials; 2) development of new concepts and technologies for addressing the challenges in the process from benchtop to bedside for human pluripotent stem cell-derived cells; 3) development of novel nanostructured materials with highly controlled architectures and chemistries for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications; 4) development of polymeric materials, nanostructures and coatings; 5) reconstruction and analysis of genome-scale and community models, systems-level analysis of ‘omics’ data, development of genetic toolkit and engineering metabolic pathways, and redesign photosynthetic apparatus and carbon fixing mechanism; 6) modeling of coupled electron/ion transport dynamics through polycrystalline oxide networks, adsorption phenomena, interfacial electron transfer and selective oxidation of Ni-base alloys; 7) Application of metabolic engineering principles and synthetic biology tools to the microbial synthesis of industrial or other value-added chemicals from renewable feedstock; 8) development of new enzyme catalysts and auxiliary functional proteins for efficient and green synthesis of pharmaceutical precursors and energy molecules; and 9) characterization of glycoproteins using HPLC and MS methods.

Civil Engineering

The Department of Civil Engineering has extensive research facilities. These facilities include multi-site experimental and computational capabilities that support research focused on: (1) fate and transport of contaminants in air, soil and water; (2) development, optimization and testing of advanced soils, materials and structural components at multiple scales and under varying demands; (3) non-contact sensing of material and structural response; (4) field evaluation of infrastructure systems and waterways; and (5) real-time assessment of transportation system safety and operations. Specific examples of unique facilities and equipment associated with items 1-5 above include: (1) real-time PCR with gradient functions, electrophoresis systems, spectrophotometers, mini beadbeaters, chromatographs, spectrometers, total organic carbon analyzers, photodiode detectors and liquid scintillation counters; (2) nanoindenters, rheometers, DIC systems, mechanical and fracture testing stations, profilometers, servo-controlled actuators, PXI data acquisition systems, and shock-tube, drop-weight and pendulum systems; (3) LIDAR and advanced imaging systems, high-speed cameras, and non-contact acoustic emission systems; (4) portable sensors, drones, data acquisition systems housed in a mobile testing laboratory; and (5) smart traffic sensors, wireless vehicle detection, autoscope and video detection systems.

Computer Science and Engineering

The Computer Science and Engineering Department houses, in addition to smaller faculty research focused laboratories, larger collaborative laboratories that conduct research on software testing and analysis, robotics and autonomous systems, cyber-physical systems, high-performance computing and sensor networking. Examples of equipment in these laboratories include a 6000 cubic foot UAV flight cage with VICON motion capture, more than 3 dozen robotic systems, 3D printers, laser cutters for fabricating experimental UAV assemblies, indoor and outdoor wireless sensor network testbeds, and significant computational resources, including a 12000 CPU system capable of delivering 121 TeraFLOPS.

Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction

The Durham School for Architectural Engineering and Construction has a host of research facilities including: full-scale psychrometric chamber, acoustic chamber, room-size lighting laboratory, large structural testing laboratory with strong floor and strong walls, material testing laboratory, several UAVs with sensor capabilities

Electrical and Computer Engineering

The Electrical and Computer Engineering Department conducts research on two campuses, Lincoln and Omaha, in the areas of Communications and Signal Processing, Electromagnetic Fields and Optics, Electronics, Energy and Power Systems, Materials and Devices, and Bioengineering. There are unique laboratories and facilities including a myriad of lasers and other optical systems, EM test facilities for radar, microwave, and THz systems, material growth systems, industry standard CAD tools for integrated circuit design, high voltage test beds, renewable generating sources, a wind tunnel, advanced SEM, TEM, and other microscopy systems, advanced 3-D printers, including metal printers, and high performance computing facilities.

Mechanical & Materials Engineering

Extensive facilities for conducting world-class experimental and computational research are available. These include multiple metal hybrid AM machines as well as 3D printers for polymers and biological materials, complete biological research laboratories, world-class materials characterization including FIB-SEM, S/TEM, scanning probe, XPS, x-ray diffraction, and multiple in situ capabilities, materials processing, fabrication and consolidation, including multiple laser facilities and spark plasma synthesis, and device fabrication in clean room facilities.

Research Description By Engineering Research Center

Biological Process Development Facility

The UNL BPDF uses a synergistic, multi-disciplinary approach to advance research-derived candidate vaccines and bio-therapeutics from discovery to Phase I/II clinical trials. For over 13 years, UNL-BPDF has provided customers with access to experienced biopharmaceutical process research and development scientists and engineers, state-of-the-art process development capabilities, and cGMP manufacturing facilities.

The UNL BPDF facility features 6,000 square feet of modular clean rooms and 7,000 square feet of support space, including a pure steam generator, a water-for-injection (WFI) condenser, a 1,000-gallon WFI storage tank, and ambient and hot WFI distribution loops. The cGMP facility has 80 Liter and 200 Liter bioreactors and is able to accommodate a 1000 Liter bioreactor. The BPDF is equipped for downstream processing of both secreted and intracellular products derived from yeast or bacteria and is designed to produce Bulk Drug Substances.

Center For Electro-optics

The Center for Electro-Optics and Functionalized Surfaces (CEFS) is a collaborative research group composed of over 30 faculty, postdocs, graduate, and undergraduate students, from a diverse range of disciplines, working together towards a common vision of developing the basic science and methods necessary to generate permanent metallic functionalized surfaces.

Design & Fabrication Lab

This laboratory has been created to support the education of our engineering students through the practical application of machining and fabrication processes. Through the use of this laboratory you will have the opportunity to develop hands on machining and fabrication skills which will increase your knowledge and understanding of machining processes that are routinely used in a wide variety of manufacturing industries.

Industrial Agricultural Products Center

The IAPC is devoted to assisting companies in the development and commercialization of industrial products using agricultural materials and agricultural byproducts. Our network, across multiple University of Nebraska departments, helps assist clients in all areas of product development, from conception to manufacturing.

Mid-America Transportation Center

The states that comprise Region VII (Iowa, Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska) have many commonalities and, not surprisingly, the states' respective transportation agencies face many similar issues in providing a safe, efficient and effective transportation infrastructure. For example, the majority of the region's roadway networks are primarily rural, although there are a number of major cities interspersed throughout the area that face traditional urban transportation problems. In addition, the four states experience a considerable amount of freight traffic on the region's roadways, railways and waterways - all of which are located at the crossroads of the nation's transportation system. In Region VII, interstates I-70 and I-80 are vital east-west corridors and interstates I-35 and I-29 are major north-south corridors. Given the region's diverse economy and the growing trade with China, Mexico and Canada, freight traffic is increasing every year and is having a profound effect on the region's infrastructure. Congestion on the roadways, railways and waterways caused by this additional freight traffic will have an increasingly detrimental effect on the safety of the region's citizens, the traveling public, the transportation infrastructure and the region's economy.

The interdisciplinary areas of expertise required to successfully meet the research, education and technology transfer objectives associated with our theme include risk and reliability analysis, structural analysis, materials engineering, transportation system operations and alternative transportation infrastructure financing. MATC will work with the leading faculty members from multiple academic departments of the consortium universities. These academicians will partner with staff from the state transportation agencies and members of the commercial freight industry; engineers from the partner organizations will add comprehensive knowledge to minimize the risk to the critical infrastructure systems of the region (and, by extension, of the nation). This collaboration is established to foster an intellectual climate and physical environment capable of supporting the increasing need to improve safety and reduce risk on the multi-modal transportation system.

Midwest Roadside Safety Facility

The Midwest Roadside Safety Facility (MwRSF), part of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is a research organization with a main focus of researching all aspects of highway design and safety. MwRSF conducts safety performance evaluations of various roadside appurtenances, developing new and innovative design concepts and technologies in the area of highway safety.

In 2009, MwRSF was approved for ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation by the American Association for Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA) in the field of safety performance evaluation of highway features and vehicle testing of crash barriers for the tests identified in the Scope of Accreditation. A copy of MwRSF's accreditation certificate and scope of services can be found by clicking here or online at www.a2la.org (certificate number 2937.01).

MwRSF Mission Statement

MwRSF's mission is to improve the safety of public roadways through the design and testing of roadside hardware.


MwRSF Goals
•Improve highway safety by making the roadside less hazardous for motorists
•Design, develop, and crash test roadside hardware
•Conduct safety performance evaluations of existing roadside features
• Perform computer simulation modeling of vehicle impacts with roadside hardware

Nano-Engineering Research Core Facilty

The Nano-Engineering Research Core Facility (NERCF) in the College of Engineering at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) was completed in Spring 2016. The goal of the NERCF is to create a centralized, shared-user core facility that houses the state-of-the-science research instrumentation necessary to position the UNL researchers at the forefront of global research efforts focused on advanced manufacturing of materials, nanostructures and nanodevices.

The NERCF enhances research capacity and quality by providing in-house nanofabrication and nanocharacterization facilities open to use by faculty across the University of Nebraska system. Further, it is the intent of this facility to become a regional hub for nano-engineering. The equipment and operations are funded in part by the Nebraska Research Initiative and the UNL Office of Research and Economic Development. The mission of the NERCF is to advance materials manufacturing efforts within the university and the state of Nebraska.

Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research

Who we are
The Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research (NCESR), a collaboration between the Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD) and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL), was established in April 2006 to conduct research on renewable energy sources, energy efficiency and energy conservation; and to expand economic opportunities and improve quality of life for Nebraska and the nation.

Mission
To conduct energy research that produces new technologies, processes and systems that provide new or significantly enhanced renewable energy sources and improves the quality of life and economic opportunity for all Nebraskans.

Goal
The overall goal of the Center is to develop research and education programs in energy sciences by fostering interdisciplinary collaboration among University of Nebraska-Lincoln faculty and with other research institutions, public-sector agencies, and private sector companies with similar interests. The Center supports both basic and applied research and has a broad mandate to explore a range of renewable energy opportunities (including biofuels, wind, and solar energy), as well as opportunities for energy conservation.

Vision
The Nebraska Center for Energy Science Research (NCESR) will serve as a catalyst at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) to expand opportunities in a broad spectrum of important and innovative energy research areas, such as renewable energy, improved energy efficiency, the production of new materials that find applications in developing clean energy technologies and other evolving energy science areas. To achieve the vision, the Energy Center plans to: NCESR Vision 2013

Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience

Atomic manipulation, Properties affected by nanoscale dimensions, Self-assembly, Ordered nanoarrays, Quantum dots and wires, Nanoelectronics, Quantum computing, Nanomechanics, Nanooptics, Nanoelectromechanical systems, Nanobiological function and life science, Molecular design.

Nebraska Innovation Studio

Our mission is to design and create a community-oriented space that fosters innovation through making. We want to promote individual growth, business growth and community growth through creativity, innovation and collaboration.

The studio fosters success by allowing our creators to develop new skills and master existing ones. We also help entrepreneurs who want to launch and grow startups. Success for us also means collaborating with institutions and businesses in ways that strengthen the fabric of our university, our city and our state.

Nebraska Innovation Studio serves as a hub for the state's growing maker movement by supporting makerspaces across Nebraska.
Our mission begins by giving students, alumni and community members the tools they need to bring their ideas to life in a collaborative and collegial atmosphere. Nebraska Innovation Studio has the potential to be an engine for innovation for Nebraska.

Nebraska Tractor Test Lab

The University of Nebraska Tractor Test Laboratory (NTTL) is the officially designated tractor testing station for the United States and tests tractors according to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) codes.

Nebraska Transportation Center

The Nebraska Transportation Center facilitates collaboration between university researchers, industry leaders, and government entities. NTC integrates transportation research, education and technology transfer programs across the four NU campuses, making it one of the largest university transportation centers in the region. This unique arrangement fosters interdisciplinary collaboration by bringing together top faculty with different areas of expertise to solve larger transportation issues.

Nebraska Water Center

The Water Sciences Laboratory strives for excellence in water chemistry innovation, analytical services, and educational training opportunities. The WSL provides standardized and custom-application analytical testing for water, wastewater, and sediments designed around academic researchers and clientele within the private sector

The Holland Computing Center

The Holland Computing Center provides campus-wide services to researchers who need high performance computing resources. PrairieFire, a powerful supercomputer located in the facilty, is used by scientists and engineers to study topics such as nanoscale chemistry, subatomic physics, meteorology, crashworthiness, and artificial intelligence.

Graduate

Subject Areas of Research

Subject Areas

  • Acoustics
  • Advanced Telecommunications
  • Agricultural Engineering, Animal Housing Systems
  • Agricultural Machinery Management
  • Agricultural Soils
  • Air Management Systems
  • Air Management Systems in Buildings
  • Algorithms
  • Applications of Digital Signal Processing to Sensor Array Problems
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Atmospherics & Gasses
  • Automated Systems
  • Biochemical Engineering in Healthcare
  • Bioenergy
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Bogor
  • Bridge Design and Construction
  • Building System Commissioning
  • CAD of VLSI Systems
  • Change, Engineering Management, Teams and Technology, and Systems Engineering
  • Channel Coding
  • Computational Chemistry
  • Computational Complexity Theory
  • Computer Architecture and Systems
  • Computer Modeling
  • Computer Networks
  • Computer Vision
  • Construction Management
  • Control Systems
  • Data Compression/Scientific Image Compression
  • Database Systems
  • Design and Analysis of Network Protocols and Architectures
  • Detection of Food Irradiation
  • Digital Image Processing
  • Digital Signal Processing
  • Dynamic and Nonlinear Systems
  • Efficient Water Use in Irrigation
  • Electrical Codes and Standards for Agriculture
  • Electromagnetic Interactions and Theoretical Calculations
  • Electromagnetic Theory
  • Engineering Design
  • Environmental Design of Buildings
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Infrastructure Engineering
  • Failure Analysis and Corrosion
  • Fluid Mechanics
  • Fluid Power Hydraulics
  • Food and Process Engineering
  • Functional Proteomics
  • Geotechnical Engineering
  • Graphic databases
  • Groundwater Engineering and Management
  • High Assurance Systems
  • High Performance and Low-Power I/O Architectures and Storage Systems
  • High Voltage Semiconductor Devices
  • Historic Architecture
  • Imaging Systems
  • Industrial Product and Fuel Production
  • Industrial Utilization of Agricultural Commodities
  • Instrumentation, Controls and Sensors
  • Interactive Computer Problem Solving
  • Irrigation
  • Irrigation Water Management
  • Irrigation Water Management/Qualtiy
  • Irrigation and Drainage Systems
  • Lighting Design
  • Lighting and Illumination in Buildings
  • Livestock Environment
  • Livestock Environment Management
  • Livestock Environment Management
  • Machine Design
  • Machine Design
  • Machine Learning / Computational Learning Theory
  • Material Science/Composite Materials
  • Materials Processing
  • Mechanized Systems Management
  • Microstructural/Nanoscale Mechanics
  • Modeling and Simulation of Digital Systems
  • Numerical Analysis
  • Object-Oriented Systems
  • Optical, Electrical and Microstructural Studies of Solids
  • Organizational Learning Approaches to Software Development
  • Pharmaceutical Products
  • Polymer/Fiber/ Physical/Chemical Treatment Processes
  • Power & Machinery
  • Power Semiconductors
  • Predictive Microbiology
  • Project Management
  • Project Management
  • Protein Absorption at Material Surfaces
  • Recombinant Protein Production
  • Remote Sensing
  • Robotic Systems
  • Scientific Computing
  • Simulation and Reliability Evaluation of Power Systems
  • Software Testing
  • Software Testing Techniques
  • Soil & Water Conservation Engineering
  • Soil and Water Conservation
  • Soil and Water Resources Engineering
  • Solid Phase Reactions
  • Sound and Vibration Studies
  • Spectral Composition of Light and Human Vision, Optics
  • Stability and Automation Control
  • Starch/Protein Processing
  • Structural Determination of Surfaces
  • Structural Engineering
  • Surface Materials Interactions
  • Surface Water Quality
  • Systems Modeling & Design
  • Thermodynamics
  • Thin Film Deposition
  • Thin Film Deposition and Surface Engineering
  • Thin Film Semiconductor Alloys
  • Transportation Engineering
  • Transportation Systems
  • VSLI Testing
  • Value-Added Process Enginering
  • Water Management Systems
  • Water Resources
  • Water Resources Engineering
  • Water Science and Mechanized Systems Management
  • Whole Farm Nutrient Management
  • Wireless Communications Channels
  • Work Teams, Quality Control and Management, Organizational Management and

Graduate

Dual Degrees

Graduate Engineering Dual Degree Program Description

The EMME program is a simultaneous double master's degree program that provides the student with a master in Engineering Mechanics from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL), USA, and a master of Engineering Materials (CEMPI) from the University of Rouen (UR), France. The program provides students with a unique educational opportunity at the interface of Mechanics and Materials, yet enables them to complete two master's degrees in approximately two years.

Students entering this program at UNL spend the first year taking courses in Engineering Mechanics, completing materials prerequisites, and studying French. They then continue their studies in the second year at UR in Materials Engineering.

Students entering this program at UR spend the first year taking courses in Materials Engineering, completing mechanics prerequisites, and studying English. They then continue their studies in the second year at UNL in Engineering Mechanics.


The MEME program is a simultaneous double master program that provides the student with a master in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL), USA, and a master of Engineering Materials (CEMPI) from the University of Rouen (UR), France. The program provides students with a unique educational opportunity at the interface of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Engineering, yet enables them to complete two master's degrees in approximately two years.

Students entering this program at UNL spend the first year taking courses in Mechanical Engineering, completing materials prerequisites, and studying French. They then continue their studies in the second year at UR in Materials Engineering. Students entering this program at UR spend the first year taking courses in Materials Engineering, completing mechanics prerequisites, and studying English. They then continue their studies in the second year at UNL in Mechanical Engineering.

Graduate

Student Appointments

Appointments by Department

Appointments - Number of Appointments
Stipend - Average Monthly Stipend

Department Fellowships TA RA Other Total Appts.
Biological Systems Engineering
Appointments: 0 0 51 0 51
Stipends: $0 $0 $1,800 $0
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Appointments: 0 11 19 0 30
Stipends: $0 $1,800 $1,800 $0
Civil Engineering
Appointments: 1 14 48 0 63
Stipends: $1,800 $1,800 $1,800 $0
Computer Science and Engineering
Appointments: 0 37 53 0 90
Stipends: $0 $1,900 $1,900 $0
Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction
Appointments: 0 21 14 0 35
Stipends: $0 $1,800 $1,800 $0
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Appointments: 0 25 50 0 75
Stipends: $0 $1,800 $1,800 $0
Engineering - Dean's Office
Appointments: 0 1 4 0 5
Stipends: $0 $1,240 $1,240 $0
Mechanical & Materials Engineering
Appointments: 1 22 53 0 76
Stipends: $1,800 $1,800 $1,800 $0
All Total Appointments 2 131 292 0 425

Appointments by Research Center

Appointments - Number of Appointments
Stipend - Average Monthly Stipend

Graduate Research Center Fellowships RA Other Total Appts.
Biological Process Development Facility
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Center For Electro-optics
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Design & Fabrication Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Industrial Agricultural Products Center
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Mid-America Transportation Center
Appointments: 0 6 0 6
Stipends: $0 $1,800 $0
Midwest Roadside Safety Facility
Appointments: 0 13 0 13
Stipends: $0 $1,800 $0
Nano-Engineering Research Core Facilty
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Nebraska Innovation Studio
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Nebraska Tractor Test Lab
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Nebraska Transportation Center
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
Nebraska Water Center
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
The Holland Computing Center
Appointments: 0 0 0 0
Stipends: $0 $0 $0
All Total Appointments 0 19 0 19